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[Christmas Must Be Tonight]

The Band: Live at the Academy of Music 1971

Levon Helm: Ramble at the Ryman

The Band: Three of a Kind

Robbie Robertson: How to Become Clairvoyant

Garth Hudson Presents a Canadian Celebration of The Band

Levon Helm: Electric Dirt

Garth and Maud Hudson: Live at the Wolf

Pulse

Dirt Farmer

Elliot Landy's Woodstock Vision

The Band Guestbook, November 2010


Entered at Tue Nov 30 22:19:03 CET 2010 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: David P: aaahhH!!!

How did I write Richard?!!! Thanks!


Entered at Tue Nov 30 15:53:55 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Ain't Got No Home

dlew919: That's Levon singing on "Ain't Got No Home", utilizing a talk box effect for the frog voice. The Band's version alters from the original Clarence "Frogman" Henry record by omitting his falsetto "sing like a girl" part.


Entered at Tue Nov 30 15:01:54 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Amelie Curran

Having explored this on YouTube following the prompt here, I checked amazon UK. Two titles. As I was in London yesterday, I thought I'd pick one up at the big HMV in Oxford Street so I could listen coming back. Not even on their system … and this is the biggest store in the UK. So more sales to the internet. Another nail in the coffin of retail stores.


Entered at Tue Nov 30 14:48:54 CET 2010 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: those other playlists

Yoko ono puts her favourite John numbers - all post Beatles...

Bono does his favourite Bowie; yet forgets Diamond dogs! (but Bowie, like Springsteen, or Elton, or The Band is hard to limit to 10)

The great things about lists is that you can dissect, discuss, feud and even agree about them...


Entered at Tue Nov 30 14:02:25 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: New Orleans Top 10s

Robbie’s choice of New Orleans music is strongly at the rock and roll end. The “New Orleans Funk” compilations in 2007 and 2008 sold very well in the UK, the former on the strength of Ernie K-Doe’s previously obscure Here Come The Girls, which featured in a 2007 chainstore cosmetics advert. They lean heavily towards the “early soul” end (though it was all blending together). Charlie Gillett’s “Sound of the City: New Orleans” 2 CD set was a great compilation, with the odd surprise (he put The Animals version of House of The Rising Sun on there, and he also had Bobby Charles’ version of Small Town Talk). Five of Robbie’s choices are on there.

The things that spring to my mind first would be Lee Dorsey, Robert Parker, Alvin Robbinson, The Meters, Irma Thomas. Also Dorsey’s “Yes We Can” is a 2008-choice, isn’t it?

Anyway, then I drifted through other playlists. Rufus Wainwright, on the songs of Leonard Cohen, doesn’t choose Hallelujah. Lucinda Williams on “Country Women” has my two first choices first (Ode to Billie Joe and Fancy by Bobbie Gentry)


Entered at Tue Nov 30 13:26:49 CET 2010 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Web: My link

Subject: Ben Pike

Ben, Darlene Love will make her annual holiday appearance on the David Letterman Show on December 20. Her performance of "Christmas (Baby Please Come Home)" has become a holiday staple. A beautiful and talented lady with wonderful energy. It is always an uplifting experience to see her perform. Hope you enjoy it.


Entered at Tue Nov 30 09:02:19 CET 2010 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Web: My link

Subject: Robbie Robertson's 10 favourite N'Awlins songs...

Robbie's list in Rolling Stone: all of them are pretty interesting, actually. But Robbie puts Clarence 'Frogman' Brown's 'Ain't got no home'. In my humble opinion, the Band covered this definitively... but something makes me glad Robbie rates the original so highly... (Richard's vocal is just marvellous... but the original is great anyway...)


Entered at Tue Nov 30 06:58:42 CET 2010 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Fred, you must have known my Grandma Anna. You spell Jeffrey the same way as she. Made a helluva cheese danish, didn't she?


Entered at Tue Nov 30 01:08:04 CET 2010 from (69.231.16.147)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland Tx

Subject: Points of Order

I got turned on to "When The Battle is Over" when it was used (with typical biting irony) on "The Sopranos." Of people in the music biz, Richard Thompson is probably one the last to be thought of logically as "a horrible person." His marriage had a rocky break up, beyond that, what? His relations with his ex seem to be amicable to the point were he plays on her albums! How many rocky break ups can claim that level of civility? Unless you are going to smash all your Phil Spector records and burn all prints of "Chinatown," a simple if perplexing human truth might as well be confronted: really bad behavior is has been found in people who sometimes display quite the opposite. This is much, much more the rule than the exception. When Bob Dylan did some of his more infamously nasty strutting he was, by any fair measure, little more than a boy. Throw in the spoiled brat element inevitable with stardom..... It's official: Darlene Love's "Christmas Must Be Tonight" (97) is definitive. Miss it at your peril. Ha! now that I've said some things I've said before ignore me again.


Entered at Mon Nov 29 22:35:01 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Joe J: Thanks for the links. I've heard that Amelia Curran song on the CBC a few times. I thought at first it was from some Leonard Cohen tribute album, it's that good. The Once song is lovely too. At appears that the guy in the black teeshirt was so overcome with emotion that he needed a swig half way through.

Back again to that March '70 "Rolling Stone". I mentioned earlier that there's an interview with Hendrix, who's asked towards the end about the Band. What's interesting to me is not his answer, which was along the lines of "People who like that sort of thing will find it to be the sort of thing they like", but that the Band was so consequential at the time that rock journalists would use them as some sort of yardstick or bellweather.


Entered at Mon Nov 29 16:08:13 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Major King Kong & Sheriff Colin Baker

The great singer-songwriter Guy Clark was on the Bob Edwards show this morning on XM satellite radio. Mr. Edwards taped an interview with Mr. Clark in the basement of his Nashville home, which serves as a workshop where he writes and builds guitars. The show included a fine sample of his recordings, as well as a nice recitation of his classic "Desparados Waiting For A Train" performed by the late-great actor Slim Pickens.


Entered at Mon Nov 29 15:17:37 CET 2010 from (198.36.218.33)

Posted by:

Jerry

Web: My link

Subject: Rockin in the Free World..Neil and the Boss....

Carmen...Great vid of Neil and the Boss...That was from Get Out the Vote in 04, and that took place in St. Paul. I know this because I was supposed to be there. It hurts to this day to see anything from this show knowing that I missed something this cool..Not only Neil and Bruce but REM and Fogerty were also there...My link is also from that show with Neil and Bruce doing Rockin in the Free World, another epic performance...


Entered at Mon Nov 29 13:12:06 CET 2010 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: PutEmUp Jeffery

It is a unique style of vocal dexterity, that definitely needs getting used to. It doesn't bother me that much. I could live with a CD with a couple of tracks sung like that, but not the entire thing! : )

I wonder what kind of a toll singing like that takes on one's throat/vocal chords?


Entered at Mon Nov 29 05:06:10 CET 2010 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Frederick

Hey Fred, How you been man? Time is coming for a catch up hello, how are you, email from us both.

Your description of Big Daddy's voice is not only not unfair, it may be dead on accurate. I have to listen to some Wolfman Jack again before I decide. I love Victor's Wolf style singing ( he can sing other ways too), but I will admit, people either love Victor's singing or hate it.

The engineer who tracked Victor's vocals for me, loved hsi voice. But the engineer who mixed it ( an engineer who i love and have the utmost respect for), when the vocals came on he went flying for knobs on his board I could tell he was not fully enamored of the vocal stylem but he mixed the vox just right ...... the engineer who mastered it loved Victor's voice.

The 9 years I've been playing these songs for people I've enjoyed watching their faces when the vocals hit.


Entered at Sun Nov 28 23:04:14 CET 2010 from (68.171.233.240)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The Only Pirates on the Sea

"Danko/Manuel", written and sung by Jason Isbell when he was a member of the Drive-By Truckers, memorializes both Rick and Richard. It was included on the DBT album "The Dirty South" and their concert DVD "Live at the 40 Watt" club in Athens, Ga.


Entered at Sun Nov 28 21:37:58 CET 2010 from (24.218.200.216)

Posted by:

Tim

Location: Boston

Subject: Queens college

Hi The 1970 Queens college show is on a streaming audio website (and available for download) it says 1/1/70 as the date, Here is the set list. Not sure if if its ok to post the website but probably familiar to many in this chatroom Colden Auditorium, Queens College, Flushing, NY 1970-01-01 01 Jemima Surrender 02 Caledonia Mission 03 Rockin' Chair 04 Genetic Method 05 Chest Fever 06 Unfaithful Servant 07 The Weight 08 King Harvest Has Surely Come 09 I Shall Be Released 10 Loving You Is Sweeter Than Ever 11 The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down 12 Across The Great Divide 13 This Wheels On Fire 14 Up On Cripple Creek 15 Don't Do It


Entered at Sun Nov 28 20:03:51 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.189)

Posted by:

Steve

Don't overlook the fact that this is Mr Bob Dylan, exactitude or factitude aren't as valued as vaguatitude and opaquatude.

Did he really fall off his motorcycle?


Entered at Sun Nov 28 19:16:57 CET 2010 from (72.78.58.33)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love
Web: My link

Subject: re: Mono Box Set

Peter, It's not just the Blonde On Blonde credits, it's almost all the musician credits. They are just bizarre. There's instruments listed that aren't there and all kinds of weird stuff. I went into this in my review.


Entered at Sun Nov 28 17:14:24 CET 2010 from (76.116.186.96)

Posted by:

carmen

Location: PA
Web: My link

Subject: great video for Neil and Bruce fans

Neil Young and Bruce performing All Along the Watchtower. This is a powerful Rock performance - Look at the way Bruce just sits back and admires Neil. Awsome


Entered at Sun Nov 28 17:11:18 CET 2010 from (24.218.200.216)

Posted by:

Tim

Location: boston
Web: My link

Subject: shows

Colden, but I think it was 84 as they weren't back together in april 83


Entered at Sun Nov 28 13:31:44 CET 2010 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Putemup Jeff: nice songs. Big Daddy's voice sounds like Howlin' Wolf channeling Wolfman Jack and vice-versa!


Entered at Sun Nov 28 12:34:17 CET 2010 from (69.113.246.252)

Posted by:

Howie

Location: Patchogue, New York

Subject: Past concert dates

I have seen the Band a number of times over the years. I am looking for help remembering the actual dates. I saw them at the Colden Auditorium at Queens College circa 1970. I also saw them at the Monticello Raceway on Labor Day weekend around the same time. I also saw them at Colden Auditorium around 1983 when they toured without Robbie. Can anyone out there help me.


Entered at Sun Nov 28 10:56:33 CET 2010 from (75.34.44.145)

Posted by:

Adam2

Saw Mavis Staples' homecoming final show of the tour in Chicago tonight. She did nearly all the songs off her new album. She also did The Weight, followed by a touching shout-out to all the members of the Band: "The Band! Robbie Robertson, Levon Helm, Danko, Richard... and Garth! I'd like to thank them for inviting the Staples to... The Last Waltz." It was great.


Entered at Sun Nov 28 02:11:30 CET 2010 from (76.65.8.103)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Speaking of The Vikings, I and several friends have on occasion recalled one memorable line from the film while indulging in the consumption of beverages on the beach during moments of mirthful levity at late hours, and that is, "Odin, bring the wind and turn the tide," which we utter with the appropriate dramatic effect. It never fails to draw a laugh. Strangely, however, I've forgotten the torn dress episode of Janet Leigh's. Darn!


Entered at Sun Nov 28 01:27:52 CET 2010 from (71.62.141.173)

Posted by:

Charlie Y

Location: Down in Old Virginny

The new book by Princeton history professor Sean Wilentz, "Bob Dylan in America" says Rick Danko was never credited for his bass work on BLONDE ON BLONDE. Similarly, the book says Robbie Robertson edited the second half of the film, "Eat the Document."


Entered at Sat Nov 27 22:17:50 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Mono Box Set

I succumbed and got Dylan's mono box. Odd are the tracks credits for "Blonde on Blonde" which do not have Robbie listed on guitar on "Visions of Johanna". Al Kooper was asked about this and confirmed firmly that, as our ears tell us, it's Robbie. I wonder where they got the credits from. Krosgaard's tape exhumation, I think. I'm surprised they didn't try to finally sort everything out and make the credits definitive at last.


Entered at Sat Nov 27 21:37:35 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.189)

Posted by:

Steve

Rick Mercer, a Canadian comedian, and a very funny one at that, had a segment on his show called " Talking To Americans" where he went to great American universities ( Harvard, Yale and so on) and did ambush interviews with students and professors on the campus.

The point was to make the most ridiculous statements of "fact" about Canada and see if Americans would believe him.

I mention the program because I believe it was at The University Of Arizona that he explained to a group of students that Canada, being a socialist state, the government is always looking for the cheapest way to pay for our costly socialist programs.

For this reason, we put our old people on small icebergs and then pushed them out into the Arctic Ocean to let the current carry them away. The students he explained this to were horrified to hear this.

To push the joke a little further he asked the students to let his camera crew film them asking the Canadian Government to stop this practice, which they were more than willing to do.


Entered at Sat Nov 27 20:34:35 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: "The Vikings"

Apologies, no disrespect intended. I think it's that the moment in "The Vikings" where the back of Janet Leigh's dress gets ripped so she can row faster was a major impact on my 11 year old mind. As a result the film is strong in my memory.


Entered at Sat Nov 27 20:11:41 CET 2010 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Songs about Levon

I think Rick Danko could match Levon for the number of songs that are about him or mention him.


Entered at Sat Nov 27 19:57:17 CET 2010 from (90.239.127.92)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Tugs / Funeral at sea

Tugs. I deeply regret my offending post. _Miserable_ tugs from the twenties did a remerkable job in minesweeping after WW2 in Gulf of Finland. Modern tugs used in Normandie came to Finland in late fourties and early fifties.

Peter, can't say that I am happy for your - in my ears - a cruel comment. We are _real_ people and concerned of this issue. It is a real problem for the ferries between the islands, too.


Entered at Sat Nov 27 18:27:35 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I thought the Scandinavian custom involved pushing the body out to sea on a burning Viking longboat. You don't tell me they've banned that! Health and safety is getting the same everywhere.


Entered at Sat Nov 27 18:14:19 CET 2010 from (90.239.97.23)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Westcoaster's tug / Please keep my grave clean.

Actually, I give a damn to tugs in general and westcoaster's tug in particular, but can't help to post this question which is bothering my mind.

In our fishing village some people want to be buried in the sea. Their ashes, that is, of course. We have pilots who are helping discreet and we have trawlers if the relatives want to have a big time. Sitting in the dog of the bay by the lighthouse I sometimes wonder if the departing pilot boats and trawlers are carrying a widow or sons or daughters of a fisherman or a sailor. - So, how are you dealing with that in your side of Atlantic Ocean?


Entered at Sat Nov 27 16:13:58 CET 2010 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Web: My link

Subject: All You Need is Klaus

The Smithsonian Channel is running a great documentary on Klaus Voormann. Very well done and highly recommended.


Entered at Sat Nov 27 13:41:23 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Black America Sings Bob Dylan

The Ace Songwriter series gets to Bob Dylan with "How Many Roads: Black America Sings Bob Dylan."

There are a few obvious ones that you should have already, like With God On Our Side by The Neville Brothers, Maggies Farm by Solomon Burke and Emotionally Yours by The O'Jays, and Tonight I'll Be Staying Here With You by Esther Phillips … well, I had them anyway. But the rest is up to the same quality. Freddie Scott on I Shall Be Released from 1970 and Major Harris on Like A Rolling Stone were completely new to me, Both are a touch overwrought (not unexpectedly) but the whole is fascinating. Masters of War by The Staples and From A Buick Six by Gary U.S. Bonds jumped out first time through.


Entered at Sat Nov 27 13:02:23 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.189)

Posted by:

Steve

The Wrecking Ball is also worth a listen, I'll be listening to more of her later, for sure. Thanks.


Entered at Sat Nov 27 09:55:17 CET 2010 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend)

Subject: Westocaster

Norm, I wouldn't want you to think I've forgotten about th tug nut song you inspired. Before I left NY a week and half ago, I spent a couple days going through duffel bags and draws, taking songs I've never recorded, and piecing together the scraps of lyrics for different songs that i never finished. Didn't get to all the songs, but did grab a few sacred dozen. and the tug nut song is included. I have musicians in mind for it, and it's likely that I get the time to get to them in the next year :-). So hopefully , before you are deaf, I get the gawd damn song recorded for your approval.


Entered at Sat Nov 27 09:49:51 CET 2010 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Web: My link

Subject: Da Bluz

Anyone interested, I just setup a free listening reverbnation page for a couple of my songs I cut in 01, mixed in 04, and finally mastered early this month.

My artist is Victor " Big Daddy" Johnson, as legit a blues singer to be found anywhere, anytime. The songs are Blue Woman Blues, and Love Snuck Up On Me. Two different views, both inspired by thoughts of the same ex old lady. My lyrics are posted on the page.

This is one case where every step of the production went well. the original live tracking of music, the vocal tracking, the mix, and the mastering. every musician and every engineer delivered a thousand per cent, seemingly effortlessly, with not a fuckup to be found.

In a couple days I'll set up the downloads for anyone who wants to purchase this. But the streaming page is there.


Entered at Sat Nov 27 04:36:32 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

R t O

Subject: Joe J (Amelia Curran)

Writing like that? Nobody. Christ, most people can't even play that nice understated style of rhythm guitar anymore, let alone use it creatively! Nice one Joe, will check more stuff out.


Entered at Sat Nov 27 03:58:04 CET 2010 from (66.45.129.2)

Posted by:

Dexy

Web: My link

Subject: Yet another new song about Levon

John Lennon holds record for films abouta rock star, but surely, no one has ever had so many songs written about him as Mr. M. L. Helm.


Entered at Sat Nov 27 02:31:34 CET 2010 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Subject: Amelia Curran

Amelia Curran & The Once both cleaned up at the recent Canadian Folk Awards. I was looking for a video of Amelia & Geraldine Hollett of The Once but can't find it. Consolation prize is Amelia singing 'The Mistress'. Who else is writing like this these days?


Entered at Sat Nov 27 01:57:45 CET 2010 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Subject: The Once

Acapella version of Leonard's 'Coming Back To You' live from the Ship Inn.


Entered at Fri Nov 26 23:49:50 CET 2010 from (66.159.176.52)

Posted by:

mark

Web: My link

Subject: InTheStudio celebrates THE BAND

North American syndicated Rock radio show InTheStudio celebrates the 40th Anniversary of the first three albums from The BAND. Show host and producer Redbeard speaks with guitarist and songwriter Robbie Robertson about The BAND's prolific late 60s early 70s career that melded a typically southern American sound with patriotic undertones that were, at the time, "not fashionable" and ironically authored by a Canadian songwriter. InTheStudio airs on 55 stations each week. To find out where and when to listen or to listen ONLINE, visit: www.inthestudio.net


Entered at Fri Nov 26 19:15:55 CET 2010 from (90.239.69.134)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Subject: The answer's can't only be blowing in the wind, can they?

One of Dylan's few words of what he and The Band were up to (1978): "... and so we were singing these homespun ballads... or whatever they were."

George Harrison (1969): "The Band is too much."


Entered at Fri Nov 26 18:19:43 CET 2010 from (90.239.69.134)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: This Wheel's On Fire

Peter, despite this website many questions still remain unanswered.


Entered at Fri Nov 26 18:01:30 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: This Wheel's On Fire

The Neil one is very good … but the best for me is still Julie Driscoll. Her icy voice just defined the song (and it was the first version I heard, which helps). I still don't understand how the 90s Band ignored "Rick's greatest hit".


Entered at Fri Nov 26 18:00:20 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.186)

Posted by:

Steve

Thanks for the piece on Neil, Garth and The Sadies, Tim.


Entered at Fri Nov 26 17:55:30 CET 2010 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: oozing mojo

Tim: thanks for that link - a very entertaining article. I'm not sure I'd agree with "the best version of the song ever recorded" (I'm partial to the Basement Tapes track) but this version is growing on me. I'm having a little trouble getting used to Neil's three syllables in "memory." I'll probably get used to that about the same time I get used to what Chantal does with "instruction."

I wonder if Garth's production method includes instruction from the Rick Danko school of enunciatory correctitude?


Entered at Fri Nov 26 17:36:40 CET 2010 from (134.174.21.2)

Posted by:

Tim

Location: Boston
Web: My link

Subject: Nice Picture of Garth With Neil Young


Entered at Fri Nov 26 17:36:07 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RtO

Web: My link

Subject: Watford Gap (for PV and Bill)

Well, it would appear that BBC Northampton have seen fit to commission a short "musical" about Watford Gap. Be warned though - it is cast entirely by locals and some do much, much better than others...


Entered at Fri Nov 26 17:14:20 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

RtO / Peter V: There's a similar diner in Tennessee, the Cumberland Gap, which like its Watford cousin is the subject of a none-too-complimentary song that calls it "a devil of a place [with] no water to wash your face". Yuck.

It was something of a standard among British skiffle groups in the '50s, who perhaps had Watford in mind. If I'm not mistaken, the flipside of the Vipers' version was "Dirty Maggie Mae" (the Beatles song, not the Rod Stewart one), which presumably refers to Maggie's face after a disappointing visit to the loo.


Entered at Fri Nov 26 14:52:46 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Web: My link

Subject: Watford Gap

Subject of legal action against Roy Harper for the lyric "Watford Gap, Watford Gap - a plate of grease and a load of crap".

And much maligned though it was, with hindsight I miss the old "Blue Boar" restaurant. Like all the other UK outlets now, it has degenerated into a load of high street concessions (Burger King, KFC etc) and a communal seating area. The old place was limited but at least it was self sufficient. I kind of miss those old blue leatherette half-moon seating bays and sprung-loaded pre-warmed plate dispensers!


Entered at Fri Nov 26 12:39:05 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Watford Gap

In case we're mystifying North American readers, I should explain that Watford Gap is a service area on the M1 North-South motorway. It was the choice of bands travelling (almost always) north to south to get back to London. At 3 a.m., circa 1967-70, there would be up to a dozen long wheelbase Ford Transit vans parked outside. It was one of the few places you could eat at that time, and though it was "most of the way to London", it was the favourite of nearly all bands, and hence part of the British rock myth.


Entered at Fri Nov 26 11:35:19 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Web: My link

Subject: Peddlers

Peter, give the instrumental called Gassin' a blast off the live Peddlers LP. It showcases the Lowrey really nicely,

Manfred M probably did have a Vox; my info that he had a Lowrey came from the long out-of-print Harry Shapiro book on Graham Bond "The Mighty Shadow".

I don't think Nixon co-invented the Mellotron; I think he meant develop it as a sales proposition over here because as far as I know the 'Tron was just a refinement of a USA made instrument called a Chamberlin which looks and sounds virtually identical.

But the walls of Jericho came down on the Mellotron recently as somebody has tracked down a Hammond Novachord and restored it. Ridiculously rare and cumbersome, this is truly a job well done. The instrument (see link) was a thirties attempt to make a tube-based synth - polyphonic, I might add - and as soon as you hear it you will realise you have heard one on an old movie soundtrack at some point! Of course, the sad thing is that this really does make the fiddly tapes of the Mellotron look like a step backwards, not the great pioneering entity that has been thought hitherto.

So what went wrong? Laurens Hammond seemed to have no sense of occasion as this like many other devices (the mechanised auto-shuffling and dealing card table, anyone?) He chose the Great Depression to launch very expensive toys. When you see the inside of a Novachord it is a fine example of something built to a spec, not to a price!


Entered at Fri Nov 26 11:04:08 CET 2010 from (198.36.218.33)

Posted by:

Jerry

Web: My link

Subject: Remembering Winterland 2...

I just found this and thought it may be of intrest to some of you who haven't seen it. This segment talks about TLW...


Entered at Fri Nov 26 10:04:29 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Mellotron

Amazing. I had no idea that David Nixon co-invented the Mellotron. David Nixon was a magician with a touch of comedy and a little ventriloquism, and a big star in 50s Britain. I saw him on stage as Buttons in the Aladdin pantomime when I was very young. The You Tube clip must have been the longest anyone played it without a loop failing.

I have The Peddlers "Live At The Pickwick" and will dig it out. I also saw The Peddlers live, so I did see a Lowrey in action in Britain. I saw Manfred Mann a few times. The first couple at least I think he had a Vox Continental, then after that I wouldn't have noticed.


Entered at Fri Nov 26 08:25:21 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Very nice Pat!


Entered at Fri Nov 26 07:00:14 CET 2010 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

David Jackson.


Entered at Fri Nov 26 02:00:05 CET 2010 from (99.236.13.43)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: Greetings

Hi guys, long time no-see. Hope all is well with you all?I think of you often, and miss you very much.

Wishing all Americans a Happy Thanksgiving. Hope your day has been a good one with the people you love.

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxo


Entered at Fri Nov 26 01:26:53 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Web: My link

Subject: Oh, I forgot Mellotrons!

I did a few gigs with sax great Mel Collins once upon a time. He told me that in King Crimson they had one 'Tron on stage, another in the wings on wheels and a third in the truck with the back of being repaired!

There's a Rick Wakeman LP that pictures his rig of a Hammond C3, a Mellotron, a few early synths and a Crumar piano (or similar). Beggars belief that the C3 was easily the most stable and reliable piece of kit!!!!

I've spent many a happy hour doodling on the Mellotron application for the iPhone! Yes, there is one..honestly!

Now, sit back and enjoy David Nixon's Mellotron promo clip....


Entered at Fri Nov 26 01:18:09 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Web: My link

Subject: Lowrey and Mellotrons

Peter, you'll kick yourself...THE PEDDLERS travelled with a Lowrey Heritage for a while. As did Jon Lord in the early days of the Artwoods and Manfred Mann himself in that eponymous combo's formative times. But back to The Peddlers - the Lowrey sounds lovely on their "Live at the Pickwick" LP if you can stand the material, Pete Murray's introduction and Roy Phillips' rather pedestrian croon. (Almost as bad as Jim Morrison, Peter...{wink})

Pete Townshend used a Lowrey Berkshire (the transistor replacement for the tube Heritage) on Baba O'Reilly (that percussive sound is a tab that Lowrey had called "Marimba Repeat") and fed the same organ through a VCS3 synth for the gated intro to Won't Get Fooled Again. Outside of the UK but in Europe: the organist from Finnish band "Wigwam" used a Lowrey Heritage for a while. A few notable UK organists (rather than bands per se) also packed a Lowrey which tended to be a Heritage. The Heritage was an all tube deluxe "spinet" (2 x 44 note manuals and 13 pedals - like a Hammond L, M or T-series organ) and was a super little instrument once you slapped it through a tube Leslie. Organists of note include Harry Stoneham (a great player; sadly descended into easy listening LPs in the seventies but forever remembered as the MD for Michael Parkinson and composer of the famous theme) and the lesser known Alan Haven.

Stoneham's "Two Fellas To Follow" LP saw him with drummer Bill Eyden (who was the sessioneer on Whiter Shade of Pale) with Stoneham on the organ pedals for bass. Worth picking up for a real gutsy, slow version of "Coming Home".

Alan Haven did a great live LP "Live at Annie's Room" at the jazz club owned by Annie Ross. Just Haven (once again, pedalling bass) and jazz great Tony Crombie on drums. If there was one organ album to own where the standards get an airing that is a little bit more "cocktail" than I'd usually tolerate, this is it. Lovely playing throughout. Haven was also the organist for John Barry in the early sixties and did some good work on the OST for "The Knack..And How To Get It". A YouTube link above shows him contributing to a Lennon/McCartney TV special, Lowrey Heritage to the fore and gyrating so enthusiastically that he either can't mime or really needs to pee badly. One thing that can be said about Lowrey vs Hammond is the quality of the bass pedal tones. Hammond just gave you the basic generator sound but Lowrey's pre-voiced string bass and later bass guitar tones had a real thump and honk that was much more convincing.


Entered at Fri Nov 26 00:29:49 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Rob, did any British band travel with a Lowrey? I don't recall seeing one in action in the UK.

The old roadie Watford Gap motorway services horror stories involved Mellotrons. According to those who had any dealings with them, no instrument was as problematic as a Mellotron.


Entered at Thu Nov 25 23:23:34 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Web: My link

Subject: Pat

Well, I don't blame Garth. Even after years of lugging about my Hammond A100 and a couple of Leslie 145s I have to say the experience of carrying an all-tube Lowrey Festival from the previous owners house, putting it into the back of my car and unloading it into the home studio the other end was without doubt one of the most gruelling and horrible experiences of my life. Somebody give Bill Avis a medal!

But it is interesting that Joe Welsh, Levon and Daniel Lanois have ALL bought an old tube Lowrey over the years so they can hear Garth play it. That must tell him something about what everybody else considers to be his forte, I would have thought.

On a slightly different topic, that Chester T link was well worth a look, as you say. Have you tried any of the gospel tutorials out there? I fancy a go at P J Morgan's course (link attached). I can't go on forever busking my way through gigs with no formal technique having learned everything I know parrot-fashion from the live Allman Brothers set, Small Faces records and playing along to Bob Andrews' parts on Brinsley Schwarz albums! Check out other bits of P J - an awesome gospel player.


Entered at Thu Nov 25 23:11:19 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: Pat

Well, I don't blame Garth. Even after years of lugging about my Hammond A100 and a couple of Leslie 145s I have to say the experience of carrying an all-tube Lowrey Festival from the previous owners house, putting it into the back of my car and unloading it into the home studio the other end was without doubt one of the most gruelling and horrible experiences of my life. Somebody give Bill Avis a medal!


Entered at Thu Nov 25 22:30:35 CET 2010 from (24.218.200.216)

Posted by:

Tim

Location: Boston

Subject: The The Band Band

Catching their tribute to The Last Waltz tomorrow night in Connecticut. Happy Thanksgiving all.


Entered at Thu Nov 25 21:41:49 CET 2010 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: propane, and propane accessories

I left Plum Tree, for this??


Entered at Thu Nov 25 21:41:34 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.187)

Posted by:

Steve

Hopefully, the -10C predicted for game time will effect Bachman's singing.

I'm guessing it was only 6 miles in your day , Bill.


Entered at Thu Nov 25 21:07:57 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Steve: Imagine that - leaving home just to avoid a 10-kilometre walk to school. Wasn't like that in my day.

Speaking of wading through snow drifts and a howling wind, anyone with a sense of humour is encouraged to watch any late-season CFL game that is played on a lidless field in November. The pigskin's frozen too rock hard to be caught, all the players digits are frozen too rock hard to throw or catch, and the field is so iced over that most first downs are made on-the-skid.


Entered at Thu Nov 25 20:50:27 CET 2010 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: move to Edmonton

Recent Hudson accomplices The Trews will be performing our "deceptively tricky" national anthem before this Sunday's Grey Cup game. (For the benefit of the non-Canuckistanians in the congregation, this game is the season finale for the Canadian Football League - the CFL indulges in US-, rather than UK-style football, although the rules are somewhat different and the players' salaries are in truck driver territory.)

Unfortunately, the halftime show (sponsored by Pepsi, renew your insurance) is Bachman / Turner. Fortunately, it is not the Black Eyed Peas aka Winnipeg's Shame . . . .


Entered at Thu Nov 25 20:40:55 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.187)

Posted by:

Steve

Landmark, I'm attached to the farm this weekend. Kate's living 10km away and going to school full time, Steve The Younger announced this week that he was really looking forward to seeing all his American cousins this weekend and Rob lives much closer to you than to the farm at the moment.

Rob lives on Decarie, next to your buddies at the Cuban Consulate. So I'm the farmer by default this weekend, or the guy left holding the bag, if you prefer.

Joe,I'm guessing when you said I might be on to something it wasn't the, Take The Money And Run, teaser, concerning my interpretation of what, "it", Robbie was referring to when he said," I just took it and ran with it". Or were you?


Entered at Thu Nov 25 20:18:09 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

RtO: If I understand you correctly, the question boils down to either carrying your junk in your hands or setting it on fire. Aren't we supposed to stick to musical topics instead of talking about US airport security?


Entered at Thu Nov 25 19:16:38 CET 2010 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

RtO, and evidently so does Garth.


Entered at Thu Nov 25 19:10:11 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

The "Globe and Mail", Canada's self-proclaimed 'national newspaper', always runs a photo on page 2, under the momentous heading "A Moment in Time" - generally something very good or very bad that happened that day in the past. Today there's a nice colour still from TLW showing Bob D, Rick D, and Joni M flanked by Neils. She's lookin' pretty cross with/at Neil D, the presumed culprit. Despite his preference, as noted in a previous post, Rick's just too far from the action to have been involved in that particular case.


Entered at Thu Nov 25 18:41:12 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: Happens to us all eventually, but you must be suffering from the malady that sadavid was just wondering about. I know we've already discussed Rick's one-word interjection on "One Too Many Mornings": I used Rick's enthusiastic rendering as evidence that he was an ass-man.


Entered at Thu Nov 25 18:05:00 CET 2010 from (76.65.8.103)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Thanks for that Danko link, sadavid. Muchly appcd.


Entered at Thu Nov 25 16:28:30 CET 2010 from (24.47.42.238)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: ny

I'm wearing my Garth Hudson shirt today. The black long'sleeve one. Remember those?


Entered at Thu Nov 25 16:09:55 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Rick Danko on YouTube

Thanks for the link, this is a superb little piece. Nicely done, and the BEHIND moment in "One Too Many Mornings" is one of my favourite bits too.I hadn't seen this piece before.

Happy Thanksgiving.


Entered at Thu Nov 25 15:57:10 CET 2010 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: maybe he was a _little_ sketchy

Apologies if this was posted previously . . . I think it was, but at my age . . . I just can't be sure . . . .

Rick Danko's biography in 8:41, a cute story telling style.


Entered at Thu Nov 25 11:18:28 CET 2010 from (86.182.154.229)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: Synths vs Organs

Pat, I've been taking garden waste down the dump twice as long as the duration of enjoying a good bonfire of a Sunday night, but I know what I prefer.


Entered at Thu Nov 25 08:35:34 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Wolverton Mountain

Is it Clifton Clowers? Never seen it written down. Try also "I'm The Girl From Wolverton Mountain" the answer disc.

I do know Morrison Hotel & LA Woman, having heard them frequently when they were new, but I haven't heard them right through in a (thankfully) long time. A Doors jibe is a necessary part of my GB personna so is always (slightly, but not entirely) tongue-in-cheek.


Entered at Thu Nov 25 05:10:28 CET 2010 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Thanks for the tip Pat. The name is one helluva hook.


Entered at Thu Nov 25 05:06:00 CET 2010 from (24.47.42.238)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: ny

In the immortal words of the great Rick Danko...

"Happy Thanksgiving"


Entered at Thu Nov 25 05:04:36 CET 2010 from (24.47.42.238)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: ny

Subject: Let It Be - the movie that is.

Now - 40 years later - it's be nice if they released a nice clean remastered version of the film......with lots and lots of extra footage.


Entered at Thu Nov 25 04:05:03 CET 2010 from (68.171.234.103)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: read it and weep ...

Digging a bit deeper into that March '70 "Rolling Stone"n we find that "Let it Be" is to be released next month, that the Traffic guys have reassembled to work on Steve's solo project, that the Stones have a live LP ready to go but haven't yet landed on a title (aside: I wish they'd tried harder). Sly and group are on the cover, there's a nice article on the Voices of East Harlem, there"s a nice article on Jesse W and his new LP, there are full-page ads for Yoko's new 45, for "Instant "Karma", for "American Woman", for "Morrison Hotel", for Ronnie Hawkins' first Cotillion LP. Slim Harpo and the Immediate label have just died. And I'm only at page 21.


Entered at Thu Nov 25 03:52:13 CET 2010 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

RtO, Garth has used synths for his basic sound almost twice as long as he played the Lowrey. I've had a couple of discussions with him about synths and he is way into them, including that crazy Yamaha CS80. I think they give him the sound he wants moreso than those early synths called organs.

Jeff, be sure to hike up into the Superstitions on an off day.


Entered at Thu Nov 25 03:40:40 CET 2010 from (68.171.234.103)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: im just sayin'

"In between are the doors of perception." -- Aldous Huxley

"Break on through to the other side." -- the Rickless Ravens

"I hear the sound of breaking glass." -- D Harry et al

"I can see clearly now." -- J Gnash

***********

"All in all you're just another brick in the wall." -- Sigmund Floyd

"Stampeding cattle, they rattle the walls." -- J Royal R

*********

"I don't care about Clifton Clowers I'm gonna climb up on that mountain." -- King Clod

"I'm gonna stand up next to the mountain, chop it down with the edge of my hand." -- James Marshall Amplifier

"Who was that masked man?" -- All N Sundry


Entered at Thu Nov 25 02:19:56 CET 2010 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Joan, i'm avoiding ruining everything by going for kosher or kosher style deli and being knocked into reality. i can tell you that two out of three Jack In The Boxes i went to have great coffee. and the other one doesn't have bad coffee, but it's consistently warm, coffee of a good quality..


Entered at Thu Nov 25 02:04:26 CET 2010 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Subject: Doug Paisley

Link to a Doug Paisley song. Yeah, every now and then Steve gets on to something. Might be one of those times.

'L.A. Woman' might be everything you need to hear by the Doors. You have to wonder what direction they might have taken though. I would have thought a jazz-blues, Tom Waits style or what would become a Tom Waits style if you know what I mean.


Entered at Thu Nov 25 01:52:41 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: Jimmy Smith (Pat B)

Pat, I know what you are saying but I get so tired of the organ "greats" being heralded for endless 12-bars in G on the Verve and Blue Note labels. Live performances may well be a different proposition as you assert, but in general if you've heard one jazz Hammond album (maybe even one side if dealing with vinyl), you've heard the lot. A few shuffles and a longer piece about halfway through a side with some arrangement added. Job done. I just don't feel the same way about Billy Preston who had the command of gospel and theatre techniques far more than the Smith/McGriff/McDuff style players. Plus he SANG. Hallelujah! An organist that plays songs too!

You can carry that through right to the present, too: technically there is no beating him but I really cannot see all the fuss about Joey DeFrancesco who has Jeff Beck syndrome: if only he'd stayed a salaried instrumentalist in a band with a repertoire and not tried to turn virtuoso chops into an album career. Give me Ian McLagan bashing his way through a gig warts'n'all any day.

That's why I like Billy P, Garth and Augie Meyers. Three very different players on three very different organs (Hammond, Lowrey and Vox respectively) but united by an approach that puts the composition first and their own prowess second. When you have that kind of class you don't need to make instrumental albums; your musicianship just isn't questioned


Entered at Wed Nov 24 23:53:23 CET 2010 from (193.35.132.22)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Location: an iPhone in the pub

Did someone say The Doors were bollocks? Goodo, keep it up.


Entered at Wed Nov 24 23:45:18 CET 2010 from (173.178.214.140)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

Steve, shouldn't you be on your way to Rhode Island? As I recall, there was a garage that always welcomed your arrival each year.


Entered at Wed Nov 24 23:29:15 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.190)

Posted by:

Steve

Sadavid, a couple of weeks back I tried to get Norm to check out Doug Paisley' music, without success I fear. I've heard him compared, by two different people, to some of the song writers that came out of the Toronto scene in the late 60's like Lightfoot and Ian Tyson. He's good but I don't know if I'd go that far, yet, but give him a little more time.

The first thing that came to mind when I read J2R's quote" I just took it and ran with it" was, that song by Steve Miller. Sorry can't think of the name right now, maybe it will come to some of you.


Entered at Wed Nov 24 22:38:21 CET 2010 from (70.28.32.74)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

Happy Thanksgiving to all our American posters and as always, don't forget to play nice on Black Friday.


Entered at Wed Nov 24 22:23:06 CET 2010 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: a Doug from Toronto?

The buzz has been building about this singer-songwriter . . . article mentions Garth Hudson as a contributor to his new album . . . .


Entered at Wed Nov 24 22:15:32 CET 2010 from (71.62.141.173)

Posted by:

Charlie Y.

Location: Down in Old Virginny
Web: My link

Subject: The Dillards Live in 1978...and The Doors (Still Alive in 2010)

I know Peter is a fan of The Dillards and the link is to an entire AUSTIN CITY LIMITS show featuring them with the late, great John Hartford from 1978.

The saddest thing about The Doors is that their final two studio albums with Jim Morrison ("Morrison Hotel" and "L.A. Woman") were their best. I have a feeling Peter hasn't listened to those, though. They hold up well. I imagine in a typical year over the last decade or so The Doors "catalog" titles have easily outsold The Band. The governor of Florida just announced a possible pardon of Jim Morrison for his indecent exposure conviction, so the Lizard King is still in the news here in the USA, four decades later.


Entered at Wed Nov 24 22:01:14 CET 2010 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: the Royal's "I"

Bill M / Ignatius: You could say John Simon gets slighted, but you could also note that the other members of The Band get acknowledged to the level of one mention per each. To add some context, beyond the requisite mention of the Sammy Davis Jr. pool house (following the requisite editorial canard that MFBP was recorded in BP), the comments are mostly about the story / subject matter of each song. I'd reckon the songwriting at about 95% JRR, so I don't see any deceit or dishonour in the I-vice-we.

Without back-checking (it's just too difficult to scroll back & forth on the BBC player / console), I think the "I just ran with it" comment relates to the kind of songs that JRR wrote for Brown being an evolution / continuation of the mode / flavour / mythology born in the Basement and (semi)refined on MFBP. "The guys left this up to me" speaks specifically to the "artistic vision" for the album.

It's also interesting (or evil, pick your point of view) that JRR takes sole credit for the sequencing: "this is the order of songs that I chose."


Entered at Wed Nov 24 21:57:09 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The Marriage of Heaven and Hell

"If the doors of perception were cleansed everything would appear to man as it is, infinite.
For man has closed himself up, till he sees all things thro' narrow chinks of his cavern."
--William Blake ("The Marriage of Heaven and Hell")

"There are things known and there are things unknown , and in between are the doors of perception."
--Aldous Huxley


Entered at Wed Nov 24 21:43:50 CET 2010 from (199.233.178.254)

Posted by:

Igantius

Location: Pac NW US

Subject: Robbie on the BBC

Fair enough, Pat B. Editing, not in his hands.

Bill, I see your point, and while an hour is a chunk of time, would appreciate your perspective on what he is talking about after you give it a listen.

I have happily sat at RR's feet since the Brown Album came out, so I am always open to points of view that help keep me there.

Ignatius


Entered at Wed Nov 24 21:38:19 CET 2010 from (64.105.104.154)

Posted by:

Pat B

Bill M, it seems to be two "it's". The first is regarding songwriting, that the songs on the first album tended towards mythic storytelling and that he ran with that style. The second "it" is that RR thought more conceptually about the album as a single piece with numerous threads running through the songs, while the others concentrated on the songs as single entities. He does talk about writing Whispering Pines with Richard, and the interview is obviously edited (Ignatius, he might have mentioned John Simon for all we know). On the whole, pretty good, but nothing really new.


Entered at Wed Nov 24 21:25:40 CET 2010 from (204.138.58.96)

Posted by:

Bill M

Ignatius: I see "it" as being the key word in the two of Robbie's sentences that you quote in your post: "I just took it and ran with it"; and "They sort of left it to me." What specifically was/is "it" in this context? The songwriting? The decision-making? Dealing with management? The business side of things?


Entered at Wed Nov 24 21:09:21 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.190)

Posted by:

Steve

David, that last post brings to mind that ageless, idiom; A fool and his money are soon parted?

@@

(~~)


Entered at Wed Nov 24 20:40:13 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I'm flabbergasted. Some things are subjective, some are objective. "The Doors were crap" is the second.


Entered at Wed Nov 24 20:32:54 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Peter: Not everyone shares you view of the Doors. Original NM mono copies of that LP often sell in the $200 range.


Entered at Wed Nov 24 20:24:22 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Thanks David for the info … but seriously, is the first Doors album whether on 180g or 1800g vinyl of interest to anyone whatsoever with an interest in music? (I'd like the Dylan though).


Entered at Wed Nov 24 20:01:35 CET 2010 from (204.138.58.96)

Posted by:

Bill M

NWC: You've always been #1 in my books.


Entered at Wed Nov 24 19:54:27 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Vinyl Siding: When Black Friday Comes

"When Black Friday comes
I'll stand down by the door"
(of my local record store)

A variety of special vinyl releases will be available at independent record stores on Black Friday sales day after Thanksgiving. Two of interest for me are a mono 180-gram LP reissue of The Doors' self-titled debut and a Dylan 7-inch single featuring the Whitmark demo version of "The Times They Are A-Changin'" and "Like A Rolling Stone" from the new mono box.


Entered at Wed Nov 24 19:42:36 CET 2010 from (199.233.178.254)

Posted by:

Ignatius

Location: Pac NW US

Subject: Robbie on the BBC talking about the Brown Album

I am not a feud guy, really anti-feud, hate the feud.

But how do you talk about the Brown Album for an hour and never mention John Simon?

After Big Pink, "I just took it and ran with it." (Emphasis on first person singular.)

The contributions of the other guys: "They sort of left it to me."

I am sadly disappointed in one of my musical heroes - and though he remains a hero, like many others, all too apparent the feet of clay.

Ignatius


Entered at Wed Nov 24 19:08:34 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.190)

Posted by:

Steve

The most important thing about, The Spectrum, when it comes to bands playing there is that acoustically it was one of the best when it came to the big indoor stadiums, or so I've heard from someone who played and saw shows there.

The atmosphere in the building was one of the better ones in the NHL as well when Kate Smith cranked up the crowd before, The Broad Street Bullies ( my all time favorite team nickname)attempted to pound the opposing team into submission.

I always thought Kate Smith looked as menacing in the video they played before the games as any of the Flyers.


Entered at Wed Nov 24 18:54:52 CET 2010 from (72.78.58.33)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love

Subject: Spectrum

Tim, thanks for the link to the Spectrum concerts. Been trying to remember what I saw there. Missing from the list is the RCO All Stars. Can't remember who they opened for. Also the Persuasions who opened for Van along with Souther, Hillman Furay.


Entered at Wed Nov 24 18:36:17 CET 2010 from (199.233.178.254)

Posted by:

Ignatius

Web: My link

Subject: Robbie on the BBC talking about the Brown Album

Didn't see this listed. I will be interested in everyone's take.


Entered at Wed Nov 24 18:30:40 CET 2010 from (90.239.81.136)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Only one can be the best :-)

The second best line in this forum ... so far: "We're all qualified (and perhaps responsible) to discuss." Bill M. said that at Wed Nov 24 16:36:44 CET 2010.

And here comes the best: "We're all qualified and responsible to discuss." I said that.


Entered at Wed Nov 24 18:31:22 CET 2010 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Thanksgiving

Happy Thanksgiving to all who celebrate. Try not to eat too much LOL, drive carefully and have a great time.

Jeff, the weather sounds great, but can you get good deli?


Entered at Wed Nov 24 18:23:10 CET 2010 from (134.174.21.2)

Posted by:

Tim

Location: Boston

Subject: Spectrum

hey Bob, never caught a show there, but saw a lot of the tours that passed through there so a lot of those concerts rang a bell. I did catch Live Aid in the old JFK stadium. With the Spectrum going,are all of the old arena's gone now in Philly? I also follow the goings-on with the SS United States in Philly, looks like they want to make a Casino, hope something happens to save it.


Entered at Wed Nov 24 18:17:16 CET 2010 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

Mike & Kim Hayward

Happy Thanksgiving!


Entered at Wed Nov 24 17:02:45 CET 2010 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Subject: Tim - Spectrum

Tim, I drove by the Spectrum yesterday and sadly looked on as the wrecking ball punched a huge hole in the building. There is a tremendous amount of sports and music history left behind.

The Band actually performed there six times. The three shows they played with Dylan on January 6 and 7, 1974 are listed under his name. Sadly, they aren't mentioned in the listing.

Happy Thanksgiving.


Entered at Wed Nov 24 16:40:19 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.190)

Posted by:

Steve

Tim, the score at the Spectrum was The Dead 52, The Band 3.

There's gotta be a movie in the most recent example of military intelligence in Afghanistan. A comedy/farce no doubt. The NY Times story about Nato meeting several times and handing over large sums of cash to a guy who turns out to be a creative, Pakistani shopkeeper rather than the Taliban's second in command goes a long way towards explaining why almost 10 years later we're still getting nowhere in that graveyard of foreign occupiers.

To bad Peter Sellers isn't around to play the lead.


Entered at Wed Nov 24 16:36:44 CET 2010 from (204.138.58.96)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: True, Bruce's is a good line, but I don't think it bears scrutiny. As living, breathing humans (or humanoids in the case of this place), we're all qualified (and perhaps responsible) to discuss. Just not all the time everywhere.


Entered at Wed Nov 24 16:12:20 CET 2010 from (134.174.21.2)

Posted by:

Tim

Location: Boston
Web: My link

Subject: Philly Spectrum

Today, The day they are knocking down the Spectrum in Philadelphia, they have posted a list of every concert played there, including 3 shows by The Band.


Entered at Wed Nov 24 15:24:39 CET 2010 from (63.88.115.195)

Posted by:

carmen

Location: PA

Subject: Bruce - The Promise

I was wondering if anyone out there had an opportunity to listen to the new Bruce CD. Any thoughts?


Entered at Wed Nov 24 14:34:21 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Bruce had a nice line on that, something about "shaking your ass in front of 60,000 people doesn't qualify you to talk about politics."


Entered at Wed Nov 24 12:37:09 CET 2010 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

I personally don't care what a musicans politcal views are. I try never letting that get in the way. My only beef about politics and music is when I go see a performance and they use the stage as a soap box. I don't like it whether I agree or disagree, I just go for the music.

Happy Thanksgiving all.


Entered at Wed Nov 24 11:20:57 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Very sorry to hear that Dion is a hard right-winger … I assumed he was at least liberal in his blues / folk years. Yes, many musicians are unpleasant people. I suspect fame and opportunity fuel basic traits to a more extreme point than what’s hidden in the suburbs. It’s good to hear that both Keef and Mick … no saints themselves … found Brian Jones beyond their level of acceptability, for just that reason. Beating up women.

Trying to recall the book on Little Richard … yes, that band must have seen a thing or two.

On musicians and politics, Bruce has some good stuff to say in last week's Sunday Times Magazine interview. Should be online somewhere.


Entered at Wed Nov 24 08:30:43 CET 2010 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Another quick thought. Politics...... a musician's politics. I love Dion. His politics, and his occasional poli- religious views are another story. In fact, it's hard to reconcile many of his standpoints with the depth of humanity that some of his songs imply. But when i hear his songs and hsi voice i basically ignore what I know that could fuck up the enjoyment for me. For those of you who aren't aware of it, Dion is a hard right winger.

Separately, I;ve been staying in scottsdale & working in phoenix. Got here a week ago. High 50s today i think, low 40s now. Out all night, and just a minute ago, in a tshirt and a button down dress shirt over it. And so gawd damn comfortable! this is gonna be the most comfortable winter of my life. Unless I get stupid and leave.....Forecast is 70 and 71 for next midweek.... I'm staying put


Entered at Wed Nov 24 07:39:54 CET 2010 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Peter, I apologize for not having the time or mental acuity presently to address so intersting a subject properly.The musician as a person verus / and-or relating to the musician as a talent, is so very rich a subject.

What we read is certainly an apsect. Peresonal encounters and relationships or extended interactions give such strong views. I've had dealings with some amazing musicians who are total pricks and schmucks in many ways. To lots of people, and to lots of people over many years. People who were friends and supporters on their way up. It sometimes made it difficult to go watch them play. but at the same time, they are so fucking amazing at what they do, and bring so much joy in terms of what they are playing, that you get past it. and you have to go for the music.

and then there are the good cases. There are musicians like Garth, who as people are truly princes amongst mere men. People like Johnnie Johnson, the same. Rick Danko, the same.

all this extrends into the not famous ranks too. You find the same schorgasboard in the ranks of the great local working musicians in communities.


Entered at Wed Nov 24 05:27:55 CET 2010 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

RtO, in case you haven't seen these, a must. Especially in the Squib Cakes one where you realize that he's kicking bass pedals through the whole thing. btw, for the rest of you heathens, Chester is in Santana.


Entered at Wed Nov 24 03:42:13 CET 2010 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

Hmmmm. I really don't think it's fair to compare Billy Preston and Jimmy Smith, especially if you hadn't seen them play live. Nowhere on Youtube is JS doing his nightly breakdown where he would go to church, then go to heaven, then go to space and beyond the universe. It was well beyond anything I've ever experienced performed on the B3. Nobody ever came close.

Billy was a great player and really great showman. When he was a kid, I believe he did one European tour with Little Richard and another with Ray Charles. His drug troubles were extensive but the sex thing was along the lines of thinking a young woman was actually a really young dude so BP tried to inflict physical damage. Just so happened he was in The Band at that time and caused some headaches. I saw that lineup once and it was unremarkable (to be kind).

As I've said before, electronic organs are synthesized versions of pipe organs. Take away the Leslie and ouch...


Entered at Wed Nov 24 01:59:16 CET 2010 from (204.138.58.96)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: how great he art!

RtO: And thank YOU for that link to Billy Preston. Most impressive. Caused me to seek out him doing "That's The Way God Planned It" for some reason, and I found the version in the link above - from the Bangla Desh concert I'm guessing. What a showman in a addition to a talent. Note the consistent use of grimaces for the (presumably) tougher bits. Note too the posters raging wildly off-topic in the comments section beneath the video; makes us look like a knitting circle.


Entered at Wed Nov 24 01:31:25 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Web: My link

Subject: Billy P

Nice one Lars. At least he didn't want to be a marine biologist or whatever a similar clip of Jimmy Page revealed.

But tune in to the above clip to see why nobody before or since plays the Hammond like he did. Or is ever likely to. Sacrilege though it is, I have dismissed Jimmy Smith since I saw this clip! If the two handed playing doesn't get you, the pedal solo at around three minutes will!

God bless him as it certainly did that day back in 1988! I am not a spiritual person but the organ players that come out of gospel never fail to thrill.


Entered at Wed Nov 24 01:09:33 CET 2010 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: NY
Web: My link

Subject: Billy Preston

Billy Preston gets his start on tv (see link).


Entered at Wed Nov 24 00:53:48 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: Peter

Billy's bag was indeed of a jollies nature although I believe the age of the other party might have been the issue. Still, I always reconcile my love for Billy P and his legacy down to the fact that if you spent your teens in Little Richard's band, what kind of example had you had set......? The self-same misdemeanour did diminish my respect for Graham Bond though. And though substance abuse should be discounted thru sheer headcount, it doesn't necessarily excuse more sinister behaviour that it inspires. Complicated stuff this rational artist vetting, eh?


Entered at Wed Nov 24 00:32:59 CET 2010 from (204.138.58.96)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Joan: As sadavid says, thanks for the link. Maybe it's the nice suits, but don't our guys look like some rock and roll spin-off from the Doodletown Pipers? The photo may be '64, though I doubt it, but the Ware record was most certainly recorded and released in '65. And that bit about the label changing their name to allow them to escape the millstone of the Hawkins name is absolute eyewash. Who'd heard of Hawkins outside of southern Ontario, where they were still having themselves booked as the Hawks? And as the label was just Henry Glover and a secretary it's a stretch to think that it/he would have concerned himself/itself with such minutia anyway.

sadavid: And thanks for your link too. I'd seen the Globe reference and was going to scout it out myself, but am pleased that you saved me the trouble. Lovely for sure, but I think I still prefer the Blind Faith version, and also the moving 1971 (?) cover by James and the Good Brothers (who were Festival Express trip-mates of both the Band and Delaney and Bonnie).


Entered at Tue Nov 23 23:50:41 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Hmm. Billy Preston. Some serious accusations there, but not direct physical beating. I thought Billy’s bag was of a sexual nature, plus substance abuse, but substance abuse doesn’t count or there’d be very very few left to listen to.

RT does not deserve to be with Phil Spector and Jerry Lee, that’s true. That was persistent deliberate mental stuff according to the article on how Linda was rendered unable to sing as a result.

From what I recall people saying here, Rick Danko was particularly sympathetic and put in a lot of effort to help in this general area.


Entered at Tue Nov 23 23:28:32 CET 2010 from (75.34.44.145)

Posted by:

Adam2

I'll have to respectfully disagree again re: Delaney & Bonnie. When I hear their single of "Soul Shake", or "Come On In My Kitchen" (both with Duane Allman), my heart leaps.


Entered at Tue Nov 23 23:01:35 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: Artists as people/Synths as organs/D&B

I never know where to stand on that question of whether elements of an artists private life should interfere with my perception of their work. I suspect not purely because you wouldn't do the opposite would you? Praise the work of a shoddy, manufactured artist just because he bought his mum a house. Nope, me neither.

My favourite musician and - I reckon - ultimate influence and hero is Billy Preston. I don't think we need to delve to deeply to see the conundrum that would confront me if I took the same line as PV does with RT. (Peter, just to clarify: RT isn't guilty of physical abuse or attempted murder, is he? I appreciate that there were times when he was unpleasant but having seen his name among the likes of Jerry Lee and Phil Spector I reckoned he at least deserves that one clearing up in case anybody gets the wrong idea.).

Rod: Totally agree that Garth is a master of the synths but I just like the rootsier nature of the organ better. I play organ myself but have never had piano lessons so wouldn't ever refer to myself as a keyboard player because I am not that versatile. With you 100% on one thing though: if you are going to play a synth not an organ, for christsakes don't try and get the synth to sound like a Hammond or Lowrey organ.

I've got a few Delany & Bonnie albums and while I don't think they are as useless as some do, I do consider them VERY lucky to have been around the right people and got the name bigger than it deserved to be because I find the albums to be perfunctory and lacklustre. Workmanlike soul-rock that has few faults but even fewer elements to make the heart go zing.


Entered at Tue Nov 23 22:50:53 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Thanks for the Robbie link. Odd to see that his links do not include "theband.hiof.no" (shameful) and that on his MySpace page, the ad that comes up is "Dating For Older People"!


Entered at Tue Nov 23 21:15:54 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.189)

Posted by:

Steve

Bill, I always suspected you were a bigger man than, Tail Gunner Joe. He would have simply demanded, " Are you, now, or have you ever been, an asshole?" Pointe finale!


Entered at Tue Nov 23 21:00:01 CET 2010 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Joan: thanks for the link to the JRR official site . . . there are a few new (to me, anyway) photos on the "Biography" page, including a stunning ca. '64 pic of the Hawks' ears in very sharp 3-piece suits.

[My link] is to a lovely solo Winwood "Can't Find My Way Home" - from the _Globe_'s "Essential Video" recommendation . . . .

Bill M: pity the beholder . . . sounds like a new sobriquet: "the artist formerly known as 'asshole.'"


Entered at Tue Nov 23 20:47:34 CET 2010 from (134.174.21.2)

Posted by:

Tim

Location: Boston
Web: My link

Subject: New Band Video and Audio for 83 on Wolfgangs Vault

Wow, some new stuff Opening for Dead in 83 audio and video.


Entered at Tue Nov 23 19:52:29 CET 2010 from (204.138.58.96)

Posted by:

Bill M

With respect to assholes, there's a difference between being one and having been one. If/when a statute of limitations kicked in is for the beholder to decide - and for many of us will depend on the level of acknowledgement and contrition.


Entered at Tue Nov 23 19:41:36 CET 2010 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Web: My link

Subject: Robbbie's website

A link to Robbie's new website.


Entered at Tue Nov 23 18:44:40 CET 2010 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Clapton

If you read his and Pattie Boyd's autobiography you will have no doubt that he is an asshole. I still like his music, but I look at him in a different light.


Entered at Tue Nov 23 18:39:58 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: It's the singer not the song...

Well it's one thing to judge the artist separately from the art itself, but quite another to use the latter as a defense when the former is charged with criminal acts. A case in point would be the recent unsuccessful attempt to extradite Roman Polanski, as Martin Scorsese and others spoke in his defense.


Entered at Tue Nov 23 16:32:36 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

BTW, I must re-read the rest of Philip Norman's "Wild Thing". I suspect every story is a thinly disguised reminiscence of a real rock musician.


Entered at Tue Nov 23 16:27:39 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Yes, D&B are a popular target. Philip Norman is clearly writing with detailed insider knowledge of the tour with Clapton. Another bit:

“The eyes of Marvel brightened like two cigarettes inhaled at once.He allowed Jobete to rise from the tray of fancy cakes into which he had been grinding her face …”

Spouse abuse: yes. it does make people think less of Delaney, and it should. I think much less of John Lennon, because from Cynthia’s reminiscences, he was a cruel bastard. But so many others have said that too. People who knew Lennon said he was the last ever person to be singing a song like "Imagine" even if he did write it. I think less of Richard Thompson because of what Linda Thompson went through … it’s one reason why his music just fails to get through to me. I’m enjoying the song, and I remember, and think, ‘but what a really horrible guy.” I think less of Ike Turner, one of the greatest band leaders ever, because of the abuse Tina received. Well, we all know what Phil Spector is, a killer. We knew that from Ronnie’s reminiscences years ago. We know that Jerry Lee’s nickname was not really a nickname, but a description. Yes, I think much less of all of them. When we say ‘Well, he beat the shit out of his wife, but what a great guitarist,’ then the world has seriously gone wrong. These just aren't good people. You wouldn't want any of them anywhere near your sister or your daughter.

As a devoted Robertson fan, I even think less of Robbie for recording with Jerry Lee. You don't get any worse than Jerry Lee.


Entered at Tue Nov 23 16:03:42 CET 2010 from (99.247.223.210)

Posted by:

biffalo bull

Subject: something from de bull

Bekka Bramlett, the daugther of D&B, has inherited her parents talent. an amazing singer and performer, she replaced Stevie Nicks for a time in Fleetwood Mac, could have been a pop princess but decided that was not her, is a backup singer and mentor to Faith Hill. a couple of performances with Sam Moore doing "you lied" live on Conan and Don Imus showcase the talent who learned her lessons well. check her out if you will


Entered at Tue Nov 23 15:42:26 CET 2010 from (70.28.32.74)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

Whenever D & B were mentioned, Bumbles always liked to trot out that story about Bonnie, who felt more comfortable knowing the faces that she had sat on previously and how that story was later credited to Bonnie Raitt. Something like that anyway.


Entered at Tue Nov 23 14:44:24 CET 2010 from (204.138.58.96)

Posted by:

Bill M

Rod: I like Garth's playing too, but a synth is still a synth. Makes me feel like waxing Fields-like: A synth is just a synth, but an organ - at the hands of Garth at least - is MUSIC.


Entered at Tue Nov 23 13:16:19 CET 2010 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Location: Far East

Subject: Syphilitic

I can't pretend to understand what Bumbles meant by syphilitic but D & B have been targets of many a putdown over the years.

Anyway we're having our first snow of the season though it looks as if it'll turn to rain before long. Think I'll put away the deck chairs and garden hose and dig out my snow tires. Thinking of you Jeff.


Entered at Tue Nov 23 12:56:01 CET 2010 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: Wavin' Hair

Thanks NB. Fallon does Neil better than Bruce does Bruce.


Entered at Tue Nov 23 12:01:13 CET 2010 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: The Liturgy of Wang Dang Doodle

Bill M: so true, Chess being religious music that is. : )


Entered at Tue Nov 23 10:28:17 CET 2010 from (75.34.44.145)

Posted by:

Adam2

Before and after Delaney's passing, it's quite popular to focus on his spousal abuse towards Bonnie. People so often write off his entire musical career because of this. It makes me sick. Would you write off John Lennon for the same reason?


Entered at Tue Nov 23 10:02:43 CET 2010 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

I like Garth's synth playing. What i didn't like was him trying to reproduce the old organ sound on the 90's recordings.


Entered at Tue Nov 23 09:16:20 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I finished reading that story “Wild Thing.” Reg Lubin is a very thin disguise for Clapton. The town they play in is festooned with “Lubin Is God” grafitti and his main hobbies are visiting joke shops and playing rather cruel practical jokes, and food fights (see Clapton’s autobiography, nearly 40 years after Norman wrote the story).

Marvel (Delaney) has the main hobby of beating up Jobete (Bonnie), and has a beard full of several days food. Jobete quietly sings “Oh Happy Day” with a backing singer amidst the chaos. At the end, Marvel & Jobete’s pay check goes. Lubin suddenly turns up with a new hairstyle, walks to the front of the stage for the first time in the tour, and his guitar is “more than wood and wire, shaped through the blow of a thousand watts, it was molten metal, blended with metal cool and sharp like fresh tin.” Their days with him are over. But for the first time in the tour they’re forced to sing as if they meant it.


Entered at Tue Nov 23 04:42:43 CET 2010 from (68.171.231.18)

Posted by:

Bill M

RtO: I've always cursed the guy who introduced the synthesizer to Garth.

Fred: Chess IS religious music!

Peter V: I too like the Carpenters' "Superstar" - the only record of theirs that I like. Still, I'd gladly give it up for the right NOT to have to hear Karen singing Christmas songs in every mall in the land for the next five weeks.

The following passage I encountered just five minutes ago in a March '70 "Rolling Stone" because it's got a nice story on Jesse Winchester, whose first LP came out not long before:

"[Michael] Pollard, with a long emerald green scarf draped around his neck, banged a tambourine onstage with Bonnie and Delaney at the Fillmore east during their last show there."


Entered at Tue Nov 23 02:07:22 CET 2010 from (59.101.61.51)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Steve: (Everyone else - go and continue talking about Delaney and Bonnie)

The baffling bit is not what you said (that's absolutely true), but that the ALP would think that this was in any way a smart and tactically and strategically smart move. They could have easily said to the miners: this is how it is - you take it, or we're out on strike. (After all the tax took their level to 17% or so - hardly bankrupting, and during a mining boom.) So my puzzlement is over a weak and vacillating Labor party... not surprising really.


Entered at Mon Nov 22 23:51:13 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: "Wild Thing" Philip Norman

I found the short story, which is part of the"Wild thing" collection (1972, 1979). Norman was covering rock tours (while writing about The Beatles). The story is about "Marvel & Jobete & Friends" doing a tour of the UK, totally subsidised by rock star Reg Lubin, who is playing with them. At the back.

QUOTE:

"Even Robb (rhythm guitar) could hardly remember concerts so bad as these. None so far had been better than a rehearsal; but fortunately paying rock audiences are accustomed to witnessing rehearsals "

The audience are there to see superstar guitarist, Reg Lubin.

"But Marvel believed it was all for him. In the intervals of drinking from a beer can, the whelk of his bearded lips assumed a regal expression. He started to behave like a rock star. Unluckily for the audience, this did not include the playing of music.'

On Marvel and Reg (or Delaney & Eric) it goes on to get much, much tougher … I realize that this story, which I hadn't opened for years, is the basis of my vague prejudice that Clapton is an arsehole.


Entered at Mon Nov 22 23:33:22 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Interesting about iTunes (who finally have The Beatles, as they've told me ten times in three days) … I'm glad they've made it available in that grouping. It's like a Playlist. Given the rights to all the tracks, you can compile them anyway without printing sleeves. I like the sleeve though. My Rolling Stones #2 is an original (in fact I lost mine in 1965, but the replacement is an original with the right sleeve note).

Philip Norman wrote a short story (fictional names) about Delaney & Bonnie.

I recall Bumble's "syphilitic quote". Some journalist had complained that one of them was the worst-smelling musician he'd encountered. Delaney, I think, but I can't be sure. On the other hand, perhaps it was Elvis Costello working out a grudge.


Entered at Mon Nov 22 22:31:31 CET 2010 from (199.86.26.15)

Posted by:

Rhythm Jimmy

Subject: Rock snob?

Bumbles, in his customary bilious style, consistently referred to Delaney and Bonnie as "syphilitic."

So, Peter V, nothing to worry about.


Entered at Mon Nov 22 22:31:08 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P.

Subject: The Rolling Stones on iTunes

Peter: I noticed that "The Rolling Stones No. 2" is now available on iTunes, as well as their early "Five By Five" and self-titled EPs.


Entered at Mon Nov 22 21:39:16 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Superstar

According to Bobby Whitlock, Delaney Bramlett and Leon Russell wrote "Superstar" in an Atlanta hotel room while on a radio station promotional tour in 1969. Coincidentally, I first heard Delaney & Bonnie & Friends, playing live in the radio studio, on WPLO-FM during that appearance here. Shortly thereafter I saw them play at the first Atlanta Pop Festival. Their set was disappointingly lackluster, despite their all-star back-up band, but they did have to play during the oppressive Georgia heat during the afternoon on July 4th weekend. I was expecting a better performance, as they had sounded really good when I heard them on the radio.


Entered at Mon Nov 22 20:44:40 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Does this make me a bad person?

I got interested in Delaney & Bonnie today and started listening back. Superstar was the one that took my attention. I rate Rita Coolidge on Mad Dogs as the best version, then (sorry, but it's true) Karen Carpenter next. Bonnie Bramlett comes third … but a long, long way behind the pack. I think in Bumbles "Rock Snob" terms that may be a seriously poor decision, but it's how my ears play it!


Entered at Mon Nov 22 20:05:57 CET 2010 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: your TV guide

Tonite on PBS, "American Masters airs LENNONYC, a new film that takes an intimate look at the time Lennon, Yoko Ono and their son, Sean, spent living in New York City during the 1970s."


Entered at Mon Nov 22 19:16:42 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Sonny & Terry

Gong back a bit, can I recommend the 1973 "Sonny & Terry" album. It includes covers of contemporary material like Sail Away, People Get Ready, Bring It On Home, and when The Battle Is Over rather than the blues they're known for.

Sail Away has a great banjo part, and obviously harmonica is a major feature throughout the album. Arlo Guthrie, Sugarcane Harris and John Mayall are among the sidemen.


Entered at Mon Nov 22 18:59:52 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Another great song written by William Bell and Booker T. Jones is "Born Under A Bad Sign", first recorded by Albert King and later covered by many, including Cream.

In the early days, around the time they were discovered by Duck Dunn playing in a bowling alley in Hawthorne, Ca., Delaney & Bonnie's group briefly included J.J. Cale.


Entered at Mon Nov 22 18:49:05 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.186)

Posted by:

Steve

Peter, maybe it's classified as " religious" because the audience members make a pilgrimage to the, Shrine of Levon, in Woodstock for the shows. Just thought I'd throw that out there to kick off the, " why is it classified, religious," debate.

NB, if you're still around, I threw as many commas into that sentence as the law allows, just for you.


Entered at Mon Nov 22 18:00:26 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I saw Taste, but my memory confuses them with that other Irish band, Eire Apparent, who supported Hendrix on early UK tours.

William Bell and Judy Clay did one of my ultimate singles, Private Number. I posted this months ago. The song was written by Booker T. and William Bell as a potential follow up to Tramp for Otis Redding and Carla Thomas. Both writers were working on a Judy Clay session which finished early, and she had time and needed something to record. Private Number was half-written and they sat down and finished writing it on the spot. Clay had difficulty learning the song, so Bell recorded a demo for her. Judy Clay recorded the song as a solo number the next day, and Booker T. then had the idea of combining Bell’s demo with Clay’s performance as one track. Neither Bell nor Clay knew it was going to be a duet.


Entered at Mon Nov 22 18:00:11 CET 2010 from (69.182.73.68)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Derek is Erik

Even though I’ve been a Clapton fan for many years, there are many incarnations of Clapton that I can take or leave. I’m a fan of the Bluesbreakers era, but indifferent about Cream and Blind Faith. First solo album is good, but Derek and the Dominos is probably my favorite. The mid 70’s stuff is OK, but doesn’t get much playtime from me. (I enjoy ‘No Reason to Cry’, but mostly for the Band connection). I think ‘Slowhand’ is a fine album as well as the live album ‘Just One Night’ from Japan. Although the production sounds dated now, I think ‘Behind The Sun’ was a pretty good album and a return to form of sorts. After that, things tended to get a little bland, although I think that Journeyman is pretty decent. So........a mixed bag for Clapton, but on balance a pretty fine career with a lot of strong material mixed in there (if you ignore the filler) throughout the ages.

By the way, I always considered J.J. Cale to be a songwriter first and a performer second. It’s usually been other people who have had the hits with his songs. I did see him once in concert a few years ago and enjoyed his groove, but I still think of him as a songwriter and studio man.


Entered at Mon Nov 22 17:28:14 CET 2010 from (68.164.3.136)

Posted by:

Pat B

I saw Blind Faith at Chicago's International Amphitheater in the summer of 1969. It was a horrible place to see music--the sound was dreadful. But I remember the opening acts quite distinctly. The first was a funky power trio called Taste who was fronted by Irish great Rory Gallagher. Of the three groups I saw that day, they sounded the best, probably because they were so stripped down their musical definition didn't suffer. The second was Delaney and Bonnie. This was more of a show band, maybe 10 to 12 musicians and singers onstage. It sounded awful. I actually made my way up to the front to check it out closely and whew. Vocals were out of key, the rhythm section was muddy, too much of everything. Clapton came out but stood way back--someone had to tell me.

Blind Faith btw was really disappointing. Very low energy and long pointless jamming. Went out and bought a Taste album that week.

When I heard a year later that Clapton was coming back with some of the D&B musicians aboard, I was a little worried. However, the Derek show I saw (with Elton John opening brilliantly) was perfect.


Entered at Mon Nov 22 17:14:40 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Vinyl Siding

I have a mono promo copy of William Bell's 1967 Stax LP "Soul of a Bell". It features "Everybody Loves A Winner", as well as his earlier recording of the classic "You Don't Miss Your Water (Till Your Well Runs Dry)". Another highlight is his fine cover of "Do Right Woman, Do Right Man", written by Dan Penn & Chips Moman.


Entered at Mon Nov 22 15:53:43 CET 2010 from (69.182.73.68)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Everybody Loves a Winner

I can’t speak to the Delaney and Bonnie version, but the version that I’ve heard Amy Helm sing with Ollabelle seems to me to be pretty faithful to William Bell’s original. About a year ago I was lucky enough to be at City Winery in NYC, and Mr. Bell joined Ollabelle for that song with Amy and William singing it as a duet. It was a pretty amazing night and all of the members of Ollabelle seemed to be pretty jazzed to be sharing the stage with William Bell.

I don’t have a lot of time at the moment to comment in depth about which Stones album is better, but I’d say where ‘Exile’ succeeds is in it’s consistency and style. Which is a little surprising considering that it was recorded in a bit of a disjointed fashion over a period of time in France and LA. I think they may have even started it at Olympic studios in England. But that murky haze, love it or hate it, permeates the entire album and really is the brand identity of the Stones at that time period. So as a work of art I think it really works well. I don’t think it was intended to be an album full of hit singles, but more of an expression of where they were at that time. Much credit should probably go to producer Jimmy Miller for keeping it all together during what must have been a chaotic experience.

I love many of their other albums, but I find that when I’m on a deadline and have been working many hours and need a push to finish up a job, I often put Exile on and it gives me some momentum to keep going. I find it works well in that way rather than picking individual tracks here and there.

I finally picked up the Beatles Mono box set because the prices are a lot more reasonable now than when it was first released. It was hard to wait this long, but I’m really enjoying it now that I have it. When push comes to shove, I usually pick the Stones over the Beatles, but listening to their mid-period work now, reminds me of how far ahead the Beatles were over most other groups of the day. Aside from great songs and singing, the powerhouse of Ringo and Paul really stands out. These mono releases really incorporate the drums into the sound in a way that I hadn’t noticed as much in the past, and showcase Ringo’s ability.


Entered at Mon Nov 22 15:51:54 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

According to HMV, Chuck Berry and Eddie Cochran are easy-listening. (They just mean "old" I guess).


Entered at Mon Nov 22 15:35:52 CET 2010 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: iTunes' genres

According to iTunes The Chess Box set is religious music.


Entered at Mon Nov 22 15:26:39 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

No, I don’t know what the deal is either. Levon opened and closed Midnight Rambles Vol 2 with the two songs, but there’s a strong resemblance in spite of different words and a somewhat stronger melody line in When The Battle Is Over. Perhaps it’s that the Midnight Ramble versions and arrangement make them seem closely linked. The 90s Band tried out The Battle Is Over (But The War Goes On). Maybe with Midnight Rambles Vol 2, Levon was just struck by the way they neatly bookended a set.

BTW, Midnight Rambles Vol 2 has its genre defined by iTunes as “religious”.


Entered at Mon Nov 22 12:43:37 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.189)

Posted by:

Steve

Dlew, I thought the TV and radio campaigns run by the coal industry against Rudd when he tried to raises taxes on them was what dropped his approval ratings with the public and that moved Gillard into position to take his job. Maybe things appear differently when they get here after they've traveled through the molten core of the planet


Entered at Mon Nov 22 12:33:21 CET 2010 from (90.199.139.217)

Posted by:

Alexander Lees

Location: Scotland

Subject: Garths new album

Amazon UK are wanting £47 for the new Band covers album..nearly 77 canadian $ ..that is crazy pricing!!


Entered at Mon Nov 22 12:26:45 CET 2010 from (75.34.44.145)

Posted by:

Adam2

Although Peter - I looked at the Levon "Ramble Sessions Vol. 2" and there are 2 songs that seem to be the same: The Battle Is Over (But The War Goes On) credited to Rogers/Winn as you mentioned, but also When The Battle Is Over which is the original Delaney & Bonnie song as I mentioned (credited to Mac Rebbenack and Jesse Hill). I don't know what the deal is with those two.

Delaney & Bonnie are real favorites of mine though. check out the original material on the expanded Home album, which I think may be their best. They really were an amazing group/duo. I used to find Delaney's voice annoying (as well as Bonnie, which is still do occasionally), but they've grown on me so much. nobody else can compare with that raw genuine Southern soul voice of Delaney's, with the range to back it up.

I urge you (and everyone else) to listen to Delaney's final solo album A New Kind Of Blues. it's really great. it's a shame he died before further albums could be released as he planned, as the late Jerry Wexler supposedly told him how they were the best albums of his career.


Entered at Mon Nov 22 11:40:03 CET 2010 from (75.34.44.145)

Posted by:

Adam2

Peter V - I would kind of agree with your point on songwriting. But A list songwriters or not, there is plenty of really great original material in their catalogue. By the way, Mac Rebennack and Jesse Hill are the writers of When The Battle Is Over. I'm not familiar with the other variations, except for Levon's, who I'm certain got his version from the original Delaney & Bonnie. Around the time of the Woodstock reunion/reissues last year, there was an interview with Levon where he mentioned "Delaney & Bonnie was always one of our [The Band's] favorite groups." I can find the link if anyone needs proof. Also, Amy Helm's rendition of Everybody Loves A Winner instantly brings to mind another D&B connection, as they covered it on their debut album Home and both Levon & Amy would certainly be familiar with it.


Entered at Mon Nov 22 11:02:27 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: When The Battle Is Over (plus)

Delaney & Bonnie … I bought “Accept No Substitute” when it came out, lured in part by the soft-textured card cover. That copy’s long gone.

An odd point about the CD which replaced it is the absence of any songwriter credits, but the poor sleeve notes credit Dr John with “Who Will Wear The Crown”. This is listed on the cover as “When The Battle Is Over”, but Sonny Terry & Brownie McGhee call it The Battle Is Over (But The War Goes On). Their version is credited to M.Rogers / J.Win (who produced the album) and the pianist on their version is Maurice Rogers. So who wrote it? Not a rhetorical question, I'm genuinely curious. Accept No Substitute pre-dates the Sonny & Terry album. I just Googled the title, and am happy to note that the Levon Helm Band’s version totally dominates the search engine. I wonder which previous version Levon refers to in his mind?

Anyway, my point on songwriting is that Delaney & Bonnie, like many other excellent craftsmen, are not “songwriters” in the … Bob Dylan / Lennon & McCartney / Chuck Berry / Bo Diddley / Keith Richards & Mick Jagger / Paul Simon /Goffin & King / Robbie Robertson / James Taylor / Willie Dixon / Otis Redding … sense of the word. They might be songwriters in the John Mayall / Paul Butterfield / J.J. Cale division, but it’s not the first division. They're performers who write, and from time to time, they come up with a great one. J.J. Cale more often than the others. The melodic stuff that stands out like Superstar (Leon Russell & Bonnie Bramlett), Only You Know And I Know (Dave Mason), Do Right Woman (Dan Penn & Chips Moman … for Aretha), Move ‘em Out (Steve Cropper & Bettye Crutcher)tend to be by other people.

While D&B Together mentions co-writers in the sleeve notes (and there usually is one), it omits a formal listing too.

The songwriters who think of themselves foremost as songwriters don’t forget to put the credits upfront.


Entered at Mon Nov 22 08:45:00 CET 2010 from (75.34.44.145)

Posted by:

Adam2

Web: My link

Subject: Delaney & Bonnie

Been listening to Delaney Bramlett's virtually unknown/unfairly neglected solo career. Anyone who writes off D&B as "not having a songwriter" is pretty ignorant of their output. Delaney (whose early 1968-1972 songs are often credited to Bonnie Bramlett due to a scheme involving avoiding debts) wrote/co-wrote 8 of the 16 songs on the expanded debut Home album (with Booker T & The MGs backing - the first white group on Stax), 7 of the 10 songs on Accept No Substitute (which the back-story has already been mentioned here, as well as influencing everyone from Clapton, Rolling Stones, and George Harrison), about half of their brilliant To Bonnie From Delaney, as well as tracks from Motel Shot and D&B Together. His songwriting output is often overshadowed by the amount of covers/traditional material D&B did.

Anyway, pick up the CD two-fer of Delaney's first two solo albums - "Some Things Coming / Mobius Strip". It presents each album back-to-back, but at 19 tracks it fits wonderfully as one sprawling double album. The story is: Jerry Wexler hears rumors that D&B are splitting up, and sells their rights to CBS. CBS releases D&B Together, the duo split up, and Delaney uses the contract to release 2 solo albums on the label. Taken as a sprawling double album, these 2 LPs show the wide variety of Delaney's musical personality, touching on rock, soul, gospel, R&B, and production that incorporates piano, organ, backing singers, horns, strings, etc. These albums are pretty unknown as far as I can tell, but read the All Music review of the two-fer CD. It's wonderful.

Above is a link for a picture of Garth with Delaney & Bonnie, I believe taken from a 1971 show in Minneapolis that both D&B and The Band headlined.


Entered at Mon Nov 22 07:39:57 CET 2010 from (71.232.26.129)

Posted by:

Dave H

This is at least the third time Fallon's done his NY impression (though the first time with 2010 Springsteen playing 1975 Springsteen). Previous performances included "Pants on the Ground" and Will Smith's theme song to the Fresh Prince of Bel Air.

Dana Carvey used to do a decent NY impression too back in the old days. He also used to do Dylan--but everyone can do a Dylan impression. Even Joan Baez has been known to slip into one onstage...


Entered at Mon Nov 22 06:54:10 CET 2010 from (70.78.227.122)

Posted by:

Northern Boy

Location: just beyond Hope, BC
Web: My link

Subject: Eerily Nearly Neal

Late night host Jimmy Fallon doing a spot-on impersonation of Neil Young, with Springsteen along for the ride impersonating himself. The song they're sending up is a viral youtube preteen hit by Will Smith's daughter. The humour of this is only surpassed by the uncanny job Fallon does with the Youngesque vocals. Maybe he should take on some other TLW performers, like Dylan, Clapton or maybe even Joni Mitchell. NB


Entered at Mon Nov 22 06:21:04 CET 2010 from (208.57.247.136)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland Tx

Hello Old Room. Glad Peter V has taken the slack in bringing up Cohen's "Recent Songs" album, that was always my job. So I'll throw in that it's one of Lenny's best. Don't have a lot to say, will be checking out Garth's project for sure. If you want a fun Band project, go to Itunes or Youtube and look at all the covers of "Christmas Must Be Tonight!" Seemed like the humblest of throw aways all those years ago when I bought "Islands" the day it came out; it's really turning into a standard.


Entered at Mon Nov 22 05:55:54 CET 2010 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

Of course, when they first appeared, electronic organs got slagged by purists for being too, well, electronic. And Garth certainly got a lot of weird electronic sounds onto those first two supposedly organic albums. I guess all you heathens who don't recognize the beauty of NLSC are just nuts.

I'm going back to the Keef autobio, but I'm already convinced he is the worst person in the world.


Entered at Mon Nov 22 03:54:25 CET 2010 from (59.101.61.51)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Steve: just to distract everyone

Ms Gillard rolled Mr Rudd - and we don't really know why. Mr Rudd had an extremely high approval rating (though the thugs of the 'Labor' party lied and said they'd lose the election.) In fact, they nearly lost: it's just that the Liberal Opposition are such a bunch of cowboys and shonks (and led by an extremely poor communicator who's also a devout Catholic - note: noone minds the Catholicism, but he pushes it past the point of reasonableness. He's protected by business interests (of course).

Anyway, Mr Rudd (a good, though by no means great Prime Minister) was dumped on extremely specious grounds, and Ms Gillard has not captured the imagination of the public. Like the NSW Premier, Ms Kenneally (who was installed in very similar fashion)she is seen as too close to the power brokers of the Labor Party, and the labor party also has blown a lot of cred: what happens when she needs to make hard decisions...? Do they dump her? They can't...

(sigh...) and from the side of politics that's supposed to be anti-big business..


Entered at Sun Nov 21 23:54:05 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.191)

Posted by:

Steve

Subject: Classical Gas Reprised

Dlew, hats off to the coal and gas industry in our country. They've shown those industrial pikers in the US how results can be achieved so much more quickly in the Westminster Parliamentary system than one of those republican forms of gov't with fixed four year voting cycles that are so passe. This is the 21st century, who can wait for 4 years for anything.

Those boys in the coal and gas industry didn't like Rudd since he was going to remove some cash from their pocket so they just got rid of him, lickity split. Bye Bye Kev hello Julia.

I'm guessing giving the gas companies the right to drill wells right downtown in Sidney near that fabulous opera house must have been agreed to before they agreed to put her on the throne. How else can you explain such a mind boggling decision?

In the US, as it stands, you either have to wait 3 or 4 years to get rid of someone or if you're really in a hurry I guess you can expedite things by having him bumped off. But that's so messy and can lead to inquiries and such. Besides you get the VP which may not be the guy you want. Our system is so much more efficient and we know how industry likes efficiencies.


Entered at Sun Nov 21 20:34:30 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Rolling Stones #2

For me that was always the crucial album. It's also one of the ones never released on CD in its original British form, not that it's difficult to re-assemble it if you have all the others. A German company did what I guess is halfway between a bootleg and pirate, reassembling "The Rolling Stones #2" and putting it in a replica card sleeve. A labour of love by the look of it rather than a ripoff.

Original British track list (with UNCUT's ratings from their current Rolling Stones special:

1 Everybody Needs Somebody To Love (4)

2 Down Home Girl (3)

3 You Can't Catch Me (4)

4 Time Is On My Side (3)

5 What A Shame (2)

6 Grown Up Wrong (3)

7 Down The Road Apiece (4)

8 Under The Boardwalk (2)

9 I Can't Be satisfied (4)

10 Pain In My Heart (3)

11 Off The Hook (4)

12 Susie Q (2)

For budding British musicians it was the guide book and the template as well as the point where the switch of allegiance from Beatles to Stones was cemented. Released January 1965. My rating might fall as low as 3 for Susie Q and Under The Boardwalk, but otherwise almost straight 5s. But you had to be there when it emerged, perhaps.


Entered at Sun Nov 21 19:40:58 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

R T O

Subject: Exile on Main Street

PV: Couldn't agree more about Exile. Yes, Tumbling Dice is a corker and for me Keef's "Happy" has always been a favourite - but I really don't see how it has gotten the reputation it has. Always felt similar about Sticky Fingers, too - for me Beggars and Bleed were the top-form LPs and yet Exile is considered the crowning glory.


Entered at Sun Nov 21 19:28:39 CET 2010 from (68.171.231.19)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: No Moss Gathered Here

Peter: I suggested no such thing, as I clearly didn't mention any of those albums that you incorporated in your own summation. On closer reading, the subject line of my post derives from the lyrics of EXILE's opening song, with an analogy to the murky sound of the album's method of burying the lyrics within the instrumental background. It's been suggested by some, including Marshall Chess, that this was an intentional attempt to recreate the sound of older blues and R+B records.


Entered at Sun Nov 21 17:49:34 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Wedding Songs

R.T.O. .......You shoulda played them "It's All Over Now"


Entered at Sun Nov 21 17:41:45 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

So, to sum up, David, you find Beggars Banquet, Let It Bleed and Sticky fingers "sunnier" than Exile on Main Street?

Like … Sympathy for The Devil, Street Fighting Man, Stray Cat Blues, Let it Bleed? Gimmie Shelter? Live With Me? Midnight Rambler?You Can't Always Get What You Want? Sister Morphine? Brown Sugar? Bitch? Dead Flowers?

I'd guess that the SLATE piece was inspired by Mick's remark recently that he couldn't see why EXILE was so highly praised, as it lacks good tunes. That's where SLATE takes off, and (to me at least) it argues the case well. Tumbling Dice and Sweet Virginia stand out, but for four sides, it lacks those melodies … those Keef melodies … that made the three before their peak.


Entered at Sun Nov 21 17:31:32 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.188)

Posted by:

Steve

Subject: Classical Gas

Fred the last decade you could call them awful, now they've moved beyond that. They are a make believe empire, after all.


Entered at Sun Nov 21 17:04:33 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

R T O

Subject: Rating the Stones

Good heavens Peter - what!!!!!! Eighties sh*te gets four starts and lowly ratings for the Nanker Phelge era? Tut tut indeed. Did a wedding gig recently and as the couple were both Stones fans from day one we dug out a load of stuff from that era: If You Need Me; Out of Time; Have Mercy Baby; Oh Baby We've Got A Good Thing Going; That's How Strong My Love Is. Funnily enough we didn't feel the need to dust off Waitin' On A Friend or One Hit To The Body. Funny that.


Entered at Sun Nov 21 16:41:44 CET 2010 from (68.171.231.16)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The sunshine bores the daylights out of me...

Murky darkness envelopes the magnificence of EXILE ON MAIN STREET. The listener is taken forcefully on a tour down dimlit back alleys to rocky places where joints are ripped, hips shake, wounded lovers boogie, as dice tumble into sweet and bitter fruits torn and frayed, where sweet black angels serve loving cups of California wines, as flesh off the bone turns to turd on the run, down ventilators where blues leads to see God's face let loose all down the line, breaking down into the shining light, where angels beat their wings in time, as the cut-throat crew of soul survivors keep a graveyard watch running right on the ROCKS.


Entered at Sun Nov 21 14:00:12 CET 2010 from (79.202.169.199)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: Sex.com

"The story of Sex.com reads like a Hollywood movie script." If you want to know more about you're second fav. side, click the link.


Entered at Sun Nov 21 13:25:06 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Strolling Bones

If you haven't read Slate's piece "Imagine if Mick Jagger …", do. See Simon's link below. Iit's very good, and funny, and mirrors my opinion of "Exile on Main Street" exactly. It's all very well done, but there's not a single song on there as good as any of Let it Bleed and most of Sticky Fingers.

I read it today because I just picked up the UNCUT "Rolling Stones" special. They make the mistake of rating every single song on every album using the 1 to 5 star rating, as in "Rolling Stone" (magazine). That betrays a failure to understand The Stones early impact. 80s stuff gets peppered with four and five stars, but stuff on "The Rolling Stones No. 2" gets three stars … "Down Home Girl" three stars? They didn't record anything after Beast of Burden as well done as that. Rate the albums maybe, but every song is a rating too far.


Entered at Sun Nov 21 11:45:36 CET 2010 from (79.202.169.199)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: Amsterdam, Nepal & the middle of nowhere

On the 12th of August 1995 there was a Stones concert with 100.000 people “In the middle of nowhere “ as Jagger said. Some years later we bought a house on that very same spot. indeed in the middle of nowhere. There is plenty room here, the houses and gardens are big, the people polite, somewhat introvert, the country side is awesome, we got our own mountain with a real mid evil fighting castle on it, and now we even have an indoor swim palace. Never the less it’s good to visit the city so now and then, last Friday we drove all the way to Amsterdam (the place where I come from) to attend the wedding of my little nice. With a view over the water we ate (ahhh), drank danced kissed and hugged the night away, it was a warm embrace … good to be back in Amsterdam for a few hours, the city and the people are the best. We sat next to a lawyer who had gave up his job and went to Nepal to teach children, he said it was the best thing he’d ever done. In the middle of the night, before we turned the BMW to blast east again, he dropped by and said, “Don’t forget Nepal, just do it!” Yes! we said, ... but now I don’t know, Nepal? …wasn’t there a fight last? welll … anyway a wonderful day here, let’s walk the dog, like on all other Sundays.


Entered at Sun Nov 21 08:00:23 CET 2010 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Habs-Leafs

Steve: shouldn't that be Good vs. AWFUL?


Entered at Sun Nov 21 03:04:27 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Goin' - to - C

Well I gots to get away tomorrow for at least one more trip this year........like it or not. A week at least.

If I ain't back by Dec 5.........you can just say...well.....that's the end of that old son of a bitch. Wish good weather on me Lars.........I hope anyway.

A load of old scrap steel, (logging equipment and junk out of the head of Rivers Inlet....well at least I get to see my brother Howard up there anyway.


Entered at Sun Nov 21 02:41:21 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: NLSC/Peter

Peter, I'd be a fool to deny that there isn't an element of that (in fact I was reading Claes Johansson's Procul H book today and he said the same thing of Pete Solley daring to play a Farfisa and the whole sound of PH going down the pan). So there is an element of the organist rather than the Band fan taking pole position! You may even have hit the nail on the head for TLW as well because Garth had adopted that horrible theatre "horseshoe" shaped Lowrey by then.

But therein hangs a metaphor for the whole of NLSC as I percieve it: as the ballsy organ gave way to luxuriant swathes of synth textures, so the whole primal, gutsy honk of the early Band gave way to a polished and way too "posh" sound. (PV: Actually: Ring Your Bell is the one I do dip into now and then as well as being grateful that in Ophelia you have a straightforward tune that you can normally get a UK pub blues band to tackle!).


Entered at Sun Nov 21 01:21:38 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.191)

Posted by:

Steve

Was a pink scarf mentioned just now? Something got me away from the hockey game ( Montreal vs Toronto or good vs evil if you prefer). Only a mention of THE PINK SCARF in the GB, which goes floating off through the ether could do that.


Entered at Sat Nov 20 23:57:01 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Complex keyboards

Rob, is the NLSC issue the move from classic organs to sythesizer instruments? I do think a blast of "Jupiter Hollow" at full volume (ignoring the lyrics maybe) would help.


Entered at Sat Nov 20 23:13:12 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: Islands haters of the world unite!

I must admit I can't get excited by Islands. Would almost agree with North West Coaster who asserted that after Stage Fright and a few isolated moments (for me: two or three moments on Cahoots, Endless Highway and a handful of cuts on Moondog Matinee) the creative magic had gone.

Rock of Ages is superb but that's a live album chock full of classic back catalogue. The fact that the 74 Dylan/Band tour even happened is to me a step backwards and indicative of a well running dry (particularly after serving up an album of covers); over time I must admit also that I see the same glossiness that TLW was riddled with actually started with NLSC. I know I am on touchy ground there but...there, I've said it! And I didn't even mention a pink scarf once.


Entered at Sat Nov 20 15:57:56 CET 2010 from (24.124.109.14)

Posted by:

ray pence

Location: the heartland/flyover country/lawrence kansas

Subject: Robert Plant

His new album/band "Band of Joy" sounds more than worthwhile. Anyone here heard it?

There are covers of Los Lobos, whom RP praises in a recent Rolling Stone interview, and Townes Van Zandt. Plus, RP talks of having visited Sonny Boy Williamson's grave in Tutwiler, Mississippi.

Also, RP states "A lot of journalists need to read a bit more, I think," when asked if he likes being called a "golden god."

Good advice for journalists who can't seem to write about Band or Band members without bringing up the feud and the coke in Neil Young's nose in TLW.


Entered at Sat Nov 20 15:44:18 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: All the Road Running

Rollie; We play that fine work of yours, thinking of you often in hopes that your health will endure. We're all with you man.

On that fine DVD of Mark Knopfler & Emmylou Harris, on the song Done with Bonaparte, I believe Richard Bennett is playing a mandocello. Although that instrument comes from Italy I believe, it became very popular in Keltic music.


Entered at Sat Nov 20 12:01:05 CET 2010 from (91.42.234.228)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: Rollie

... from Germany AND The Netherlands too.


Entered at Sat Nov 20 11:19:11 CET 2010 from (59.101.61.51)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Keep going as best you can Rollie

Thoughts from down under are with you.


Entered at Sat Nov 20 11:12:43 CET 2010 from (94.172.135.108)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: UK

All the very, very best from here in Birmingham UK Rollie. Keep on keeping on.


Entered at Sat Nov 20 09:04:38 CET 2010 from (207.183.172.133)

Posted by:

Rollie

Subject: Thanks........

.....to Jan and Band fans for your continued support.Still able to walk though typing is getting more difficult. Cheers,JN


Entered at Sat Nov 20 04:13:09 CET 2010 from (59.101.61.51)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: I'm surprised about themandocello too...

As soon as I took mandolin seriously, I ran across information on the mandola (which I think Amy Helm plays in Ollabelle) adn the mandocello. But i suppose it's possilbe that he'd seen one years back, not noticed, or just never come across one... it is a beautiful instrument, adn thanks Norm for those clips...


Entered at Sat Nov 20 00:34:20 CET 2010 from (59.101.61.51)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Keef... Mick's riposte...

Thanks for posting that, it was terrific. One thing I'd dispute is 'Brian couldn't write a song to save his life': Jagger admitted years later that 'She's a Rainbow' was written by Brian. But, in any case, that one against Honky Tonk Women, Satisfaction, Loving Cup, Tumblin' Dice, Start Me Up, gimme shelter (!), Jumpin' Jack Flash, 'It's only Rock and Roll' 'Brown Sugar' tends to pale into insignificance.


Entered at Fri Nov 19 22:43:25 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Mandocello Pickin'

As David has said here is some guys doing some real pickin'.


Entered at Fri Nov 19 22:30:56 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Why Didn't yuh jus say so

Mandocellos have been around for hundreds of years. They are played a lot in Potugal, Spain, and Greece. I watched a couple of guys in Vancouver in a Greek restuarant one time. The guy playing a mandacello was magnificent. Beautiful music to listen to.

There is a 1910 model for sale here on the internet for $2500.


Entered at Fri Nov 19 22:15:30 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Mando Up

Progressive bluegrass musicians Mike Marshall and David Grisman have the mandocello in their arsenal. In tone the mandocello is related to the mandolin as the cello is to the violin. Likewise the mandola is to the mandolin as the viola is to the violin. As you can tell, I read too many musician magazines.


Entered at Fri Nov 19 21:57:47 CET 2010 from (136.167.103.38)

Posted by:

Dave H

Well, a mandocello isn't a combination of a mandolin and a cello (or anything else), it's just a large member of the mandolin family. Not particularly common, but not super-rare either in folk music circles. I'm surprised Tyson hasn't ever run across one.


Entered at Fri Nov 19 21:31:16 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.186)

Posted by:

Steve

Bill, listening to the interview again the other day, Ian, called it a mando-cello. Interesting combo. He also said Sylvia had her own picking style she's worked out on the instrument. He'd never seen a mando-cello before or since.

Seems the Atlantic just isn't big enough for the Canadian and American navies to be in at the same time. Two war ships, one Canuck and one Yankee, ran into each other while on joint ( that may explain it) training maneuvers Maybe they should move it to the Pacific and give it another go.


Entered at Fri Nov 19 21:05:32 CET 2010 from (136.167.103.38)

Posted by:

Dave H

"Take This Waltz" on I'm Your Man was also a setting of an (English translation of) a poem by Federico Garcia Lorca--clearly one of LC's favorite poets, as his daughter is named Lorca.


Entered at Fri Nov 19 20:58:09 CET 2010 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: Bob Dylan, visual artist

What the ____?


Entered at Fri Nov 19 19:23:15 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Knockin' On Heaven's Door

Thinking over days gone by and some of the hits that I was moved to watch while playnig some music on a couple of my guitars with the youtbe videos. I was prompted to search this out, and found what I was looking for.

The audio is in Spanish, but from about 1.40 on is the scene that this song has always brought to my mind. I've always been a great fan of Slim Pickins.


Entered at Fri Nov 19 18:49:15 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: L. Cohen

Thanks Jersey Girl, that one slipped my fading memory. I went back a double-checked the credits on his 2004 album "Dear Heather", which includes the cover "Tennessee Waltz" by Redd Stewart & Pee Wee King. On that album Mr. Cohen added music to two poems, Lord Byron's "(So We'll) Go No More A-Roving" and F.R. Scott's "Villanelle for Our Time". His song "The Faith" recycles the melody from the previously mentioned "Un Canadien Errant".


Entered at Fri Nov 19 18:30:39 CET 2010 from (86.140.223.197)

Posted by:

Simon

Web: My link

Subject: Mick on Keith?

There's some doubt that this long-ish riposte sent to Slate is genuine (they cover themselves with "Imagine if ...") but it's a good laugh, well written and worth a read in any case.

As far as Islands goes I'd have to say "Right as Rain" is a personal favourite.


Entered at Fri Nov 19 18:22:41 CET 2010 from (67.85.169.75)

Posted by:

Jersey Girl

Web: My link

Subject: Leonard Cohen's covers

Leonard didn't write The Partisan. He translated it, but the original was Le Complainte du Partisan, a WWII song of the French Resistance by Anna Marly (not to be confused with Chant des Partisans, the anthem of the Resistance). Leonard's version is magnificent, but you can hear her own version on youtube (linked above).


Entered at Fri Nov 19 17:58:03 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Death of a Ladies' Man

I don't believe Mr. Cohen himself cares much about revisiting his recording ordeal with Phil Spector. When he selected cuts for the 2-disc "Essential Leonard Cohen" compilation a few years ago, he chose not to include anything from that album.


Entered at Fri Nov 19 17:31:59 CET 2010 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: _Bird On a Wire_ DVD

Peter V: $17.36 Canuckibucks from Amazon.ca.


Entered at Fri Nov 19 17:13:17 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Leonard

Didn't know those covers … I guess he's not doing anything currently though.

For those in the UK, Tony Palmer's 1972 film on Leonard Cohen gets its airing tonight on BBC4 at 21.00. It's long been thought lost and it was pieced together from 3000 fragments, it says in today's TV guide. No doubt on DVD soon.


Entered at Fri Nov 19 17:05:29 CET 2010 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: un montréalais errant

The theme of "Un Canadien Errant" overlaps considerably with the theme of "Acadian Driftwood" i.e. the complainte of the homesick expat / the good old days, they're all gone. Exiling someone from Canuckistan is just adding insult to injury -- I mean, it's barely a country, six months of snow, and most of the folks are from somewhere else in the first place . . . .


Entered at Fri Nov 19 16:20:50 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Covered by L. Cohen

Over the years Leonard Cohen has recorded several covers. Included are a couple of folk songs, "The Lost Canadian (Un Canadien Errant)" and "Passing Through", a soul song, "Be For Real", Irving Berlin's "Always", and the country classic "Tennessee Waltz".


Entered at Fri Nov 19 09:35:19 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Trews

Joe J … so is that a Newfoundland accent they're trying to do on the "Move to Japan" intro? I thought "this is the worst attempt at a British West Country accent I've ever heard". The people who used to run our local Health Food Shop were from Prince Edward Island, but they sounded normally Canadian.

It is a sign of Garth's involvement that the Canadian Celebration doesn't rest on the really big names (well, except Bruce Cockburn and Neil Young, who come first on the cover). That's a good thing on the whole, but it started me wondering about the "big names" and what they could have done.

One of the glaring songwriter omissions on k.d. lang's "Hymns of the 49th Parallel" was Robbie. She could have repaired that with "It Makes No Difference" being one of the few singers (apart from Rick) who could do it justice.

What about Len? He avoids cover versions altogether. It might be that he lacks the range for other's material, but given his female back up trio, he could do something with a strong narrative, where other voices do the hard bits. Daniel & The Sacred Harp?

Joni doesn't do much nowadays. She could sing anything, but is probably still brooding over which Neil pinched her bottom on TLW, and that slight she's mentioned in interviews where Robbie and Don Henley failed to notice her arriving in a restaurant.But she could do anything. Would any lyrics suit her though?

Daniel Lanois … Acadian Driftwood (with someone else).


Entered at Fri Nov 19 08:47:29 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Recent Songs: Leonard Cohen

On "Recent Songs" Garth Hudson played on two tracks. One of them, The Gypsy's Wife, features in recent shows.

On Band albums in general, the dredging through the vaults for A Musical History reveals little spare material, unlike Bruce Springsteen, who it seems can release versions with bonus tracks to infinity, plus boxes of "rarities" and outtakes. It looks increasingly as if The Band recorded what we got, and most other stuff was sketches or demos. As Pat B pointed out, the exception was Cahoots, where Bessie Smith and Don't Do It would have boosted the album.

Otherwise, I think we got the best of what they had around most times, and in a considered running order. Twilight was floating loose, used on the Best of The Band only. I'm in the school that puts NLSC up there with the first three albums. Jupiter Hollow is one of the best bits of recorded Garth.

Daniel & The Sacred Harp would be in my top four or five Band songs too. As a review said a few years ago, side two of Stage Fright is equal to the first two albums, and side one is pretty near.

The only additional studio tracks I think were ever finished to a point worthy of playing with existing track lists are Bessie Smith, Twilight, Get Up Jake, Don't Do It.

Bob Dylan threw some of his best stuff away (from Death of Emmett Till to If You Gotta Go, Go Now to Blind Wllie McTell and beyond). The Band weren't that prolific. If they had been more prolific, we wouldn't have Cahoots or Islands in their existing form, both well below par.


Entered at Fri Nov 19 07:44:12 CET 2010 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: Don't Go Knocking Islands

I quite like this album. It has a few weak tracks (Islands, ALOL, Living in a Dream (IMHO)) but I usually enjoy listening to it. I agree that is was an attempt to give one more album to Capitol before moving on and it would be nice to think they were holding something back for the mega come back Warner Bros release. The Well was a step in that direction. After the publicity generated by TLW they could have made a killing with a decent album.


Entered at Fri Nov 19 05:23:10 CET 2010 from (206.53.153.151)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: tonight, Montreal

I bought the new Garth on Tuesday but gifted it to a friend a couple hours later. So I've heard it just once - but it sure sounded good. The Mary Margaret will break your heart, and Neil Young and the Road Hammers deserve much credit for the grit and sleaze they invested in their respective numbers. /n Dunc: Alexandra MacLean Denny a Sassenach? Say it ain't so!!/n Steve: Judging by the little photos on the sleeves of the Woody Guthrie tribute albums, Bill Lee even shared a stage with our guys. Sylvia's main early instrument was the autoharp, but that can't be the mystery instrment that Ian was referring to. If you've seen "A Mighty Wind" you've seen Catherine O'Hara (sister of the above-mentioned Mary Margaret) doing a pretty decent Sylvia imitation, complete with autoharp and the harsh rural Ontario accent. I too once saw a mystery instrument that I've described to people as a cross between a banjo and a harp; it was taped to the hand of the singer when we spent New Years Eve in an Eritrean restaurant in Toronto 15 years ago. /n Adam2: I like what you did with "Islands". I do prefer "Cahoots" to NLSC though. /n Westcoaster / Fred: Wilf Carter's greatest champion in recent decades has been Stompin' Tom, it seems to me. /n Westcoaster / Steve: A thing you guys have in common, besides cussedness, is mothers who are big Wilf fans. Maybe someone should do something to put them in touch?


Entered at Fri Nov 19 05:15:44 CET 2010 from (99.141.45.89)

Posted by:

Adam2

Subject: NLSC/Islands covers

Anyone notice how on these 2 album covers, Robbie is portrayed as dominating the group? NLSC - Robbie is standing above all the others, and Islands - he's looking down on the others from above. Maybe I'm looking into it a bit much, but it's there.


Entered at Fri Nov 19 04:57:33 CET 2010 from (68.95.73.78)

Posted by:

ray pence

Location: the heartland/flyover country/lawrence kansas

Subject: 1977: Death of a Ladies Man, Leonard Cohen

Good, no, great to see NLSC getting its due here. And yes, by gum, Islands. I recall looking at that album in Woolworths, back when those existed, and being intrigued. But that was about a year before I introduced myself to the Band's music and started buying.

Now, I'm listening at the moment to an album that's bound to start some arguments, among those who've actually heard it--Death of a Ladies Man by none other than Canada's own, and the International Treasure--Leonard Cohen. With the infamous and polarizing Phil Spector at the controls, not to mention the firearms.

This is a masterpiece.

Bob Dylan and Allen Ginsberg are on this record. As are the familiar Spector studio players. The Wrecking Crew, I believe they were called.

And it's a nice litmus test to see who one's real friends are. I've cleared out a couple rooms with this record.

Phil S. was scarcely more polarizing after being convicted of murder than before. This album's a big reason why. But I still say it's a masterpiece. And I still love Spector's production, and the fact that I've never been near the man probably has as much to do with my admiration as the production itself does.


Entered at Fri Nov 19 03:52:36 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The End of the Line

Thank you for your response guys. I did the same as you Carl, watching that chair rocking. I remember when I first ever watched that video, quite a long time ago. I thought at first man those guys are looking miserable.

Then as I watched it a couple times more, I started to really watch it, and pick out all those things. It hit me between the eyes like a sledge hammer. You know you feel stupid, and look around to see if any one is watching you.

I say to myself Roy has died you idiot, this is a tribute to him. Roy is another part of my life I really miss a lot, like Waylon Jennings. So I watch that video quite often as that is a collection of musicians and singers most dear to me. With George gone now too. In that video George looks the best ever in my mind.


Entered at Fri Nov 19 03:09:56 CET 2010 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Location: in front of the fire

Subject: garth's latest

Finally got my copy of Garth's latest and got a chance to hear (most) of it in the car today. I'm giving it a second spin as I speak.

Some of you will be mystified at the Canadian content. Well, Raine Maida is from Our Lady Peace and at one time could sing falsetto. Kevin Hearn is of the Barenaked Ladies. I don't even know who Peter Katz, Suzie McNeil and Ian Thornley are though I'm sure Bill M. will set us straight.

Didn't hear any duds the first time around though I have to wonder why anyone would want to tackle such a minor Dylan song as 'I Must Love You Too Much'. Not surprisingly Neil Young and Bruce Cockburn do great jobs of 'Wheel's On Fire' and 'Sleeping' respectively. Kudos to Chantal Kreviazuk for 'Tears Of Rage'.

Let me note that the Trews are NOT a Newfoundland band but are from that far lesser island. Their feeble attempt at Newf humour in their spoken intro might survive them though.

Let me also note, that now I can read the album notes, the multi-talented Mr. Hudson is given credit for vocal harmonies on two songs. Also that on 'Knockin Lost John', Garth plays the reviled piano accordion while Bob Hallett plays the button accordion. Got to give that another listen.


Entered at Fri Nov 19 02:42:46 CET 2010 from (24.108.12.129)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: Hey Norm

Sorry. I missed that post about the Wilburys. I love those two albums for the acoustic guitars. In the video you speak of, the rocking chair brought a tear to my eye. Shit, was it that long ago? Funny story. On the first album George brought the tune that became 'handle me with care' to the table but as was usual with George, he had no title for the song. While the guys were rehearsing, Geoff Lynn glanced down at one of the crates that said 'handle with care' and thus the title. You can see it in the video.


Entered at Fri Nov 19 02:32:48 CET 2010 from (203.41.84.218)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Norm: those wilburies who travel....

Indeed, I went out and got a copy of them after seeing your link. I had a flatmate who played them to death, and it took me 20 years to finally get to the point where I could bring myself to listen again. (The flatmate is still one of my best friends, just by the by).

What happened when I listened to them? I liked them a great deal. Tweeter adn the Monkey Man is one fo the great dylan tracks. End of the Line is Sublime. it's all right is just... terrrific. Yep.


Entered at Fri Nov 19 00:32:25 CET 2010 from (99.141.45.89)

Posted by:

Adam2

They're wonderful songs of course, but I figured Evangeline (along with the Weight remake) were already claimed for the Last Waltz as they were performed with the guests.

Cryin' Heart Blues is indeed wonderful as well and would have provided a country link on Moondog. I don't really know where I'd put it in the tracklist though. I think Going Back To Memphis as the last track also works really well - just adding these 2 really strengthens Moondog a bit, and I really love Moondog as it is. Having 2 Chuck Berry songs on the album definitely isn't a bad thing anyway. Their cover of Memphis was always superb.


Entered at Thu Nov 18 22:51:48 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Travellin' Willburys

A few days back I put a link to "The End of the Line". I don't know if any one looked 'cause no one said anything. Then I forgot about it.

My reason was, I thought it was really cool the respect a lot of these guys who we have watched playing music all these years, (collectively & at their own bands, gigs, whatever) have always shown each other. The youtube, vid they are all on a train doing the song, except for Roy Orbison because he had died. With the respect they held for him, they had a black & white photo of him on a little table there, and amoung them was his guitar in a rocking chair, and the chair was rocking. So because he was gone, and they missed him, they had his memory amoung them in the video, and his voice is in the song. That's sticking together and I thought a great respect.


Entered at Thu Nov 18 19:15:25 CET 2010 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Sadavid, thanks for posting that interview with Rick. I hadn't read it before. The mention of the Dylan painting that was the cover of MFBP is interesting. It was just put up for sale for $18000.000. I was checking my penny jar to see if I could get into the bidding, but alas not this year. :-)

As to the song choices on the new compilation, Garth said in an interview that these were songs he liked, not necessarily songs that were popular.


Entered at Thu Nov 18 19:08:23 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Cuttin'Heads

Right you are David. The fellas making up "Black Country Communion" are Derek Sherinian on the Keyboards, (Alice Cooper, Billy Idol,etc) Glenn Hughes - Bass, (Deep Purple Black Sabbath....) and Jason Bonham on drums, whose list is very long including having a go at Led Zepplin.

Some of the interview with Joe Bonamassa are quite comical. He has quite a humour. His Dad was a guitar dealer, so he started playing when he was four. He says, "There were always guitars around our house, they were like furniture.

As he says the blues guitarists from England were his greatest infuence, (he liked their stlye better across the water). One of his great influences was Clapton. So when they get to cuttin' heads, it's like those two guitars are talking to each other. Sometimes maybe not a friendly conversation.


Entered at Thu Nov 18 18:30:56 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The Ballad of Joe Bonamassa

westcoaster: I did recognize Anton Fig from David Letterman's CBS Orchestra as one of the drummers playing with Mr. Bonamassa. The Palladia channel has been broadcasting that Royal Albert Hall concert in high-definition and the video & audio quality is indeed excellent.


Entered at Thu Nov 18 18:21:46 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Who's Number 1

Jerry; Yeah that is good stuff. I spent a little time reading a little more about Mr Bonamassa. He won blues guitarist of the year two years in a row voted by the fans on Guitar Player mag. They are calling him the greatest guitar player in the world. I don't know about that.

In that Royal Albert Hall concert, (the vid I watched is the professional camers, with super sound). Him & Clapton are like a couple of gun slingers facing off. The old man & the new upstart. Getting to the end of Futher on up the Road, when they start trading licks, I think Joe kinda does Eric in for licks. I think I like the sound of that Gibson better.

That is a real alstar loaded band that Joe Bonamassa has tho'. There sure are some great vids with good sound of some of Satriani solos.


Entered at Thu Nov 18 17:22:01 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Island Hopping

Adam: I completely understand your intention, as a reconfigured "Islands" is an interesting approach to revisiting the album that most Band fans rarely listen to, at least from beginning to end without using the remote to skip over certain songs. Your alternate selections have led us to examine that album in a new light, prompting the type of dialogue vital to keeping this guestbook alive.

I agree with Jon Lyness that the addition of "Evangeline", "The Well" and "Out of the Blue" would have greatly improved the album. I also wonder how some of the material included on Rick's comtemporary solo album, like "Sip the Wine" and "Java Blues", would have sounded if they'd been worked out with the rest of the group on "Islands".

On the subject of "Moondog Matinee", it's interesting to note that substituting some of the outtakes, such as Rick's take on Johnnie & Jack's "Crying Heart Blues", might have made the originally released version of that covers album stronger.


Entered at Thu Nov 18 16:10:54 CET 2010 from (65.47.151.50)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Subject: Islands 2.1 ;)

How about Evangeline as track #5 -- either replacing Living in a Dream, or bumping it back down to the #10 end slot? It's definitely one of my favorites from this era. It does seem remarkable that songs as good as Evangeline, The Well and Out of the Blue didn't make the album, while stuff like the Islands instrumental did...


Entered at Thu Nov 18 15:41:18 CET 2010 from (99.141.45.89)

Posted by:

Adam2

Well I understand if people don't count Moondog because it is a covers album, and not really a "new album" per se. Don't get me wrong, Moondog is one of my very favorites. But I understand that some people wouldn't really count it towards the best Band studio albums in terms of offering original material. I rank Moondog very high on the list though.


Entered at Thu Nov 18 15:27:42 CET 2010 from (59.101.61.51)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Adam: why wouldn't you count Moondog?

Just wondering...


Entered at Thu Nov 18 14:42:55 CET 2010 from (99.141.45.89)

Posted by:

Adam2

Ok - I don't mean to be annoying - but really... try the revisited Islands in iTunes and see for yourself. It really makes for a wonderful follow-up of new songs/outtakes to Northern Lights. The album would have been so much stronger if released as this...

01. Ain't That A Lot Of Love

02. Christmas Must Be Tonight

03. Georgia On My Mind

04. Knockin' Lost John

05. Livin' In A Dream

06. Twilight

07. The Well

08. Out Of The Blue

09. All Our Past Times (w/ Eric Clapton)

10. Home Cookin'

Make a playlist in iTunes. a very respectable follow-up to Northern Lights.


Entered at Thu Nov 18 14:15:27 CET 2010 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Web: My link

Subject: Bowling Stones


Entered at Thu Nov 18 13:14:31 CET 2010 from (99.141.45.89)

Posted by:

Adam2

I just listened to Northern Lights again - it really is awesome. The only track I would really say is a bit weak lyrically is Jupiter Hollow, and I classify Stage Fright in the same way - the only weak track lyrically is Daniel & The Sacred Harp. Both tracks are experimental and try something new, so that is hardly a criticism of their respective albums. This is the first time I've really bought into the whole thing that Northern Lights is "the best album since Stage Fright". It really is, though I would argue Moondog rivals it (though it would be fair to not count Moondog).


Entered at Thu Nov 18 08:23:00 CET 2010 from (24.47.42.238)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: ny

Thanks for bringing up Merle Travis. I checked out sadavids link and I couldn't stop watching videos of him. Fantastic.


Entered at Thu Nov 18 08:18:01 CET 2010 from (99.141.45.89)

Posted by:

Adam2

Subject: Islands

I think my point is being misinterpreted a bit. I'm not saying that Islands, as it stands, was a good or even competent collection of material to release as an 'album'. I'm just saying that to re-structure such a release of odds and ends material from 1975-1978, you can create a much BETTER album that puts a much better spin on that studio era than is generally seen by fans.

My re-constructed version of Islands contains half of the songs originally on the album. Start with the two Northern Lights outtakes - Christmas Must Be Tonight and Twilight (which was not on Islands but a single/bonus track). These two are a pretty good start. Maybe nothing extraordinary, but a good start. Add the new material - Knockin' Lost John and Livin' In A Dream are really pretty good. Lost John is very creative, offering a nice story and very interesting arrangement (where else do you hear Garth's accordion mixing with late period Robbie doing some weird whammy bar guitar work... or Levon and Robbie singing lead vocals in unison?) Livin' In A Dream is pretty good filler - almost a late era Time To Kill.

Then add the two covers - Lot Of Love and Georgia On My Mind. I used to agree with everybody that both of these are sub-par, but I don't anymore. For those who feel Don't Do It/Loving You/etc. aren't stellar covers, we don't agree on their BEST covers anyway so it really doesn't make sense to argue the merits of these two. Taken as they are, they're great and strengthen the collection of outtakes. Richard was wrong about Georgia - he really doesn't over sing it anymore than he does on SNL. It's beautiful.

That's 6 out of 10 songs so far. Add the 2 songs from the studio Last Waltz - The Well and Out Of The Blue - and the collection becomes even stronger. The Well is so underrated and if it wasn't buried on the 3 LP Last Waltz, it would have been a highlight of their next studio album (which is the point I'm trying to make - taking the various highlights of this period and putting them together on one album.) Out Of The Blue is great as well, and goes along nicely with Lost John as a precursor to Robbie's solo career/vocals.

And finally, add two Rick Danko songs: the Clapton co-write All Our Past Times and Home Cookin'. The Clapton song is really great - someone once said it acts as a precursor to Rick's solo career and I totally agree. If it were included here as was the Van Morrison collaboration on Cahoots, it would be a highlight. Very strong song that doesn't deserve obscurity. Home Cookin' - however unfinished it may sound to some - would be a perfect end to this odds and ends collection. To me it sounds pretty fully formed. Rick playing acoustic, singing one of his most heartbreaking vocals... it's great. It's a great song.

So for me, this re-constructed version of Islands puts a far more positive spin on an era that is considered the bottom of the barrel in terms of studio output. Putting all these highlights together really shows the potential the group still had. Put it together in itunes, and use it to follow up with Northern Lights. It holds up.


Entered at Thu Nov 18 05:49:59 CET 2010 from (198.36.218.33)

Posted by:

Jerry

Web: My link

Subject: Satriani, Landreth, Knowles....

That's a good one Westie...I saw Bonamassa the same summer of the Albert Hall video at a really nice venue here. He pulled out the acoustic and sucked the air out of the place...

The link above is a super jam featuring Joe Satriani bringing out Sonny Landreth. The look Satriani and Davy Knowles give eachother while Sonny plays is priceless...


Entered at Thu Nov 18 04:39:06 CET 2010 from (71.62.141.173)

Posted by:

Charlie Y

Location: Down in Old Virginny

Subject: Elvis Costello Influenced by The Band

THE NEW YORKER's November 8th issue includes an excellent profile of Elvis Costello. The following passage got my attention:"...it was through the [Grateful] Dead, and subsequently The Band and Gram Parsons, among others, that he discovered the traditional American music they'd tapped into...[and] this in turn became the foundation, along with the likes of Van Morrison, for the kind of music he was starting to write and perform himself...The Band's Rick Danko was a major influence on Costello's style of singing."


Entered at Wed Nov 17 23:40:06 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.191)

Posted by:

Steve

Sadavid, I was quite impressed by the boots, you couldn't miss them as he leaned back in the rocker and crossed his feet.

In the 9 Pound Hammer video he's wearing a very catchy checked shirt and doing some Jonathan Winters eye rolls. The guy was way ahead of his time.

Peter, Hawksley Workman is an interesting guy. He writes a lot of quirky stuff and you never get two consecutive albums that you'd think would appeal to the same fans but they do.

In a nod to his Jewish grandma he did a sort of Kosher album sequence release of two albums this year. One called Meat and one called Milk.


Entered at Wed Nov 17 22:30:00 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Helena Springs

As I recall, Helena Springs is also credited with co-writing "Walk Out In The Rain" and "If I Don't Be There By Morning" with Dylan. Both songs were covered by Eric Clapton on the album "Backless". I believe she also wrote several more songs with Dylan during their time together.


Entered at Wed Nov 17 21:08:38 CET 2010 from (67.186.182.84)

Posted by:

Richard Wall

Subject: Garth's new CD

I ordered copies of Garth's new CD last week from Amazon.ca and I was very surprised and pleased that they arrived here in the U.S. on the Canadian release date, yesterday (a week before they'll be available from Amazon.com), and at a non-import price. They sent them overnight by DHL for the standard shipping rate. A great deal! Thank you Amazon Canada.

Truly incredible CD, by the way! I heard bits and pieces while Garth and Maud were working on it but now to have the whole thing in hand is just spectacular. I can't say enough. Maud did a beautiful job on the package design. Garth is THE MAN...


Entered at Wed Nov 17 20:43:26 CET 2010 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: a postcard from Helena Springs

Marjorie Kaufman: "High On the Hog has two Dylan cuts, "Forever Young" and "I Must Love You Too Much" - which Dylan never recorded. Why did you choose it now for the album?"

Rick Danko: "He wrote it for us years ago. Paul Butterfield and I had a band together at one point. (Bob) wrote it for us then. We were just too messed up, as humans... We had a great band and the music was good, but we were - pardon my language - we were just too fucked up to have anybody put much faith and trust in us. and I don't blame them one bit. But here it is now."


Entered at Wed Nov 17 20:43:03 CET 2010 from (68.164.5.229)

Posted by:

Pat B

NLSC is superb which is all the evidence you need to consider whether they could still deliver when everyone was into it. Rather than try to make a purse out of Islands by drawing on material from different albums, consider Cahoots with Don't Do It (with Allen Toussaint horns) and Bessie Smith.


Entered at Wed Nov 17 20:23:57 CET 2010 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: Merle's Docs

Steve: he plays guitar pretty well. What is really impressive is his fashion sense - he was into the Doc Martens twenty years before the other kids caught on.


Entered at Wed Nov 17 20:14:09 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Someone called "Hawksley Workman" who I've never heard of (now called "I Love You too Much"). Astonishingly, it took two people (Bob Dylan + Helena Springs) to write it. Maybe he just wanted something from "High on the Hog".


Entered at Wed Nov 17 20:10:49 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Travis Picking & Waltzing

Ike Everly, father of the famous brother duo of Don & Phil, was a friend of Merle Travis and was equally adept at playing in that style. In light of the recent Keith Richards discussion, I would also point out that Mr. Everly taught his sons the open-G tuning which Don used to add the driving Bo Diddley rhythm to their country songs.

The Last Waltz is perceived as The Band's farewell, justly offering the public a richly produced look at the group's collective talent. A combination of their contractual obligation to Capitol and the waltz-like pace of the year & a half preparation of the film & soundtrack in the end offered a redemption for the shortcomings of the "Islands" release that followed TLW event itself. Through Martin Scorsese it can be said that The Band achieved a Hollywood ending of sorts, though it's debatable as to who ended up riding off into the sunset with the love interest.


Entered at Wed Nov 17 19:37:49 CET 2010 from (90.239.160.249)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: David P: From Shangri-La to Islands in the Sand

Sorry for depressing and disloyal comment to your post but in my mind that happened earlier: after Big Pink, diverse collaborations with Dylan and live concerts, The Band and half of Stage Fright.


Entered at Wed Nov 17 19:16:58 CET 2010 from (68.164.5.229)

Posted by:

Pat B

Steve, where did you think the term "Travis Picking" came from?


Entered at Wed Nov 17 19:07:33 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.188)

Posted by:

Steve

Sadavid, I didn't realize Merle was such a great picker. I don't think I've ever seen him play, only heard recordings and assumed someone else might be doing the guitar work. Watched a couple of his videos.

Peter who does, I Love You Too Much on the album?


Entered at Wed Nov 17 18:33:10 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: I Must Love You too Much

… in spite of my criticism, they do actually improve on the 90s Band version!


Entered at Wed Nov 17 18:23:00 CET 2010 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: another Lost John

. . . from Bowling Green, KY . . . .


Entered at Wed Nov 17 18:22:13 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Canadian Celebration of The Band

Garth’s “A Canadian Celebration of The Band” arrived today. It’s a must-buy, mainly because everyone has taken a fresh look at the songs rather than just done straight cover versions. As I said, Knocking Lost John by Great Big Sea as a sea-shanty works well for me. Clothes Line saga jumped out, but I love Margo Timmins’ voice. Margaret O’Hara on Out of The Blue is another. Sleeping always was a beautiful song, and Bruce Cockburn does it justice. Neil Young takes This Wheel’s on Fire more like the Julie Driscoll than The Band. Forbidden Fruit does very well for itself with a bit of Garth’s “Northern Lights” sound at the start. I like You Ain’t Goin’ Nowhere by Kevin Hearn. Blu Rodeo had that name as the most-Band like group a few years back, and they have the biggest task, my favourite song, King Harvest. No one’s ever going to please me on that compared to the original, but it’s an excellent attempt.

There’s very little downside to it. I still don’t understand the inclusion of I Must Love You Too Much, a Dylan throw-away (perhaps his worst composition) that really can’t be one of anyone’s “favourite Band songs” whatever the sleeve says. It always was a piece of dull crap, and no interpretation is going to improve it. Garth has always done such lovely sax on It Makes No Difference, that I’m really surprised that’s missing. Also the long jokey Spike Jones style spoken voice intro to Move to Japan will not work the second time through (it's not even funny the first time through), but they do the song OK. I wish Garth had done The Moon Struck One as a big instrumental. Raine Maida sings it fine, but the lyrics are, at the end of the day, the lyrics.


Entered at Wed Nov 17 17:46:49 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

David sums it up. I reckon if they had anything "fantastic" it would have been kept back for Warner Bros. But they didn't. And the warner possibility never happened, except for the studio bits of TLW. BUT the version of "Knocking Lost John" on Garth's new CD is superb, and that shows up as a decent enough song.


Entered at Wed Nov 17 17:32:08 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: From Shangri-La to Islands in the Sand

The contractual obligation excuse did nothing to ease my disappointment with "Islands" when it was released. That feeling has not lessened with the passage of time. Robbie's assertion that the road had taken its toll became starkly real upon listening to the material that they assembled for their last Capitol product, on the retreaded heels of a greatest hits compilation. Taking into account opposing views with the finger pointing mantra in the retelling the group's history, as the principal songwriter, it was also apparent that Robbie's creative juices and/or interest at that point was waning. At the time, the assertion that the group was merely taking leave from the road offered some promise that they would recharge their batteries and hopefully release material for another label (Warner Bros.) down the line, which would measure up to the high standards that they'd set in the past. It was clear then & now that "Islands" would never be the "desert island" record anyone would choose as representative of The Band and it's a shame their last gasp wasn't stronger. The hope offered in "Northern Lights - Southern Cross" had faded fast into the sunset on a Malibu beach.


Entered at Wed Nov 17 16:45:19 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Disguise - Black Country Communion

Watching these guys play, the faces look kind of familiar. But they've aged, shaved the long hair, and al sorts of changes.

When you research how they came together, then it's not surprising.


Entered at Wed Nov 17 16:25:34 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: High Water Every Where

That's a good one Jerry, thanks. I particularly like this one. This acoustic guitar work and dynamics he uses impresses me. Also his band is so tight with this. They obviously really enjoy this guy.

For a young white blues boy, watch some of the black folks in the crowd move to his music.


Entered at Wed Nov 17 12:25:10 CET 2010 from (99.141.47.30)

Posted by:

Adam2

Peter - Home Cookin' is a bit undercooked, but I think that's the appeal of it. It's not really a song that would benefit much from being more polished - it has the feel of the basement tapes, with Rick on acoustic guitar/Levon on bass/Garth on piano/Richard on drums. To me it's whole appeal is the raw homegrown vibe I get from it, especially Rick's beautiful vocal. While listening to it I feel like I'm not listening to them cutting tracks or filler material, but just making some music. Ain't That A Lot Of Love - a lot of people feel this is a weak cover, but I don't compare it to others and just accept it as is. It reminds me of the live version from the SNACK benefit with Neil/Dylan/Ben Keith/etc. And taken as it is, I really love it - listen to the great bass rhythm, Robbie's guitar and how Richard's wonderful boogie piano picks up the rhythm slack when the guitar solo start. It may pale to other versions, but I love it. That kind of thing shows they still had the chops right up until the end. Plus Levon's drum fills are a great way to start off any album.


Entered at Wed Nov 17 11:40:51 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The joy of iTunes is you can instantly create a new Playlist and try stuff.

But Home Cookin’ isn’t on my Band iTunes playlist. Home Cookin’ sounds demo to me. It sounds tentative, as if they’re searching for the song, and not quite finding it. Also the vocal sounds as if straining too much to get there. Definitely not “ready to go” as it stands, though I agree they could have worked it up, because the potential’s there.

I think “All Our Past Times” is better as a song than anything on “Islands” (except perhaps Christmas Must Be Tonight), but the place that was really missing was the TLW release. It’s a far more interesting song than the hackneyed old “Further On Up The Road” BUT the guitar strap drama made that essential. Anyway, it looks as if they never recorded it on film, using the first song to set up camera angles again.

The TLW studio songs are also better than most of Islands, but Islands was “contractual obligation”.

I know you don’t want me to comment on covers, but I would never start an album with The Band’s uncharacteristically dull version of “Ain’t That A Lot of Love.” The place to start on that song is Taj Mahal, then go to the Homer Banks original, then Levon Helm & The RCO All Stars “Live at the Palladium NYC” (where Levon did it much better than on Islands), then The Flying Burrito Brothers. All better.


Entered at Wed Nov 17 09:16:47 CET 2010 from (99.141.47.30)

Posted by:

Adam2

Yeah, I definitely agree. i think the only reason Home Cookin' was left off Islands may have been because it was such a good song that Rick didn't want it wasted on the original tracklist, and may have wanted to save it for his solo album but ended up not using it/it didn't fit.


Entered at Wed Nov 17 09:03:54 CET 2010 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: Islands

Home Cooking definitely should have been on Islands. Can't understand why it was ever left off. If I was going to choose a version of Twilight I'd do go for Robbie's demo thats on AMH. Thats a really haunting version. Pity they didn't finish it off like they did for some of Richard's demos.


Entered at Wed Nov 17 07:40:42 CET 2010 from (24.73.245.130)

Posted by:

Charlie Y

Subject: Waterloo Records

With record stores fast disappearing in the US, I finally made it to Waterloo Records in Austin, TX yesterday and it lived up to the advance word I'd read about it. The store has a great mix of new and used vinyl, CDs, DVDs, and some books. It's a great place to browse for hours and spend lots of money...


Entered at Wed Nov 17 07:33:04 CET 2010 from (76.99.245.65)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: by the edge of the (indoor) turtle pond

Subject: Bonnie & Roseanne

Bayou Sam, (Welcome back, BTW) Thanks for researching which episode the bare bones, stunning performance of "You Really Got A Hold On Me" was on. Saved me a lot of digging through old VHS tapes! When we first saw it, my wife & I knew that Bonnie was playing a character in Roseanne's "loose meat" restaurant, and we started taping, in case they let her burst loose in song. Talk about "goosebumps time"! For everybody who posted links to Delaney & Bonnie & Friends, many thanks! Now if I could only find the episode where Dan Connor (the inimitable John Goodman) and DJ cut loose in the "We're Goin' to the Freakshow" tune, I'd be a happy man. This GB has had me mining YouTube and other sources, looking for Delany & Bonnie, Leon Russell and other stuff I had written off as, "seen it once, now it's gone". Ain't this internet thang amazing! Also, I devoured all 600 pages of Keith's book, and found it mostly consistent with what he's said over many years in interviews. Seems like his attitude is, "Truth? I'll give you the truth, that is, IF you can handle it". Gotta love his frankness.


Entered at Wed Nov 17 06:35:02 CET 2010 from (198.36.218.33)

Posted by:

Jerry

Web: My link

Subject: Joe Bonamassa

Westie, You're right on about Joe. If you ever get a chance to see him do not miss him. His live shows are outstanding...The above link is "Just Got Paid" from Albert Hall..He writes some good songs as well and his vocals have improved since he was a 12 year old opening for BB King...


Entered at Wed Nov 17 06:30:21 CET 2010 from (203.41.84.218)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Adam 2: interestign isn't it

I don't know Islands, but it's funny how rearranging an album can lift or ruin it. I remember when Sgt Pepper's was first released adn you could program your cd to put it in the order in which it was first intended... they got it right the second time, at least I think so... /n


Entered at Wed Nov 17 04:52:09 CET 2010 from (24.47.42.238)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: ny

Subject: Bonnie Bramlett on Rosanne

Peter - it says this for nthat clip from Rosanne: Season 3, ep 23. Scenes from a Barbeque.


Entered at Wed Nov 17 01:44:48 CET 2010 from (24.218.200.216)

Posted by:

Tim

Location: Boston
Web: My link

Subject: More Garth

talks about new album


Entered at Wed Nov 17 01:43:55 CET 2010 from (99.141.47.30)

Posted by:

Adam2

Subject: Islands

Thanks a lot Jon. I used to think of the "Islands"/'75-'78 studio material as really scraping the bottom of the barrel, but I'm loving this re-arranged tracklist. When you take the really weak material out, all the other stuff just sounds better and more worthwhile to me. Starting off with Ain't That A Lot Of Love gives a great kick-off to the collection, and that along with Georgia give a bit of a Moondog Matinee feel (which is a very good thing in my book). You've got the two good Northern Lights outtakes - Christmas and Twilight - as well as two new good songs in Knockin' Lost John and Livin' In A Dream, as well as two better new songs in The Well and Out of the Blue. The Well seems pretty underrated, it would have been a great live song for Richard in an era where he could handle few. The Clapton song and Home Cookin' show Rick's writing coming into the mix - it's a shame they didn't follow up with more recordings as taking the worst of the lot out of the mix really shows the potential they still had as a group.


Entered at Wed Nov 17 00:01:03 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Chelsea Drug Store

I'm not sure about UK laws then. I was quite surprised in the Sounes McCartney bio that said Sir Paul used to keep a jar of pharmaceutical coke openly on the mantelpiece circa1967 (keeping her face in a jar by the door?), but got very pissed off because Brian Jones used to consume it freely while he was away without replacement. It says it was"then legal" and all the big stars did it. That was news to me. But I was a mere youth operating lights in theatres or reading the works of James Fenimore Cooper very slowly at the time.

But yes, in general addicts were prescribed drugs. Reputedly, several famous musicians were also prescribed cannabis tincture legally to ward off their paranoia about getting busted. I thought that was stopped around the time of the Stones busts. The Stones busts were generally believed to be a case of collusion between the News of The World "newspaper" and corrupt policemen.

No one, in retrospect has a good word to say about Brian Jones.


Entered at Tue Nov 16 23:08:28 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.188)

Posted by:

Steve

Subject: Bienvenue

I liked the way, Ian gave Sylvia her dues for their success. I hadn't realized Spike Lee's father was a jazz player and had played bass on Ian and Sylvia's first album. I read his father's Wiki page and found out about his involvement with Dylan, Lightfoot and others.


Entered at Tue Nov 16 22:49:33 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Joe Bonamassa

Back to the blues thing for a moment.There is another young guy, I don't recall any one mentioning here before.

The first vid of him that caught my attention some time back was when he was 12 playing with Danny gatton.

The video of him and Clapton playing Further on up the road at Royal Albert Hall is pretty good. I think I like his work on that LP Gibson just as well as Clapton.


Entered at Tue Nov 16 22:43:43 CET 2010 from (165.112.214.196)

Posted by:

Jan F.

Subject: I know I promised but . . . .

Keef also liked the sound from the cassette recorder as it reminded him of the old blues vinyl he used to listen to as a kid.


Entered at Tue Nov 16 22:38:31 CET 2010 from (165.112.214.196)

Posted by:

Jan F.

Location: metro D.C.

Subject: Keef - I promise I'll stop now . . . .

Charlie, I only meant the tuning and chord talk was boring and that's only b/c I don't understand it (and really don't care to). The book itself is good but it's like "you can't make this stuff up." But then again, maybe some of it is made up. I'm still not convinced certain liberties weren't taken to describe drug-fueled adventures.

I was always a fool (a 10 year old fool, but fool nonetheless) for Brian Jones. Even at 10, I thought he was the most talented of the Stones at that time. When he died, I kind of kicked the Stones to the curb and got into other things (The Doors, Byrds -- but most of all folk music -- J. Baez, Peter, Paul, Mary, Ian & Sylvia, etc). When I started dating Mr. Steve he was not only a big fan of The Band but also the Stones. Richards guitar playing had improved remarkably by that time. And yeah, I now know Brian was (probably) not only mentally ill, but a drug addicted sot and none of the Stones have anything good to say about him today. He's certainly not here to defend himself, but that's life (and death).

Where Keith got his hypodermics (I know you really DO want to know Charlie!): Well, while in the US, since he couldn't buy them here, he had a needle stuck in his hat holding a feather and then went to FAO Schwartz and bought toy doctor kits. The barrel and plunger (along with his contraband needle) in the kits was good enough for a desperate smack addict.

From what I understand from reading the book, the laws in the UK regarding drugs were not all that strict during that time. Maybe it was something to do with who he was, although the UK establishment/politicians of the day certainly didn’t care for the Stones. The drug busts in the US were taken care of by the best lawyers money could buy. At that time, for heroin addicts the UK National Health Service furnished (according the Keith) heroin and cocaine. A bad smack addict would sell/trade his cocaine for heroin. This tapered off and was later changed to NHS-furnished methadone. Peter is this correct, or do you know?



Entered at Tue Nov 16 22:29:29 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Get Yer Cassettes Out

As Keith Richards has recounted in guitar magazine interviews over the years, he acquired one of the first Philips cassette players. In addition to its portability, he discovered that the built-in microphone allowed him to get a unique sound. On "Street Fighting Man" for example, he was able to record two acoustic guitars without limiting to get a big overloaded sound. Most people were surprised when they found out that he wasn't using electric guitars, except for the bass, on the recording. Considering his condition back in those days, the cassette player also offered the advantage of being simple to operate, within arms length at home or on the road whenever an inspiration for a song hit him.


Entered at Tue Nov 16 21:37:17 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The Olive Branch

Good job farmer.....thanks. That is a good interview. I guess ol' Ian has mellowed out pretty well in his old age.

It's many,many years since I have spoken with him. Him and Lightfoot both were not interesting to talk to years ago. It was like wikipedia. All they did was rattle off like statistics how many hit records they had and awards ect,ect.

It was never just like have a friendly gab conversation. They were both pretty high on themselves.In this interview, Ian makes a lot of interesting comments giving a lot of people back in our history some credit that is due them, like Wilf Carter.

I'm not sure if I ever mentioned my first meeting with Wilf. He had become pretty good friends with my Mom some where back there. My mom to this day at 88 is like a history book. She remembers every dam thing. Anyway she had taken my two older brothers and I to see Wilf at the Odd Fellows hall in Courtenay. It's a really cool big old log building, that is still there.

At his intermission, he came and visited with mom and bought us all a bottle of pop, (that's soda to you gawd damn yankees). To this day, as I was 6 at the time I remember him shaking my hand. Wilf Carter was a really big guy and my little paw disappeared in his big mitt.

Wilf has two daughters, Shiela, and Carol. Carol's birthday is the same day as mine, but I think she's a year younger.

At that meeting, Wilf had Toller O'Shea playing drums for him. This was in 1950. In 1975, When I lived in Sechelt, my brother Lorne and played music in the Legion most of the time for years. So one weekend we weren't damn if along comes Toller O'Shea's band, so 25 years later, I'm playing music with. He was the first drummer I ever knew, and he was pretty damn good.


Entered at Tue Nov 16 21:22:21 CET 2010 from (65.47.151.50)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Subject: Islands Revisited

Adam, I like your Islands 2.0. Nice mix/swapping of lead vocals too. Well done!


Entered at Tue Nov 16 21:15:10 CET 2010 from (217.42.25.251)

Posted by:

Dunc

Subject: Bill M

Never thought of Sandy Denny as being Scottish, even with the very Scottish name. Always thought of her as an English folksinger, even though I knew her grandmother was Scottish and sang traditional songs.

Enjoying 'Let's Frolic' immensely.


Entered at Tue Nov 16 17:09:11 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.188)

Posted by:

Steve

Web: My link

Norm, if you've got the time and the interest I finally remembered where I heard the Tyson interview, it was on The Sunday Edition at the link above. It's the first hour segment of the show, just slide the little white button to the 8 minute mark where the interview starts.


Entered at Tue Nov 16 15:27:04 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Memories

Peter M; Well you certainly didn't go on too long for me old friend. These posts of yours are what it's all about.

Living in the wilderness like I did most of my life, I never got to see nearly as many shows as would like to have.

I have never been a fan of Roseanne. I can't stand her voice, although I have always really liked Big John, so I never watched her show.

Those old Shindig shows are something I always tried to watch. Jerry Jeff's music right thru the seventies was a big part of our lives out west here. He just was the right style for us. For a time there you heard "Up against the wall you redneck mother" everywhere you went.\ Also what was really big out here was that "Southern Rock scene" When you listen to that old Charlie Daniels song, "The South's gonna do it again" Charlie names off all the players. Elvin Bishop, Dicky Betts, Barefoot Jerry. Lynrd Skynrd The Marshall Tucker Band and all that southern rock scene was the big thing out here.

As I said way back there, my band that I had for quite a while back there, our steel guitar man Rick Dunn was from Spartanburg Carolina. On the other end of the satge our lead guitar man (THE STRAT MAN) Rick Leather was from Toronto. (We called him Vinyl Richie) anway we had a lot of fun with that music.


Entered at Tue Nov 16 15:24:49 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.188)

Posted by:

Steve

Bill, I heard a great interview with Ian Tyson on Q a couple of weeks back. He spoke quite a lot about the early part of his career and teaming up with Sylvia. He gave Sylvia a lot of credit for their success. He said that when he first met her she was playing some kind of instrument that was a cross between a harp and a banjo, at least that is what I think he said. Anyway, he described it as an instrument that he'd never seen before and that he doesn't think it actually had a name, and that he's never seen another one.

I went to Q's site to look for the interview, I was going to post a link to it for Norm but didn't find it. It must be in the podcast section and since you have to pay for those( I assume) I didn't search for it.

I'm going to make another search today for it if I have time.

My mother can sing all of Punkinhead, and still does.


Entered at Tue Nov 16 15:14:15 CET 2010 from (99.141.56.63)

Posted by:

Adam2

Subject: Islands revisited

Seeing Forbidden Fruit and Out Of The Blue on Garth's new album made me want to revisit Islands for some late-period Band. I made my own track list, dropping a few tracks and adding a few more, and it's a really great listen that really sounds stronger than the original. I dropped the really weak Robbie songs, left the couple best, added the ones from the Waltz studio side, etc. The inclusion of All Our Past Times from Clapton showcases perhaps Rick's most significant co-write (and gives the tracklist a Van Morrison/Cahoots/4% Pantomime kind of thing), and I added his Home Cookin' as well. This is a great listen, really includes the best of the period and stands up nicely with Northern Lights. (And please let's not debate the covers. Personally I love their take on Lot Of Love.)

"Islands" revisited

01. Ain't That A Lot Of Love

02. Christmas Must Be Tonight

03. Georgia On My Mind

04. Knockin' Lost John

05. Livin' In A Dream

06. Twilight

07. The Well

08. Out Of The Blue

09. All Our Past Times (w/ Eric Clapton)

10. Home Cookin'


Entered at Tue Nov 16 15:05:19 CET 2010 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: (previously) forbidden fruit

Apparently Apple Corps has chosen cooperation over litigation . . . .


Entered at Tue Nov 16 15:02:37 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: John's link

Thank you so much for sharing, John from Texas. I also loved the asymmetrical collar and the handkerchief hem, it gives a slimmer silhouette, something I could definitely use. I've always found rayon and polyester most flattering and comfortable. What an exciting time you must have posting garbage on websites.


Entered at Tue Nov 16 14:19:11 CET 2010 from (75.1.99.206)

Posted by:

John

Location: Texas
Web: My link

Great stuff!


Entered at Tue Nov 16 09:53:18 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Garth CD

I had a note that my copy was dispatched from Canada yesterday. Looking forward to it, even at $CDN 39.

So I just got a "recommendation" from amazon.co.uk to buy the same CD. It was £26 last week. Now amazon.uk are asking a whopping £46.99 for a single CD, i.e. $CDN 76. That must be a first. You have to assume it's an error.


Entered at Tue Nov 16 09:10:16 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The Rosanne episode is country-barred, so doesn’t come up on YouTube in the UK. Any idea where it was? In a fit of nostalgia, my daughter bought Seasons 1 & 2 in a sale at HMV last Christmas for something like £5 a season.

The Keef interview had great clips of the early Stones. They stand up very well to the passing of time, better than any of their contemporary bands would, I suspect. Notably in the Top of the Pops ones, Keef was almost as keen to jump around being the teeny pop star as Mick. That’s why the eyeliner interested me. Years ago, someone said in an article that the only way Keef could tolerate Mick was that he was equally vain, but with a different mode of expression. They only had one post 1971 video clip too, which is about right. Wasn’t it Mick who opined that their newly-released 1972 DVD was far better than TLW? I wonder when he last watched TLW. Perhaps he should!


Entered at Tue Nov 16 08:30:50 CET 2010 from (76.99.245.65)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: by the pond

Subject: Presidential Gonzo

And on Jerry Jeff's newsletter they called it, "Bill & Al's Excellent Adventure".


Entered at Tue Nov 16 08:07:13 CET 2010 from (76.99.245.65)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: hanging with the turtles

Subject: Hey Norm, re: JJW

Thanks for the input, westcoaster (and you too, Charlie Y!). I was a bit concerned that I went on too longwinded on the subject, however it was one of the coolest, and edgiest nights of my life. I first heard Jerry Jeff & David Bromberg interviewed (with guitars in hand) on Philadelphia radio in about '68, and really enjoyed the show. We then saw them at The Main Point a year or two later. I was sold from the start. In June '71 I experienced culture shock, moving to Tulsa at 18 yrs old, after living on the east coast. Sometimes the only stuff that brightened my 5 year stay in Oklahoma was musical. We did get to see Jerry Jeff and the ever growing Lost Gonzo Band regularly. It was nice seeing JJ Cale, Leon & Eric Clapton, Freddie King (many Tulsa connections there), Leon and Shindogs, Mad Dogs, and many players from Marcy Levy's band, "Marcella", who fell in with that whole Delany & Bonnie & Friends unit. Howard Johnson was playing there regularly, either with Taj, or just jamming with some locals. I moved back to Phila in 1976, after a failed 5 year try at Living on Tulsa Time (my family all reside there still). Back in, and around Philly, I saw Jerry Jeff and the Gonzos several times in the late '70s (delightful). Then, I saw his Bandito Band, with Vassar Clements, Dickie Betts, Reese Wynans and a few guys who replaced the Gonzos during that dark period you mentioned. They often played wild and loud. In the early '80s I saw them at The Tower Theater, loud and out of control. Some spaced out guy from the audience sauntered up to Jerry Jeff's mike and started singing "Bojangles", um... inappropriately. Jerry Jeff went into a white hot rage, played about a 6 minute medley of a dozen or so songs, and said "Fuck you, and goodnight!". This was only about 20 minutes into his show. He left the stage, leaving his band looking dumbstruck. Vassar Clements and Dickey Betts did their best to salvage the event, but JJW was out of there. My wife and I swore off Jerry Jeff that night, and stayed away for several years. By the time you saw him, Norm, I had decided to give it another chance. I saw a show from the same tour you did, and even with only a solitary guitar, I was bowled over, remembering the magic he cast over the room. The next show I saw him do, he had the unbelievable guitarist, John Inmon back in the fold. I ran to a pay phone to call my wife at work, telling her to get down here, "John's back!". The rest is history. Bob Livingston on bass signed up again next, then Steady Freddie Krc, on drums, was also back. Saw them do a few tight, incredibly moving shows in the late '80s and throughout the '90's in Philadelphia and NYC. Some of the best shows of my life were watching JJW & the Gonzo Survivors, or Gonzo Compadres, in the '90's and early ought years. Tight, sober, and always on the mark. Unfortunately, in the latter part of the 2000's, he started using other players in his ensemble, and it seems to me that the mojo isn't there like it should be... BTW, thanks for the Delany & Bonnie clips. When my wife & I saw her on the Roseanne show, we realized that she was a semi regular character on it. When we saw her belt out "You Really Got a Hold on Me" in a scene where the Connor family were just hanging out and cutting up, we were gobsmacked. Even my teenage son was impressed.


Entered at Tue Nov 16 00:57:47 CET 2010 from (72.43.141.253)

Posted by:

Charlie Y

Subject: Mr. Richards

I got a copy of the Keith Richards book and started it but tossed it aside. I always had mixed feeling about the Stones. I always liked The Beatles, The Who and even the Doors better than the Stones. Keith just isn't that interesting. If he'd been a poor white guy or a black man he'd have spent years in prison for tax evasion, drug possession, etc. Just ask Chuck Berry.

Frank Zappa was a more inventive and interesting guitarist than Mr. Richards and there are countless musical autobiographies I'd read before his if they were available: Garth Hudson, Robbie Robertson. Elvis Costello, Joni Mitchell, Roger McGuinn, Jackson Browne and many others. A high school friend of mine once said sardonically to a young woman in class, "I don't care what the Monkees eat for breakfast." In this case, I don't care where Keith got his hypodermic needles and where he stuck them. As Jan said, it's just BORING...


Entered at Tue Nov 16 00:40:52 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Cassette players were pretty rare in England. Even in 1969 they were moderately exotic. The funny thing is, we had a large batch of Philips 1970 machines (in a group of language schools) that were very sturdy and sounded good, and they were still being used all day, every day in 1980, outlasting at least three generations of machines (Sony, Telefunken, Tandberg) that we kept buying to replace, them looking vainly for better sound quality.


Entered at Tue Nov 16 00:07:10 CET 2010 from (59.101.61.51)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: The cassette...

Almost certainly Keith means 'reel-to-reel', though the first commercially available cassettes were available in 1962. It's conceivable that the Stones had the income and the contacts to have one...


Entered at Mon Nov 15 23:59:41 CET 2010 from (24.73.245.130)

Posted by:

Charlie Y

Location: Austin (This Week)

Subject: Jerrry Jeff & Bill & Hillary & Al & Tipper...

Peter M: I loved your tale of Jerry Jeff Walker at the Birchemere the night the Clintons and Gores were in the audience. As a regular audience member at that 500 seat venue I know that night looms large in their legend (as George Harrison might have put it). Your description put me in the room and I wish I could have been. Who ever thought Bill & Hill would still be a couple in 2010, but not Al and Tipper? As Mr. Berry said, " you never can tell."


Entered at Mon Nov 15 23:30:54 CET 2010 from (67.210.173.2)

Posted by:

Bill M

Dunc: Should've been Sandy Denny (Scottish), no?

dlew: Liz may be on Facebook now, but she's still out of touch if she approved the counterproductive idea of sending Charles here to boost the monarchy.

RtO: I too here Levon singing "the", but I don't think that means he was singing about a boat. I think Robbie was thinking 'army' or 'brigade' or 'regiment - which are often (here at least) called things like 'the Princess Pats', 'the 48th Highlanders', 'the VanDoos', etc. A biggish Toronto bar-band of the early '70s was 'The Robert E. Lee Brigade'. (One LP - and not a good one, unfortunately.)

Adam2: "Motel Shot" also has an uncredited Joe Cocker and a credited Hawk, Sandy Konikoff.

Steve: The second and third albums I owned were Lightfoot's first and Ian and Sylvia's second ("Four Strong Winds"). My first was Montana Slim's (i.e., Wilf Carter's) "Christmas Time in Canada". I can still sing a bit of "Punkinhead", I'm afraid.


Entered at Mon Nov 15 22:53:02 CET 2010 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

Gbear

Web: My link

Subject: Never too young to love the music.

Check me out sportin' "The Levon Helm Band" attire.


Entered at Mon Nov 15 22:33:38 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.187)

Posted by:

Steve

Jan, try giving the, "doing what you want and dressing how you please," a go. Why let self expression be restricted to the rich and famous, they get enough perks as it is. Besides, people will look at you and think you're one of the many minor celebrities that they just don't recognize. Of course you'll have to keep a Sharpie handy to sign various body parts on complete strangers.

Bet you can't wait to get started


Entered at Mon Nov 15 21:58:01 CET 2010 from (165.112.214.196)

Posted by:

Jan F.

Subject: Blues Guitar

Or even Keith Richards' open chord tuning on Brown Sugar, Honky Tonk Women, Start Me Up,m etc.

J.F.


Entered at Mon Nov 15 21:35:46 CET 2010 from (174.89.117.48)

Posted by:

Kevin J

So...........top marks for world peace.............if we could only fugure out blues guitar!


Entered at Mon Nov 15 21:02:32 CET 2010 from (110.171.36.90)

Posted by:

Devices Computer

Location: USA
Web: My link

Subject: Devices Computer

You doing a great work for Peace! Keep this up.. You're appreciated!


Entered at Mon Nov 15 20:18:33 CET 2010 from (165.112.214.196)

Posted by:

Jan F.

Subject: more Keef

Peter, yes, Keef goes into pretty good detail about recording on cassettes in hotel rooms, etc. It was on of the things I wondered "could that be true?"

And,yeah, think he does the eyeliner b/c he can. At some point (from I hear from female Asian friends - they have their eyebrows tatooed) the ink around the eyes does eventually wear down/off. He probably has had it re-done -- or maybe not. If I were him or anyone else as famous (or infamous!) as Keith, I'd pretty much do/wear whatever I wanted and yep, I'd look pretty weird. No telling what I'd come up with . . .



Entered at Mon Nov 15 20:14:04 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Cassette Tape Recorders

Peter: Philips/Norelco had introduced the cassette recorder by 1964.


Entered at Mon Nov 15 19:52:28 CET 2010 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Web: My link

Subject: NY Times review of Keith book

This is a rather extensive piece that appeared in The Times Book Review om Sunday by Liz Phair.

Bayou Sam nice to hear from you Tom.


Entered at Mon Nov 15 19:48:46 CET 2010 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: Keef's _Life_

Jan F.: I finished the KR book a few days ago. I found the discussions of songwriting process among the most interesting bits in the book -- because I am interested in how it's done, not because I am a fan of the songs. And I am always astonished at how quickly some of these guys can write a hit song, whether it's Dame Elton putting music to Taupin's words, or Sir Mick putting words to KR riffs.

I take it to be all true -- but then I take novels that way, as well.

My copy came with plain endpapers (in a very fetching purple, but blank) -- I'm pee-oh'd that I can't see the bits of the KR record collection that our friends in the UK are privy to . . . .


Entered at Mon Nov 15 19:49:49 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Eyeliner

Mrs V is right. She said it was tattoos. I thought it was just eyeliner. I wonder why he went permanent? I mean it accentuates the eyes on stage, so eyeliner, but it's a bit weird to have a permanent black line for wandering around the supermarket. I don't suppose Keef does.


Entered at Mon Nov 15 19:43:51 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Keef's "Life"

The interview last night had his co-writer on (separate interview). The co-writer made one technical slip - he said they recorded stuff on cassette in 1964. I don't think that can be right. One bit was Keef on Satisfaction which he said was a rough draft that Decca insisted they put out. He said he'd always imagined it with horns, just as Otis Redding did it a few months later.

On the blues thing, he said they always felt frauds in the presence of people like Muddy Waters. But heck, anyone would in the presence of Muddy Waters.

Bobby Keys looked like he was auditioning for a new picture sleeve for "Good Old Boys". Great quotes,


Entered at Mon Nov 15 19:23:43 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Hurricane Force

Sadavid; I'm not sure if you would know this. The sinking of the Edmund Fitsgerald, was one of the disasters that caused Environment Canada weather to re-evaluate their broadcasting of marine "weather conditions & forcasts).

For the information of mariners to make their plans due to weather forecasts.

Strong wind warning - 10 to 20 knot wind

Gale warning 25 to 45 knot wind

Storm warning above 50 knot wind

Hurricane force wind above 60 knots

This is supposed to give mariners more warning to avoid such disaster by heeding a "hurricane warning" and stay out of harms way.


Entered at Mon Nov 15 19:10:33 CET 2010 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Rollie

Hi Jeff, Could you please e-mail me. It's " "motus2aterolsdotcom" I want to pass along some info.


Entered at Mon Nov 15 18:47:25 CET 2010 from (165.112.214.196)

Posted by:

Jan F.

Peter V - yes, Keef's eyeliner is tattoed.

J.F.


Entered at Mon Nov 15 18:43:18 CET 2010 from (165.112.214.196)

Posted by:

Jan F.

Location: metro DC

Subject: Keef's book

Is anyone else reading Keef's book? I'm almost through it although I have to admit some of the technical stuff I had to skip. If you are interested in how the music for some of the Stones' songs were written, it must be great. For me - boring.

Other than that -- very interesting read. I think he was wise (or I guess there wouldn't be a book) to rely on interviews from some of the people who were with him when certain things happened b/c he sure as hell can't remember things (and he readily admits this).

Levon is given a mention on a road trip that Keef doesn't remember but is described by a friend's son who evidently was driving the car (don't quote me on that part). They were all pretty much strung out -- Keith more than anyone else, as usual (well, except maybe Anita, but she wasn't there that night) and they were driving around upstate NY and ended up spending the night at Levon's b/c they were so wasted. I'd be curious as to someone else's take on the writing style and content. I mean, is all/most of this supposed to be true or is it really a work of fiction? 8-)

J.F.


Entered at Mon Nov 15 18:35:38 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Rolls Royce Silver Dawn

The Electric Flag and Delaney & Bonnie both had connections with Albert Grossman. Albeit, the latter's was indirectly through the Barry Feinstein photo used for their On Tour with Eric Clapton LP.


Entered at Mon Nov 15 18:30:15 CET 2010 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: re-writing history

Bob Frost: this might interest you.


Entered at Mon Nov 15 18:11:56 CET 2010 from (90.239.82.242)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster ... errr.. Ilkka J.

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Bayou Sam :-)

I forgot to say (maybe because I was sober): Good to see you back in gb!

I hope that many more misstreated and hurt gbers would return: Ragtime, Pher, Dave The Phone Guy, Dave, Kalervo, MattK, Sundog and others. Like PETER V once posted: the list is long.


Entered at Mon Nov 15 17:33:51 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Badfinger

While scampering around on youtbe, I came across some pretty nice footage of this band, and with a pretty good sound.

What a tragic end to a band that was so talented.


Entered at Mon Nov 15 17:29:40 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I was in a (used) record shop today and they were playing The Electric Flag. I tend to put Delaney and Bonnie in the same class … a band where they had everything going for them … except a decent songwriter.

Still, they blew any chance of recruiting Elvis Costello!


Entered at Mon Nov 15 17:24:30 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Delainey & Bonnie with Clapton

This is the kind of stuff I remember from Delainey & Bonnie.


Entered at Mon Nov 15 17:17:49 CET 2010 from (174.89.117.48)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Todd......RTO

Excellent discussion all around this subject...............the beauty of music really....that sometimes it is just a catch in someone's voice or the way they turn a phrase that can turn someone on and make them a believer...........Favourite SRV album was the one his brother put together after his death "The Sky is Crying" ...Least Favourite was the one the two brothers did together........I admire Jimmy Vaughan but never find myself going back to his recordings.................From Left Field..........and from the guilty pleasures department........I find myself unable to turn away from any thing Rihanna does..........almost everything on music television these days is unwatchable....but there is something in her voice and look that I find mesmerizing..........


Entered at Mon Nov 15 17:17:44 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Delainey Bramlett - Shindogs

The history of Delainey & Bonnie is huge & fascinating. Delainey's days on Shindig with Leon Russell and so many more. Bonnie's work from her days with Ike & Tina Turner, and it was really cool that they came together.

A multitude of musicians came and went with those two people.


Entered at Mon Nov 15 17:01:55 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Delaney & Bonnie

Delaney & Bonnie's "Accept No Substitute" was released on Elektra Records. At the time, George Harrison was trying to get them to record for Apple, but they had to be reminded that they were under contract with Elektra. That situation didn't last long at all, as they were quickly booted off the label after Delaney Bramlett threatened to kill Elektra head Jac Holzman. The story was recently retold in the November issue of MOJO magazine, which came with an excellent CD sampler of early Elektra recordings in honor of the label's 60th anniversary.


Entered at Mon Nov 15 16:43:13 CET 2010 from (99.141.26.55)

Posted by:

Adam2

Bayou Sam - Delaney & Bonnie are one of my favorite groups. Their albums are impeccable. I recommend all of them - "Home" (1968) on Stax with Booker T & The MG's as the backing band, "Accept No Substitute" (1969) with Bobby Whitlock/Carl Radle/Leon Russell/etc., "To Bonnie From Delaney" (1970) with Duane Allman/King Curtis/Sneaky Pete/Little Richard, "Motel Shot" (1971) with everyone already mentioned plus Gram Parsons & more, and finally "D&B Together" (1971). My favorites are the first three. Really impeccable...


Entered at Mon Nov 15 16:17:37 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Slowhand Beano

Many guitar afcionados prefer the rich honey tone that Eric Clapton displayed on the 1966 Bluesbreakers LP with John Mayall known as the "Beano" album (named for the comic book Mr. Clapton was reading in the record's cover photo). At the time he was using a 1960 Gibson Les Paul through a Marshall model 1962 combo amp, which featured 2x12" speakers powered by the same amp circuit used for the JTM45 head. The Les Paul was stolen shortly thereafter when Mr. Clapton began playing with Cream. It was recently announced that the Gibson Custom Shop will issue a limited edition reproduction of Clapton's Beano Les Paul next month.


Entered at Mon Nov 15 15:32:32 CET 2010 from (24.47.42.238)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: NY
Web: My link

What's fun about youtube is how you can end up going down all kinds of roads you didn't expect. While looking at Clapton clips I naturally came across some great Delaney and Bonnie stuff. They are a band that I'e long promised myself to delve more into. Maybe now's the time.

Anyway, check out the link for a great clip form the Rosanne show. I've never seen this because I've never really liked Rosanne (the person). I'm not sure if Bonnie was making a cameo appearance or if she was a regular on the show, but she is amazing in this little bit from the end of an episode. The regular cast memebrs look as though they'd never heard her sing, and are understanably stunned.


Entered at Mon Nov 15 15:03:25 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Derek and the Dominos at Bournemouth Pavilion … I have no memory of missing it, and I was probably in London at the time. What's interesting is that the theatre is a comparatively small theatre venue (1200 seats) and it was rare for any kind of name band to play there in those days (now lots do). They were usually at the Winter Gardens (2000 +) and vastly better acoustic. That makes me think they actually played in the ballroom, not the theatre. They could probably have got more in, and the likes of Family played the ballroom around then. Very hard place to get a decent recording though … surrounded by windows which were usually open to admit the sea breeze.


Entered at Mon Nov 15 14:07:46 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.187)

Posted by:

Steve

Subject: Political Useless Information?

Normy, when you say, " political useless information", did you mean, politically useless information? Or did you mean useless, political information? There's a great difference. I read every post and try to understand what people are saying. Yours take longer than most but I always give it a shot.


Entered at Mon Nov 15 12:10:57 CET 2010 from (196.7.230.230)

Posted by:

Nux Schwartz

Location: Durban South Africa
Web: My link

Subject: The Loudness War


Entered at Mon Nov 15 11:20:42 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Yes, Charles is the one that looks more stoned then. I hasten to add that Keith was born four years before the Duke became royalty. Does Keef wear eyeliner on a daily basis, or has he had his lower eyelids tattooed? That's how you can tell them apart.


Entered at Mon Nov 15 10:40:24 CET 2010 from (59.101.61.51)

Posted by:

dlew919

Web: My link

Subject: Prince Keef?

hmmm... and from a Canuckistani paper no less... check the picture ...


Entered at Mon Nov 15 10:29:41 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Keef and Charlie

Separated at birth. Yes, the Prince and the Millionaire rather than the Prince and the Pauper. The interview, done after the new book, “Life” is uncanny. It was a great TV programme with lots of flashbacks to early videos. Keith starts out with National Health crooked teeth, then gradually they become blackened stumps. He’s now sporting a rank of spotlessly white even-sized large choppers which has completely altered his face. Also because he had his hair wrapped in a scarf under a hat, his ears were revealed full on. The wry smile was pure Charles. I think the old Duke might have been putting it about in Dartford!


Entered at Mon Nov 15 08:40:19 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Lost Gonzos

Peter M; Happy that you enjoyed that little bit. You may know as well, that song has been the theme song for "Austin City Limits" for over 20 years now.

It sounds like a great and memorable night you had. My one and only chance I saw Jerry Jeef, was about '87 or '88 I'm not sure at the moment. I lived down in the Vancouver area for a few years then, when I was really doing a lot of bar work, (6-7 nights a week.) A good friend of mine at the time was Harold Kenndal, (ol' weird Harold) Station manager of CKWX radio. Many times he had demo tapes sent to him from Nashville etc. He would give me copies before they were even aired up here. For example there were songs of George Strait, Steve Earl, and many others I had my band playing in bars with me before they were ever really heard up here.

Anyway, one day Harold phones me and says, "We got to get down to the Commodore tonight, can you make it?" The Commodore Ball Room is one of the best small venues in Vancouver to see live shows. Holding around 1000 people. Harold says Jerry Jeff was down here today doing a live interview on Elmer Tippy's show, and he laid four tickets on me. I said hell yeah. This was at a time there when Jerry Jeff had got hiself in a lot of grief with drugs or booze and his band all left him.

A band of my friends opened for him. Jerry Jeff comes out on the stage by himself with just an Ovation guitar. (Because Harold was a friend of Drew who owns the Commodore, and there was a line up for two blocks down the street, we got let in first). We had a table right 5 feet in front of Jerry. He just sat on a stool playing that Ovation, with a beer beside him, and he was sweating and working, I felt, to regain his credibility.

Anyway, he's singing all those songs he wrote, one particular song I've always got sentimental over is "She knows her Daddy sings" he wrote for his daughter. As he was singing this and really doing a great job, as he did of everything he played that night. So during that song Harold nudges me and says look. I looked behind us, the Commodore has a huge dance floor that runs the entire length of the place, and a raised area on each side, where all the tables are. Well the entire dance floor was filled with people. Pretty much every guy was holding his main squeeze in front of him with his arms wrapped around her holding her waiste in front, and they were all swaying to the music as he sang. It was the damnest thing sitting at that table, and being like a party in your family room.

Harold told me after, that Drew said he had 1300 people in there that night. I've seen guys like Don MacLean, or Dylan, or Don Williams hold a crowd like that playing all alone. He played for hours, stopped to go to the washroom, came right back and played a couple more hours. It was up close and personal, and a show I sure enjoyed. Ol' Jerry Jeff really is a regular guy.


Entered at Mon Nov 15 07:21:29 CET 2010 from (75.34.59.36)

Posted by:

Adam2

Never was a fan of Clapton. Between Delaney & Bonnie and the Band, you have two of the original aspects of his solo sound. He doesn't offer much else for me.


Entered at Mon Nov 15 05:43:42 CET 2010 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

The beauty of this little artifact: it's before the album was recorded.

Bob Frost, you should check out Peter Viney's article on The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down in the Library section of this website. It would help you update your piece very nicely.


Entered at Mon Nov 15 05:40:59 CET 2010 from (76.99.245.65)

Posted by:

Peter M

Location: by the pond

Subject: Jerry Jeff Walker memories

Norm, thanks for the reference to, and the link to London Homesick Blues, played on Texas Connection 15-16 years or so ago by Gary P. Nunn joining Jerry Jeff and most of the Gonzo Compadres (where was Freddie Krc, I must ask?). I was hungerin' for some JJW material all this weekend, and this tasty little morsel just hit the spot. In 1993 I wanted to see Jerry Jeff and company. Since he no longer played the Phila area, we got tickets for the Birchmere, in Alexandria, Va. My wife was supposed to join me and my brother in law, but she had to cancel due to our toddler son being sick. Well we had packed enough cookies for three, and ended up splitting it only two ways. As we neared the venue, my brother in law, John, kept asking if it was a safe neighborhood, and, if so, why were all these police cars present at every corner? When we sat down, there was a table 10 feet from ours with "Reserved" signs on it. Guys in London Fog coats were walking around talking into their sleeves. I told John that, "If that asshole Marion Barry shows up, we're outta here!". Lights went down, there was a low murmur from next to us, and Jerry Jeff led off with "Hi, Buckaroos!", and launched into "Gettin' By". Near us, singing along were a couple of the most recognizable haircuts in the world, in silouette. Bill & Hillary, Al & Tipper. They had a blast, joining in on singalongs like the aforementioned "London Homesick Blues", "Up Against the Wall, Redneck Mother", and even obscure stuff like "I Feel Like Hank Williams Tonight". The band played so well, Cosmic Bob Livingston was giggling and quipping, John Inmon played beautifully, soaring with his eyes closed, playing the prettiest I've ever heard him play, and Freddie was the (2nd) best drummer in the world that night. For a taste of how they played, I recommend Jerry Jeff's "Night After Night" CD, recorded at the same venue a little late in that year. We couldn't undue the effects of the Denerlike "baked goods" so we just had to laugh and enjoy it. My buddy & I were at the end of a row of tables that ran vertically up to the stage. They were at the end of the line, 2 tables away. Walking past their seats to get to the bathroom, the bottom of my sports coat brushed Clinton's elbow. I was nervous and exhilarated (exHillaryated?) at the same time, terrified I'd get tackled by Secret Service. When the night was over we were overwhelmed with a feeling of "Did that really happen?". Good times.


Entered at Mon Nov 15 04:59:11 CET 2010 from (24.47.42.238)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: NY
Web: My link

Subject: back to Clapton

Talking about the subject of which guitar people prefer him on is interesting. Here's a live clip of him on the hollow-body (335?), and he's absolutely tearing it up on the same Derek/Dominoes song I posted below. IMO this is Eric when he is totally "in the zone". Love it.


Entered at Mon Nov 15 04:54:44 CET 2010 from (24.47.42.238)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: NY

OUOTE: Ilkka Jauramo = “On a serious side: for a couple of years ago the long time signature BAYOU SAM posted here about someone who had sent a message to Levon Helm's website containing pro-Robbie parts of Sam's posts in this gb. That someone had - according to the signature - even included his more or less passive emailaddress which he used in early years and signed as Bayou Sam. Just wondering...”

Though I haven’t been posted much at all the last couple of years, I have been posting as “Bayou Sam” since the days of the first GB. Since the great Rick Danko was till with us in fact. I used to frequent the chat-room on a regular basis and picked the nickname “Bayou Sam” after I saw other posters using Band names. I make no secret of the fact that I am actually Tom from NY.

I think that the incident you are referring to was when someone posted some trash-talk on Levon’s site and had the balls to use my handle. It was NOT me and I went to great lengths and several emails with the people that run Levon’s site to make it quite clear that I had nothing to do with it. They were very nice and I felt that they completely accepted my innocence.

I was right in the middle of many Levon/Robbie “discussions” in the past but I always tried my hardest to not drag it to the level that caused the first GB to shut down. I always found the subject interesting, and though I have opinions on it I remain a big fan of both men and have no reason to trash either one. In fact, I am so thrilled to see where Levon has come since the days where Butch was giving us daily reports on Levon’s progress, and it wasn’t certain he would/could EVER sing again.

So –yeah, it’s me. I’m glad you asked just in case there are any posters who also remember that ugliness regarding Levon’s site and maybe think ill of me.

I didn’t do it 


Entered at Mon Nov 15 04:44:08 CET 2010 from (59.101.61.51)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Peter V: separated at birth?

Have we ever seen Keef and Charles together?

Live Aid, but... did anyone see them together?...

Rob: I've said it before: A tele - you got to work a little harder, but the effort's worth it. A strat fits into you, you can do anything: I love the Strat, but I think Robbie's (and Clapton's, and ... et cetera) change in style is because the Strat is just easier to play... something is lost, though - I agree with you there.


Entered at Mon Nov 15 04:22:44 CET 2010 from (59.101.61.51)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Road Kill Cafe ...

There's one in Darwin: motto - you kill 'em, we grill em. Buffalo, Emu, Kangaroo, crocodile. All rather tasty, (one is tough... emu, maybe?)


Entered at Mon Nov 15 01:06:10 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Great Keith Richards interview on TV tonight. Weird thing is, if you turn the sound down and look at the smile, the ears and the gesture, you'd think it was Prince Charles. Even with the sound up, it wasn't far off. Bobby Keys was praising him saying he'd played with hundreds of guitarists, but not one like Keith Richards.


Entered at Mon Nov 15 00:53:59 CET 2010 from (75.34.59.36)

Posted by:

Adam2

Ring Your Bell was played a handful of times in 1976, I believe.


Entered at Sun Nov 14 23:50:11 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Hello in There

Lard Tunderin' Jasus!....I slip away for a few hours to cut a load of fire wood. Meantime some one lets that gawd damn farmer out of that chicken coup so that he's abusin' cyberspace again.

You thought?? you've never really had a thought. The way I hear it, yer kids 'er some one does all this research with Jiam Gomeshi & all other internet sources making notes. Then when yer done shoveling manure outside, (and yer allowed at the computer.) You coming in here pounding away, usually spewing all this political useless information, thinking that everyone is gonna go......

WOW!!!!! Look at that cave man go.........he sho' is hep ain't he........ride daddy........ride!


Entered at Sun Nov 14 23:38:40 CET 2010 from (83.82.232.6)

Posted by:

The Mad Arab

Location: The Netherlands

Subject: Ring Your Bell!

Hello everyone, I'm currently really into "Ring Your Bell", have they ever performed it live, or should I add it to the list that includes Daniel & The Sacred Harp and Jupiter Hollow?


Entered at Sun Nov 14 22:54:52 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: (The) Robert E. Lee

Bob, great piece. Interesting to note the comment that Joan Baez inserted "the" in front of Robert E Lee to allude to the riverboat not the General. I have always heard it as THE Robert E. Lee...have a listen to the original again and see if you cant hear Levon "suggesting" it as if in natural conversation. I reckon it always was the boat......


Entered at Sun Nov 14 21:21:48 CET 2010 from (76.254.59.153)

Posted by:

Bob Frost

Location: Oakland, California
Web: My link

Subject: A New History Website that discusses the Band

I'm launching a Website this week called HistoryAccess.com with more than 100 history and biography articles aimed at the general reading public including "A Few Fine Pop Songs Immersed in History." Not much doubt in my mind what song had to be first on the list! I invite you to visit at the link above.


Entered at Sun Nov 14 20:47:28 CET 2010 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Jan H

Thank you for the "museum". This particular patron of the arts appreciates all the time and love devoted to this place.

The fact that at least 2 generations of musicians and listeners hark back to The Band is evidence of their lasting influence. Here we sit almost 35 years after they disbanded and we are still discussing and dissecting them. Your web page is a treasure trove for all the "New" The Band fans (and many old ones too.

So thank you.


Entered at Sun Nov 14 18:36:16 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.191)

Posted by:

Steve

Subject: I

Normy, at first I thought, cool, a youngster working in a garage who is into the Band's music. Then I thought, wait a minute this is Normy calling somebody, a young guy.

Now, if it was Todd, say, who referred to someone as a young guy, I'd probably be safe assuming he was talking about someone in their 20's, possibly. But coming from you you could be talking about someone older than ME! Someone who's age might only be accurately arrived at through carbon dating.

Then I began to look at the whole tire garage experience you had in a different light. Maybe the " young guy" turned up the radio because he's losing his hearing and wanted to be able to actually hear the radio.

The dropping of the wrench may have just been a reaction to severe arthritic hand pain.

Tell, me Normy, was this a radio station dedicated to oldies as opposed to an oldies station that plays older music? You can tell me Normy, it's Sunday and we're probably alone here. Now be honest.


Entered at Sun Nov 14 18:21:22 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: London Homesick Blues

Well there is bars & bands & songs called Road Kill Cafe.

Gettin' back to England swings and pickers from over there, my kind of music puts Mark Knophler at the top and Jimmy Page. The most fun ever was the Willie & the Poor Boys concerts, with Bill Wyman's collection of musicians.

But this song of Gary P Nunn's shows his impressions of London......now this is a party.


Entered at Sun Nov 14 18:19:10 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I've got a "Road Kill Cafe: Alaska" T-shirt with a list of delicacies. Bought it in 1994, I think!


Entered at Sun Nov 14 17:58:25 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Road Kill Cafe

That's what it's called over here. Started out many years ago. If you remember, Louden Wainwright the third's, "Dead Skunk in the Middle of the Road".

I got a real funny story 'bout that song. Many years ago, when I fished commercially with my fish boat every summer. When the fishing shut down every week, (we only got a few days of the week to fish). We would all end up in the fish camps for the rest of the week. Doing maintainance, mending nets etc. Of course out would come the instruments along with bottles. We'd all play.

There was a very tiny Japanese guy from Steveston whose name was "Beanie". Now picture this, Beanie played the banjo, sang with a lisp and drank copious amounts of Crown Royal rye. So here you have a little Japanese guy sitting on a pile of gillnet half pissed playing his banjo and screaming, "There's a dead thkunk in the middle of the road!".........J guess you had to be there. Sadly Beanie drank way to much rye one time, and while out in a river canoing with one of his mates fell out of the canoe and was washed away and drown.

It seems to me there is some songs about the "Road Kill Cafe"


Entered at Sun Nov 14 14:01:45 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Rook pie

Rob, have you read “Germania” by Simon Winder? I haven’t myself, but will when Mrs V finishes our copy. At present she merely reads out a line every five minutes or so and they’re all hilarious. It’s a huge history of Germany.

I looked up Electric Wizard. Apparently they started in Wimborne. It’s the home town of Robert Fripp, but now best known for its Morris Dancing festival. I was in Wimborne yesterday morning and didn’t see any rooks, so maybe they have all been eaten. We’ve got plenty left in Poole and we’re only 8 miles away, so they’ll be coming here next. They can have any rooks they want as long as they take the magpies too. The magpies can be seen on every road feeding on squashed squirrel. The nut hiding season makes the little buggers reckless and they get run over in droves. Hence this is gourmet dinner season for magpies. They’ll be nice and plump.


Entered at Sun Nov 14 13:37:05 CET 2010 from (86.183.226.29)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: German heavy metallers - in the kitchen!

Now, here's a thing: though generally I stick to Mojo or Uncut when considering monthly mags, I picked up Classic Rock today having noted a "making of Born to Run" Brucefest and also a piece on criminally underrated Brumsters of note The Move. A December issue so no surprise that there is a freebie 2011 calendar chucked in for good measure.

Now, I love Germany. I love the simplicity of hearty fare and a big mug of beer to wash it down with, I love the Black Forest, the Rhineland, Bavaria...I always look forward to a week in the Fatherland. Not on my list of reasons for liking Germany, however, is the native brand of heavy metal (not that this genre dislike is limited to the homegrown acts of Germany, mind!) but I have to say that the Fatherland has come up trumps in this years Classic Rock calendar.

For the calendar is a heavy metal cookbook with recipes from our big-haired, pointy-guitared brethren the world over. Worthy of note is the Blood Red Beans and Rice dish from New Orleans metal act Eyehategod and - Peter V please note - Dorset native Liz Buckingham of Electric Wizard has submitted a delicious looking ROOK Pie - but Germany wins with a hearty roast and a nice cake - as you would expect from such a nation. Interesting too that the fellas have trumped the ladies in the culinary stakes: be-leathered minx Doro Pesch (played havoc with many a teenage hormone in my school, did Doro) has contributed an authentic Black Forest Cake (yes, cake - not poxy Gateau - it is Schwarzwaldkuchen on home turf, after all) but what is this? 1 package of "chocolate cake mix" as an ingredient. Tsssk! But I bet it is lovely by the time you add all the fresh cherries and kirschwasser.

Hats off to Udo Dirkschneider of Accept, then: Roast beef with green beans! The beef cooked first in a big pan to sear all the sides of the joint, then smothered in a tarragon, rosemary and thyme butter and finished off in the oven making a delicious herby crust. Udo suggests green beans first boiled then seared in a pan with spring onions and rosemary as a side serving, but don't throw the oil away yet because he also throws some chopped garlic in and fries some croutons at the same time. Mmm-mm!

You can damn near forgive them for pointy guitars and unnecessary loyalty to spandex after that.


Entered at Sun Nov 14 12:39:46 CET 2010 from (86.183.226.29)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Location: Wherever I lay my MacBook is my home....

Subject: Clapton/guitars/SRV etc

Some good points made about Clapton, particularly about how the choice of guitar influences his playing. Would definitely agree that EC on a 335 is the real EC and liked the cutting tone of the Firebird in Blind Faith.

The Stratocaster is indeed a jack of all trades - but a master of none. To come back to our own guys, Robbie's shift from a Tele to a Strat around '73 signalled a shift in attitude: much more soloing, less pretty little fills. Whichever you prefer, it can always be argued that the original feel was lost to a certain extent.

Micky Jones from the Welsh psychedelic band Man (who sadly passed away this year after an enforced early retirement following complications from a brain tumour) was another example: all through the seventies he played a Gibson SG thru' an old Echoplex tape delay. A real fat, mellow and very languid tone. Switched to a Strat in the eighties and it wasn't quite the same. Still Micky, still brilliant - but the original feel was lost in favour of the glassy textures that a Strat suggests to the player.

For every yin there is yang, naturally. Given his technique and feel Richard Thompson is one player that springs to mind whose switch from a Les Paul to a Strat was just the ticket - Fenders are far better for picking; Gibsons are too powerful and thus some clarity is lost. Likewise Jorma Kaukonen, when taking Hot Tuna into the electric era around '71 he wisely chose a Strat for his electrification of fingerpicked country blues rather than one of his trusty old Gibson Stereo 355s that were his squeeze in Jefferson Airplane.

And so to SRV. I do wonder if I might have enjoyed him a bit more if he'd have gone for a nice old Gretsch or something else to get away from that Strat tone; but I fear it is as JQ said: I just don't need any more blues guitar heroics in my life: SRV, Gary Moore even Joe Bonamassa who is reckoned to be excellent. Much sooner hear Ray Lamontagne or The Sadies these days!


Entered at Sun Nov 14 12:36:38 CET 2010 from (79.202.171.47)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Mickey


Entered at Sun Nov 14 12:32:47 CET 2010 from (90.239.74.124)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: the pier

Subject: Museum? I'm in, for sure!

westcoaster: the scientists say that we Finns have more CroMagnon genes than other Europeans. When I am in a good mood and connected to the internet (doesn't happen too often and not necessarily simultaneously) I might even post my beloved Siberian Mammouth slow-food stew receipt to in this gb.


Entered at Sun Nov 14 10:52:50 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: left hand / Clapton / Britsoul

Norm … there’s a bit in the McCartney biography about Paul teaching the bass part of “I Wanna Be Your Man” to Bill Wyman. Paul just picked up Wyman’s bass , turned it upside down and left handed and started playing effortlessly.

461 Ocean Boulevard is my favourite Clapton album.

Brit soul. Today’s Sunday Times adds to the discussion inadvertently. It has an article on Phil Collins, whose “Going Back” album of mainly Motown covers is, it says, number one in several countries. It’s backed by three of the Funk Brothers. Anyway, it quotes Quincy Jones, who after Collins’ Montreaux set this year said:

“This man is not from London. This brother is from the south side of Chicago.”

Quincy’s enthusiasm on the day may have been a little excessive.


Entered at Sun Nov 14 10:10:50 CET 2010 from (59.101.61.51)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Clapton...

'Journeyman' and 'Unplugged' (taking out the version of layla, which I can't stand) are both good (even great) albums..

Todd: I agree with you wholeheartedly.


Entered at Sun Nov 14 08:39:06 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Well.......Anyway

Thanks Todd, I finally got a belly laugh. Hell I couldn't resist it when it came to "Dressing Down" singers from "over there".

I wonder if you guys noticed something from Clapton's playing those early days you are referring to. When he's getting into that blues mode, he's playing a 335 Gibson as BB does. A total difference with that guitar and those Hummbuckers.

There is a youtube clip of him playing "The Thrill is Gone with BB. He's playing a Strat, and even SRV playing with Albert King, with Paul between them on his harp SRV playing a Strat, (tho' I think he's far bluesier than EC, I don't think a Strat is a blues guitar at all.

It's pretty funny, in comments below that video some fool has made a comment that it's sick because Albert King plays a Gibson Flying V left handed, upside down strings. It's a guitar that Billy Gibbons had made for him for his 65th birthday. I guess Billie would get a kick out of that stupid remark. I know several guys who play a right hand guitar upside down and backwards like that.

Some of that earlier stuff of Derek & The D's was alright, but not being a real great fan of the blues to begin with, it never did a lot for me. Those 10 minute guitar solos playing the same ribbit solos over & over just gets boring & annoying. I think EC just gets too into himself in the later years trying to over power everyone he plays with. It loses the feel of the music.

Gawd damn it! I went to bed..........couldn't sleep 'cause I knew Todd said something here! Actually I got up to come and look for something else down here and.........you guys.


Entered at Sun Nov 14 08:30:21 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Folksingers Choice

When I said "it's on amazon" I meant the CD is for sale officially.


Entered at Sun Nov 14 08:28:22 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I was listening to “Folksingers Choice” yesterday, the Dylan radio show recorded just before his first album. It’s on amazon and in very clear quality. The interviews with Cynthia Gooding are fun, though she’s drooling over him with extreme enthusiasm. It’s the source tape for many of the lies reported in biographies. He was an awful little fibber, going to lengths where even the very keen Cynthia began to smell a rat. He describes his six years working in a carnival, working the ferris wheel and dealing with the elephant lady, and Cynthia starts to work it out. “But you’re twenty, and you claim to have been a singer for three years, so how …” He keeps up the story though (he skipped a lot of school, he says). Anyway, highly recommended. He denies writing folk songs, saying he writes “contemporary songs” and he also plays a lot of blues, much more than folk stuff. I thought “Fixin’ To Die” beats the recorded version because of its urgency. Very fine “Death of Emmett Till” too. He also happily admits to stealing melodies from other singers.


Entered at Sun Nov 14 07:41:57 CET 2010 from (69.182.73.68)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT
Web: My link

Subject: Clapton - Hard Times

OK, Last one and then I'll let it rest.....Besides Norm's probably chomping at the bit to post some more Boy George videos. ;-)

Link above is to a performance to David Sanborn's excellent show called Night Music. This is Clapton singing 'Hard Times' from around 1988 or 1989. Yeah, I know it's not Stevie or Richard, but I still like it.


Entered at Sun Nov 14 07:29:18 CET 2010 from (69.182.73.68)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT
Web: My link

Subject: Five Long Years

Performance of Clapton doing 'Five Long Years' from Japan 2001. Good quality audience video that has a rawness and energy in his performance that doesn't always show up in Clapton's commercially produced videos. Plus he always seems to play better in Japan.


Entered at Sun Nov 14 07:13:21 CET 2010 from (69.182.73.68)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT
Web: My link

Subject: Clapton With Delaney and Bonnie

The above link is Clapton singing ‘I Don’t Know Why’ from a performance with Delaney and Bonnie. The video quality is kind of poor, but there’s just something about his vocal on this performance that really grabs me, and shows a soulful side of Clapton that doesn’t always surface. This song is on his first solo album and sounds fine, but the live version linked above is better. Yes, it’s not Otis Redding, but it does have soul.


Entered at Sun Nov 14 07:03:23 CET 2010 from (69.182.73.68)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT
Web: My link

Subject: Clapton and SRV

Bayou Sam, Thanks for the link to Derek and the Dominos. It’s the album that turned me into a serious Clapton fan. I also rank his Bluesbreakers period highly.

Kevin J. I get what you’re saying about Clapton. But there are times that I’ve (just speaking for myself) definitely felt it coming from him. I’m also a big fan of SRV, although I listen to him much less than I used to. I’ve got all of his albums. He’s definitely the real deal. And I think that if I found the most moving Clapton track, and compared it to the most moving SRV track, Stevie would probably come out slightly ahead. His live version of ‘Texas Flood’ from Montreaux in 1982 is a fine example of what he brings to the blues both instrumentally and vocally. I also enjoy his performances from Austin City Limits that you mentioned. Another great SRV live video is from his performance at the El Mocombo from 1983. The version of Texas Flood linked above is from that show. As good as his Montreaux performance was, I think the El Mocombo show is even better. His playing is more fluid and dynamic. The intro is fairly standard, but check out his flurry of notes at the 52-second mark in the above clip. He really shows his creativity and what set him apart from other blues guitarists. That type of playing is where he moved on from trying to be Albert King, and became Stevie Ray Vaughn.

Where I think Clapton has the edge, is in his versatility and variety. It’s also the thing that’s confounded his fans over the years. It doesn’t always work, but that willingness to try different styles is what has led to his success over the years.

His fame is primarily due to his guitar chops, but ironically, I think that Clapton really shows his soulfulness with his singing. He doesn’t have the pipes of a Stevie Winwood or a Richard Manuel, but he works well within his limitations. And that’s where I think you can sometimes hear the Soul Singer that’s trapped in his body emerge.

I’ll link to a Clapton performance in another post that illustrates that point.


Entered at Sun Nov 14 05:14:40 CET 2010 from (71.62.141.173)

Posted by:

Charlie Young

Location: Down in Old Virginny

Subject: The Wiyos Cover "Ophelia"

The retro Americana group called The Wiyos (they opened the Willie Nelson-John Mellencamp-Bob Dylan tour a while back) recently released two limited-edition live CDs of which only 300 copies of each were pressed. One of the tracks is from one of the shows with Dylan, their really interesting old-timey arrangement of "Ophelia." I like it a lot.


Entered at Sun Nov 14 04:55:44 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: Kevin/JQ (Re: Eric, SRV and the blues in general)

Kevin, I know what you mean about the "anybody over 55 will not like SRV rule" and the reasoning you give behind it. For myself, I am 36 years old and just don't think he's up there with Bloomfield, Johnny Winter or Roy Buchanan.

I love Jimmy Vaughan, though - taste and economy to the fore, great tone, a sense of an arrangement.

JQ - A good point well made on EC. I gave 461 as a yardstick of what the last decent studio album was but yes, would agree that you could probably draw a line in the sand after Derek era or at least the Rainbow concert. Funnily enough I spent my teens glues to dad's old Cream LPs and thought they were the best thing since bottled chips but these days that whole self-indulgent "every man for himself" sound and attitude bores me sh*tless. It's stuff like the first solo album or the D&D albums that I appreciate most though. Thank heave Big Pink came out and ushered in the change of tactic that led to I Looked Away and did for the likes of Toad!

I think you are quite right to stay away from pure blues. Done to death, and then some more!


Entered at Sun Nov 14 03:46:29 CET 2010 from (24.108.12.129)

Posted by:

Bonk

Subject: dlew

Yeah, Yeah dude looks like a lady.


Entered at Sun Nov 14 02:39:46 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Subject: I shot the farmer.........but I did not shoot the Depity

To answer your question Lars.


Entered at Sun Nov 14 02:17:38 CET 2010 from (59.101.61.51)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Lars: aerosmith have sung about it...

But the mind boggles.... I think I need to go lie down... :)


Entered at Sun Nov 14 01:37:44 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: You think??

Well.....his mascarra was running so much, it's all over my gawd damn monitor.


Entered at Sun Nov 14 01:12:14 CET 2010 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: The lonesome pine tree

Subject: "Hatred is only disappointed love"

I wonder what would happen if you two were stuck in an elevator together. The mind reels.


Entered at Sun Nov 14 00:31:08 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: OH! GOLLY ! GEE!

You think we don't all know that farmer??? It was a joke ....see.........J-O-K-E you are as dumb as Joe's dog's ass.

Your whole great big speel was just......spinnin' yer tires. There is other things to listen to on the radio too ....y'know. Other day at Kal Tire, I stopped to talk to a guy about something. The shop radio was playing away..one of our local stations. All of a sudden "Life is a Carnival" starts playing. This young guy working on a car on the hoist drops his wrench, scurries right over to the radio & cranks it up!.

But you keep on tryin'...to........catch up.


Entered at Sun Nov 14 00:16:59 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.189)

Posted by:

Steve

Norm, the fact they mutated into various forms 35 years ago is completely irrelevant as far as influence on music today not to mention the timeless quality of their best stuff. Bach has been gone a lot longer and he's still a going concern for many people.

I'm guessing you don't listen to Jian Ghomeshi's program, Q. The best culture gabfest on radio. But if you did, as I do, almost every day during the week for at least part of the show, you'd be amazed by the number of groups in their 20's who know the Band, their music and the special qualities that they brought to the music.

I've stopped being surprised by the number of mentions they get and by from what people.

This week just out of curiosity I counted the number of times The Band or individual members came up during the week.

In five shows the Band were cited 3 times by guest musicians and Garth got 5 individual mentions, mostly for his new album of Band songs and his collaboration with Toronto singer songwriter, Doug Paisley on his second album, Constant Companion. Paisley is a guy to watch.

The only other band that compares with The Band in this respect on Q is Radio Head.


Entered at Sat Nov 13 21:57:16 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Museum!

So we're basically a bunch a dinousaurs and cromagnauns uh? Well being as we are fans of a BAND that has not existed for about 35 years, isn't that rather fitting?


Entered at Sat Nov 13 21:14:40 CET 2010 from (85.255.44.145)

Posted by:

jh

Subject: Test

Just modified some CGI stuff to keep up with new versions of the serverside software. And it all still works! Rather amazing for a 15+ year old code base. A museum, this is now. Which is kind of nice. Still haunted by trolls old and new, too... We'll keep the museum open, though, put some new stuff in every now and then and let regulars and new visitors leave their comments here. Thanks to the contributors, as always.


Entered at Sat Nov 13 19:52:31 CET 2010 from (166.129.139.89)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: EC and me

I think I was the perfect age and attitude (17 in '67) for Cream. I was a mad fan, especially for the live stuff. For me Clapton then was pure passion. And post-Cream, I think the leads on his 1st solo record, the S Still's track "Go Back Home" and Layla are top-notch. I never got to see Cream but I did hear them from the sidewalk outside the Whiskey- A- Go Go and I got to see Derek & the Ds and was in a gobsmacked daze for days afterwards. But that was the wrap up for me and EC. I was really looking forward to his return with the 461 Ocean deal but was unhappy with the lack of passion on that one and most everything since. In hindsight now it seems my early interest was due to my age, a lack of a developed taste for Blues-based music and maybe the way music sounded whilst reefering. And that EC was mostly just messing around in Cream and/or his junkie status provided the requisite lift. But it worked for me then big-time and occasionally still does. And always at top volume. As an aside, my taste for live record jams changed from Cream as soon as I heard the Allman Bros live album, in 1971 I think.

That's my lot. These days I'm done with Blues guitar - so damn boring - and guitar leads generally. I think my favorite lead instrument now is the trombone or bass clarinet - some geezered taste, eh?


Entered at Sat Nov 13 19:25:12 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Paying Attention

I'm so broke, I can't even afford to PAY attention. Well yeah Pat, I don't play Mo town around my place that much, but after looking at a youtube performance of long ago, the late 60's come back to me and I remember that. You are right of course.

I remember Jimmy Ruffin, as being some where between Smokie Robinson and Lou Rawls in sound, as back at that time I was trealy into those two guys.

You see on youtube here those young guys from Ireland "Westlife" who have had quite a career. I recall the first time I really heard them on radio, and it was that song. I thought who in hell is that? For some kids from Ireland they do it quite well.


Entered at Sat Nov 13 14:16:33 CET 2010 from (90.239.75.126)

Posted by:

Ilkka Jauramo

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Bayou Sam

On a serious side: for a couple of years ago the long time signature BAYOU SAM posted here about someone who had sent a message to Levon Helm's website containing pro-Robbie parts of Sam's posts in this gb. That someone had - according to the signature - even included his more or less passive emailaddress which he used in early years and signed as Bayou Sam. Just wondering...


Entered at Sat Nov 13 13:41:28 CET 2010 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Link is to Jimi doing 'Tears of Rage'.


Entered at Sat Nov 13 13:35:50 CET 2010 from (90.239.75.126)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: the pier

Subject: What the blues is all "aboot"

Yes, Lars, when your dog won't recognize you anymore, when your spose has escaped with the girl next door, when your Windows says: "Quantitative Undependaple Error In Cluster 1000110010100", when your vinyl LP turntable is running backwards... Yes there is only one thing to do: To join THE BAND WEBSITE BLUES:

(C) The emphasis is still on content and well-organized quality information

(F) Yes I said the emphasis is still on content and well-organized quality information

(C) Hmmm...fa-fafa-fa gfagf9yeeah

(G7) Ohhhhh Lord will I never gonna loooosee

(C) This BAND WEBSITE BLUES

/Fades away... just like we :-)


Entered at Sat Nov 13 13:31:43 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Translation

Crazy old fart! OK Pat, I gotta Listen.........but anyway...he does look a lot like the farmer......same makeup.

My cousin sent me an e mail last night, seeing as it was Rememberance Day.......about how the music "Taps" came about, and the words. Does anyone recall? I saw this a long time ago. I guess it's true.


Entered at Sat Nov 13 12:01:49 CET 2010 from (90.239.97.147)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: westcoaster's Rockin' Chair thread

Gawd Damn it westcoaster......It's time we shared a rockin' chair. Every time I'm pissing in the wind I think of you.

....or maybe I missunderstood the thread once again?


Entered at Sat Nov 13 08:13:11 CET 2010 from (68.198.46.146)

Posted by:

George

Subject: Rubicon Series on AMC

Was the best programme on telly this past year, closely followed by Mad Men. Shame on AMC for cancelling Rubicon.


Entered at Sat Nov 13 06:46:42 CET 2010 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

No one has come near Jimmy Ruffin on that tune, and Derek & The Dominoes is almost as good as it gets.


Entered at Sat Nov 13 04:34:46 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Pissin' in the Wind

Gawd Damn it Lars......It's time we shared a pint. Every time I listen to Rockin' Chair I think of you.

Well shit Carl. I understand we're all a little different. I used to grimace at that every time I heard him. I convinced myself that it was because of the look and what it represented. So I got to like a few of those tunes after I made myself get past that.

When you compare it to Joan Osborne, she's so good, it's lacking. Joan of course also has the advantage of those MoTown, gawd damn Funk Brothers.

Hunh!.........Carl, I think you're just a gawd damn red neck like me. Any way Sammy I'm never gonna agree about Clapton. He's contrived, a fake with good hands. I just watched him playing the breeze with JJ Cale again a few minutes ago.

This is my sons take after watching it with me a while back. Shit, even JJ with those busted up old arthritic fingers of his plays more soul into that song. Which reminds me, I got to rock that kid up side his head with some knuckles for that crack about old arthritic fingers. Gawd damn upstart whipper snapper.

Eric Clapton is generic clinacly perfect and clean with no soul...........but he plays real well. Today I found myself humming a song that Bobby Darin wrote back in 1969. Now Lars, you and all those old 'Nam vets will remember this real well.

Come and sing a simple song of freedom,

Sing it like you've never sung before.

Let it fill the air, tell the people every where,

We the people here don't want no war......this has never changed.


Entered at Sat Nov 13 03:52:28 CET 2010 from (24.47.42.238)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Web: My link

Ahh Prarie shit. I meant to make that a direct link
Hopefully this will do it.


Entered at Sat Nov 13 03:50:36 CET 2010 from (24.47.42.238)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: NY

Subject: Slowhand

QUOTE: Todd…
"A lot of Clapton can come off as bland and repetitive, but at his core, there's a blues and passion that sometimes surfaces....and is genuine."

Nicely said Todd. Here’s a GREAT example IMO – when EC was “tremblin’ in pain” for Pattie Harrison (his best friends wife).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QUhWQOj3I1I&feature=related


Entered at Sat Nov 13 02:47:23 CET 2010 from (24.108.12.129)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: Soul?

Sorry Norm. But I don't have to look at who's singing it. I puke when I hear him sing this song. Some of his other stuff, ahh, not bad. Go on youtube and listen to Nathan East sing 'can't find my way home' I know he's not from over there any more but I heard he was born there. Cheers, Carl


Entered at Sat Nov 13 02:29:37 CET 2010 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: Arggg.

Subject: We've taken the GB!!!

Avast Norm, I'm with ye!! Until you've bellied up to the taffrail and blown your guts owt into the cold 'eartless sea of whitecaps...YEW don't know what the blues err ABOOT!!!



Entered at Sat Nov 13 01:02:42 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: The Brits that Can't Sing

Well I'm not so sure about that.....again it's all in taste. Try to play this and listen, and not look at who it is..........it's kinda like lookin at the farmer.

I've always thought this is a pretty good voice no matter what. Lets face it. There are voices on this continent, that have become very popular that still make some of us cring or howl at the moon.

There is another youtube video, back here somewhere. Ican't think of the name of the song at the moment. Rod Stewart, Sting and Bryan, that's BRYAN.....Kevin Adams. They do a good job together, and it is soul.

Some of the look down your nose crowd here, like to think they are the experts to define SOUL! So, I want to see yer gawd damn credentials showin' me what makes y'all such outstanding authorities!!.........bunch a gawd damn land lubber piss ants.


Entered at Sat Nov 13 00:11:27 CET 2010 from (75.34.51.94)

Posted by:

Adam2

I feel dumb having to explain myself here, but yes, I have an older brother who is also a big music fan and uses my laptop occasionally. I don't think he's posted much before this debacle. Neither of us are "angry teenagers", nor are we the same person like the resident forum detective suggested earlier (though I'll meet you halfway and say that my brother can be a real jerk.) I'm kind of pissed at him as I always figured my reputation here was alright - I try to keep my posts here fairly worthwhile (when I do post.)

Anyway, for those who are interested... I saw Dr. John last Monday in a small room in Evanston. Phenomenal show. It was a thrill to be an inch away from the Dr. as he walked through the crowd. I'm still feeling the gris-gris.


Entered at Fri Nov 12 23:37:25 CET 2010 from (59.101.61.51)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Bill M; fair comment - scratched.

So how about we put Roger Daltrey and David Bowie instead?


Entered at Fri Nov 12 20:58:09 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.188)

Posted by:

Steve

Subject: The End?

Peter, I bet Crist just doesn't want to slam the Door on his way out of office. Florida; state or a legalized Ponzi Scheme?

Bob's Your Organ, thanks for the NRBQ video, I haven't seen them play since 73 or 74. Splendid.

Sadavid, or Montana Slim yodeling in The Rockies.


Entered at Fri Nov 12 19:52:00 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I didn't know that Christ had returned and was governing Florida. Predictable choice. Hot, palm trees, lots of white-painted buildings. Have they moved the governor's mansion to Celebration? Walt will be delighted. However, I'm writing right away to implore him NOT to pardon Jim Morrison for "pointing Percy at the public" as they say. I quite believe those websites that say it was all a set-up and he didn't really point Percy at the public, but "The End" certainly removes any plea for clemency or pardon.


Entered at Fri Nov 12 19:46:08 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Leslie simulators. A friend had one powered by a washing machine motor. Hoover was apparently better than Hotpoint. I was dubious having been in the kitchen when a Hoover washing machine caught fire, but he swore by them. He reckoned the speaker he fitted was superior too, and the homemade cabinet weighed way more than a Lesley. It sounded good (in memory) but the noise was a problem in quiet numbers.But, hey, in those days, who had quiet numbers.


Entered at Fri Nov 12 19:45:27 CET 2010 from (81.156.61.223)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland
Web: My link

Subject: Beatles in scotland

Interesting article about the Beatles' links with Scotland.


Entered at Fri Nov 12 19:25:51 CET 2010 from (81.156.61.223)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Deep South West of Scotland

Subject: Favourite solo artist and group

I have no doubt, after a poll I did with myself, that my favourite solo act is 'Bob Dylan' and my favourite band is 'The Band'. No doubt at all.

Just now, my favourite album is 'Stage Fright'. A truly great album.

Looking forward to the Chess documemtary tonight on the telly.


Entered at Fri Nov 12 19:16:43 CET 2010 from (81.156.61.223)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: The Deep South of Auchtermuchty

Subject: Great British Musicians

In my humble CD collection, about 900, these are the bands from the UK which score the most. You'll enjoy any of them Tom

1. John Martyn - over 25 albums there.(Scottish genius)

2. The Beatles - complete.(many links with scotland)

3. Average White Band - complete apart from My Ding a Ling (Scottish)

4. Dr Feelgood - greatest R n B band ever. You want to see pub rock in a pub, Tom.

5. Joe Cocker

6. Sandy Denny

7. The Rolling Stones - still great. (one of the Rolling Stones was Scottish)

8. Joe Cocker

9. Frankie Miller (Scottish

10. Rab Noakes (Scottish)

11. Michael Marra (Scottish)

But I really like American and Canadian music.


Entered at Fri Nov 12 18:55:03 CET 2010 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Siblings

I guess you could say that they are just one big dysfunctional family.


Entered at Fri Nov 12 18:48:49 CET 2010 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: authentically, yours

To say a performance is "authentic" is to say that it has a preponderance of features that are consistent with a particular idiom. Perhaps there was a time when only a person from a particular culture could absorb the idiom deeply enough to provide an authentic performance. Records and radio changed all that. And even in the good old days (they're all gone), "authentic" was no guarantee of "good." (Not every oppressed cotton-picking blues singer had the Right Stuff. See also the authentic pop music at [My link].)

What's authentic about R. Zimmerman singing dust-bowl ballads? Or Presley singing "That's Alright Mama?" Or Toots Hibbert doing "Take Me Home, Country Roads?" Or just about any of The Band's compositions that cheerfully steal from 3, 4, 5 or more idioms simultaneously?


Entered at Fri Nov 12 18:48:16 CET 2010 from (86.183.226.29)

Posted by:

Morty the Organ

Web: My link

Bill, Steve: the good folk of top combo NRBQ tell us all about Tom's siblings here, I think.....


Entered at Fri Nov 12 18:36:39 CET 2010 from (86.183.226.29)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: Keyboard player jokes / Jim Morrison

I guess after years of the drummer taking the brunt of abuse I may as well share another couple:

"How many bass players does it take to change a light bulb?"/"Hey, let's see the a**hole with the Hammond do THAT with his feet, too"

A Hammond purist on another forum came up with a corker recently while discussing the highly emotive issue of using a rotary cabinet simulator versus a real Leslie. One guy said he'd put an organ through a rotary simulator and had good results. The purist said that the only thing he'd put through one is a chainsaw!

Peter, I'm with you on Jimbo. Add Bryan Ferry on the "negative" list for me, too....


Entered at Fri Nov 12 18:28:39 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Steve: Big family - Tom, Jerry, Adam1, Adam2 ...


Entered at Fri Nov 12 18:07:26 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.188)

Posted by:

Steve

Tom, I'm guessing the sibling's name is Jerry.


Entered at Fri Nov 12 18:05:53 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.188)

Posted by:

Steve

To get past everyone's cheat notes on who can be considered an authentic blues singers, you'd have to do a controlled blind test. All you get is the song to work with. Who shouts out, Berkley California!, after hearing Fogerty doing, Born On The Bayou or after hearing Richard's version of Georgia thinks that guy's gotta be from somewhere in Canada.

Peter, since I see you're still mourning the loss of Jim M., I'm sure you'll be happy to hear the governor of Florida, Charlie Crist, is considering pardoning, Jimbo, before he leaves office in January. Let's keep our fingers crossed.


Entered at Fri Nov 12 17:59:04 CET 2010 from (75.34.51.94)

Posted by:

Tom

Sticking with one posting name? Well, not really. Same computer, different poster. Hence the different name. Think siblings.


Entered at Fri Nov 12 17:24:58 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Bobby Charles songs

I guess my all time favourite of Bobby C's is Clarence "Frogman" Henry's "I don't know why I love you but I do."

A real piss off for me, was Marty, (or whoever) leaving Bobby C off The Last Waltz movie. I'd sooner have seen him than Dr. John although the doctor was part of his song I guess.


Entered at Fri Nov 12 17:14:08 CET 2010 from (86.138.229.194)

Posted by:

Simon

Web: My link

'Tom' a/k/a Adam2 should do us all the courtesy of sticking with the one posting name. The joyless sullen teenager routine is a dead giveaway. As are similar comments in many threads on another music forum over the last couple of days. Talk about making it obvious.

British singers ... I'd nominate Dusty Springfield. I found some audio of Dusty's performance of Mockingbird (a slight Band connection) with the Jimi Hendrix Experience. The video for this is thought to have been wiped long ago but the audio still exists. Click link and it's between 4:00 and 6:00.


Entered at Fri Nov 12 17:16:26 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: movingness

It's gotta be more the song than the singer that makes a performance moving. Just about anyone singing "A Change Is Gonna Come" is going to be more moving than anyone, up to and including Otis, singing "Dock Of The Bay", which is going to be more moving than just about anyone singing "Fa-Fa-Fa". Peter Gabriel singing "Biko" makes my skin crawl (in a good way); Peter Gabriel singing "The Battle Of Epping Forest" doesn't. Ralph McTell singing "The Streets Of London" could change your life; Ralph McTell singing "Sunday Morning Coming Down" could make you change stations.


Entered at Fri Nov 12 16:57:07 CET 2010 from (174.89.117.48)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Add Amy Winehouse and Paul Weller to a list of British singers that should move you...................Automatic rule that anyone over 55 will not like Stevie Ray Vaughan.........because they just can't get by the derivative aspects of his early career.................I 'm afraid my point was lost though...............true that anyone with a heart can HAVE the blues..............but making others FEEL the blues - deep and to the bone - takes something special........Clapton is an extremely gifted and elegant player and I love a lot of his stuff......but he has never ever made me feel the blues.............SRV is an example of someone who did immediately and at all times................and his death unlike Hendrix has curiously not elevated him any where close to the same way as it has for others...............................For anyone who cares.........seek out the dvd of SRV on tv's best music show Austin City Limits......it's brilliant - two appearances one early and one just a short while before his death when he was clean and out of this world good.........


Entered at Fri Nov 12 16:53:14 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Walking to New Orleans

A key to the authenticity of Bobby Charles' own performance is that added dimension of knowing firsthand what inspired the song. Fats Domino have previously recorded another song written by Mr. Charles, "Before I Grow Too Old", later featured on the Bobby Charles Bearsville album. During a visit with Fats, backstage at a concert outside New Orleans near his home, Mr. Charles asked him for a copy of the 45 of the recorded song. Fats said he didn't have one with him, but he could give him one when Mr. Charles came to New Orleans. Since he lived quite some distance from the city, Mr. Charles' responded "I don't have a car. If I go, I'll have to walk." Quickly realizing the inspiration for another song, he later wrote the lyrics for the subsequent hit in a matter of minutes.


Entered at Fri Nov 12 16:40:33 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Toronto
Web: My link

Peter V: Your Tower Records experience coulda been worse. Imagine if it was Jack Black behind the counter.

Re "A Change Is Gonna Come", I'd say that the most affecting version I've ever heard was delivered by John Finley at a gospel show in a church here a few years ago, with just Michael Fonfara on piano). John D was there too, and may or may not agree. (It was a Danny Brooks show, so Richard Bell was onstage too, but that song was just Finley and Fonfara; Domenic Troiano was in the audience.)


Entered at Fri Nov 12 16:11:21 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Jokes!

This has nothing to do with music....maybe a good way to start the weekend is all.........that's too late for you Brits & Aussies.

Brian invites his mother over to share a fine dinner with him & his "room mate" Jennifer. During the evening the couple's behaviour implies to mother, they are more than just room mates. Realizing this, at dinner Brian says, "Mother you may perhaps think Jennifer & I are more than just room mates." I assure you our relation ship is strictly platonic.

After a couple days Jennifer says to Brian. I've searched every where, and can't find our silver gravy ladel. You don't suppose your mother took it "by accident?" Brian says I'll e mail her.

Brian's e mail..Hi Mom, I'm not saying you took our gravy ladel, and I'm not saying you didn't. However it is missing. Can you think where it mat be?

Mother's e mail. Hello Brian, I'm not saying Jennifer is sleeping with you, and I'm not saying she's not. However, if Jennifer had been sleeping in her own bed, she would have found the ladel.........Yikes!......Busted!


Entered at Fri Nov 12 15:41:00 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Todd, agree on how moving Peter Gabriel's voice is.

On Bonnie Raitt, yet another repeated story. Years ago when Tower Records existed in London I was looking for a Bonnie Raitt album without success. So I asked.

"Country & Western" said the manager (who was Afro-Carribbean).

I said I thought it would have been blues, what with John Lee Hooker appearing and all.

'No, she's used pedal steel,' he said, 'And she's got red hair.'

I looked amazed. He added

"Anybody who's ever used pedal steel goes in Country & Western."

So forget the jokes about accordions and banjos. In Tower Records London, pedal steel was the unforgiveable instrument.


Entered at Fri Nov 12 15:35:56 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Bill, but neither of them were Jim Morrison. He's the one I can't stand.


Entered at Fri Nov 12 15:15:33 CET 2010 from (69.182.53.2)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: John D's Adventures in Mono

You're welcome John. Let us know if you ever track down a version of the Canadian B.O.B. mono vinyl.


Entered at Fri Nov 12 15:11:51 CET 2010 from (69.182.53.2)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Soul

Peter Gabriel's 'Washing of the Water' is pretty soulful. Also 'Don't Give Up' and 'Blood of Eden' are other fine examples. Not "Soul" music in the traditional sense, but moves me almost as much as Otis Redding when I'm in mood for it.

A lot of Clapton can come off as bland and repetitive, but at his core, there's a blues and passion that sometimes surfaces....and is genuine. Anybody with a heart can have the blues.....that's the beauty of it.

I love what Bobby Charles brings, but Fats Domino is the version that I heard first. Hard to get past that sometimes. When I think of New Orleans, Lucinda Williams does it for me too.

Bonnie Raitt may be one of the best blues singers ever. She can certainly hold her own. Gillian Welch was raised in a Los Angeles suburb, but dammed if she isn't one of our Country's living embodiments of Appalachian Gospel. And comes across as very authentic.



Entered at Fri Nov 12 14:53:28 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

dlew: For very different reasons I'd be inclined to remove Dave Davies and Sandy Denny from that otherwise admirable list of "British guys who can sing".

Peter V: If nothing else you deserve full marks for maturity for keeping your mind open to Jess Roden, given that his big gig after the Bown band was with two of the Doors in the Butts Band.

RtO / Pat B: The sad truth is that most of those jokes, up to and including the birth-control one, apply equally well to record collectors and GB posters.


Entered at Fri Nov 12 14:50:24 CET 2010 from (99.254.209.45)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Todd & Bill M

Thank you very much for your info. Much appeciated.


Entered at Fri Nov 12 14:19:26 CET 2010 from (59.101.61.51)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: British guys who can sing...

Robert Plant; Freddie Mercury; Paul Rodgers; Dave Davies; Ian Anderson; Sandy Denny; Joe Cocker...


Entered at Fri Nov 12 12:47:48 CET 2010 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Skin color, origin of country, etc.., should have nothing to do with how any song is done or be disqualifier of any kind when taking on a song. It is and always will be about the passion an artist brings to it. If the song resonates with you, then it works. I've never bought into that a white british guy can't do justice to a song that was born out of Motown and such. As a Brit might say - Bullocks. Now.., are there bad versions of such and vice versa, absolutely but a blanket statement just sounds ridiculous.


Entered at Fri Nov 12 11:51:42 CET 2010 from (59.101.61.51)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Peter M: What's perfect pitch

Throwing an accordion into a skip bin and it breaks a banjo ;)


Entered at Fri Nov 12 10:22:56 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Not liking ANY British musicians or singers is fairly sweeping, and closes off quite a bit of rock & roll, Tom. The Beatles? The Rolling Stones?

Authenticity. I was thinking about this. OK, Sam Cooke or Otis Redding singing A Change Is Gonna Come has an authenticity that cover versions … even by Rick Danko … can’t match. But this relies in a weight of history, and many times or most times Otis or Sam sang that song, they weren’t meditating on the lyrics, they were just performing something they’d done many times. And doing it impeccably. It’s just that the soulful meaning is a stage re-creation with any singer much of the time.

I don’t agree, but I can see Tom’s point about British soul singers (I also prefer the originals to Band covers in all cases), and the thing that can irritate is soul mannerisms, as used by Tom Jones (early days), Van Morrison or Chris Farlowe, Chris Farlowe being another British soul singer I forgot. Sometimes, if you’re not in the mood, both Van and Chris Farlowe can go over the top in the “gotta – gotta-gotta-gotta have it, oh, yeah, yeah, yeah, baby, baby. baby. sock it to me one more time” department. But they really do immerse themselves in it, and the fact that the vocal mannerisms they draw on are originally American may be your problem. Not a problem that Solomon Burke or John Lee Hooker had with them, but each to their own.

On my morning drive today I had my Le Kilt Playlist on, and got into repeat mode on The Impressions You Must Believe Me and Otis Redding’s Respect. Respect brought back a long conversation I had with a soul vinyl dealer. He used to be a major soul DJ, and also had his own soul reissue label. He was explaining the secret of the floor filler, which he said was the killer instrumental lead in. He demonstrated with Respect (Otis and Aretha), Reach Out I’ll Be There (Four Tops), Uptight (Stevie Wonder) and Hold On I’m Coming (Sam & Dave). The highly recognizable lead in gets people to their feet and they hit the dance floor just as the vocal comes in. Good theory. He explained that my initial choice, Ain’t Too Proud To Beg, was not a floor filler, because it starts right in. But it is the definitive second song … to keep them there.


Entered at Fri Nov 12 09:01:52 CET 2010 from (75.34.51.94)

Posted by:

Tom

I don't like British singers or musicians, for that matter. For 'Rod Stewart' to sing a Bobby song, a song born and raised as a love letter to New Orleans, I would never want to hear him sing a natural New Orleans R&B song. And yes, Bobby Charles' version is the best. Fats' comes in second.


Entered at Fri Nov 12 08:38:36 CET 2010 from (76.99.245.65)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: by the dormant turtle pond

Subject: RTO, et al... musician jokes?

Hey Rob, As Ian McLagen says about Rod, he quit rock & roll for a career of singing for the blue haired crowd. But Mac's a compendium of musician jokes... "What do you call a woman on a drummer's arm? A tattoo". He used to have a joke about, "What do you call perfect aim? A disgruntled accordion player throws his instrument into a dumpster. As luck would have it, it lands on, and crushes a banjo"... or something like that. He gathered these jokes with the assistance of Ian Wallace, drummer extroardinaire. For more jollies, (including a Neil Armstrong story, later debunked by the Snopes Urban Legend site), visit "Macspages.com" and look under "Jokes. One more... "Two drummers walk past a bar...Hey, it could happen".


Entered at Fri Nov 12 08:38:16 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: My favourite musician joke

I first read this here in the GB (Pat B?) and have repeated it since. It bears a third time:

So this guitarist died and when he emerged from the long white tunnel he found himself on a huge stage, with a gorgeous blonde angel in a transparent white robe handing him a Martin D-50 guitar. He wandered to the centre where Jimi Hendrix was tuning up with Buddy Holly. Elvis was chatting to James Jamerson and Rick Danko about bass guitars, and Billy Preston had got up from the Hammond to help John Lennon and Richard Manuel get Ray Charles seated at the piano. Miles Davis and John Coltrane were wiping the gob from their mouthpieces. The newly-arrived guitarist looked round at the empty drum stool, 'Wow!' he said, 'I never thought heaven would be this good! Who's playing drums?' Jimi stared at him, 'Who told you this was heaven, man?' At that moment Karen Carpenter strode on stage, picked up her drumsticks, tapped a cymbal sharply, and said, 'Right. "We've Only Just Begun" in C. One … two … three …'


Entered at Fri Nov 12 08:33:18 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Brit Soul

My leaving out Steve Marriot and Frankie Miller was appalling. Leaving out Steve Winwood was SO appalling that I’ll have to spend the day listening to the Spencer Davis Group. And I don’t much like Stevie Ray Vauhan or Gary Moore either.

I have a playlist (which usd to be a series of three CD compilations) called “Le Kilt” after the Bournemouth late 60s club of the same name. When “All or Nothing” breaks in between The Four Tops and Otis Redding, no one notices the sudden “whiteness”. Nor does anyone say during P.P. Arnold … “Hey, those backing guys sound British!” Others that fit in are Spencer Davis Group covering You Must Believe Me, and for white Americans, the Four Seasons Working My Way Back To You slips in well too.

Incidentally, in the soul (ish) genre, we seem to be producing lots of good young female singers here nowadays.


Entered at Fri Nov 12 06:54:13 CET 2010 from (203.41.84.218)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: More musician jokes....

How do you get two piccolo players to play in unison? Shoot one of them

What's the difference between an accordion and a trampoline? You take your shoes off to jump on the trampoline

Guy gets a gig with a chick singer. On the second night, he says, 'for Stella by Starlight, I want you to start in B, modulate it to C# for two bars, modulate it down to A for most of the rest of it, and do the last 16 bars in 5/4.' She says 'I can't do that!' He replies 'Dunno why not, it's what you did last night...'


Entered at Fri Nov 12 06:05:23 CET 2010 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

My favorite musician jokes.

What do you call two guitarists playing the same chart? Counterpoint.

What is a drummer? A guy who hangs out with musicians.

How many bass players does it take to screw in a light bulb? None. The keyboardist can do it with his left hand.

And finally, for Rob (and me, I guess). What does a keyboardist use for birth control? His personality.


Entered at Fri Nov 12 03:36:02 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: Authenticity will never trump personal taste!

True, Rod Stewart has lost the plot in the last few decades but I can imagine what a great performer he must have been in a sweaty club back in the sixties before - as one of the UK monthlies so accurately said in the last year or so '..before "Smiler" onwards where he began to phone the vocals in from a yacht'. I'm not remotely tribal in any sense (other than Surrey versus London) but while authenticity often has the upper hand, there was a period where the UK needed to educate some portions of the USA about their own indigenous arts that colour culture prevented a natural shift towards. Hence Eric Clapton. Hence Rod Stewart. Hence (Tom...wait for it...) Van Morrison.

See, Peter - I even stood up for your point after you left Steve Marriott and Frankie Miller off your list! I am sure this was an oversight and the bonus points for Jess Roden being there counter it anyway!

Must take issue with one point that was made though: I think I must be the only person that doesn't see the point of Stevie Ray Vaughan. All that fuss for a white kid that did a bit of Albert King and a bit of Hendrix, and all of it way too loudly*? Hmm, I'll take 461 Ocean Boulevard any day of the week. To be fair, a lot of my opinions on SRV come from playing organ in countless blues bands that feature an SRV obsessed guitarist, hence the popular bass/drums/organ/horns musicians joke: "Q: How many guitar players does it take to play a Stevie Ray Vaughan tune?" / "A: ALL of them, apparently....".

The again, I wouldn't take anything from EC after 461! The whole mid seventies to almost present day period (via the disastrous Armani suit/mates with Phil Collins period) is as limp as a soggy barge rope. The latest is reckoned to be somewhat of an early 70s quality return to form though - ought to buy it I suppose.

So - what gives, then? Of course, Stevie's dead! Ah...the artistic elevation tool to beat all others bar none, to say nothing of the wonders it works for back catalogue and posthumous release sales.

*(This is not a UK vs US argument, honest. I don't like Gary Moore much, either).


Entered at Fri Nov 12 01:03:48 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Hard to Pin down

Good gravy farmer! No one ever expects you to say anything too sensible at all. But......what could possibly be the reason you persist in making yourself look like such a jackass all the time?

It seems your phycological problems could be even more deep seated than we primarily diagnosed. We'll have to see if there may be some meds we can all pitch in and get for you to help straighten you out.

Mean time, stay out of the barn for a couple of days and try and lay of the whacky tabbacky. It just might surprise you, that you could actually say something sensible. Gawd.......what a thought.


Entered at Thu Nov 11 22:43:04 CET 2010 from (86.138.229.194)

Posted by:

Simon

Subject: Hendrix

I managed to snag ten tracks from the forthcoming Jimi box ... the complete tracks were put up on the official site (presumably in error) then taken down and replaced with 30 second clips. This really is some stunning stuff. "Are You Experienced" is a first take and quite astonishing just as an instrumental. Ditto "Castles Made of Sand" ... just great playing with a real mid-sixties poppy-yet-slashing guitar sound. This track just shows how fluid and fluent he could be. "May This Be Love" is a subtle remix by Eddie Kramer that I think improves upon the original. There's also an instrumental called "Burning Desire" that has many gear shifts and turns into something halfway through that could be off Miles Davis' "Tribute to Jack Johnson" album. Some of the most subtle and soulful playing I've heard. If the rest of the tracks are as good as these then it's a must have for Jimi fans.


Entered at Thu Nov 11 22:07:59 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Joan: Turned out to be a cookie issue with the NYT. I won't accept theirs so we're at a standoff. Both of us will survive.


Entered at Thu Nov 11 22:02:01 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.189)

Posted by:

Steve

I know what you mean, Norm. I never heard Rick do Inka Dinka Do, but I know it could never match the authenticity Jimmy Durante brings to that classic.

Actually I can say that about all Durante's hits. The only one I can see anyone coming close on is ,Burl Ives, doing Frosty The Snowman. And I think Burl really only has a leg up on that holiday classic because I've seen him do it in such an animated way.

He has become Frosty in my mind.

And I know I don't have to make the Rick and Burl connection for anyone here.


Entered at Thu Nov 11 21:35:25 CET 2010 from (86.138.229.194)

Posted by:

Simon

Joan, the link worked for me. Thanks for posting it. There's some pretty interesting stuff that they found.


Entered at Thu Nov 11 19:25:03 CET 2010 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Links

Bill I'm sorry about the link. It works for me but I think it is because I'm a NY Times subscriber. Basically, they found things like Aretha's contract, Posters, Ads, even a copy of an 1819 Beethoven letter. I imagine some of this stuff will show up at auction someday.


Entered at Thu Nov 11 18:50:13 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Authentic

Calvin; One of the best examples of "authentic". As much as I have always enjoyed and appreciated Rick Danko and the feel he has expressed always in his music.

To listen to Rick, (or anyone else for that matter) sing "A CHange is Gonna Come", and then listen to Sam Cooke, no one compares with Sam (for me). On any song he did.

As a real young kid, out on my fathers fish boat in Johnstone Strait at night. Lonely, missing my buddies, (and my old man was not very good to me). I'd sit with an old SS Stewart guitar that I had playing and singing mostly 2 songs.

Cupid draw back your bow........... and The light in the harbour, don't shine for me. I'm like a lost ship adrift on the sea......


Entered at Thu Nov 11 18:47:14 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Khazakhstan Cowboys Go America?

Joe J: Looks more like three deposed strongmen from the minor republics of the Soviet Union, attempting a new career in muzeek.


Entered at Thu Nov 11 18:14:38 CET 2010 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Link is to a video of Buffalo Springfield at the Bridge School concert. Sound's not great but. But what's with Stills dressing like a car salesman? Already inevitable rumours of a tour next year.


Entered at Thu Nov 11 18:13:26 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Toronto
Web: My link

Subject: invocations of the Band's legacy ...

There are a couple of worthwhile shows on successive nights at Hugh's Room in Toronto next week:

Tuesday, November 16
Porkbelly Futures
CD Release – The Crooked Road
Porkbelly Futures has travelled a crooked road since the band’s founding in Toronto fifteen years ago. ... Two session musicians on Porkbelly Futures’ debut album Way Past Midnight subsequently became indelibly associated with the band: vocalist/percussionist Rebecca Campbell (Jane Siberry, Fat Man Waving) remains with the band to this day, while legendary keyboardist Richard Bell (Janis Joplin, The Band, Blackie and the Rodeo Kings) lost his battle with cancer after only four years as a “Belly.” Tragically, cancer also recently claimed Porkbelly’s much-loved lead vocalist Paul Quarrington, a nationally-recognized writer. ... The band’s third album The Crooked Road ... features songs by Martin Worthy, Quarrington/Worthy and Willie P. Bennett ...

Wednesday, November 17
Lee Harvey Osmond
“Acid folk” was born in an old garage off Clinton Avenue in Toronto, concocted by Tom Wilson from Blackie & the Rodeo Kings, a few Cowboy Junkies, and some Skydiggers. Allowing bass, hypnotic rhythms and a lot of groove into their songwriting circle, the artist collective LeE HARVeY OsMOND created a sound that would creep out of the Northern woods and across the Great Lakes into the South, the same way The Band did forty years before them.


Entered at Thu Nov 11 18:12:05 CET 2010 from (70.60.190.33)

Posted by:

Calvin

I'm on board with "authentic" being the superior the majority of the time-just not always.


Entered at Thu Nov 11 18:08:01 CET 2010 from (174.89.117.48)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Above link a beauty from Joe Cocker.............thanks Bill.

Westcoaster.........a good one about a positive contribution really from George...........I purchased the dvd of Concert for Bangladesh a few years ago and was reminded of that great scene where a rock audience was being exposed to Indian music - and they burst into applause as Ravi Shankar and his band were just adjusting their instuments........Shankar responded by saying.."well if you liked the tuning....we hope you like the music even more!"


Entered at Thu Nov 11 17:08:08 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Blowin in the Wind

Kevin; Generally speaking people become accustomed to hearing the particular sound and feel of music where it comes from and being original.

That case doesn'y necessarily hold true tho' there are always exceptions. You can make a case for any number of them.

As far as ethnic music goes tho', the one outstanding example that comes to my mind immediately is the blending of George Harrison and Ravi Shankar. The friendship bond and respect they shared through a lifetime changed the world in some ways regarding ethnic music.


Entered at Thu Nov 11 17:06:57 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Kevin J: If you're a punk fan interested in its early days in Toronto and Hamilton, be sure to buy the newish book "Treat Me Like Dirt" by Liz Worth. The bad news is that you can only get it online. (See the middle item in the fourth row at the link above.) I'm about half way through and it's a mixture of tedious and fascinating, with the occasional burst of brilliant insight provided by one or another of the interviewees. (It's all paragraphs of dozens of long interviews taken apart and reassembled to provide a narrative flow.) Harold Kudlets comes up, and there's some really valuable info about Hawkins's first gig in Canada (in Hamilton) that I was going to post at some point - and still will. Among the other items in the BongoBeat catalogue are several albums by Dave Rave, an old Hamilton chum of Daniel Lanois and Bill Dillon, both of whom have contributed to his recordings over the years, and possible the BongoBeat ones too.


Entered at Thu Nov 11 16:41:21 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Not only did they back it, I heard they volunteered for the pleasure of working for the master at base union rates. Then what happened!

Extending the authenticity argument intp “Can white men sing the blues?” , then doesn’t that make Bobby Charles’ version of the song he co-wrote with Fats Domino and Dave Bartholomew less than Fats Domino’s version, because Fats Domino’s black? (I do know that early promoters were absolutely astonished to find Charles’ was white).

There are some fine British soul singers … Van Morrison, Joe Cocker, Eric Burdon, early Rod Stewart, Long John Baldry (before he went easy-listening), Robert Palmer, Jess Roden, Zoot Money. Even Mick Jagger once upon a time.And Tom Jones circa 1965 even.


Entered at Thu Nov 11 16:38:16 CET 2010 from (174.89.117.48)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Thanks Dave for that article - always good to see an underrated song get some exposure.....Rick's singing on that version ranks as one of the best examples of innocence/hurt/ tenderness ever put down in the long history of rock n roll......

Tom's point: Just staying with the Blues/Rock n Roll - there are thousands upon thousands of examples that would support his case........I remember vividly some event broadcast on TV years ago where the likes of Bon Jovi and Phil Collins did a few numbers and then on came Wilson Pickett and the authenticity scale just blew up and exploded.........Has anyone ever felt "The Street" when some private school educated white boy grabs his crotch and tries to Rap................Blame it all on Pat Boone I guess............... Punk's a funny one because while there is some evidence ( oh how hard the critics try have the Ramones as the starting point ) of origins elsewhere - the Sex Pistols WERE the starting point and when Volvo driving college students like Nirvana tried to claim an "American Punk" mantle 10 years later it was all a bit laughable..................at the end of the day though....lean toward Calvin because for every Eric Clapton and thousands like him that will NEVER make you feel the Blues.....there will be a Stevie Ray Vaughan that will get the Blues into your bones within 10 seconds of first exposure.........


Entered at Thu Nov 11 16:22:12 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

1) It being Remembrance Day, the link above comes with the suggestion that you scroll down the right margin to "The Light Brigade" and give it a listen and a thought.

2) David P: Thanks for that very interesting post about the Fort Hamby crowd. All news to me, but perhaps not to Robbie. I wonder if anyone's asked?| 3) Joan: Your link doesn't work today, I'm afraid.

4) Peter V / Dunc: The mentions of Forever More reminded me that I was surprised to see in some liner notes that Chuck Berry's back-up band for his execrable Ding-a-Ling hit included a couple of FM/AWB guys. Must've been difficult to live that down, though they obviously managed to pick up the pieces.


Entered at Thu Nov 11 15:25:27 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.190)

Posted by:

Steve

Maybe that's why Robbie let Levon sing, TNTDODD, instead of singing it himself. Frost-backs recognize their limitations.


Entered at Thu Nov 11 14:18:33 CET 2010 from (76.188.38.138)

Posted by:

Calvin

I don't know if it's sniping Peter-Tom seems to be stating a long standing argument about art/music-In fact while I understand Tom's sentiment I completely reject it.

I dont want to put words in your mouth Tom, but you seem to be espousing the old argument that the only folks that can do justice to a song are the culture/race/county originators. It's that kind of thinking that has stymied Black Opera Singers or While Blues and Jazz Artists. And it's just faulty thinking.

While I it's very easy to see someone preferring a Bobby Charles' version of a song to Rod Stewart's version (Although frankly I've never been a fan of either)I would draw the line at believing the reason Charles' version is better has anything to do with him being "authentic" as opposed to British. If you've got game, you've got game-who you are is irrelevant.


Entered at Thu Nov 11 12:46:06 CET 2010 from (75.34.51.94)

Posted by:

Tom

Well for me, a song written and born in New Orleans, couldn't possibly be sung by some Brit with a fake soul voice. A song like that needs to sung by an authentic New Oreans R&B ambassador, ie - Bobby Charles.


Entered at Thu Nov 11 11:31:37 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Walkin' to New Orleans

While vowing not to engage with snipers, let’s mark a rare music post. The thing is Tom, you weren’t there in 1965, Rod never recorded it with the Soul Agents, so neither of us can ever prove our point, and at my age the warm glow that memory puts round it enhances it. I’d agree that on the evidence of the last thirty years, it’s unlikely to see Rod as a great soul singer, but he certainly was in the 60s and early 70s. Being British doesn’t disqualify you.

I guess you’re thinking of the Bobby Charles / Fats Domino duet on Wish You Were Here Right Now? Playing it now. It’s on my iTunes. Great languid stuff, with outstanding lead guitar, but I don’t think it competes in a head-to-head with the original Fats Domino hit version, because those strings were so unexpected, and two minutes was just right. There’s also a great reggae cover. It might be by Bitsy McLean who had the big hit cover of It Keeps Rainin’, another Bobby Charles song. What’s strange is how little McLean had to change It Keeps Rainin’… the original sounds Jamaican anyway.

I doubt that a time-machine trip to 1965 would see Rod’s version coming out on top, BUT you have to add in the club with seven foot ceiling, packed to twice its fire capacity, walls streaming with condensation. Then you have to get young again too. Listening to the Bobby Charles 1984 version today, Rod back then had the advantage of youth powerfully on his side. But in total seriousness, I’d choose the Fats Domino single.


Entered at Thu Nov 11 09:53:34 CET 2010 from (75.34.51.94)

Posted by:

Tom

Subject: Bobby Charles / covers

Bobby Charles. Like some fake soul singer from Britain - Rod Stewart - could come up with a better version than New Orleans' own Bobby Charles. What a joke.


Entered at Thu Nov 11 08:40:11 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Hookfoot / covers

Hookfoot. I saw them a couple of times. I went to look them up in “The Tapestry of Delights” and three were in The Soul Agents. So was Rod Stewart briefly, and The Soul Agents with Rod Stewart is one of those gigs that shine out in the memory. I still say no one ever did Walkin’ To New Orleans as well as Rod & The Soul Agents. Rod is the link, I guess, to Elton John, both coming from Steampacket.

DUNC, but then my eye wandered on to the entry on Hopscotch, who mutated into Forever More. It notes that they did three singles (I hadn’t known that) and the last, in 1969 was “a cover of The Band’s Long Black Veil.” They were great Band fans so would have taken it from MFBP, not earlier versions. Something to look out for.

Hookfoot are a prime example of a band who had everything … except a great songwriter. Five or six years earlier, they could have done much better. A set of judicious cover versions. Put out a great, but obscure, couple of covers as singles. Then get good new songs from the likes of Goffin-King or Jackie de Shannon and you’re away. The Searchers seven years earlier are a good template. By 1970 you had to have the originals. Audiences at British colleges watched mutely as bands ploughed through 90 minutes of stuff they’d never heard before and would never hear again. No wonder the isolated cover (perhaps as an encore) got everyone cheering. The Band were close enough to that mindset to have Slippin’ and Slidin’ and Loving You Is Sweeter Than Ever near the end of their sets as insurance!


Entered at Thu Nov 11 05:48:20 CET 2010 from (76.188.38.138)

Posted by:

Calvin

Agreed Jeff, I saw Richie live not too long ago and I was shocked and how amazing he sounded. And how content and happy with his life he seemed.

The Leon Russel-Elton John impresses on the first few minutes of listening as its two old pros going about their jobs, but as it goes on to the 3-4-5 track a sense of sameness and blandness seemed to be seeping out of it. At least that is my two cents.


Entered at Thu Nov 11 04:54:50 CET 2010 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: NY

Subject: Stoneman and his West Point school days

George Stoneman of "torn -up -tracks" fame was roommates with Tom (later "Stonewall") Jackson when they were cadets at West Point. There's an excellent book by John C. Waugh called "The Class of 1846," Warner Books, NY, 1994. West Point brought a lot of the 19th century soldiers together with the friendships that were forged on the Hudson Highlands in the days of their youth.


Entered at Thu Nov 11 03:57:31 CET 2010 from (205.188.116.5)

Posted by:

PutEmUp (Friend0

Web: My link

Subject: Buffalo Springfield Reunion Again

Vids of the reunion shows are up all over the net. Richie's voice sounds amazing. not unchanged, but damn close. Pushing 70, he sounds better than most great singers do by the time they hit 46 -50 range.


Entered at Thu Nov 11 02:46:41 CET 2010 from (208.54.38.59)

Posted by:

Dave

Location: Portland, Or
Web: My link

Subject: "It Makes No Difference"

Here's a great little blog entry about The Band and "It Makes No Difference": http://www.eastportlandblog.com/?p=2813


Entered at Thu Nov 11 01:32:32 CET 2010 from (59.101.61.51)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Elton and the Band...

Anyone heard the latest Elton with leon russell?

Also, Capt. Fantastic (particularly the title track) could have had our guys on it easily - even a touch of mandolin...


Entered at Wed Nov 10 23:53:23 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Web: My link

Subject: For Steve - Re: Tumbleweed Connection

Steve, while the whole album is certainly Bandsome, as well as Son of Your Father I always found the track "My Father's Gun" to be the one that sounded like it ought to have been wrapped in a brown jacket with a black and white photo on the front. If the basic instrumentation and lyric doesn't convince you, the drum fills (eg 3 mins 30 on linked video) during the extended refrains will!

Bonus points for lead guitarist Caleb Quaye who even managed to add a flavour of Steve Stills in the opening moments!

Caleb Quaye of course being from the band Hookfoot who often served as Elton's engine room until the Olsson/Murray/Johnstone core were established. Typical band that did their best work on other peoples' stuff as their own albums were frequently inconsistent and had that "nothing wrong with it but nothing that grabs you either" vibe. Bassist Dave Glover particularly shines on Son of Your Father. Wonderful bassline!


Entered at Wed Nov 10 22:45:05 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The Other General

I've mentioned this before in the guestbook -- Following Gen. Stoneman's capture earlier in the war during Sherman's march through Georgia, he was later exchanged in a prisoner release for Confederate Gen. Daniel Chevilette Govan. Although he was from North Carolina, Gen. Govan had settled in Helena, Arkansas to become a planter shortly before the war and later returned to the area afterwards. I wonder if Robbie or Levon were aware of this historical & geographical connection between the generals and the man from Arkansas who would so convincingly sing the anthem TNTDODD.


Entered at Wed Nov 10 21:57:49 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: TNTDODD / Vietnam

At some point I think I beat Mr Hartley to that one. I recall quoting Joseph Heller on Catch 22 (probably in response to Lars, who knows the book even better than me). Heller said that CATCH-22 was set in the Second World War, written during the Korean War, but actually ABOUT the "next war to come" which was Vietnam.

What a great day (with one exception) on the GB. I'm playing catch-up because I was in Bath today watching a play (starring the magnificent Alisn Steadman).


Entered at Wed Nov 10 20:31:25 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Thanks Pat for the link.

Placing TNTDODD in the context of when it was written in 1969, Mr. Hartley concludes that the "song was more about Vietnam than the Civil War", as he elaborated in his preface with the analogy:

"It was a time of turmoil and war. Brother confronted brother. Long-cherished beliefs were trampled underfoot. Generations were at loggerheads. And young men died by the thousands on hotly contested battlefields"

He further contends that "George Stoneman's last raid was more about a beginning than an ending. The raid did not help end the Civil War as intended, but it made the beginning of Reconstruction harder in those areas it touched."


Entered at Wed Nov 10 20:28:04 CET 2010 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: classifying popular music

This notice has been appearing in the _Winnipeg Free Press_ "Concerts" listings for a couple of weeks now:

"Paul Revere & The Raiders Nov 22, Club Regent Casino, 8 p.m. Remnants of British Invasion band. Tickets $30 at Ticketmaster."

Gives me pause, every time.


Entered at Wed Nov 10 20:00:37 CET 2010 from (68.164.2.96)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

David P, definitely get this issue which I posted before.


Entered at Wed Nov 10 19:46:31 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Dixe, Disney & Carny

I've just begun reading an interesting new Civil War book, "Stoneman's Raid 1865" by Chris J. Hartley (John F. Blair Publisher / Winston-Salem, NC). The first verse & chorus of "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down" are quoted on the epigraph page. In his preface Mr. Hartley points out that his book's subject, the "obscure 1865 cavalry raid of Major General George Stoneman served as the unlikely backdrop" for The Band's song, as well as for a 1970 Walt Disney made-for-tv movie entitled "Menace on the Mountain", starring Mitch Vogel and Jodie Foster. The film, as Mr. Hartley recounts:

[T]ells the story of a teenage boy who struggles to protect his family from Yankee deserters who have seized its home while the father is off at war. The movie is based on a true story of an outlaw gang that ravaged western North Carolina in the spring of 1865 from a stronghold called Fort Hamby. The real outlaws were led by a deserter from Stoneman's cavalry."

This was one of Ms. Foster's (then age 12) earliest acting roles. The Band connection is furthered as she appeared with Robbie Robertson & Gary Busey in "Carny" a decade later, which Mr. Hartley doesn't mention. He does, however, mention that some cover versions of TNTDODD "omit the Stoneman reference, possibly because the phrase 'Stoneman's cavalry' has been interpreted as 'so much cavalry'".

In a footnote the author cites Peter Viney's article "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down (Revisted)", with a link to Jan's article section, which includes a quote from Robbie regarding the song's creation. The footnote also references an Oct. 2002 MIX magazine article which also included the quote.

Bringing things full circle to another footnote, this one cited by Peter in his article, I mentioned a previous piece by Chris Hartley, "War's Last Cavalry Raid" (published in the May 1998 edition of "America's Civil War" magazine), in a guestbook posting about Stoneman here back in Oct. 1999.


Entered at Wed Nov 10 19:45:50 CET 2010 from (90.239.132.239)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Subject: Northern Boy's thread: Wives who have been kind enough over the years to repeatedly remind us of what a great concert we managed to miss.

My favourite Celtic/folk group CUMULUS played on an Annual Fishermen's Party in 1968 in a fishing hamlet which was her Summer resident.

BTW I understand that there are many gbers whith an interest of social history and the music: Cumulus was building bridges between Finns and Swedish speaking minority in Finland which - paradoxically - consists partly of economical, political and cultural elite living in the capital and partly of common people living in coastal region (agriculture and fishing). On the other hand the Finnish speaking minority in Sweden lives as miners and loggers or in middle-sized industrial towns, just like Finnish immigrants mostly do in the US and in Canada.


Entered at Wed Nov 10 19:02:47 CET 2010 from (166.187.20.252)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Elvis C article

The November 8 New Yorker has an interesting article about Elvis Costello - a big-time Band fan. With that magazine you always get the best writers too, so it's a top-notch piece altogether.


Entered at Wed Nov 10 18:59:55 CET 2010 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Web: My link

Subject: Warner's warehouse

An interesting article from yesterday's NY Times about what "Treasures have been unearthed in Warner Music's warehouses.


Entered at Wed Nov 10 17:38:56 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Steve: Never having been a big Elton fan, what I think of when I see reference to "Burn Down The Mission" is "Let's Burn Down The Cornfield", a Randy Newman song that appears on the Elton side of the Long John Baldry album. It's Bandish too.

All this talk of the Canuckistani pressing of "Mono on Mono" is kind of depressing given the fact that I didn't dump my copy until this century. I had no idea whatsoever that it was different and rare and unreplaceable. Another one that got away, I'm afraid.


Entered at Wed Nov 10 17:36:08 CET 2010 from (69.182.79.77)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: B.O.B. Mono

Sorry John D., I just scrolled back and saw that you had already referenced Roger Ford's analysis of Blonde on Blonde, so you're obviously familiar with his work on the subject. Will be interesting to see his updated comments later this year on the new Mono release.


Entered at Wed Nov 10 17:23:48 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.191)

Posted by:

Steve

Just heard an interview Jian did on Q with Sir Elton about his new album with Leon Russell.

During the interview he mentions his love of Big Pink and The Band and their influence of those two albums on the sound of Tumble Weed Connection, citing, Son Of Your Father and |Burn Down The Mission as the obvious examples though the Band's influence, he says, is there throughout the album.


Entered at Wed Nov 10 16:49:30 CET 2010 from (69.182.79.77)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT
Web: My link

Subject: Blonde on Blonde Mono Summary

John D, There a LOT of information in the previous link. It's very detailed regarding differences between individual tracks. The link above has a summary of the differences between all of the mono versions laid out in a chart. It would be interesting to know if this agrees with your memory of the original Canadian Mono release. According to an update on Roger Ford's site, he plans to do an update by the end of the year to include the latest Mono CD released version.


Entered at Wed Nov 10 16:44:38 CET 2010 from (69.182.79.77)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT
Web: My link

Subject: Blonde on Blonde Mono

John D, you've probably seen the article by Roger Ford at the link above, but if not, it's a pretty lengthy and detailed history of the various Blonde on Blonde versions. Here's an extract re: the Canadian Mono version which he refers to as one of the earliest mixes of the album. Do you still have your original version? It's probably pretty rare.

"The earliest set of assembled mixes appeared - presumably by mistake - on the Canadian mono album, which reached the shops in the first week of July. This clearly shows the album in a much rougher state than the final US version. Note There are vocal slips (in "I Want You" and "Sad Eyed Lady Of The Lowlands") and instrumental phrases (on "Visions Of Johanna" and "Temporary Like Achilles") which were subsequently either edited out or rectified by splicing, and on "4th Time Around" there was an organ that was completely removed before the final release. Some tracks also have longer or shorter endings. All the Canadian mono copies that I've been able to trace have these characteristics, so it seems that the mistake went unnoticed there, and this edition stayed on the market for maybe a couple of years."


Entered at Wed Nov 10 16:24:24 CET 2010 from (24.252.246.109)

Posted by:

Calvin

Speaking of Bruce Palmer, and the Buffalo Springfield-anyone catch the reunion show at the Bridge School Benefit? The audio is archived on http://rustfest.org/allonesong/BSB2010SAT/ at least for the moment. The three guys sound great together.


Entered at Wed Nov 10 16:12:53 CET 2010 from (205.188.116.5)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: John D iTunes player info

I recently had an issue with a release of my own. .iTunes has the right info on their listing, but when i upload the cd into a itunes player the wrong info pops up.I know I gave the right info to the mastering engineer and factory, i know the cd is produced with the correct info. Seen it in other circumstances. Since Cd Baby handles my digital distribution I contacted them. here is what they had to say:

"As far as the information being displayed in your iTunes player, most media players use an online data base called the CDDB (CD Data Base) which is owned by a company called Gracenote......"


Entered at Wed Nov 10 15:29:15 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Toronto

John D: You might appreciate this. On Sunday I got a call from an old friend telling me that he and his wife had just moved back to Toronto from Blind River (the one mentioned in Neil Young's "Long May You Run") where she listened religiously to your Sunday morning CFRB show via the internet. Now her big concern was "Where's John Donabie?" Thanks to Kevin J here at the GB I was able to help out.

In the early '60s the guy'd been co-leader of the neighbourhood band that evolved into Robbie Lane and the Disciples, and that in its early days included both Bruce Palmer (later of Buffalo Springfield) and Richard Bell. Richard was pulled from the group by his parents after an incident involving a bottle of wine, two tipsy 15-year-olds, a parental automobile and an unyielding oak tree.


Entered at Wed Nov 10 14:23:04 CET 2010 from (59.101.61.51)

Posted by:

dlew919

Web: My link

Subject: Interview with Garth

This was posted on Facebook by Maud (Mrs hudson) and also Carol Caffin (Rick's publicist for those who don't know her0, and I don't think anyone else has posted it here: apologies if so. Great interview with Garth.


Entered at Wed Nov 10 13:41:48 CET 2010 from (99.254.209.45)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Dylan Mono Box Set

So........I received the Dylan Mono Box set yesterday and immediately put each one into my computer to be a part of my iTunes. Got a surprise; when I got to the 3rd album, The Times.....

When I put it into iTunes the title of the album read, The Times They Are A Changin'[UK]

UK? What's a UK version doing in the middle of this set; with the rest of the American releases? And the CD jacket is textured.....the others are not. Quite nice actually. Then I read all the print on the outside of the jacket and there is no indication it is a UK release. All the American release info is there. Did somebody make a mistake; or does the computer read it wrongly. Bonus I guess.

And one mo' time I will complain that I would have preferred the Canadian Mono mix of Blonde On Blonde. Do you know I have talked to all kinds of collectors; including Bill M and Dr. J. No one seems to have this one in their collection. I'll bet many threw out their mono versions in the '60's; when the stereo versions became available. Remember......we didn't want to be left behind.


Entered at Wed Nov 10 10:17:34 CET 2010 from (99.141.36.176)

Posted by:

Tom

Maybe if we're lucky we can get Viney to tell us about Van's "The Jazz Tour". Please, go on...


Entered at Wed Nov 10 06:50:44 CET 2010 from (69.182.79.77)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Syria Mosque Set List

Thanks Peter for the set-list from Syria Mosque. Nothing there from Cahoots, so I think that November 1970 makes sense. Fall of 1971 would probably look more like the Rock of Ages set list. It would be great if they would release a DVD of a complete concert from those days.....or even an audio CD. The Royal Albert Hall show would be a good start. The stuff from there that's on AMH sounds really good.


Entered at Wed Nov 10 06:43:17 CET 2010 from (70.78.227.122)

Posted by:

Northern Boy

Subject: Convocation Hall (University of Toronto)

I attended my graduation gig there in the 70's but during my "unfortunate incarceration" at that institution, I somehow managed to miss out on a great John Mayall/John Lee Hooker concert at Convocation Hall.

My wife, whom I met at U of T, has been kind enough over the years to repeatedly remind me of what a great concert I managed to miss that evening.

If I could have a 70's mulligan, I think instead I should've actually attended that blues concert but come graduation time, just stayed home and convocated with a case of beer. NB


Entered at Wed Nov 10 05:24:32 CET 2010 from (24.108.12.129)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: JT

Man. That brings back so many memories. I don't know, or remember, how many times I've been to Convocation Hall for music. It always seemed to me to be a big secret and not very much press whenever something was going on. The first show I ever seen there was in the late 70's and it was a cover band of the Beatles. I remember they were so good that I thought they were the Beatles. A few years later, they were headlining at the O'Keefe Center. It's funny. But I always used to think, man , this is hallowed ground and I'm watching a band here. The sound was always awesome and I think it had a lot to do with the shape of the hall.


Entered at Wed Nov 10 04:58:20 CET 2010 from (174.119.191.73)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Convocation Hall Toronto

Remembering concerts loved brings me to a 90s concert in Toronto with Levon, Garth, and Colin Linden and others who played with them during those times. The set list (lifted from the Archived Tape section herein) was: WS Walcott Med Show Crazy Mama Blind Willie McTell Rag Mama Rag Atlantic City It Makes No Difference Stuff Ya Gotta Watch Stagefright Life Is a Carnival Shape I'm In Ophelia The Weight Remedy Blues Stay Away From Me I always thought convocation hall was for graduating only, having done that in that building in the early 70s and then watching my sons and my daughter-in-law do the same thing. But I can truthfully say that the sound in there was great and the performance was superb. It is one of the great shows I've been to. I think it would be great if the boys (any or all of them, Robbie included) could 'crank it up' one more time. Colin, Tom and Stephen could join them and and that would be something. It is a dream but I can almost hear it now.


Entered at Tue Nov 9 21:00:00 CET 2010 from (74.75.67.12)

Posted by:

Bob R

Location: Maine USA
Web: My link

Subject: Band Radio Show

Hi all- anyone up for a three-hour radio show featuring The Band ? This Saturday night, Nov 13th, 9:00pm-Midnight EST, my program "Mystery Train" will be dedicating all three hours to The Band. Together, solo, you name it, we'll have it. You can listen in from anywhere in the world by logging onto www.wjzf.org -- so join us for a very fun night of music ! We'll be taking requests during the show, but if you have any requests or shout outs or dedications you want to make sure get into the program, please email me during this week at mysterytrainradio@yahoo.com -- thanks and hope you can make it !


Entered at Tue Nov 9 20:40:02 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

And sadly, after the Academy of Music (Rock of Ages) concert, The Band would go 19 months before performing live again at Watkins Glen in late July 1973.


Entered at Tue Nov 9 20:32:13 CET 2010 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

I recall the effort to document Band performances, and I have a draft that I compiled for 1970. Levon recalled that they played a lot during the first three months of the year; that would include Massey Hall. Then you have Central Park NY, May 1. We know they played the Festival Express in June and the Hollywood Bowl July 10. The Cali tour probably included Berkeley and Pasadena. Once Stage Fright came out, they started flying on a small plane to gigs around the East Coast, probably one-offs. At the end of October they did some Southern gigs--Memphis and U. of Alabama--came back north for November (Peter's list with the Spectrum being in Philadelphia), then did another Southern swing. Dallas on Dec 4, followed by Houston, New Orleans, Atlanta (DP's gig), Jacksonville, and finally MiamPr


Entered at Tue Nov 9 19:42:49 CET 2010 from (74.190.123.87)

Posted by:

Mike C

Thanks to all for the info on the Syria Mosque show, and for helping to plug the gaps in my increasingly leaky memory. Probably a few less snorts of Wild Turkey over the years would have helped even more in that department.

Makes me wonder now whether it was '70, not '71, when I saw them in Baltimore. Anybody else out there (Charlie Y?) take in that show?; it was at the Civic Center. Seems odd that they would play Pittsburgh, but not DC or Balmer.

Anyway, my recollection is that they were touring in '71 to support Cahoots. And as it turns out, this would have been just before the shows that were recorded for Rock Of Ages.


Entered at Tue Nov 9 19:32:36 CET 2010 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Web: My link

The link is to a You Tube clip of This Wheels on Fire from the Syria Mosque show.


Entered at Tue Nov 9 19:01:53 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Peter: A promotional poster for the Atlanta concert was duplicated in the booklet for one of the 2001 Capitol CD reissues (Stage Fright?).


Entered at Tue Nov 9 18:33:23 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

David, the Atlanta Dec 10th poster doesn't seem to be in the "tickets and posters" archive on the site. I have one clipped into the would-be document. I think Tim found it. Or maybe you supplied it?


Entered at Tue Nov 9 18:29:35 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Syria Mosque

Set list:

The whole concert in order on the tape was:

The Shape I'm In:

Time to Kill:

The Weight:

I Shall Be Released:

Stage Fright:

Strawberry Wine:

Rockin Chair:

This Wheel's on Fire:

The Rumor:

Up on Cripple Creek:

W.S. Walcott Medicine Show:

King Harvest:

Unfaithful Servant:

We Can Talk:

Look Out Cleveland:

The Night They Drove Dixie Down:

Across the Great Divide:

Lovin’ You Is Sweeter Than Ever:

Organ solo:

Chest Fever:

I listed the seven broadcast in Holland below. Hey! We're actually talking about The Band …


Entered at Tue Nov 9 18:08:49 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Westcoaster doesn't seem to have come up for air since he reported on a successful adventure in cooking. Hope he's okay.

dlew: There's no way I, as a world-class anal retentive, would give up any part of my collection of rubber duckies for such a purpose.

Kevin J: As far as I know, Ray Blake plays every Sunday afternoon / early evening upstairs at Birds and Beans coffeeshop on the Lakeshore in Mimico. The first time I saw him play was '70 when he was with Mashmakhan; the second time was in the mid '70s when he was in the Lisa Hartt Band (who I went to see because the deservedly legendary Denny Gerrard was on bass). Lisa Hartt's the singer at Birds and Beans.

Calvin: I think that, technically speaking, Jim Clench replaced Fred Turner on bass in BTO, when Turner, who was really a guitarist, moved over to take Randy Bachman's place. Clench had left April Wine to join the Loverboy 'supergroup' that was being assembled by a management group. Loverboy ended up going with another bassist, and I suspect that Clench's consolation prize was being placed in BTO, who were part of the same management stable. When that went nowhere he hightailed it back into the waiting arms of April Wine.


Entered at Tue Nov 9 17:30:51 CET 2010 from (69.182.79.77)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Syria Mosque

Is the entire set list available? The 7 songs that Peter mentioned are all pre-Cahoots, which would, make sense for a Fall 1970 show. A Fall 1971 show would probably include at least 'Life Is a Carnival', and maybe some others from Cahoots.

Lars, thanks for the foliage update. I suppose that Levon's arrival could have been after Halloween as John Simon suggests, and based on your report of Overlook Mountain still having some decent color this past week. We've been way past peak for quite a few weeks now here in the hills of Northwestern CT, but it's been a strange year with a warmer than normal October. Most trees are bare except for the damn oaks that I'll probably still be raking mid-December.


Entered at Tue Nov 9 17:23:02 CET 2010 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

The Syrian Mosque show was shot by a European (Dutch?) film crew that obviously used an audio feed from the live mixing board. There is a version of the opening that uses some basic graphics to provide the boys' names, the location and the date of the show. I believe The Weight, Time To Kill, TWoF, and one other that eludes me for the moment were all filmePr


Entered at Tue Nov 9 17:16:36 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The Band in Atlanta 1970

I attended that concert at the old Municipal Auditorium in Atlanta on Dec. 10, 1970. The Band sounded great! There was no opening act, which was unusual at the time.


Entered at Tue Nov 9 17:15:55 CET 2010 from (174.89.117.48)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: Mike C

Best thing about links sometimes is where they lead.........Rod Stewart doing TWOF......Dig some of the pictures....


Entered at Tue Nov 9 17:06:01 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Fall 1970

Sorry, to add to that, these were known dates in Fall, 1970:

Tufts University, 5 Nov.

Worcester, Ma, 7 Nov

Spectrum, LA 8 Nov.

Syria Mosque, “Nov.”

Syracuse, 21 Nov

Atlanta 10 Dec

The tour must have been way more extensive. We never got round to compiling any more because no one gave any more information. It was mainly from tickets and posters on the Band site, plus known tapes.


Entered at Tue Nov 9 17:00:39 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

There was a Band cassette with the title "Syria Mosque November or December 1970" back in the days when there were lists.A couple of years ago we tried to compile a list of known gigs with any related memorabilia, but it never got finished. Tim did a lot of work on it. The list I was doing had Syria Mosque November 1970 listed. Seven songs (out of twenty) were broadcast:

Time To Kill

This Wheel’s on Fire

Across the Great Divide

Up On Cripple Creek

King Harvest

The Weight

Strawberry Wine


Entered at Tue Nov 9 16:43:33 CET 2010 from (74.190.123.87)

Posted by:

Mike C

Web: My link

Maybe everyone knows of this vid, but it is new to me; the fellas doing TWOF at Syria Mosque in Pittsburgh, shot with a hand-held camera by someone meandering around on stage. Claims to be from Nov '70, but I wonder if it's not from the following November. I saw them in Columbia Md in the summer of '70, and then in Baltimore in Dec '71. Wasn't aware that they toured in between those dates. Can anyone shed any light on the date of the show?


Entered at Tue Nov 9 16:10:11 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I think at 30-40 weeks they place them in a plastic bag tied to a small float (say a plastic bath duck), and set them down in the Atlantic to find their own way across. They probably have a British 2nd class stamp inside the bag with instructions to finders on British beaches to affix the stamp and slip them into the nearest post box.


Entered at Tue Nov 9 13:38:30 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.190)

Posted by:

Steve

Dlew, you were sworn to secrecy about the walking on " you know what" thing! If pilgrims start showing up here again, you're in deep shit.


Entered at Tue Nov 9 13:12:10 CET 2010 from (59.101.61.51)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: 30-40 weeks? Does Norm put them on the tug?

Does Steve walk them across? Does Bill M. throw them as far as he can into the tide and hope it carries across?

30-40 WEEKS!!


Entered at Tue Nov 9 13:06:39 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Amazon Canada

Amazon Canada lists three shipping speeds for international. These are "Standard 30-40 weeks" , "Expediated 7-14 weeks" then "Priority" at 2 to 4 days. On the "priority" which is the only viable choice, the price of Garth's CD is $CDN 39.95. I've ordered it. That's the price on my order. Yes, it's a huge lift, and it's obvious the other two shipping speeds are simply ways of saying "Use Priority." Which means about £15 sterling, or nearly 25 Canadian dollars.

In contrast, Jeff's CD was here in the UK in about three days for such a fair and low shipping rate that I even e-mailed back to ask them if they were charging enough. As keen amazon reseller and ebay buyers keep finding out, people sell stuff online at 98 cents + post. When you get through to the "post" section very late in the order you find it's $4.95. It's happening everywhere. I was speaking to distributors here about something else, and they were quoting much lower charges "if we can have the post and packing".

Amazon Canada, on International orders, are making a huge amount on shipping. Do pass the figures on to Maud, because you probably can't even access those international rates from within North America!


Entered at Tue Nov 9 12:37:14 CET 2010 from (99.254.209.45)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Alexander from Scotland

Alexander, I may be wrong; but I would order Garth's new CD from Amazon.ca and even; with the shipping costs, I believe it would come out cheaper than ordering; from Amazon.uk. I spoke with Maud Hudson the other day and they are both very excited about the new release. I know many of the artists involved and it will be great!


Entered at Tue Nov 9 10:00:23 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Fragmentation sounds wrong. We’ve seen ten years of conglomeration into three mega groups. But now independents are cropping up outside that as distribution is getting so much easier (due to the likes of amazon).


Entered at Tue Nov 9 09:56:47 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Metallica / Garth

Dlew, I didn't know of Metallica's more modest origins, but perhaps backwards: a bird then a dinosaur?

Alexander, I priced it last week. As I said then, you can order straight from amazon Canada and all your UK account details come up, but then it's £10 plus £15 postage, so you end up back at the amazon.uk price within 50p. I ordered from Canada because it's 2-4 days delivery, but it's released a week earlier. On reflection, the most sensible thing was to have phoned SPIN in Newcastle, who always import any Band-related stuff. If they've bought it in bulk, it should be cheaper. I don't know if they have yet … but their ads appear in all the main music magazines and their prices are fair.

The simultaneous release pattern in the UK / USA which lasted from around 1985 to a couple of years ago is slipping away fast. The fragmentation of the record industry means it's better for artists to do restricted deals with smaller labels than to drop the lot on Universal or whatever. This means the old 70s business of selling American import records is reviving while the British deal is done (if it gets done).


Entered at Tue Nov 9 08:40:39 CET 2010 from (90.199.139.33)

Posted by:

Alexander Lees

Location: Scotland

Subject: Garths new album

I am looking forward to the new album of Band covers by Canadian artists and thank Garth for his input but the cost is $16 Canadian which is roughly 10 uk pounds but if I preorder on Amazon UK..it will cost 26 UK pounds....that is a huge difference and very disappointing.


Entered at Tue Nov 9 08:34:50 CET 2010 from (59.101.61.51)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Rob: sent another one - check your junk mail?

Peter V: Metallica started out as a garage band, and developed into something else - it seems a little like taking a dinosaur, and then a bird, without looking at the steps inbetween...


Entered at Tue Nov 9 01:27:08 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.186)

Posted by:

Steve

Bill, is probably down at the concert being given by, The Ukulele Orchestra Of Great Britain. They're playing in Toronto tonight.

I just heard their version of the Theme From Shaft on the radio. Bill, should have some good Uke jokes for us if nothing else. The head of the orchestra described the song as an "American folk song" composed by Issac Hayes' great great grandfather.


Entered at Mon Nov 8 20:08:49 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Trampin' thru the forest

Lars! Y'all been hangin around down in Hickry Holler? You run into Hickry Holler's Tramp?

You know the path was deep and wide from foot steps leading to our cabin.

Above the door there burned a scarlet lamp.

Where in hell did ol' Bill Munson get to? I thought he was comin' over to share some wine and pickled sockeye. I know he loves it!

The pickle I did this year was the best ever. I put quite a lot of different colour bell peppers in there for colour, red onions, and a nice little haleepiano pepper in each jar. It's so good it's immoral. You got to watch the aphrodisiac properties of this stuff. It can be dangerous. I don't know if Bill could handle much of it.

Last night I made ol' Suz a seafood chowder. Sockeye and fresh shrimp. Fresh steamed muscles from PEI on broad noodles with garlic and butter dribbled over 'em. I think I might have give her too much of that aphrodisiac. You gotta watch givin' it to women. Drives 'em a little crazy some times.


Entered at Mon Nov 8 18:48:01 CET 2010 from (174.89.117.48)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

For a smile - check out the link above - Robbie Robertson's "Sonny Got Caught by the Moonlight" with a popular US television show as background...........an overlooked GREAT song - with a stunningly good contribution from Rick Danko....................found this by accident looking for a thing on Garth's new project..............


Entered at Mon Nov 8 18:30:41 CET 2010 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: NY

Subject: misc

NORM- You should have a bosun's pipe.

FYI- Tonight at the Iron Horse Music Hall in Northampton, MA the bluegrass band "Trampled By Turtles" is performing at 9:00 PM. I wish I could be there, but I can't get away.

It's a rainy day here. When it started around 9:00 AM there was a little sleet mixed in. We had a black frost this weekend and now the rain is knocking out the last russet -colored oak leaves. The woods are beginning to open up. Sat at dusk I was sitting in a big old white oak and a 7 point buck walked right up to my tree and put down a scrape under a nearby scrub cedar. I was so close I could see his whiskers. I love this time of year.


Entered at Mon Nov 8 18:14:28 CET 2010 from (174.89.117.48)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Thanks Peter.....found this Tracklisting for See My Friends:

1. Better Things - Ray Davies & Bruce Springsteen

2. Celluloid Heroes - Ray Davies, Jon Bon Jovi & Richie Sambora

3. Days/This Time Tomorrow - Ray Davies & Mumford & Sons

4. Long Way From Home - Ray Davies, Lucinda Williams & The 88

5. You Really Got Me - Ray Davies & Metallica

6. Lola - Ray Davies & Paloma Faith

7. Waterloo Sunset - Ray Davies & Jackson Browne

8. 'Til The End of The Day - Ray Davies, Alex Chilton & The 88

9. Dead End Street - Ray Davies & Amy Macdonald

10. See My Friends Ray Davies & Spoon

11. This Is Where I Belong - Ray Davies & Black Francis

12. David Watts - Ray Davies & The 88

13. Tired Of Waiting - Ray Davies & Gary Lightbody

14. All Day And All Of The Night/Destroyer - Ray Davies & Billy Corgan

Davies will return to the U.S. prior to the release of See My Friends in late November for a string of select dates with the Dessoff Chamber Choir, in support of 2009's The Kinks Choral Collection.

Tour Dates:

11/24/10 New York, NY Beacon Theatre 7:30PM

11/26/10 Montclair, NJ The Wellmont Theatre 8PM

11/27/10 Philadelphia, PA Verizon Hall 8PM

11/28/10 Boston, MA Wilbur Theater TBD


Entered at Mon Nov 8 18:09:12 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Ray Davies

Music News.com has a pretty good review of Ray's new album by Andy Snipper, with a little video of Ray's thoughts on the project.


Entered at Mon Nov 8 17:53:06 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: 2120 Michigan Ave.

Chess Records benefited from the expertise of a great engineer, Malcolm Chisholm, who learned his craft working with another legendary recording figure, Bill Putnam, at Universal Recording in Chicago. When Chess built their own studio, with Mr. Chisholm's help, it became known for the sound of its "live" room and echo chambers.


Entered at Mon Nov 8 17:53:43 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Alex Chilton

Alex does Till The End of The Day. Ray says they also cut Set Me Free with Alex Chilton, but didn't use it.


Entered at Mon Nov 8 17:38:52 CET 2010 from (174.89.117.48)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Retirement Funds

See My Friends.........have not heard it yet.....but understand Alex Chilton is on it - one of the last things he did before passing on.................However, just the thought of Bon Jovi on it prevents me from running to the record store.......slow walk maybe....


Entered at Mon Nov 8 17:11:22 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.186)

Posted by:

Steve

If Peter can supply that upper crust pipe I'd gladly stuff it for you.

I once found a pipe while fishing that I've always regretted losing, it was left behind in a trunk in the attic of an old farm house we once lived in the late 70's. It's a three hour drive from here and by the time I discovered the trunk had been forgotten and got back there 3 years later the house had been bulldozed along with the trunk I suppose.

I found the pipe while fishing for trout in the brook on my grandmother's wood lot up in The Gaspe.

There had been a small sawmill there in the bush back in the 20's and 30's. All that remained were huge piles of sawdust and some of the mill's saw bunks.

When I was about 15 or 16 I found a little clay pipe in a sawdust pile where it touched the brook.

The pipe was like new. It still had the company name on it. It had probably been buried in the sawdust for 40 or 50 years. It's the one thing I've lost over the years that I really regret.


Entered at Mon Nov 8 17:10:21 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Thanks, David. "mediocre" obviously didn't apply to the performances, more to how they sound stands up next to (say) contemporary Chess Records in terms of dynamic range. They do sound very compressed.


Entered at Mon Nov 8 17:05:45 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Fats Domino

Fats Domino with Dave Bartholomew, like most New Orleans musicians, recorded their classic tunes at Cosimo Matassa's J&M Recording Studio. The earlier recordings, such as "Fat Man", were recorded in a small back room at Mr. Matassa's appliance & record store, using a direct to disc recorder. The songs were released as 78 records so, needless to say, the sound quality was not that good. Hence, modern reissues of the material are sourced from lacquer acetates.

Begining in 1951, Mr. Matassa switched to the then state of the art Ampex tape recorder and an array of high quality microphones. Later that decade, he moved the studio to a new, larger & better designed facility, moving up to 4 and later 8 track recorders.

So, by the time Fats Domino recorded songs like "I'm Ready", the recording technology had improved vastly. I wouldn't call subsequent recordings mediocre, they were just recorded & mastered in a certain style. In addition, Mr. Matassa used an original Neumann U-47 / Telefunken microphone for vocals, which tended to add a crisp bump in the mid-range.


Entered at Mon Nov 8 17:05:39 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: See My Friends

Ray Davies’ “See My friends” came out today. It’s one of those albums where one review gave it one out of five, the next review gave it four. The sleeve note stirs it up. Of Waterloo Sunset, he now suggests that Terry & Julie are”two characters, probably my older sisters.” The friend who joins him on that is Jackson Browne.

Thinking of the negative review, I think he made a mistake in kicking off with the Springsteen duet (Better Things). It’s irresistible in sales terms, but it sounds too Springsteenesque. Also on the next one Celluloid Heroes, it’s so nice when Jon Bon Jovi stops and Ray’s voice comes back. You Really Got Me with Metallica makes the point that it was starting heavy-metal … but it loses the garage band / punk bit. So far (one listen) he comes off better with younger artists like Mumford & Sons (Days) and Paloma Faith (Lola). Long Way from Home with Lucinda Williams sounds great, but I keep getting compilations where she sings one song, and it’s usually the best one.

The negative review was pissed off that it was the second recycling exercise in a year (after The Kinks Choral Collection), but seeing as it was in the supermarket Top 20 this morning, it's what the public want.


Entered at Mon Nov 8 16:08:25 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: A pipe!

I want a pipe too. A good Ivy League pipe with some sickly sweet smelling tobbacco.......gotta have a pipe....


Entered at Mon Nov 8 14:02:56 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.190)

Posted by:

Steve

Nice gesture, Peter. Maybe you could send, Skipper Norm, the ascots since you no longer will be able to wear them without causing provocation.

Actually, if you could part with one that goes nicely with Navy Blue, the color of the barn coveralls I'll be sending The Skipper, that might be something to keep in mind.

I think Norm has said he has sea blue eyes which is a factor to consider as well. The ascot does make the all important connection between the coveralls and the eyes.

Now, I just have to find the list I made of Norm's measurements that he so kindly posted a awhile back, to make sure I send the right size coveralls.

Norm, do you prefer snaps or zippers?

One last thing, the all important footwear. Fortunately, barn boots are perfectly suited, with their non slip soles, for walking on any surface that might get overly moist. Things like a yacht deck or barn floor .

I know your height, weight and waist sizes but you never posted your shoe size. Do you see a need for steel toes. I'll wait on that til I hear. Unfortunately, you only have a choice of black or pea green. Do you have a preference? Accessorizing, who knew it could be so complicated?


Entered at Mon Nov 8 10:47:24 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Snipers

Snipers. It’s odd how people visit websites in the middle of the night their time (always a bad sign) to snipe. As far as I can see “Tom” or “Gene” has never commented on The Band, the musical content, nor on music. What's the motivation? How many other sites do they glance into, sneer, and move on?

I’m not counting Bob W. here. Bob used to post on music and we corresponded by e-mail in a friendly way years ago. There’s a grudge there now. I don’t even remember what it was about, though my neckwear assumed some importance in it. I know Bob was genuinely interested in The Band, so perhaps we fell out over some long-lost Levonista / Robertsonian debate. It was a long time ago, way back when Lars still used to sleep in trees, and as I say, the origins escape me. A lot of ire dates back to when I used to moderate Little Pink. Posts got eradicated. Some, like Bumbles, shrugged and accepted the referee’s decision on this or that particular tackle and carried on. Others took offence for life. Bob hasn’t posted about music for a long time. Perhaps he will again. I promise not to make unpleasant remarks if and when he does (this is called an olive branch).


Entered at Mon Nov 8 08:47:11 CET 2010 from (99.141.26.52)

Posted by:

Tom

How long did it take you to think up that one, Viney?


Entered at Mon Nov 8 08:36:03 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Loog Oldham

The first one (Stoned) is way better than the incoherent and aptly titled "2Stoned". I agree on the attitudes, but it's the snippets of stuff surrounding it that count, basically because it was all happening round him. His error was in thinking it was all because of him. There's a book called "The Immediate Story" (about his label) that has much more.

I just looked for my copy of "Stoned" and I can only find the second one. So in the words of Shel Silverstein (almost), "I've got "Stoned" but I've missed it."


Entered at Mon Nov 8 00:04:31 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Feelin' the Blues.....Ocean Blues

Awwwww......the poor little feller. Lars, I think it's just too painfully obvious the little farm boys jealous. I mean being a bog hick, living out there pickin' stones and shovelin' cow chit man. That can really do you a lotta social harm.

You can easily tell when all he ever does is complain about all the politics, environmental issues and every negative subject he can dream up. It must be a real hell wandering around kicking rocks, fence posts talking to cows having chickens snickering behind yer back.......very degrading.

Thank god for computers to come along, so you can complain to every one in the world and you just know they're hanging on yer every word.


Entered at Mon Nov 8 00:03:44 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.184)

Posted by:

Steve

For the totally dimwitted, I was only pulling Norm's wooden leg, of course. I made the post after checking out the other sleek looking yacht Norm posted the name of.

Lars, sometimes I wonder if you're running on all cylinders. That last post being a fine example of why.


Entered at Sun Nov 7 22:01:55 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: dLew

David, still no sign of your email yet! robmillis 74 at hot mail dot com


Entered at Sun Nov 7 20:10:12 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The Poor House

Joan; You always sound like a little ol' girl....hmmm, must be because you are. Your a sweet heart, your husband's a lucky man.

Lars! I've just googled up a yacht for us. I'm sure you'll want to throw in. It's only 42 million and change. Quite a boat. I'll find the sight again so you can look. I think it's in Anacortes.

I've been meaning to say something after my trip to Alaska. Now don't any of you "Mericans take this the wrong way. I'm not critisizing, insulting, or being sarcastic. I picked up a lot of papers, and did a lot of reading just out of my own curiosity.

The Alaska Journal of Commerce, there is 11 pages @ 24 to the page, of default sales of homes. Of course we all are aware of the mess real estate is in by allowing people to qualify too easily for mortgages. But when you see that kind of mess right in front of you, it's pretty scarey.

My reason for going up there was how the price of pleasure boats is falling. However, it's also very horrifying how many people have let these things, and homes included deteriorate. These are tough times.


Entered at Sun Nov 7 19:31:53 CET 2010 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Why can't we be friends?

Thank you Bonk. Very well put. If something bugs someone here, just try to let it go. No need to get "snarky" That's not what this site is for.

For Autobiographies: Pattie Boyd's was pretty good for R&R gossip. Ray Davies' is weird but fascinating.


Entered at Sun Nov 7 18:57:32 CET 2010 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

STEVE- You really enjoy bothering people, don't you? I guess you won't be happy until this GB is in the middle of another one of the flame wars you love to start. Then when Jan pulls the plug we'll know who to blame.


Entered at Sun Nov 7 18:24:55 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.184)

Posted by:

Steve

Subject: Grand?

OK, I'll check it out but, "Grand Yachts", sounds like "The Dollar Store" for boats. Are all the boats really a grand and what the fuck do you get for a grand? Are you going to be slum-yachting just to avoid having a big chunk of your tax money routed our way?

If you do buy one, I have some clothes that I can send you that will make you the envy of the slum-yachting crowd. Let me know if you want the odor removed before I ship them. I offer the service for free but recommend not taking me up on it if you'll want to be smelling as good as you look.


Entered at Sun Nov 7 17:02:33 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Taxing my patience

Well farmer, nothing you say or do bothers me at all. I think you determine your own punishment. Some times it's really funny.

In answer to your question, no......I haven't bought that boat yet. I'm looking at a couple of others. Google Grand Yachts Vancouver. About halfway down list of yachts for sale click on "Symbol Yacht fisher". I'm looking at it and a couple of others.

Regarding the tax, you get none. I get pretty well all of it back. I am a boat charter business. The boat is purchased as a charter boat for business. The tax goes into my regular quarter and is handled as always.

You get NOTHING you crimina! Why would you want to get into anything about Tommy Douglas, a good man. However I doubt he even played the guitar. Now of course we know you don't seem to understand. This is not a political form.

I'm not the Messiah....alright I AM the Messiah.....now f&^% OFF!


Entered at Sun Nov 7 16:36:11 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.184)

Posted by:

Steve

Norm, I'm guessing you haven't bought that boat yet. I've been checking the incoming cash( to Quebec)from that new sales tax in BC and haven't noticed that purchase listed.

Our cut here from your purchase would be about $10,000 and with winter coming we could use it for snow removal or to send a couple of needy Quebecers to Florida for the winter. I hope that wasn't just talk when it comes to the boat purchase.

By the by, keep up the comparisons to Monty Python will you. I know we both agree on their brilliance.

I should also thank you for the comparison a few years back to, David Suzuki. I bow to the west. I was reminded of the compliment yesterday when someone on radio mentioned that in a poll of Canadians last year, Dr. Suzuki was voted Canada's most trusted person.

Now if you could work up an "insult" containing a comparison to, Tommy Douglas, I would feel the wind in my sails til well into next year.

Remember, BUY BUY BUY.


Entered at Sun Nov 7 13:42:36 CET 2010 from (59.101.61.51)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Loog Oldham's memoirs

They're rather sort of pathetic, aren't they... it's as if the banad was one thing, and he was another, and he oculdn't see it...

there's a recent trend for Aus. managers to do books... Stuart Coupe's is the best one - he interviews quite a few of them...


Entered at Sun Nov 7 12:32:24 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Rock autobiographies

Dlew, Keef’s autobiography is next in line after “Fab”, the Howard Sounes biography of Paul McCartney, which like his Dylan one, is very good and even turns up new stuff on the early days. That’s hard to do when you’ve read a dozen books on the period. Some of it is scurrilous, like Epstein consulting a divorce lawyer for The Beatles after their return from Hamburg in late 1962, because divorce lawyers always knew how to get their clients’ venereal diseases treated with discretion. But scurrilous bits are what the papers all quote from Keef’s book.

I just read the review of James Kaplan’s new book on Sinatra, which only goes up to 1954 and has the requisite bits of weirdness we like to read about major figures. Sinatra apparently changed his underpants up to twenty times a day. He also was said to have had the biggest organ any of his paramours had ever seen, so perhaps he wore them out.

Ian McLagan’s “All The Rage” is a good one on the sixties. Ronnie Spector’s “Be My Baby” is another. I like the “manager” ones. Simon Napier-Bell’s “Black Vinyl White Powder”, Andrew Loog Oldham’s “Stoned”. Don Arden’s “Mr Big” isn’t well-written but tells the tale from the side we don’t usually hear it.

If you can get it, Clive Selwood’s “All The Moves, None of The Licks” is very good … he was in senior management at half the record labels in the UK at various times, and also tells it well.


Entered at Sun Nov 7 11:28:09 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Yes, it should be back to the music. I over-reacted yesterday, but the trouble is that Bub only appears from time to time and then to drop a remark which is placed to get reaction. Never to comment on music, I note. Steve and Norm battle it out regularly, but with a sense of humour. When Norm says “shoot the farmer!” I usually smile. If Bob said it, disgruntled postal workers would come to mind. Then you get the trolls, the Tom or Gene or Jim or whatever … no comments on music.

I spent Saturday in the area of Wiltshire which is dominated by military bases; the area that regularly receives the bodies back from the “peacekeeping missions”, and sees the funerals. Being just before Rememberance Sunday, poppies were being sold everywhere. All quietly. No braggart claims about lives on the line or saving the world.


Entered at Sun Nov 7 09:49:03 CET 2010 from (59.101.61.51)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Anyone read Keith's memoirs yet?

Had a brief look at it in a shop today: looks pretty good. Insofar as music memoirs, Dylan's chronicles are by far the best. But Bill Wyman's, salted as they are with bitterness and a bizarre OCD (every dollar, every woman...) are good...

Clapton's worked a lot better the second time. Bob Geldof's 'Is that it?' are really good: though there's a 20/20 hindsight cringing passage on Paula Yates - though it was undoubtedly true when he wrote it. B B King's are fascinating and dull all at once. Buddy Guy's 'Don't get me to talkin'...'

I think there's a general rule that the more obscure the author, the better the autobiography - though Dylan smashes that rule, (as he did so many others)...

what other bios do people like? and has anyone read Keef's yet?


Entered at Sun Nov 7 06:04:20 CET 2010 from (218.103.206.118)

Posted by:

Taylor

Location: Hong Kong

Thank you


Entered at Sun Nov 7 04:10:47 CET 2010 from (24.108.12.129)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: JAN!!!

Don't do it. Don't you break our hearts. Please, don't do it. It will pass. It always does!


Entered at Sun Nov 7 04:04:41 CET 2010 from (24.108.12.129)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: CHILL

Now , Now boys. Be nice. Just because someone says something that pisses you off you really don't have to respond. Even if the person is intentionally trying to get your goat. Which happens here now and again. Sometimes the remarks are pretty funny. And sometimes there downright hurtful. But that's the human beast and you guys have been reading it for a lot longer than I. But you all, mostly, keep coming back. So someone's a dick head. So what. Ignore them! Hey. I was just introduced to a great album called 'the return of the formerly brothers'. Really bad ass music. Give it a listen...Cheers, Carl


Entered at Sun Nov 7 03:48:30 CET 2010 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Subject: Python

"I'm Brien....and so's my wife!!!"

I was just watching something really good on tv with the wife. I always liked it when old farts used to say, "....the wife" and now I'm doing it. hmmmm.

John Brown. Old Osawatomie. A/K/A Isaac Smith. I'll bet Pat B. knows something. I just know that I've always hated the "Battle Hymn of the Republic" because it was derived from "John Brown's Body" or at least the tune was. I used to give my girls a quarter if they would skip that song for their piano lessons. The way I see it, John Brown owes me a lot of money.


Entered at Sun Nov 7 03:46:35 CET 2010 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

My crystal ball alerted me: it eminated - I see a shut down.


Entered at Sun Nov 7 03:22:04 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Too Good to be true

Things were coasting along nicly here , music wise. Then the farmer has to throw some political crap in here. He doesn't even know how to discuss or appreciate music. Pretending to be a political analist. Well......thanks.

I guess it's a good place to stay away from for a while. I'll e mail you Lars. There's got to be a better way. When some one thinks they are "The Messiah"! Well then we have to take things in hand, "Big Nose"!

"ooh'er you callin' big nose??? I'll knock your f//kin' nose flat across your face I will!


Entered at Sun Nov 7 03:14:13 CET 2010 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Read the posts, Viney. Just because you can't bring yourself to even occasionally shut the fuck up it doesn't give you the right to put words in anyone else's mouth.

Bub this, you arrogant jackass.


Entered at Sun Nov 7 02:36:38 CET 2010 from (99.141.26.52)

Posted by:

Tom

I wonder how many of us it would take to drive Viney away...


Entered at Sun Nov 7 02:06:37 CET 2010 from (206.18.100.1)

Posted by:

Calvin

I know there are a few hard core civil war buffs in here who just might be able to direct me to someone who might answer a question for me.

My current project is for a small village named Burton in Eastern Ohio. From Roughly 1810-1825 the minister of the congregational church was one Luther Humphrey who lived until 1871.

Abolitionist John Brown wrote a few letters in the 1850s to a Reverend Luther Humphrey who was his cousin. Anyone know a John Brown expert who I might call on? The John Brown house in Akron, Ohio had no idea.

Any assistance would be apprecaited.


Entered at Sun Nov 7 00:36:03 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The trouble is, Bub, this stuff about brave American boys putting their lives on the line for democracy plays well in Kansas. I come from the only other country outside the US of A where it plays at all. We tend to go along with it as your greatest allies. To the rest of the world, sadly, you come across as another loud-gobbed, swaggering bully.

Anyone heard from our old pal, Empty Now? Oh. no. That's right. He got driven away.


Entered at Sat Nov 6 23:09:06 CET 2010 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Thanks Joan. His Garthship is as fascinating as ever.


Entered at Sat Nov 6 20:25:16 CET 2010 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Or we could all stand around with wooden rifles pretending to be involved.


Entered at Sat Nov 6 19:21:15 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: "I'm Ready"

Back to music … some of the best compilations of the last few years are Ace’s “The London American Years.” Ace pride themselves on finding the very best sources and the tracks are normally the best you’ve heard them. They released the 1959 volume last week. This is stuff the early Hawks were playing, and it starts off with “I’m Ready” by Fats Domino (as covered by The Band). The strange thing is that the recording is all “middle”. Almost no bass there at all. It would be the single mix, as they always are in the series. My cheap EMI Fats Domino compilation sounds much the same. When you get to the next track on the Ace compilation, (Della Reese’s “Sermonette”) the bass leaps out at you, as it continues to do on the rest of these mono single mixes. Has anyone noticed this before about Fats Domino recordings? i.e. they were pretty mediocre recording quality?


Entered at Sat Nov 6 19:17:11 CET 2010 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Web: My link

Subject: Interview with Garth

Link to a wonderful interview with Garth that Maud posted on Facebook


Entered at Sat Nov 6 18:51:35 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.191)

Posted by:

Steve

Peter, I went with Zimbabwe since it's further towards the end of the alphabet and because of the move by American financial wizards away from The Chicago to the Harare school of economic policy.

Actually, it's quite a reasonable move. When you're broke and carrying the kind of debt that even those fiscally dimwitted, Soviet Commies couldn't imagine, it makes complete sense to look around for someone in the same boat as you and see what they've tried as remedies.

Bob, are you cleared to let the world know what hooliganism those Marines were up to in Yemen? I hope they destroyed all the underwear factories before leaving. I know it's not the manly kind of thing you'd want associated with the Marines, and not the kind of thing they immortalize with statues but it has to be done. How about the shoe stores, did they get them?

Poor Yemen, the country is close to splitting into two countries, they're being ruled by a dictatorial, President for life, now in his 32 year of rule, the water table is falling 20 feet a year in a country that is mainly agrarian based, the oil fields, the country's only source of international cash, are drying up just as quickly and still they can't take our pressing needs into consideration. Bastards! Someone should do something to get their attention on this matter.


Entered at Sat Nov 6 16:51:26 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Alphabets / Keef

You missed Zaire, Steve. Now that's one you could get bogged down in to a degree that would make the others look like pleasant vacation places. Still, I'm sure Bub and friends would have them democratic and peaceful pretty fast. I mean, it worked in Yemen.

You can spend a good ten minutes admiring the array of LP spines on the endpapers of Keith Richards' "Life." The usual suspects are there (Alexis Korner, John Lee Hooker etc) but you also get Buddy Holly (Not Fade Away link), The Everly Brothers, Otis Blue, The Temptations, Marvin Gaye, McLemore Avenue, Highway 61 Revisited and Mick Jagger's Performance soundtrack with Ry Cooder. I was looking at it and realized there wasn't an album on there I wouldn't want to have.


Entered at Sat Nov 6 16:13:21 CET 2010 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: the Woods

Subject: Dairy products in general, not just cheese

Norm- I don't feel insulted. I was never in a war, I was in an accident.

We still haven't had a black frost yet and my annuals may be looking kind of stressed but at least they're still alive. The killing frost is late this year. A lot of signs point towards a hard winter, but I'm not sure the nuts and the wooly caterpillars are really accurate indicators. By the way, there's still enough foliage on Overlook Mt. so that it's possible when Levon first saw the orange leaves around Woodstock he might have been arriving after Halloween, which is what John Simon remembered. We were talking about this topic last month (when did Levon arrive in Woodstock in 1967?).


Entered at Sat Nov 6 15:31:52 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Dust in the Wind

Bob; If you scroll thru the posts of the last few days, you find a relaxing conversation pretty much about music, musical equipment etc.

After all this time, I'm sure you must agree, the stoned farmer seems to have some deep seated inadequasy that motivates him to pound out these "grating" posts about nothing relavent. It seems he's trying to convince everyone here, he actually knows something of what he speaks.

Imagine how difficult it must be to go around with a rubber boot covered with cow dung in yer mouth a lot of the time.

As well as insulting your son and his troops, he insults people like Lars, and even his own father, and any one who was a part of any armed service that served their country.

Even tho' many people understandably don't agree with much of the conflicts of today and how they are managed, to continually stand on the soap box on this forum and yell at the masses how things should be, just puts me in mind of Monty Python.

Bless the cheeze makers!


Entered at Sat Nov 6 15:20:37 CET 2010 from (130.244.196.90)

Posted by:

Northwestcoaster

Subject: Steve

Beware america.


Entered at Sat Nov 6 14:46:57 CET 2010 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Steve, my son and hundreds of his fellow Marines spent several months last year breaking down training facilities in Yemen. While you sit in that foggy stupor of yours making desperate attempts at sarcasm there are realities being dealt with by people willing to put their lives on the line to do so.

I have come to appreciate your email that so eloquently instructed me to "tell your son he isn't fighting for me". It was the height of your ongoing obnoxious statements and made clear for me exactly what you are all about.

There's no rule here that says you have to take your job of shoveling bullshit literally. Give it a rest.


Entered at Sat Nov 6 13:58:53 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.186)

Posted by:

Steve

Subject: SNAFU

In the new, post 9-11 version of reality, Air Canada has responded to the Chinese man who boarded a flight disguised as an elderly white man by clamping down on all flights to and from Yemen.

Now that Iraq is a thriving democracy, time to fill in its spot in, The Axis Of Evil, with another dastardly foe from the Muslim world.

Yemen, the country where men carry bombs in their under wear and have an air force made up of Fed X planes. Sounds like it's time for CIA headquarters in downtown Sanaa to head to the roof tonight and illuminate the sky with the Bat image. If there was ever a case with Batman's name all over it, this is it!

If Bruce can't handle it we can always send in a couple of hundred thousand troops, that is if the Chinese will bank roll it.

There has to be some 3rd world country, somewhere, that we can whoop the tar out of.

If we can't take Yemen, there is only one country left in the alphabet of 3rd world trouble makers, Zimbabwe. It could all come down to Zimbabwe.

Selling, Zimbabwe, as an evil doer may be tough now that the US has based it monetary policy squarely on the, Mugabe School, of fiscal policy; If your economy is in the toilet and you can't come up with a creative remedy, just start printing money.


Entered at Sat Nov 6 03:35:08 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: for peter v

peter I send you the rough mixes cd so far next week and i buy the new biro and send too it is very good i see the trolls havent come back for their pudding yet? by the way as well as organ i also do proo freading please i like the van morrison too


Entered at Sat Nov 6 01:45:37 CET 2010 from (24.252.246.109)

Posted by:

Calvin

Clench didnt just didnt play with April Wine, while he was with them on and off for 36 years he also took a several year leave of absence to play in BTO. He actually was gutsy enough to replace Randy Bachman in the band and played and sang on BTO's final two albums.


Entered at Fri Nov 5 20:54:14 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

westcoaster: Yes, I did check out the video when you first posted the link. Needless to say, I picked up on a few pointers for playing that Amazing Rhythm Aces classic.


Entered at Fri Nov 5 20:10:18 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The Cowboy Song

Thanks for that David. I don't know if you've had the time, but Arlo does a great job of the ARA song. You should see it on the side bar suggestions.


Entered at Fri Nov 5 18:27:37 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

westcoaster: Thanks for the Arlo West link. I'm not familiar with him, but he's quite a talented player & craftsman.

If you have HDTV, another sometimes decent music channel is Paladia. I believe it's owned by MTV/Viacom and specializes in rebroadcasting music programming in high definition 1080i, especially concerts, originally produced by other channels. Programs include such series as VH1 Storytellers, CMT Crossroads and PBS Soundstage concerts.


Entered at Fri Nov 5 18:17:50 CET 2010 from (174.89.117.48)

Posted by:

Kevin J

JT: The descriptions of this history that you and Bill M in particular provide at this GB are the the top of my list as to reasons I tune into this place.......great stuff..............there truly are some places of hallowed ground in Toronto relating to music - especially as it relates to The Band......


Entered at Fri Nov 5 18:10:17 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.190)

Posted by:

Steve

Subject: A Warning To Tea Party Members

It's probably against The Tea Party's moral code to fly on anything but American Airlines but I feel obligated to warn party purists of the dangers of flying Air Canada should they be tempted by a seat sale.

Yesterday, an elderly white man boarded an Air Canada flight in Hong Kong. By the time he arrived in Vancouver there was no doubting he was a changed man. He had become a 23 year old Asian male.


Entered at Fri Nov 5 18:08:49 CET 2010 from (174.89.117.48)

Posted by:

Kevin J

sadavid: excellent......thank you.......you are right about Bravo.....hard to find much else though........how are the "music channels" allowed to stay on the air without playing any music anymore?


Entered at Fri Nov 5 17:55:28 CET 2010 from (38.112.100.2)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto

Subject: Ossington and Bloor L&McQ: Hallowed ground

Kevin J - That building at Ossington and Bloor is hallowed ground. Underneath that musical instrument facade and echoing in the walls and halls is the sound of the Concord Tavern and its own Levon and the Hawks, David Clayton Thomas and the Shays and Jon and Lee and the Checkmates, not to mention so many others. I lived there Saturday afternoons in the early 60s watching the matinees and wondering why these musicians were not 'up there'. I cannot find a photo of the old Concord Tavern anywhere. I'm going to have to go through some old papers that are put away to see if there is any such photo. If anyone has one or knows where to go to get one (Bill M?), please let me know. Right now, all you can see in 'images' on line is the L&McQ version.


Entered at Fri Nov 5 17:33:04 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Lesson - Building guitars & "Playing"

David, do you know of, or have you ever watched anything by Arlo West? Interesting guy from Maine who builds guitars, and is quite a player.

Some of his videos on youtube are quite interesting and entertaining. I particularly like this one about this little guitar he put together, and the way he plays it.


Entered at Fri Nov 5 17:30:16 CET 2010 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: ramble per bravo

Kevin J: that was one of a series of 6 Bravo!-original specials. They've been repeating them sporadically for months. The series title is "Innovators in Music" which is quite as misleading as the mission statement: exploring "how the creative impulse extends beyond music-making and into other realms of artistic pursuit." That seemed to fit the piece on Mickey Hart -- I am not entirely sure because I could only take about 5 mins of watching Mr. Hart gas on about his visual art. I saw some of the one with Dave Stewart which was better. The Levon one was all about the Rambles, and it was a really good piece, coulda gone longer. Larry Campbell got a lot of speaking time and said some nice things; I also got a kick out of seeing Amy drumming behind her dad. He related how he was a weekend father; he took Amy to the studio instead of to Disneyland. He also got a little misty bragging about his grandson sitting on his lap, drumming with one hand and teething on the other drumstick.

Bravo is my default channel after the news, just cause they do a fair bit of music - the other night I caught a couple of specials (hosted by Ranee Lee) of performances from the Montréal Jazz Fest -- 2007, I think. One was R. Bachman and it was really very good, until he started "singing." (Someone should tell him, really.) The other one was Costello / Toussaint with The Imposters and the Crescent City Horns. Very fine performances, and outstanding production values. I remember thinking how far we've come since _Midnight Special_ et al. -- at least some of that has to be down to Marty, a lot of the framing / angles was very like TLW.


Entered at Fri Nov 5 17:24:49 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Sometimes you have to bite your lip, and recite "Don't feed the trolls."


Entered at Fri Nov 5 16:07:12 CET 2010 from (174.89.117.48)

Posted by:

Kevin J

David P: Wonderful......thank you.

Levon Helm: I got in last night.....flipped on the tv and as I was making my way up the tuner to 46 ( the local real estate channel that is the only thing left on the tube that does not have goofy political or celebrity content! ) I landed on Bravo 40 and was stunned to see a Levon Ramble.......15 minutes of the best tv in a long time and sad that I only got the last bit of it...........What was this?.....obviously some type of documentary but I was not aware or at least had not heard any promotion on this????

Bill M: Speaking of Jerry Mercer...........another former band mate of his - guitarist in the Mashmakhan Rayburn Blake - works at Long & McQuade ( Ossington and Bloor location ) - 2nd floor of the guitar shop........always fun to chat with him about things past and the Festival Express experience..........

Sorry to hear about Jim Clench


Entered at Fri Nov 5 15:38:15 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: mono MFBP

Roger: Determing whether a mono mix is a true, dedicated one or merely a fold-down of the stereo mix requires a comparison of the two versions. If you have a stereo version of "Music From Big Pink", in addition to your mono version, listen to both and see if you can hear differences in vocal & instrument levels and in the bass & treble. In a separate mono mix, you should hear differences, sometimes very distinct or often subtle, from how the various multi-tracks were mixed in stereo. If the mono mix sounds close to that of the stereo, only reduced to one channel, it's more than likely a fold-down.

In the case of MFBP for instance, use "The Weight" as a sample and listens for things like the volume levels & tonality of Garth's piano, Robbie's acoustic guitar, Rick's bass and Levon's drums.


Entered at Fri Nov 5 14:54:57 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Monsieur Tabernouche is referring to the passing of longtime April Wine bassist Jim Clench, who was in the band from the late '70s until the last couple of years. Looking at the link above, I see that longtime drummer Jerry Mercer has also hung up his skates (though still walks the earth, as far as I know); Mercer is likely the only one known at all outside Canuckistan, and then only to a select few trainspotters, for his work with Roy Buchanan (Hawks link!!) in the early/mid '70s.


Entered at Fri Nov 5 14:37:49 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Vinyl Siding

Spinning on the turntable the last few weeks:

PROUD MARY -- Solomon Burke (Bell Records stereo promo LP) recorded at Muscle Shoals Sound in 1969

EARTH MUSIC -- The Youngbloods (Sundazed mono LP reissue)

THE HILLS OF INDIANA -- Lonnie Mack (1971 Elektra stereo promo LP)

WITH A LITTLE HELP FROM MY FRIENDS -- Steve Cropper (Volt stereo LP)

GABOR SZABO 1969 (Skye stereo promo LP from a great jazz guitarist, featuring instrumental covers from that era)

OBVIOUSLY 5 BELIEVERS -- Dylan (Columbia mono 45 single) This killer version was the B-side to an edited version of "Just Like A Woman"

RUNAWAY b/w JODY -- Del Shannon (Big Top mono 45 single)

BIG GIRLS DON'T CRY b/w CONNIE-O -- The 4 Seasons (Vee Jay mono 45 single)

HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE b/w DON'T YOU JUST KNOW IT -- Huey "Piano" Smith and The Clowns (Ace Records mono 45 single)

SIT DOWN I THINK I LOVE YOU (arr. by Van Dyke Parks) b/w DON'T LEAVE ME CRYING LIKE BEFORE -- The Mojo Men (Reprise mono 45 single)

TO KNOW HIM, IS TO LOVE HIM (originally the B-side!) b/w DON'T YOU WORRY MY LITTLE PET -- The Teddy Bears, written & produced by Phil Spector (Dore Records mono 45 single)


Entered at Fri Nov 5 10:39:45 CET 2010 from (166.205.141.204)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Mono button

My Sansui 5000 amp (1969) had one and I used it when I moved 1 speaker away from the other temporarily, like if I was working outside, and it worked well that way. It also had a "reverse" button which changed the output around; not sure about the value of that one.


Entered at Fri Nov 5 10:03:33 CET 2010 from (99.141.26.52)

Posted by:

Tom

Maybe Peter V can design the new website. He can fill it with his inane ramblings, pretentious opinions, and connect it all with a Van Morrison connection.


Entered at Fri Nov 5 09:31:30 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I enjoyed Mr Singh's post. Just what Jan needs! A new website design from someone who can't type capital letters. Where do these people come from? (Jan - you may as well take this out when Mr Singh's post joins the dustbin of history!)


Entered at Fri Nov 5 09:29:05 CET 2010 from (202.70.54.88)

Posted by:

leimo

Web: My link

Ok. I will buy a Canadian Celebration of The Band at amazon.


Entered at Fri Nov 5 07:00:03 CET 2010 from (223.223.136.54)

Posted by:

Isan Singh

Web: My link

Subject: Suggestion

i think u need a nice design for this website... i am i website designer i can help you... my charge is very cheap just contact me and leave your feedback in my website http://www.isanatyourservice.co.cc


Entered at Fri Nov 5 05:14:42 CET 2010 from (24.252.246.109)

Posted by:

Calvin

Web: My link

A couple of years back I saw Kasim Sulton (Of Rundgren's Utopia, and the long time musical director for Meat Loaf) play a solo show in a small club. His band consisted of him and another guy playing acoustic guitars.

at one point he broke a string, and not only did he not have a guitar valet he asked if anyone in the crowd of about 100 people was really good at changing guitar strings. So during his next song and audience member fixed his guitar.


Entered at Fri Nov 5 00:08:41 CET 2010 from (64.7.132.42)

Posted by:

jacque tabernaque

Subject: R.I.P.

rest in peace mon amis. Jim Clench has passed away, always looked happy on stage. like they say, if there is a rock n roll heaven, they now have a hell of a band


Entered at Thu Nov 4 22:13:30 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: Spencer Davis Group become Traffic

Yep...and I think all three are credited with the BVs as well.


Entered at Thu Nov 4 20:22:04 CET 2010 from (68.164.5.62)

Posted by:

Pat B

I believe two other Traffic members,Chris Wood and Jim Capaldi, not only roadied for Spencer Davis Group but also played various percussion toys on I'm A Man. And on a side note, there is a version of Gimme Some Lovin' that has a different Winwood Vocal, no backing vocals, no organ, and no percussion. Same rhythm tracks so I assume Jimmy Miller got them back in to improve the song and did some excellent overdubbing.


Entered at Thu Nov 4 14:49:12 CET 2010 from (86.161.15.48)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Location: a place where I get a good iPhone web connection

Subject: Guitars and roadie career development

Peter, don't forget that former Spencer Davis crewman Dave Mason has already topped the promotion to tech role by qualifying as lead guitarist in Traffic.

As for Burns, they live on today. I'm considering a Marquee bass as we speak!


Entered at Thu Nov 4 13:03:12 CET 2010 from (38.112.100.2)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Gunther Plaut again

Bill M Right again. Re;Gunther Plaut: "He held pulpits in Chicago, Illinois (1939–1948) and at Mount Zion Temple in St. Paul, Minnesota (1948–1961). He moved to Holy Blossom Temple in 1961."


Entered at Thu Nov 4 12:52:31 CET 2010 from (204.138.58.96)

Posted by:

Bill M

I'm going to decline David PP's kind offer, but I want to be clear that I see nothing wrong with others accepting it.

Jerry T: Thanks for your post. Must've been an awful period. Hell, 13 WAS an awful period, and I wasn't even on the 'outs' religiously. That post of mine a couple of weeks ago was essentially a restatement of one from the previous summer when I happened to visit the same store in the same town and found the same book on the shelf. I'm pretty sure that I noted that Plaut had moved from Minnesota to Holy Blossom in Toronto - and even wondered (not seriously, obviously) if it was the good rabbi who hipped Dylan to the Hawks. I mostly remember him from his op-eds in the Star, though I know I preferred those of another Holy Blossom rabbi, Reuben Slonim, presumably because I generally agreed with them.


Entered at Thu Nov 4 12:50:40 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.184)

Posted by:

Steve

Tom, you're not necessarily drunk, though you might be. David always speaks in mono and you're probably reading in stereo. Try closing one eye.


Entered at Thu Nov 4 09:21:44 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

When did roadies become guitar techs? And is guitar valet a better description? Circa 1970-71, I can’t think of anyone having a guitar tech. A lot of guitarists carried three guitars even at fairly humble levels … two electrics and an acoustic … but while the roadie might replace a broken string, the guitarist always applied tuning themself. That’s probably why there was so much tuning up and farting around between songs, something the guitar tech has eliminated.

It reminds me of Bruce Welch’s autobiography. He was rhythm guitarist with The Shadows, and a noted rock composer for others too. Anyway, it’s a good book, but he mentions his obsessive terror of being out of tune, and sitting in the dressing room never being quite sure whether he was (electronic tuners and guitar techs being many years into the future). It suddenly struck me that The Shadows used Burns guitars after their initial success (with Fenders) and that I haven’t seen a Burns in years. Maybe they were hard to tune!


Entered at Thu Nov 4 01:58:29 CET 2010 from (24.108.12.129)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: David P

OK David. I just choked on my micro brew remembering that line! HaHa


Entered at Thu Nov 4 01:03:46 CET 2010 from (94.172.135.108)

Posted by:

Roger

I've got a mono MFBP but I wouldn't know how to answer your question David. What would I listen for?


Entered at Thu Nov 4 00:27:53 CET 2010 from (75.34.32.226)

Posted by:

Tom

Man I must be drunk. David is sounding almost as British as Peter V


Entered at Wed Nov 3 20:24:54 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Perhaps you would like me to come in there and wash your...

I guess if you have a custom Louis Vuitton guitar case you'd have a guitar valet, rather than just a guitar tech. I can't help but think of that famous line spoken by the butler Hobson (Sir Arthur John Gielgud) in the film "Arthur". You can fill in the rest... :-)


Entered at Wed Nov 3 19:40:29 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Thanks, David. Sadly my original British MFBP is stereo. I might look for a mono one out of curiosity though.

Kevin … consider carefully before you take the rash step of employing a guitar valet. He will be a guitarist who failed to make a living at it. If he’s better than you in spite of that, he (or indeed she) will hate you. He’ll spit on the strings. He’ll make merry with the house full of maids, then go and work for someone else and spend the next few years entertaining the new boss with tales about you.


Entered at Wed Nov 3 17:55:45 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Between the (mono) buttons

Peter: The mono button was designed for playing records, allowing you the option to optimize playback of mono records using a stereo cartridge. Engaging the button allowed you to sum up the two channels of the cart into one, while phasing out surface noise in the grooves at the same time. (The button is not needed when playing CDs with mono material, since they've already been mixed down digitally.) Here in the U.S., the mono button began disappearing with the advent of CDs, as built-in phono sections in receivers and pre-amps became the exception, rather than the norm. My older model NAD pre-amp has both a phono section and a mono button, but such options are indeed rare these days.

Kevin: I'll try to post a new "Vinyl Siding" review by Friday, as I have a stack of vintage & recently acquired vinyl sitting beneath the turntable.


Entered at Wed Nov 3 17:33:16 CET 2010 from (174.89.117.48)

Posted by:

Kevin J

David P: Quite something about the royalty arrangements still in place.....I am actually stunned by the numbers you note as revealed in recent lawsuits.............all these 99 cent downloads I have made and all along thinking that surely the artists were getting at least a respectable percentage.....I guess not..........................speaking of new music............I'll be heading out of town soon and look forward to hopefully seeing another edition of "What's spinning on your turntable" ...

Peter V.......a bit strong to conclude all were bastards.......like Todd Rundgren concluding The Band were all rock star prima donna's - which they may have been during that period but it hardly is an accurate description of them..............besides I want a guitar valet and a hous full of maids - and soon!

Bill - Thanks......

I read recently that music selection is now a relatively important function of the top paid political/campaign consultants............sometimes to hilarious effect..........remember a Republican using "Born in the USA" some years back before someone explained the lyrics.......Cougar's "Pink Houses" was similarly misused I believe..................So did Brien Sz go with "Brandy" or "Hells Bells" or perhaps a Band song? I actually live in fear that the Tea Party might have a Band song presented to them that they just couldn't resist using.......Let's hope note.....Ann Coulter being a Deadhead did more to turn me off the Dead than Jerry's sloppy guitar playing................

Steve: Apparently it is a custom that a departing President of USA leaves a note on his desk for the incoming President............according to sources the note Jimmy Carter left for Ronald Reagan was a good one........it read " Dear Ron....I leave you two things........Menachem Begin and Sam Donaldson"..................................anyhow.......someone gave the good people of Chicago Marty Turco and I think it will not be a pleasant experience.....he's been done - completely done for a few years already.........


Entered at Wed Nov 3 17:04:16 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Mono

David, when did they take the "mono" button off amplifiers? I haven't got one on any of my current crop, some of which, like my Quad, must be over 20 years old. What did it do? Just blend the stereo channels automatically? Or was it supposed to be used for mono source material? The last one I had it on was a massive Kenwood receiver which made its way to the dump at least 15 years ago.


Entered at Wed Nov 3 17:02:49 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Just to clarify my previous post -- A mono LP version of "MFBP" was released in the U.K., in addition to a stereo version. None of The Band's LPs were released in mono here in the U.S., as far as I know.


Entered at Wed Nov 3 17:01:04 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Collectors corner

On British amazon, Beatles obsessives can find "The Embassy Beatles Covers." Embassy was Woolworths own label, and in the early 60s had 5% of theBritish market. The Beatles cover versions were always credited to "The Typhoons" (a changeable line-up). Apparently, Northern Songs used to supply Embassy with advance copies of Beatles singles so they could get the cover version out the same day … the extra sales generated made it worthwhile. These are quite collectable on vinyl, and this is the first CD release of the label.

Of other interest to vinyl collectors … there are some (well, I've seen two, Tim Buckley; Nico) new replica Elektra 45 rpm singles in their 60th Anniversary collection.


Entered at Wed Nov 3 16:49:26 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Mono Mixes

Apart from the a U.K. LP version of "Music From Big Pink", the 45 single of "The Weight" b/w "I Shall Be Released" and the "Get Up Jake" 45 b-side of the live "Don't Do It" (from "Rock of Ages"), I'm not aware of any mono releases from The Band. Over the years I've always been curious as to whether those mono versions are actually separate, dedicated mono mixes, or just fold-downs from the stereo mixes.


Entered at Wed Nov 3 16:02:02 CET 2010 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

Mike & Kim Hayward

Web: My link

Beautiful live version of "I Shall Be Released" by Wilco & Fleet Foxes.


Entered at Wed Nov 3 14:20:44 CET 2010 from (217.5.150.254)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Sorry to hear it Brien. Their loss.


Entered at Wed Nov 3 14:18:11 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.191)

Posted by:

Steve

Subject: To Everything Change Change Change

Congrats Brien, good for you. What office did you run for?

The way Americans vote for change is enough to make your head spin.

Now that the game of spin the populace has got everyone pointed right can there be any doubt the next spin in 2012 will be for REAL change. Yes, it'll be the liberals turn to spin and I see, Dollar Bill Clinton, in the future. He's just so damn lovable.

The Old Trojan Stud will be drafted back into office where he will finish his work; Government Of wall Street , for Wall Street, by Wall Street. Maybe after that, the pretense that there is actually a difference between Dems and Reps will be a thing of the past and they'll just stuff the old war horse and put him out to pasture in the Rose Garden. Game set and match. Neigh you say?


Entered at Wed Nov 3 12:50:57 CET 2010 from (38.112.100.2)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Gunther Plaut

Bill M A couple of weeks ago, you wrote: "Speaking of Minnesota, I revisited the secondhand bookshop in exurban Newmarket and found that they still have a 1959 book, "The Jews in Minnesota", by Gunther Plaut for sale for eight dollars. The Zimmermans aren't mentioned, but Hibbing is - mostly to say that the Jewish population was very small, so small that there was no synagogue in the '20s and '30s and the faithful had to go to nearby Calhoun. I believe the only individual mentioned was a Max Pogarsky" Rabbi Gunther Plaut was a highly regarded rabbi in Toronto. Leading the congregation at Holy Blossom Temple, he had followed the leadership of Rabbi Abraham Fineberg (also of LP fame in Toronto with a release during the 60s). Rabbi Plaut was a true academic and provided leadership and one of a number of voices for the Jews of Toronto and Canada. I had the opportunity on a number of occasions to speak to him and admired his work greatly. He has written a number of books and this one has held particular interest for me. The synagogue where Robert Zimmerman recited during his Bar Mitzvah is apparently for sale but no takers to date. I can only imagine what it must have been like for a 13 year old Jewish boy growing up in a small town in Minnesota. I still recall my experiences summering in Jackson's Point north of Toronto when I got beaten up on a number of occasions in the early 60's because of my religion. I can still feel the sting in my ribs when I think about those times. I think it would be interesting for Bob to write in Chronicles II (if he ever gets around to it) about those early years and the influences he had (not only the Hanks, Snow and Williams, or Little Richard or the radio waves that he picked up or the records he got via his father's store) but also what it was like trying to be part of the crowd in a small school in a small town when you were an outsider (that's how it felt in the late 50s and 60s) and were trying to 'fit in'. I don't think about growing up in Toronto in the 50's and early 60's too often now but when I do, I remember what feeling like the underdog was like and why I was drawn so strongly to the work of Bob Dylan: he said what I was thinking and feeling. I bet that was true for a lot of people... not only of the Jewish faith.


Entered at Wed Nov 3 12:24:27 CET 2010 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Hey gang - Just wanted to let you know that I ran for office in my town but did not win. My opponent is/was a 30 year incumbent. I gave it a good shot and wouldn't trade the experience for the world.


Entered at Wed Nov 3 11:38:48 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Record Fairs

Record fairs … there’s one a month in (e.g.) Southampton, four a year in Brighton, Reading etc. There’s one in London most weekends with a mega one four times a year. 75% of dealers sell secondhand vinyl and CDs and don’t touch bootlegs. These are the stalls I go to visit. Many of the dealers used to have second-hand record shops, but rent and taxes forced them out. They say that by doing a fair every Saturday and sometimes Sunday, they sell more than by sitting in a shop all week. These dealers are true music lovers, happy to chat about Garnet Mimms for ten minutes. I was discussing the early Atlantic UK singles with one, and mentioned I had "The Stones I Throw" by Levon & The Hawks. He told me the catalogue number! This is called "trainspotting" but is nevertheless impressive. I hasten to add that I have no idea whether he was right.

Maybe 15% sell CD and DVD bootlegs, which is banned by the organizers allegedly, but never enforced. They usually but not always intersperse them between legit CDs. Another 10% (say) sell unsorted CDs in totally random order at low prices, and I never understand why searching questions aren’t asked of them. The number of bootlegs fluctuate. After one dealer got a prison sentence, they shrank for about a year. They’re now way back up, with as many DVDs as CDs on sale … DVDs are easy if people taped a lot off air. It’s true that some artists have taken individual action. I think the record companies are more concerned with piracy (direct imitations of legal stock). There was a huge UK raid earlier this year where they found millions of counterfeit chart CDs.

There are also a few brand new vinyl EPs of collectable 60s mod groups like The Artwoods appearing at around £8 each. I’m not sure what the provenance is on these, as some were never released in the first place (but the great designs look as if they were). The Artwoods one even has 1965 Decca logos on it.

Another feature at Brighton this year was that the 60s band The Downliners Sect performed, and had their own record stall with Cds and also lots of very collectable 60s records by themselves which were signed. I assume they were buying old copies at high-ish prices, signing them and selling them for more.

The best things are Juke Box Fairs (about four a year) where they sell juke boxes, but there are lots of vinyl dealers, retro clothes and furniture dealers, a parade of old cars and motorbikes outside and a rock and roll band playing live. I’ve not seen bootlegs at any of those, probably because you see very few CDs either. These are 95% vinyl events.


Entered at Wed Nov 3 05:46:28 CET 2010 from (205.188.116.5)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Web: My link

Just hit the link


Entered at Wed Nov 3 05:19:06 CET 2010 from (205.188.116.5)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Years back, Johnnie Johnson was playing Chicago Blues in NYC with Jimmy Vivino's band backing him. I was in St louis at the time. Dona Oxford opened. Johnnie goes on..... and keith richards shows up. Vivino introduces him.....etc etc. Johnie brings up Dona, they are playing paino together. Dona is pretty damn good, always has been. keith was impressed. Turns to Dona, smiles & says " You are a bitch!" she remembers that moment with pride.


Entered at Wed Nov 3 01:19:02 CET 2010 from (206.47.201.191)

Posted by:

Steve

Kevin, I'm not really following the election very closely, it's all pretty bizarre .

Yes both Price and Halak are top quality NHL goalies.

Now, Pat's X goalie, the one he was waxing puckishly about in the playoffs, has the worst GAA in the league. Of course he no longer has the league's highest paid roster and Stanley |Cup Champs in front of him anymore. But, I think Pat probably realized he was a 2nd or 3rd stringer and was just being a team player when he was talking up, No, Not Me's stats.


Entered at Tue Nov 2 21:49:05 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I agree, "X was a total bastard. But sang great stuff" works for the majority of rock stars, which is why one falls into it.

For example, I ran into various members of Merseybeat groups in the late 60s / early 70s. The Beatles were always discussed. Three were always described in generallypositive terms (though Paul was "too pleasant"), but the people who actually met Lennon in the early 60s universally described him as an extremely unpleasant guy. There you go. But he sang great stuff.


Entered at Tue Nov 2 21:29:21 CET 2010 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: a legal matter?

Peter V: I didn't notice the sexism, but then I pretty much expect it from men of that vintage -- and that's not ageism, we're all products of our time and place . . . . I did notice that the text has a weird habit of paragraph-long slagging of this or that figure, followed by a brief ray of opposing-viewpoint sunshine. Along the lines of: "Sir X was a filthy manipulator, a real low-life pratt who wasn't fit to clean the bog. Great guy, though."


Entered at Tue Nov 2 21:14:44 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Mono box set

PSB, your review tipped the balance. I'll get it.


Entered at Tue Nov 2 21:05:30 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: "Life"

From Lynn Barber's Sunday Times review:

Keith complains that Mick lives in a bubble of flattery with all his socialite friends, whereas he is down with the real people, the Rastas and the bootleggers. But he lives, let us say, a privileged life. He mentions cooks, drivers, bodyguards, minders, gardeners, a guitar valet; he has houses in Sussex, London, Switzerland, Connecticut, Jamaica and the Turks & Caicos Islands, Even in his junkie days there was always a top lawyer to tap."

End of quote.

Add an army of accountants, lawyers, surgeons.

Having just watched "Made in Dagenham" a great film about the 1968 strike at Ford UK for equal pay for women, has anyone noticed the entrenched sexism? Among the army of servants Keef employs, but fails to even mention, will be those who make the beds, wash his underpants and pour bleach down the toilets. They are all female, and therefore, to Keef, not worthy of mention.

Moral: all the Rolling Stones were bastards. Great music though.


Entered at Tue Nov 2 21:03:52 CET 2010 from (75.34.32.226)

Posted by:

Adam2

I'm a die-hard like many of us here, so I don't think twice about collecting the unofficial recordings. There most certainly is a different between traders/torrent sites/etc. sharing and distributing the music for free, and bootleg companies/greedy individuals selling them for money on ebay/etc.

When you've collected all the official releases over the years, there's just no way you should feel guilty or against bootleg recordings. I've got the Mobile Fidelity reissues of all the albums, the 2000 remasters, the recent box set, the Last Waltz and Festival Express DVDs... as a fan, I want it all. Because fans are (in most cases) freely distributing the Woodstock or Watkins Glen shows, it doesn't mean that the artist is losing money. How is there money being lost when they simply don't want to release these things? If they were to release them, I would certainly buy it. Hell, I'd buy multiple copies I'm sure.

As for the point that artists might not want recordings being shared if they think their performance was less than stellar, well the die-hard in me has to ignore that as well. As a musician I can certainly relate to not wanting anyone hearing me at anything less than my best. But with the Band, not releasing the Woodstock gig or Watkins Glen because they weren't their best? The gigs are what they are, the performances are stellar, and however raw or rough they may be, they're undeniably a part of music history and deserve to stay preserved. Thank god they are...


Entered at Tue Nov 2 21:01:22 CET 2010 from (72.78.58.33)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love
Web: My link

Subject: My take on the two new Dylan sets

For anyone interested, the link is to my review of the Dylan albums.


Entered at Tue Nov 2 20:49:17 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Kevin: The times they haven't changed much in the music business with new technologies. As lawsuits filed in recent years by artists such as the Allman Brothers Band against the record labels assert, the artists themselves are lucky if they get about 4.5 cents for a 99 cent download. And carried over from contracts relating the sales of records, the labels still deduct percentages for packaging & returns, as well as a 50% reduction for music sold through the new technology.


Entered at Tue Nov 2 20:36:58 CET 2010 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: period, dis City

Bill - there's an event about once a year, or maybe twice as often. Is that frequenter than "very seldom"? -- I had the impression the UKers were tripping over these things at every street corner. Anyway, I've never attended, I can't even afford the CDs I manage to buy sans 'fair' trade.


Entered at Tue Nov 2 20:27:37 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Kevin J: For "Tinderbox", check Indigo in the Manulife Centre. (I got mine at the HMV in the Dufferin Mall, but that was then.)


Entered at Tue Nov 2 20:20:54 CET 2010 from (174.89.117.48)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Remember Chuck Berry explaining to Little Richard and Bo Diddley in Hail Hail Rock n Roll that while they were worried about only getting 1 cent of the 59 cents the record cost - Chuck immediately focussed on where the other 58 cents was going...........moral is that even doing the right thing in terms of purchases doesn't always serve the artists in the way it should.........that all said.....I don't have a single source of music in my possession that is bootleg...............Interesting sidebar - I feel differently about the black market in dvd's as no industry ever invented was in need of a black market more than the North American film ( read: Hollywood ) industry.

Bill M: I was wondering about "Cha Cha Cha"......thanks I shall pick it up.......funny though in how difficult it is to find him in the HMV's........he's packed away in the Country section and does not even merit a little Canadian flag that they use to designate the like of Celine and Bryan A........and they never seem to have "Tinderbox" in stock........

Steve: I know that the election results tonight might knock you a bit off kilter.......but rather than valium - just rejoice in the fact that the Montreal Canadiens are a top the standings in the NHL and your call on Carey Price ( and Halak for that matter ) turned out to be correct.


Entered at Tue Nov 2 20:14:22 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

sadavid: Don't know where exactly 'here' is for you, but a friend of mine in Brandon sends me annual reports of record shows he attends in Winnipeg - which, in the old days at least, was a grand place to find hard-to-find music cheap.

As for why the record company guys aren't policing, it may have to do with the fact that most of them are also buying boots. Imagine the embarrassment when the dealer whines, when fingered by the record-narc, "Hey Jim, how come you weren't complaining last week when you bought those Queen board recordings from me?"

As for the Tyson book, I agree with Neister that it's truly disappointing (and maybe even dismal), and I agree that blame belongs on the shoulders of the ghost-writer. Even a brief trawl through the shallow end of the internet should have netted better and more informative questions than those that he had at his disposal. Any ghost-writer who thinks his job is just sitting down with the subject, turning on the recorder and saying, "Tell me about your life Ian, eh to zed", and then typing up the transcript, has never even had a decent talk with his parents.


Entered at Tue Nov 2 19:55:02 CET 2010 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: pirate bios; bios; pirates

There I was at Wal-Mart the other day (the glamour of it all!) when Keef fixed me with his stony gaze. The sticker said "40% off," so I bought it. I'm no Stones fan at all, but -- since reading a _Rolling Stone_ magazine interview back in the stone age (sorry) -- I am always interested to hear what Mr. Richard(s) has to say. Halfway through, it's relentlessly fascinating, and often hilarious. The _Globe and Mail_ has some juicy excerpts under the article "Keith Richards Won't Fade Away" in their Music section. (Echoing a theme oft-repeated in this GB, KR mentions that in their first couple of years, the Stones worked non-stop and never saw any money. As soon as Ms. Faithfull hit with "As Tears Go By," the royalty cheques began to pile up in the mailbox.)

The _Globe_ also reviews Ian Tyson's new autobio today [see (My link)], apparently it sux. And look under the "Arts" tab for interview w/ Howard Sounes, who has a huge Sir Paul bio on the way (excerpts with this one also).

We don't have these "record fairs" here, or very seldom, but I'm curious -- how come the evil multinationals who own the rights to the legit product (and whose shareholders are arguably the most-aggrieved parties) are not out there enforcing? Why would they leave that to the talent?


Entered at Tue Nov 2 19:15:40 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: for those buying the new Garth ...

If you follow the link you'll see that not only does Chapters let you buy the new one, they even have the wonderful "Queen of the Angels" in stock. Prices are weird, though. If you search on Fred Eaglesmith you'll find they have a dozen of them, with the most recent - the brilliant "Cha Cha Cha" and the even brillianter "Tinderbox" selling cheap - $13.67 and $14.89. As this is how I got "Cha Cha Cha", I know from personal experience that if you order it at a kiosk right in the store, and pay for it right away at the checkout counter, you can pick it up at the same store within a couple of days with no shipping or handling fees at all. The catch?: Only in Canada. Pity.


Entered at Tue Nov 2 18:49:51 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Yeah, fair enough, it all sounds very two-faced Tom "Goebbels" Cruise TV talk - but that's why I wanted to show at least four points that could be seen either way. In short, as per Peter - Deadhead style bootlegging is fine ethically: the band even cleared a space for them to set up their boom stands! But some (apologies for language but I am going to say it anyway) tosser raking in £55 out of every £60 package sold after deducting costs is the kind of thing that Van, Sting and Knopfler were quite right to have some of their people attend record fairs and investigate. As PV said, the artist sees a return of pence for every legitimate CD release after the manufacturing costs, PRS and "the man" (record company) have taken their divvy. £55 a box set? Even the likes of Clapton, Springsteen, even U2 would salivate at the thought of that level of return per unit.


Entered at Tue Nov 2 18:29:09 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Garth's new CD

For British buyers, it's listed as available on amazon.co.uk as an import from 23 November at £25 something. That's a lot more than the Canadian price which is around £11. I went to the Canadian amazon site and ordered it (your British account info comes up), but by the time they add £15 shipping, there's virtually no price difference. BUT it will be shipped by courier and a good week earlier. This is to save others having to wade through both processes and calculations as I just did!


Entered at Tue Nov 2 18:20:30 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

A lot were £60 … The Band 1974 tour was as I said before £90.


Entered at Tue Nov 2 17:59:08 CET 2010 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Bootlegs

I have some bootlegs. I try to buy as much music/DVD as I can legitimately, but sometimes the stuff is not available (Out of print etc,) so i do buy the bootleg. If I wasn't around to get something the first time around, I think its fair.


Entered at Tue Nov 2 17:54:24 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I agree with those who say that it’s better swapping than buying at inflated prices. A guy who taped a show and wants to share it free with their friends would be quite acceptable in Deadhead territory. I also liked the recent Ashes & Sand basement bootleg where someone put often bootlegged material into a new order, like a mix tape. But these guys who are taking other peoples stuff, copying it for 20p a CD plus say 50p for the case, then selling it at huge prices? That really is theft. I know artists who don’t worry about fans swapping stuff, but they’re all horrified at some guy making £58 ($93) profit off their work. Do you know how many CDs let alone legal downloads you have to sell to make £58 ($93)?

Rob’s point is also a strong one. When someone plays a live show they play for the moment, and they might not want it being swapped around forever. When I’ve given talks on books and someone says “Can I video this?” I find I’m not as relaxed and don’t interact as well as I do in the absence of a camera. Twenty years ago, people understood if you said “I’d prefer not to be videoed” but nowadays they take great offence. For a speaker who earns money by speaking it’s a swine, because if you go back there in two years, all your jokes or carefully placed asides might be set in stone on video. Artists use intros and asides for years and once they're on record, they can't be used again. Some shows now are very high on security, and that's their right. Not everyone wants to be "making a record" every time they go out and play.


Entered at Tue Nov 2 17:38:41 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: One Flew Over.........

You guys are all gawd damn nuts........shakes his head sadly


Entered at Tue Nov 2 17:33:10 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: do as I say, not as I do

Bob W: Yes, they're both TV-evangelists-in training. The future's never looked brighter.


Entered at Tue Nov 2 16:59:25 CET 2010 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

No easy feat.....balancing oneself atop a stack of bootlegged cassettes and Cds while lecturing the masses on the improprieties of bootlegging.

Well done!


Entered at Tue Nov 2 16:57:56 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: Bootlegs

Ah, the old irreconcilable debate! On one hand, it is tough for a fan to say "no" to any bootlegs and owning them seems justified on the following grounds:

1. If they were legitimately available, the same fan would probably buy them. The material would often be tarted up as best as can be done with it, in a decent studio, and the package would probably include some rare pics from the era concerned and maybe a few memories and narrative from the artist.

2. To bother with a bootleg at all, the fan has probably shelled out good money on a given artist - eg all the vinyl albums and singles first time around, then original CD issues, then newer improved CD reissues, then Mobile Fidelity releases, then a limited edition 180g vinyl....blah.

3. "I just buy records that are for sale - how am I supposed to know it's a bootleg?" or similar - to shift the guilt firmly from their own shoulders and lay it on those of the retailer or pressing plant.

4. In a similar vein "Well, if somebody is resourceful enough to get a decent bootleg package out, more fool the record company or artist for not just buying one and duplicating it themselves".

But...I'm with Peter (and like him, yes - of course I have bootlegs, who doesn't?) in the it is the artist who is ultimately compromised. IMHO the answers to the above four points are thus:

1. See point four

2. Difficult to argue with because there probably has been good investment in the career of an artist by a completist fan. All I can say is - get a copy of it off the internet. You might not be paying the artist anything but at least you aren't paying £60 to a copyright crook.

3. It's not shifting the blame - the fact that you felt it NEEDED shifting is evidence enough that you are uncomfortable. These things do compromise your loyalty to an act in a funny kind of way.

4 (and 1). Okay... so if they were out in a legal version you'd buy them. But they aren't, and neither has the band done any knock-off themselves for the T-shirt stall. There may be many reasons for this - quality of material, considered duplicity (ie the other dates of a tour that already has a great live album to legally document it) and artistic control. The latter point to me is vital as the artist simply may not want the material to be released and does not consider it part of their body of work that should be commercially available. As a musician I would rank this reason right up their with any loss of income, probably higher in fact. How dare anybody decide what albums I release or choose not to!

Just my four penn'orth....


Entered at Tue Nov 2 15:29:28 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Dylan's Back Pages

Ultimately, I believe it's Bob Dylan himself, through his manager Jeff Rosen (who oversees the Dylan archives), and not Sony/Legacy/Columbia, who has control of what gets released. Although one can quibble over certain decisions, with the "Official Bootleg" series of releases, the SACD reissues and the new Whitmark & mono recordings, I think Dylan fans have been rewarded with a wealth of riches.


Entered at Tue Nov 2 15:04:07 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: ... he asks leadingly ...

Peter V: Which line?


Entered at Tue Nov 2 12:45:31 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Adam, one of the reasons Bob Dylan never bothered with the Basement Tapes till 1975 is that he assumed everyone who wanted a copy had one. That’s probably one reason why CBS have never done a proper set too. Though they did relent over Live 1966. I’d suggest that one reason you can’t buy a Woodstock set in decent quality is that it’s not much point them putting out what would be a collectors item at best, when most of the keenest collectors already have it. For free.

Not getting paid for your work means not getting paid, whether the person who ripped you off straight steals it, or sees themself as Robin Hood and gives it away.

I’m trying hard not to be “holier than thou” because I have stacks of cassettes and CDs I swapped with people. But I was at Southampton record fair on Saturday, and there were piles of bootleg Beatles / Dylan stuff on sale. I was pissed off when I saw bootleg stuff by musician friends on sale too. Take the Dylan / Band 1974 tour. That’s a bootleg 5 CD set selling at £90 and it’s at every record fair. Do any of the Band members get a penny of this? No. I think there’s only one word for that process, and it’s “theft.” 5 CDs with packaging would cost about £3 or £4 to make. There were piles of Dylan, Beatles, Stones bootleg box sets at over £60. In contrast, the legal archive "Band on The Run" released yesterday, 2 CDs and one DVD, retails at £12.99

Van Morrison had the right idea. He (allegedly) employed people to go to fairs and confiscate anything with his name on it. Now you almost never see Van bootlegs.


Entered at Tue Nov 2 12:03:01 CET 2010 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: "Blues So Bad" (Peter/Bill)

It does remind me of the good natured flak we used to give bassist, blues historian and raconteur Bob Brunning when playing or visiting his club in SW19.

"During my days in Fleetwood Mac, I..."

"That's exactly right, Bob, isn't it?"

"How do you mean?"

"During your DAYS in Fleetwood Mac....."



Entered at Tue Nov 2 10:40:20 CET 2010 from (75.34.32.226)

Posted by:

Adam2

Peter V - Where can I buy the Band's footage at Woodstock and at the Syria Mosque? I can't? Then I guess I will take the "unofficial" versions. Bootlegs are products that people sell for money. In this day and age, no collector with any sense pays money for this stuff. These unofficial recordings are thankfully available for free from torrent sites and traders.


Entered at Tue Nov 2 08:53:52 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Torrents etc

When did the word "unofficial" replace "bootleg"? OK, I've bought bootlegs, but let's call them what they are. These "unofficial" collections are compilations of people's work they'll never be paid for. That's a bootleg.


Entered at Tue Nov 2 04:45:58 CET 2010 from (76.99.245.65)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Drat, I meant, "Rhythm Jimmy". My apologies. Typing quicker than I think...


Entered at Tue Nov 2 04:44:10 CET 2010 from (76.99.245.65)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: by the pond

Subject: Keith, per Kevin J.

Loved the title, "Keith Richards, gentleman". And I reflect on his eloquently calling Terry Gross "honey" and "baby" in his recent interview. He pulled it off like a gentleman, indeed.


Entered at Tue Nov 2 03:50:33 CET 2010 from (67.80.147.201)

Posted by:

Owen

Location: Hudson Valley
Web: My link

Subject: The Band - Ultimate Collection Torrent

Ultimate Collection is an unofficial Japanese compilation DVD, with assorted TV performances by The Band and band members solo.


Entered at Tue Nov 2 01:08:11 CET 2010 from (199.86.26.15)

Posted by:

Rhythm Jimmy

Web: My link

Subject: Keith Richards, gentleman

Nice letter in today's NY Times (see link).

Hoping y'all is well, keep on rockin'


Entered at Tue Nov 2 00:35:19 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The blues so bad …

I'm sure I never mention that line more than four times a year. Maybe five some years.


Entered at Mon Nov 1 22:07:36 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Pat B: Speaking of Sonny Boy Williamson, whenever Peter V mentions Sonny Boy's line about the English groups wanting to play the blues so bad, and playing the blues so bad, I'm reminded of a story a musician friend told me about his own younger days. (Note to Bonk: this'd be Denny of Bo Jackson and the Corporation.) His little band of 17- and 18-year-old blues lovers played a kinda tough R&B club on Yonge Street and at the end of their set an intimidating regular came up and said, "You guys were BAAAD!" They were crestfallen and said, "We were bad?" "No", he said, "Bad's good!"

I'm not saying that Robbie et al couldn't tell the difference in the intonation.


Entered at Mon Nov 1 21:31:36 CET 2010 from (68.164.3.231)

Posted by:

Pat B

Bill M, Sonny Boy Williamson.


Entered at Mon Nov 1 21:07:34 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Groundhog Day at Kevin J's nursing home ...

Day 1: "Nurse, nurse! Wanna see my Big Pink? Oww! What do you mean 'restraints'?"

Day 2: "Nurse, nurse! ..."

...


Entered at Mon Nov 1 20:19:59 CET 2010 from (174.89.117.48)

Posted by:

Kevin J

David P & Peter V: A wish...........I hope that you both live to about 100 .....but that when you do go that somehow your Wills get messed up and I receive your record collections..........they must be something to see!!!!!! On second thought I would be pushing 85 and having to explain to my wife or perhaps my 20 year old girlfriend/nurse what I am doing with 10 different copies of Music from Big Pink - might just be too much effort....."No no - you see they are all just slightly different......"


Entered at Mon Nov 1 20:08:36 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

I always liked "Those Were The Days", though I always think of it as the soundtrack to a series of clips of on-ice fights spliced together, which is what "Hockey Night in Canada" did with it in '69 or '70. "Temma Harbour" was okay but not exactly major league. I think it was written by a guy named Philamore Lincoln, whose album had Led Zep guys on it, despite its rather tepid nature (as I recall it).


Entered at Mon Nov 1 19:38:26 CET 2010 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: those WERE the days . . .

Something for the apfelskrufs - Mary & Martha '68 (complete with wow! on the tape, but did YOU have a handycam in '68?).


Entered at Mon Nov 1 19:33:46 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The Other Basement Tape

I lucked up with ordering the Dylan mono box set. Even though I waited until the Wednesday after its release before ordering from Amazon, I noticed that they'd replenished their supply of the Live At Brandeis disc and it was still available. Sure enough, with free two-day Prime shipping option, I received the box the following Friday, along with the free bonus disc and the replica inner sleeves for the first two albums, which were missing from some shipments.

Since the tape reel containing the Brandeis concert was discovered among the memorabilia in the late Ralph J. Gleason's basement, you could call it the Other Basement Tape.


Entered at Mon Nov 1 19:08:47 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Pressing matters (pressing enough copies)

That was the issue with the Dylan mono box too. I mentioned it last week. If you pre-ordered you got “Live at Brandeis” in the box. Amazon wouldn’t accept pre-orders until they announced them late Sunday night (e-mailed to me at 11.32 pm when I was asleep). At 7 am the next morning it was “no longer available.” I'm pissed off that I can't get the Live at Brandeis, which has stopped me buying the box.

With the Apple ones, my local HMV had five of each Badfinger on the day of issue, and still had five of each issue yesterday. Have they sold any? Who knows? I suspect some were built in rare … the MJQ was “two left” on amazon.co.uk, and I didn’t try for The Whale by Tavener (which I have on original vinyl). I think the compilation is the key one. There is a box set with ALL of them. If you like a bit of Hare Krishna and Mary Hopkin with your MJQ, modern classical and Doris Troy, that is.

BTW, Mrs V judges the Apple “Carolina on My Mind” as “excruciatingly bad” compared to the versions on “Classic Songs” and “Live At The Troubadour” and made the ELO comparison.


Entered at Mon Nov 1 18:23:18 CET 2010 from (90.239.77.161)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: (Almost) Scotland

GB master minds must know about this but I just discovered the connection between the Northern part of Great Britain and MASON DIXON LINE by listening to Mark Knopfler "Best of..." CD which I purchased on a Norwegian gas station the other day.


Entered at Mon Nov 1 16:29:57 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Try doing this

Probably every one has some time watched child musicians who are quite amazing play on You tube clips.

This kindergarten girl in North Korea is the most amazing I have seen. Any one who plays guitar knows, it isn't always easy to bar chord on a classical guitar. With these tiny hands, the way she is able to do this, and the reach she has with her fingers. As well her rythmn and dynamics are quite incredible.


Entered at Mon Nov 1 15:59:53 CET 2010 from (174.89.117.48)

Posted by:

Kevin J

If I recall correctly.....we got a little tease of the Garth album about 6 months ago with a surprisingly great reading of "Moon Struck One"..........If that one could be made to sound that good.......this release is going to be great.........Mary Margret O'Hara doing "Out of the Blue" is the most exciting Band news in a long time.........and having Neil Young on any release guarantees.built-in sales - in the range of 20,000 units..........also a deft touch by Garth to stay away from the big four......TW. TNTDODD, IMND and UOCC............


Entered at Mon Nov 1 15:43:57 CET 2010 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Norbert: Looks like your wish is about to come true, and you'll finally get to hear Mary Margaret O'Hara sing a Band song - "Out Of The Blue". I'm looking forward to that too, and also Danny Brooks singing "Forbidden Fruit", Neil Young singing "This Wheel's On Fire", and Bruce Cockburn & Blue Rodeo performing "Sleeping".

Pat B: Do you think Robbie ever felt bad for a blues singer?


Entered at Mon Nov 1 15:41:36 CET 2010 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: If you want it, it's not here, so you can't get it

Interesting note about the Apple reissues. The owner of one of the local independent CD/record stores in my area is having trouble getting copies of many of the individual Apple reissue titles. His distributor is telling him that EMI did not press a lot copies. Reports are that other indie retailers are having the same problem. This has become all too common lately and extremely frustrating for indie store owners, who are already suffering from dwindling sales.


Entered at Mon Nov 1 15:25:12 CET 2010 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Realization & Admission

PETER! You guys buying all these re commissioned recordings from Mono ,stereo, hidden and suddenly found tapes and recordings..........this is all just desperate and feeble attempts to hold on to your youth!

Now.......didn't that sound.........profound???


Entered at Mon Nov 1 14:12:30 CET 2010 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Come & Get It! Best of Apple Records

Come And Get It – The Best of Apple Records is going to be one of my albums of the year, with judicious use of the skip control. It rounds up singles and rarities, and is fascinating.

Firstly it shows how involved Paul and George were in finding artists, and how willing Ringo was to turn up and drum. John was only interested in his own stuff in the early days, apart from the withdrawn single “King of Fuh” by Brute Force. this is all about the magical land of Fuh, where people say “All hail the Fuh king”. It’s utter crap with expensive and elaborate backing.

Stuff that hadn’t sat well in my memory like Mary Hopkin and Black Dyke Mills Band now shine with Paul’s abilities as an arranger. My big surprise was how well Govinda by the Radha Krishna Temple stands up to time, almost eradicating memories of being harrassed in the street to buy the LPs.

George’s soul stuff with Doris Troy and Ronnie Spector (and Jackie Lomax) also stands out, and George re-used Ronnie’s backing tracks on his own version of Try Some, Buy Some in 1973.

Billy Preston is great on That’s The Way God Planned It, but I’ll skip his attempt at My Sweet Lord in future. Badfinger shimmer with pop chops.

Favourite track (which I had on album anyway) has to be James Taylor’s Carolina On My Mind. It’s easy to forget that Apple added Paul on bass, George on backing vocal, then an orchestra and more backing vocals, because the version on James Taylor compilations is a later stripped down one, presumably due to licensing problems with Apple. The “plus ELO” version might not be to his taste, and while it is over the top, it’s also great listening.

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