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The Band: Live at the Academy of Music 1971

Levon Helm: Ramble at the Ryman

The Band: Three of a Kind

Robbie Robertson: How to Become Clairvoyant

Garth Hudson Presents a Canadian Celebration of The Band

Levon Helm: Electric Dirt

Garth and Maud Hudson: Live at the Wolf

Pulse

Dirt Farmer

Elliot Landy's Woodstock Vision

The Band Guestbook, January 2011


Entered at Mon Jan 31 22:22:03 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: Tim Drummond

NB: NB: Tim Drummond is the bassist throughout the "Saved" CD by the NorthernBlues Gospel Allstars featuring Danny Brooks and John Finley. The title song was written by Drummond and Bob Dylan.


Entered at Mon Jan 31 22:08:10 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Double Shot

Another James Brown Part 1/2 single was "Licking Stick, Licking Stick", which featured a young white bassist with a Band/Neil Young connection: Tim Drummond. Mr. Drummond was then a member of the Cincinnati-based group the Daps, who briefly stepped in to play with Mr. Brown after a falling out with the Flames.


Entered at Mon Jan 31 21:03:29 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: part 2 / continued / etc ...

Peter V: I wish James had called it "Papa's Got An Additional New Bag". Would've been nicely Pythonesque or even - harkening back to our discussion of Diddleyish things - Derek&Clive-esque.


Entered at Mon Jan 31 20:51:32 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Papa's got a brand new bag

In Britain, it was "continued" not Pt 1 and Pt 2 (see link).

James Brown specialized in Parts I and II records, or Part 1 on one side and Parts 2 & 3 on the other side as in Hot Pants (1971), or even Part I on one side and Part 4 on the back, (what happened to 2 and 3?) as in Hey America (1971). Back in 1965 he was content with Papa’s Got A Brand New Bag - Continued.


Entered at Mon Jan 31 20:43:43 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Papa's Got A Brand New Bag lists at £20 mint in the UK, but on the London label. London pressings are considered superior to the originals for most titles, but it's a moot point. It's by no means rare (UK #25 hit), but always desirable.

On vinyl, The Decemberists "January Hymn" new 45 has "Row, Jimmy, Row" (Garcia-Hunter) on the b-side. A nice six minute track, not on the album.


Entered at Mon Jan 31 19:43:03 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Bill M: It's on Part 2 of "Papa's Got A Brand New Bag" that Maceo Parker really cuts loose on sax. That 45, which was in really good shape, only cost $2.00.


Entered at Mon Jan 31 19:37:10 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Another worst concert (although calling it a "concert" may be a misnomer.) I won tickets to the MTV party boat for the Statue of Liberty anniversary.There were all sorts of "celebraties" on board. ZZ Top was to perform. Mostly they hung around below deck doing coke with Don Johnson et al. When they finally came up to perform, they did 2 numbers and walked off. Well, at least I got to see the fireworks from a good vantage point.

Bayou Sam, some years ago I found an old Brunswick Balke Callendar cabinet wind up phonograph. I had some old 78's form my parents (things like Caruso) Its kind of fun


Entered at Mon Jan 31 19:35:37 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

David P: That's a nice find. James Brown must have more great Part 1 / Part 2 records than any other artist. Two favourites of mine are "Money Won't Change You" and "World" (with its killer trombone slides). I'm now listening to a James comp thanks to you.


Entered at Mon Jan 31 19:03:01 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Flick On Flick

While John Barry may have arranged the James Bond theme, is was guitarist Vic Flick that made the difference for me.

Kevin J: Thanks for pointing that out about the Crossroads performance of "Who Do You Love". I'd forgotten about Bo Diddley's medical situation at the time. However, I still wonder if and/or why that was the only song that Robbie played on at that year's festival.

Bill M: I recently purchased the King 45 version of James Brown's "Pappa's Got A Brand New Bag Parts 1 & 2", a killer double-sided single.


Entered at Mon Jan 31 18:34:16 CET 2011 from (216.165.95.66)

Posted by:

ari

Web: My link


Entered at Mon Jan 31 18:27:56 CET 2011 from (206.47.33.101)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

...also Robbie and Jerry Lee Lewis perform "Twilight" on "Last Man Standing" recording.


Entered at Mon Jan 31 17:52:36 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: "Twilight" (sans vampires)

David P listed a number of versions the other day; there's also a version on Danko / Fjeld / Andersen _Ridin' On the Blinds_. IMHO, not a great version; Rick sounds like he'd rather be somewhere else. Cute sequencing, in that "Twilight" is followed by Richard Thompson's "Dimming of the Day" -- currently my favorite track on the album, due to Kirsten Berg's vocal.


Entered at Mon Jan 31 17:50:41 CET 2011 from (72.78.58.33)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love
Web: My link

Subject: Bob in Birmingham

Jan, the show you saw was in 1978, right before the Christian stuff, though are signs it was beginning.


Entered at Mon Jan 31 16:50:46 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: John Barry

Another great popular composer gone today. R.I.P. His son in law was on the radio saying he never stopped composing tunes, and that he described himself as a "musical dramatist." Apart from so many music soundtracks, and the James Bond Theme, in the UK he will also always be the composer of "Hit or Miss" the theme tune to Juke Box Jury!


Entered at Mon Jan 31 16:46:14 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronno

Jocuri: Thanks for stopping in - Perhaps our first poster from Romania.

Peter V: I can see that having to play "Stormy Monday" YET AGAIN might be a drag, but I never tire of hearing the song. Same goes for "Help Me", though I expect it would wear thin quicker if I was, say, the doorman in a blues bar.

Nor surprise that Henry Lowther was brilliant. Most of the people on "Songs for a Tailor" were.

Ilkka's Dog: When your master awakes, please point out to him that if he has 0 mp3 files, then 100% of his mp3 collection plays perfectly - thought of course 100% of his mp3 collection is also garbage. Human arithmetic is like that.

RtO: Thanks for the thoughts / link to McGriff Part 2. My rule of thumb is that any 45 featuring Part 1 / Part 2 should be bought on sight; I've very seldom been less than very pleased.

RtO: Regarding Steppenwolf, somewhere I read Goldie McJohn attributing his percussive style of playing to a cheap, misfiring organ that called on him to hit keys repeatedly rather than just holding them down. Anyway, you're right that it's the drumming as well as the organising that's diddley-like. No surprise that drummer and organist came out of the sub-Hawks Toronto scene of '63-'65. Also, a 'letter' from Dennis 'Mars Bonfire' Edmonton appears in a 1967 R&B Toronto fanzine that a friend lent me recently. Among other things, it expresses the view that "Freddy Keeler [i.e, Robbie's principal disciple among Toronto's budding guitarists during the Hawks' time here] is better than Mike Bloomfield, and we [i.e., the Sparrow] were told by all who say us that we were better than any blues band thay had ever heard."

BEG: Stylish perhaps, but comfy - who but the Robster can say for sure?

Lars: Good point - it may well be that the only difference between Short Fat Fanny and Skinny Minny is a weight-loss program.


Entered at Mon Jan 31 16:43:20 CET 2011 from (70.50.64.34)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Jed….Jeff….Well said…..We’ll move on…..with just a final point about David’s reference to “In one of his rare live performances, out of all the possibilities, Robbie played "Who Do You Love" with Eric Clapton at the Crossroads Guitar Festival”…………at the time Bo Diddley was lying close to death and the song choice was a homage to the great man……I thought an appropriate and gracious one given the event was a Guitar Festival after all and the stadium was filled with 60,000 guitar nuts and a nod to the first man of rock n roll guitar hit the mark for me…………….

It is funny though when songwriters are asked to perform their songs especially in cases where the songs were made famous by other singers…………..at the Grammy awards early 80’s – the lady who wrote “Bette Davis Eyes” performed it and the crowd started howling wondering why it sounded so different than the Kim Carnes version……………….Paul Anka has had to endure the minor humiliation of whispers every single time he performs “My Way”……….”It’s just not like Frank’s”…..most moan………”it’s just not like Elvis” some moan and “It’s just not like Sid Vicious” the hipsters moan…………


Entered at Mon Jan 31 16:08:58 CET 2011 from (162.99.232.17)

Posted by:

SteveH

Location: Maryland

Subject: Bad concerts

Jan F, I'm sorry to hear your first Dylan show was so bad. My first was the 74 tour in Charlotte NC and it was great.

Worst show I've ever seen was Clapton in Dec. 74 in Paris. He was very drunk and the crowd booed. That finally got him revved up and he did a great Little Wing, but still overall a bad show.


Entered at Mon Jan 31 16:00:41 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Slash N' Burn

dlew919: A slash (as in a diagonal line rather than the former G N' R guitarist) chord inversion might be a little different than what RTO was describing. I believe a slash chord is one where the bottom or bass note is different than the root. It's mainly used as a passing chord. An example would be the C/G (C chord with G bass note) in "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down".


Entered at Mon Jan 31 12:09:10 CET 2011 from (76.116.186.96)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: PA
Web: My link

Very cool web site. What came first the Ramble or Live From Daryls House. Music fans will enjoy this.


Entered at Mon Jan 31 11:34:49 CET 2011 from (72.196.147.183)

Posted by:

Calvin

The worst show I've ever seen had to be Joe Walsh. Now I'm not a huge fan, despite living at the 20 minutes from the bars Walsh started out in. But It was 1983 and he was coming off his Eagles success and the James Gang was considered "Local". But he was hammered, stupid drunk. At least 3 times he stopped in the middle of the song with some sort of awareness he had screwed it up and started it again.

Around the same time I saw Rundgren, of who at the time I was a huge fan of, and was quite sure he'd be dead within 6 month he looked so bad.

The most disappointing had to be the Reformed Band. I had got the chance to see the OQ, so when the reformed group came to town I jumped at the chance. They werent bad, just average, when I wanted amazing. In all fairness a couple of years later I saw them a 2cd time and they were damn close to amazing.

Its a funny thing, but I make a good deal of my income doing digital archiving project-history based projects and such as one of my Master's is in Library Science, and I have written a fair amount of Migration Policies. Yet I havent done anything with the literally couple thousand bootleg shows I have. I really should be migrating many of them to newer discs to save them. I have to have around 300 Band, or individual or Dou members of the Band shows and I'd really hate to lose them. Ive thought about buying a Removeable Hard Drive and transfer all my files to it.

While I don't have any Cylinders I do have a fair share of 78s. Jazz mostly, but a fair amount of oddities-stage presentation of MacBeth and the like.


Entered at Mon Jan 31 10:52:19 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Der blooz

RTO, two examples of interest there … the Keef Hartley Band and Pete Brown’s Piblokto (who I saw on the same day as Screaming Lord Sutch in Norwich). All three were assemblies of superb musicians with … er … a leader who was crap. Pete Brown cheerfully admitted as much somewhere. Keef Hartley had a great pedigree playing with others, but his own band were terminally dull.

Anyway, a few years ago, an old friend gave me back a pile of my letters from the late 1960s when we exchanged reviews of bands we saw. I was looking for a 1970 review of Keef Hartley, but also found a review of Ian Anderson who was support act (the folk singer, not the Jethro Tull man). I wrote down roughly what he said:

“I’m just going to do a blue. Most people would call it a “blues” but I use the singular as the whole genre has only one tune. So you may have heard this one before, especially if you have any Fleetwood Mac records, as it appears twelve times on all of their LPs. The first line should be “I woke up this morning” but that’s stupid. I never met a musician who gets up before midday, so it starts “I woke up this afternoon.”

He then did a very funny, perfect Peter Green imitation. The Keef Hartley review notes that Henry Lowther was brilliant. The guitarist highly inventive and unusual, and the bass player “the worst I’ve seen in my life, not helped by being wildly out of tune.” Interestingly, the other support were Memphis Index. I have no memory of them at all, but note they blew Keef Hartley off the stage, and the lead guitarist hada Watkins Rapier III. A £35 guitar … one to conjure with there!


Entered at Mon Jan 31 10:13:05 CET 2011 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: BAyou Sam

You can get Edison players for around $50.00 from Japan - they're reproductions...


Entered at Mon Jan 31 09:56:09 CET 2011 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: RTO; Striking the right chord

I'd still go with the slash chord, but Adam or David P may have a more technical answer... D/E (It's kind of a second, I guess...)


Entered at Mon Jan 31 09:02:45 CET 2011 from (41.97.191.79)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: on teaching

an awesome and so true definition of a teacher and the act of teaching can be read on the back cover of Eric Clapton's 2005 album - Back Home

"They were great teachers, because they didn't know they were teaching, they were just doing the next right thing. They taught with love and by example, without prejudice or guile, simply by being true to themselves. ….. First they taught me to listen, then to love to listen, and then with all humility, to try and provide with love and care, music that was safe and for others to listen to."

Eric Clapton is unfit to arrange this phraseology, he was helped to confect it for sure. It's frustrating that the author of this text will remain forever a complete unknown. The most important for a genuine creator is that what he says is receipted somewhere, it's not important to know who exactly says it, the motivation of ghost writers and genuine creators in general


Entered at Mon Jan 31 08:35:33 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Bayou Sam, then you need a copy of “Perfecting Sound Forever” where he tracks down an Edison cylinder and an early Victor shellac for comparison. The Edison sounds more “real” he says.

In record fairs here, the very, very few open reel tapes that turn up fetch premium prices, but commercially-produced open reels barely sold at all in the UK, and nor did 8-track. My old writing partner had a Swiss-registered Mini, which ws terrifying because it was tiny, and in the UK, the steering wheel was on the wrong side of the car, making the passenger seat a very scary place. He had an eight-track with only two tapes, Rubber Soul and Best of The Beach Boys, but actually that was fine for the several longish journeys we did in it.

Ten years or more ago a friend persuaded me to go to a Corvette rally, where about 150 Corvettes gathered in a field near Oxford. That was probably 90% of the ones in the UK in one place … they were never sold here. One beauty from around 1964 was for sale, and I was very tempted. It had eight tracks artfully strewn across the seat, the original radio, and the eight track under the dash. It was playing constant Beach Boys … an excellent sales pitch. The guy selling revealed that we weren’t hearing eight-tracks but a CD player concealed in the trunk. The original radio is a bonus because it fits beautifully in style, and so many were taken out to install eight tracks. Apparently, if you import one to the UK by sea, you always remove the radio and carry it by hand, because otherwise it will disappear in transit.


Entered at Mon Jan 31 08:10:07 CET 2011 from (24.47.42.238)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: ny

Subject: misc audio ramblings

Just did a quick skim back at the last bunch of posts. I enjoyed some of the posts regarding the various audio formats.

I've recently been going through a mountain of cassettes that go back 30+ years. They have held up remarkably well for their age. A couple of them had a problem where that little soft, white thing in the middle that the tape passes over lost it's grip and let go. An easy enough repair. Still, I'd better start transferring the irreplaceable stuff to CD or something.

I've also been digging out the vinyl more lately than I have in years. I listened to a mint copy of the Stones' "Goat Heads Soup" today, and it sounded fantastic.

I even hooked up an old Lafayette 8-track player. Not to actually listen to them, but to show younger people a real 8-track in action - and to get a big grin out of people of my own age group.

Also - I came into a few reel-to-reels recently. A few nice Beatles reels, a few nice Rolling Stones, and "Pet Sounds", to name a few.

One thing I'd love to add to this is an old (of course it's old) Edison cylinder machine. They're out there, but way to expensive for me right now.


Entered at Mon Jan 31 05:13:04 CET 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Web: My link

Subject: J2R fashion

for purchase, see the link


Entered at Mon Jan 31 04:58:31 CET 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Web: My link

Subject: Angie's link

The caption should be "Please Don't Judge Me By My Shoes".



Entered at Mon Jan 31 04:56:57 CET 2011 from (138.88.133.195)

Posted by:

Jan F.

Location: metro DC

Subject: worst concert(s)

Saw Dylan for the 1st time in Birmingham, AL in 1979. Think it was toward the end of his "Jesus-freak" era. Was still wearing the makeup -- stoned and/or drunk out of his mind -- stumbling all over the stage. Horrible. I cried.

Pink Floyd concert in 1994 a close second. Not the band's fault though. Bad venue (sound) and out of control kids on drugs.

J.F.


Entered at Mon Jan 31 03:17:46 CET 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Bear& other Barnburners fans

Mary Bear, Chris Leary, from The Barnburners, has a new recording out that XM Bluesville been playing 2 songs from quite a bit.I believe one of them is a old Barnburners' #.Can't think of the name of the song but you can hear levon's influence all over it, even in Chris's vocals. Both #s are good,Leary's singing & Chris Vitarellos' guitar playing on the blues # are excellent.


Entered at Mon Jan 31 01:45:13 CET 2011 from (166.205.142.239)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: A really bad one

Bob Dylan with The Pogues (sans Shane) at The Greek Theatre in LA, late 80's. Although I sat next to John Malkovich and Martin Sheen was just in front, it was a dreadful show by Bob. "Wheeled-out" best describes his state that night. The SNL guitarist CL(?) Smith did his best as the bandleader but it was hopeless.

I bring up the celebrities not to name-drop but because it was a very big event and a tough ticket to get, as I think Bob still didn't come around much then.

This one was the worst but I'm 0-3 with him and I've decided to stick with his records only, unless he starts hitting tiny venues some day.


Entered at Mon Jan 31 00:21:40 CET 2011 from (24.3.83.176)

Posted by:

Mary (bear)

I saw ZZ Top, Aerosmith, Rick, Levon and the Barnburners......but my all time best concert was Rush. For 3 guys they put on one hell of a show.


Entered at Sun Jan 30 23:15:23 CET 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Three worst concerts - Beach Boys (walked out), The Fixx (walked out) and sorry to say, of the 8 9 times I saw the Band, they were great except one time, they were so bad we walked out.

Saw Santana and they were good. Saw CSN twice, once good, once average. Saw the Allmans about ten times, and they had two clunkers but not what I would consider awful.


Entered at Sun Jan 30 22:10:24 CET 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Peter, yes you CAN dare say it about Fleetwood Mac and I've got your back if the mood turns ugly. Great blues guitarist in PG but I've always been slightly "nothing wrong with them but don't do it for me" about them. In 1966 bands started to break away from the strict blues format (Traffic, Cream, the later Animals - christ, even Mayall by "Bare Wires"!), only for Mac/Shack/Savoy Cack to bring it back again. I hate all that Brit bloooze revival revival stuff with a passion these days - the soulful voice of Miller Anderson (Keef H band) being the only thing worth singling out for praise, along with some admiration for Wynder K. Weaver as an organ grinder.

I have tried to like Night Train and agree a punchy, short arrangement with decent horns does a better job. Piblokto/Babe Ruth/Graham Bond drummer Ed Spevock is a good friend and frequent gigging partner and travel companion and he even played me a big band arrangement that lasted less than five minutes. It WAS better, but I just don't like the tune - I always long for Eric Burdon to come in with "In this dirty old part of the city..." to take it somewhere!

I too have Santana at the top (bottom!) of my live experience list. I got freebies for the tour where he and his brother Jorge recorded an album together and toured it. Widdle, widdle, widdle - bit of hippy-dippy claptrap preaching - widdle, widdle, widdle goodnight. Two things ought to be said though: it is NOT the worst gig I have been to because I went to the V96 festival (freebies again) and had to sit through the indentikit song tedium that is the Lightning Seeds. Best thing about that afternoon was sitting right next to Sarah Cracknell from St Etienne, resplendent in snug white leather. Hate to be predictable - but "Woof!".

The other point is that, in my book, all trainee blues/rock organists should start off with the work that Gregg Rolie did on the first four Santana albums. I still delve into some of those phrases today at a gig - nothing flash or fancy, just a good feel, lovely tone and, well, just right. dLew, Adam: Sorry, I explained my "lost chord" search incorrectly. What I described is indeed a seventh! I meant where you raise the root a tone (ie an E root but the rest of the chord is a D major). Like "The Long and Winding Road" is riddled with.


Entered at Sun Jan 30 19:47:15 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Awful concerts

Some years I got tickets to see Squeeze at Madison Square Garden. The opening act was A Flock of Seagulls. I had seats on the floor in front. They were awful. Painfully loud and distorted. We just went outside til they finished and Squeeze came on. Richard claimed he couldn't hear for a week.


Entered at Sun Jan 30 16:13:42 CET 2011 from (91.42.228.67)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: Movies outside from outer Hollywood (France);

La Grande Vadrouille (Don’t Look Now… We’re Being Shot At!):

Classic Louis de Funes aired every Christmas on France TV. Saw this movie when I was kid with my father, brother and brother in law in the beautiful Amsterdam Tuschinski theatre. The whole theatre was filled with laughter from the start to the end, we had a great time.

Paul dans ca vie:

"This is filmmaking of both heart and humanity with poetry in its vision and restraint and care in its telling. Really lovely.” “Documentary looking at the life of Paul Bedel, a farmer from Auderville (Normandy, France) who is about to retire. Overall, this touching documentary offers a reflexion on different aspects of life - the passing of time, inheritance, the importance of nature, general existential questions, etc. Focussing on the example of a local French farmer, it becomes universal.”

Etre et avoir

"The documentary sensation that followed a year in the life of a rural French village school in the Auvergne, its dozen children aged between 4-10, and their single teacher, Monsieur Georges Lopez. A master of quiet authority, he patiently navigates the children towards adolesence, cooling down their arguments and listening to their problems, while trying to balance the varying needs of the disparate age groups for whom he must provide." (link, p.s. our late frence house was in that area too, wonder how my Frence friends are doing there now)



Entered at Sun Jan 30 13:54:55 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

35 years ago, I was buying cassettes for four language laboratories and a listening centre, so we bought 1000 cassettes at a time. We used Philips because the cassettes were sturdy. Memorex had a line called "Audio tutor" red on one side, blue on the other to discourage students from 'lifting" them. You couldn't buy them in the shops and they were distinctive. They sent us a sample pack of five, and our technical dept ran tests on them … superb frequency response. We bought 1000. Then when we got the bulk stock we found they sounded very dull and shed oxide ridiculously … a major cleaning pain when they're running eight to ten hours a day in one hundred decks. We compared them with the samples. The tape inside was a different quality – even a different colour (dark red, not black) and had far lower frequency response. So they loaded high grade tape into the samples, low grade into what they supplied. We never bought them again. The thing is you remember stuff like that, and in the VHS days I wouldn't buy Memorex video tape either.


Entered at Sun Jan 30 13:47:05 CET 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Worst

Saw Roger Waters with Eric Clapton in the early 80's on "the Pros & Cons of Hitchhiking" Tour.Not many "Pros".EC turned his back to the audience,refused to play,& watched the screen's videos all night.Waters' ego was all consuming,swallowing up EC & all the music...we left early! Last night we saw Dickey Betts mainly for nostalgic purposes.It was well enough but don't think of the "great" guitar playing,songwriting,singing great Dickey--this was musically a nice evening out,but,let's just say...it was an experience. But,we couldn't get tix for Band of Joy--sold out.We were considering seeing The Band The Band,but figured too long a drive & we had no clue who these guys are--anyone know? are they any good? Or,a comedy act? LOL


Entered at Sun Jan 30 13:46:02 CET 2011 from (90.239.116.113)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster's Dog

Subject: False alarm

My master just fell asleep. Our American friends can take off their life jackets and oxygene masks and breathe normally again :-)


Entered at Sun Jan 30 13:10:58 CET 2011 from (90.239.116.113)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Is it DEAD or is it Memorex?

After my previous post I had this odd feeling and checked out my remaining MEMOREX C-cassettes (Made in USA) in a hurry. None of them were playable anymore! I CONSIDER EVERY US MEMBER OF THIS GB PERSONALLY RESPONSIBLE OF THIS DISASTER!!!


Entered at Sun Jan 30 12:50:40 CET 2011 from (41.97.211.108)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

It's more a Dustin Hoffman affair, The Graduate all along with Little Big Man and Midnight Cowboy, forms somewhat a trilogy involving the same reincarning antihero which fits the esthetics need of the audience of the era.

A very nice article from NYDN in the link above "DiMaggio Was Perfect Fit For My Song, Simon Says" by Mark Kriegel, short and compacted of information.

Joltin' Joe wanted to sue Simon since the line asks prejudiciably "Where have you gone Joe DiMqggio ?" while Joe was where he was. Simon escaped by arguing that given that Joe's career as hero of the nation is behind him he is immune of any eventual corruption, then Simon had to deal with the dissatisfaction of Mickey Mantle who claims it's him who should be in Mrs Robinson not joltin' Joe. Simon escaped by arguing that Mantle is not a singible word, safe in Rhythm'n Blue, history doesn't record whereas Joe reacted to Mickey claim

I think that Joltin' Joe has nothing to do with anything in the song from cocoocachoo to the candidate debate, and in The Graduate movie he is even more invisible


Entered at Sun Jan 30 12:40:37 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Ah, being support act to The Beatles in 1963 / 1964 was a lot worse. They were totally inaudible for booing and screaming. I think one was Peter Jay & The Jaywalkers, the other Sounds Incorporated … both very good bands at the time.


Entered at Sun Jan 30 12:32:41 CET 2011 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: The angels (who supported guns and roses...)

They were bored - with each other, with themselves, with the songs.. they broke up acrimoniously a few years later...

I think I've mentioned this before, but the support act to Tom Jones a few years back - they'd had a hit single (which was an ok song...)... they were a little dull, but ok - it wasn't the full band, but the chick singer and the guitar player (when we stopped laughing at all the potential jokes, we listened.) As I said, they were a little dull, and the set was perhaps a little long... the guitar players mother was in the audience (of about 9 or 10 000). He pointed that out.

anyway about 4 songs into it, the chant started (We want Tom/We want Tom)... (Boooo... Get off!) (We want Tom, We want Tom... Get off! Boooo!)...

I've been to the 'Tattoo' bands but no crowd was ever that wild nor rowdy. To their credit, they finished the set, adn even calmed the audience down a bit... but...


Entered at Sun Jan 30 12:31:23 CET 2011 from (90.239.85.71)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Is it live or is it Memorex?

(Actually, Diamond Lil should get credits for my subject line... for many years ago.)

100% of my 78 rpm records are playable. 99,99% of my vinyl records are playable (not Stones EP "Last Time" :-( 50% of my C cassettes are playable, 25% of my CDs are playable, 0% of my iTunes files are playable, mainly because I never download files and don't own the gadget. If this is the trend there will be very quiet marching music at the battle of Harmaggedon. - I happen to own an original Scottish sack pipe (and a few bottles of Old Pultenney) so I will guarantee at least some noise if this happens in our lifetime.


Entered at Sun Jan 30 10:50:53 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Sly

Sorry, I also forgot Sly & The Family Stone a few years ago! Nothing is that dire.


Entered at Sun Jan 30 10:49:23 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Santana

You just reminded me … the worst major band I ever saw were Santana. We've argued this one before, but they played in a symphony concert hall with their full stadium set up, and were just a horrible distorted mess from beginning to end. AND boring. The week before (or after) I saw Hot Chocolate at the same venue, and if they'd been on the same night Hot Chocolate would have blown them off the stage. Weird, I know. But that's how it was that particular week in 1976.


Entered at Sun Jan 30 10:26:06 CET 2011 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Worst bands....

I've probably been in some of them, and I'll stay away from small local acts (who 1) can't be held to the same standards, and 2) you won't have heard of)...

Guns and Roses - late (of course), too loud (frequencies cancelling each other out), and sloppy... they improved on the next tour (I'm told)

Sting (some years back): boring. Dull. Tedious. Self-indulgent. Songs arranged to the maximum boredom rating. Would have liked to have seen him later (particularly the lute tour, which I'm told was excellent.)

There are others, and I acknowledge too, that I may have seen them on an off-night, or just not 'got them' on those particular tours. And (with the exception of G and R, who have changed) I'd give them all another go...


Entered at Sun Jan 30 10:14:15 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I’ve been pondering RtO’s list. Help Me and Stormy Monday tower above, or rather “mine deep below” anything else on the list. If Chris Farlowe is backing Van Morrison you can get both in an evening and even with a brilliant band, these are truly dire songs.

I can’t agree on Night Train. I know what you mean about British renditions, but a good soul band with a punchy horn section should give it a lively bounce which is a long way from the dirge-like qualities of Help Me. But I have two friends who were in such a band who also shudder at the thought of ever having to play Night Train again. The problem with Night Train is quantity rather than quality. Three minutes with a tight horn section is great. But it’s always an excuse for a monotonous ten minutes.

Also listen to the lightness of touch on Mose Allison’s versions of Parchman Farm or Baby Please Don’t Go compared to anyone else doing them. Van’s Mose Allison tribute album was near to his worst, but “Mose Allison Sings” is a seminal blues LP. Don’t blame Mose for the dull renditions he inspired. But Parchman Farm falls into a special category … white boys being deeply meaningful on prison / chain gang songs. See also Big Boss Man. That has a special place in my … bottom … from personal experience of a rhythm guitarist who was the world’s worst harmonica player who always saw it as his big harmonica moment. And his longest.

I’d place Help Me and Stormy Monday equal first and Caldonia and Need Your Love so Bad just after. But the most boring evenings I recall in the 60s were spent listening to The Groundhogs, Savoy Brown, Chicken Shack, Killing Floor, Blodwyn Pig, Keef Hartley … and dare I say it … Fleetwood Mac version one. Yes, the one with Peter Green. I think the Fleetwood / McVie rhythm section evolved into something very listenable indeed in the 70s, but in the late 60s they were dull and turgid.

Two of the worst bands I ever saw were Graham Bond in 1970 (post Graham Bond Organisation) and Screaming Lord Sutch and The Savages the same year. What's the worst job … sorry "band" … you ever saw?


Entered at Sun Jan 30 10:05:02 CET 2011 from (86.124.223.47)

Posted by:

Jocuri

Web: My link

I just want to say hi from Romania.


Entered at Sun Jan 30 04:31:49 CET 2011 from (75.34.45.47)

Posted by:

Adam2

An A chord with the root lowered a whole step/tone would be an A7 (also known as an A Maj. min. 7, or just an A dom. 7). However, barring one fret across the fretboard (ie, 5th fret barred across the neck) does not produce that chord or any other. Look at chordfind.com to see how to position an A7 bar chord.


Entered at Sun Jan 30 04:27:38 CET 2011 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: RTO: most likely a slash chord...

So, C/D (D, E, G, C)...


Entered at Sun Jan 30 03:39:44 CET 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Any music theorists awake out there?

What do you call the chord that is made by taking a major chord and dropping the root down a tone (eg for guitar: barring the whole neck at one fret). Anybody know? Ta!


Entered at Sun Jan 30 03:33:59 CET 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Web: My link

Subject: Bill M

Bill, I found part II! No longer MIA...

Can hear what you mean about Magic Carpet Ride, certainly - the percussive element (both the true percussion and the organ feel) are the key to the similarities, don't you think?


Entered at Sun Jan 30 02:20:25 CET 2011 from (68.171.233.250)

Posted by:

Bill M

RtO: I understood that you do approve of some diddley music, but was really wondering if a) you hear the Hawks' version of diddley music in McGriff's "I Got A Woman" and b) if you hear the McGriff song in Steppenwolf's "Magic Carpet Ride".

John D: It's not the zeroes that fade; it's the ones - to nothingness.


Entered at Sat Jan 29 22:05:23 CET 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Just for the record -vinyl was far from indestructible. Can't tell you how many times an album skipped for apparently no reason. I wasn't one of those who stacked them on the turntable either.

I'm with you Joan about books. I like holding them. I also like to reference things -especially when it comes to maps or use of an appendix or bibliography, I can simply hold my finger on a page and flip to it. I like that act. I enjoy holding a newspaper as well, though I do read a good many on-line.


Entered at Sat Jan 29 20:21:20 CET 2011 from (24.218.200.216)

Posted by:

Tim

Location: Boston
Web: My link

Subject: The Band performing Remedy on The Tonight show on YouTube


Entered at Sat Jan 29 20:11:15 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: CDs

I've probably said this before, but I'm somewhat autistic about records, books, newspapers etc. I like to be able to hold the product in my hand. Liner notes increase my pleasure of listening to an album. Who plays what. Sometimes you get the words. I even resented a bit when we went from vinyl to Cds, as it compromised the album cover art and in many cases the liner notes that appeared on the back or the sleeve.

I can get the NY Times on line, but to me, there is nothing better than picking the paper up off the driveway, and sitting down with a cup of tea and reading it. Separating the sections, putting them in the order I like and just relaxing.

I feel the same way about on line books. I know I can read them on a computer or a kindle, but there is nothing like holding a book in your hand. I love going to the library and browsing the stacks,reading the flyleaves and the brief summaries. I like to be able to quickly go back to a page and perhaps hold 2 pages open. I like the way a book smells and feels

I suppose I'm a dinosaur and I'll ultimately wind up wiped out but that's me.


Entered at Sat Jan 29 18:06:03 CET 2011 from (41.97.250.75)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

journeymen of the begining of life
today it rather looks like an anterior life


Entered at Sat Jan 29 17:20:59 CET 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Do not throw out your old cds...they might make for conversational coasters.

BTW, the quality of cd manufacturing has been heading downhill for quite some time.

If cds bite the dust,it will be intersting to see the fates of all the so called new fangled "Mastering engineers" who do not know bupkis about mastering for vinyl and running a lathe, etc. Not likely that digital mastering disappears completely though. What is a criminal possibility is that internet releases become more and more popular and music goes to ipod or vinyl. And people buy music from itunes, and burn their own degeneratable cds.


Entered at Sat Jan 29 15:48:03 CET 2011 from (76.66.26.222)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Robbie's footwear....always comfy and stylish and .....yeah.....guitar's pretty special too.


Entered at Sat Jan 29 15:43:37 CET 2011 from (76.66.26.222)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

2011 Martin 00-42K ROBBIE ROBERTSON PROTOTYPE & CASE
$5,520.00

Thanks dlew919...cool, cool hat!


Entered at Sat Jan 29 15:27:11 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Dying CDs

The Dylan "Genuine Basement tapes" bootlegs first run are now unplayable. Teach me to buy bootlegs! Allegedly it's one legitimate plant in the 1982-87 period … and the amount of ink printed on the other side contributes. I've had several that hop, skip and jump, but they are all that era … I think it's Polygram, because one is ABC "Lexicon of Love".


Entered at Sat Jan 29 14:48:05 CET 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

I've had audio cd's that have skipped in the past but as I've learned, the smallest smudge or nic can mean all the difference. Storage cd's on the other hand - I'll never use again. I've had a number of them fail to the point where nothing could be retrieved for no reason. I backup, check the material to make sure it's there, store. Pulled out the cd a half year later - gone. A few times this happened. Nothing like that ever happened with an audio cd.

I used to have a sizeable record collection until about the late 80's. I bought into cd's as soon as I heard them. I just thought the sound was so much cleaner. It worked for me and has ever since. Sold all my albums years and years ago.


Entered at Sat Jan 29 14:26:38 CET 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: CDs

There was always speculation on whether they would last from day one, wasn't there? Interesting reading on this subject because I and those I know haven't actually had an occurrence of a CD "expiring" as yet, but it comes as no shock that it IS starting to happen. With regards to my own album we were actually wondering whether to press a CD or whether to go straight to download with a pdf of artwork for those who want to make a CD of the tracks at home! We opted for the CD method in the end just so we could see the album documented in the waning "physical" product format while it still lasted.


Entered at Sat Jan 29 14:19:33 CET 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Bill M

Sorry, Bill - forgot to respond. No, I love that McGriff tune along with most of his others! I rate him higher than Jimmy Smith to be honest: more attack, more of a visceral style. I also rate Brother Jack McDuff higher than Smith for the same reasons, if not as pronounced. There's about 6 old school organists (ie black, American, used a jazz ensemble format) who I prefer to Jimmy Smith.

I think you misunderstand the list I posted somewhat as I also love The Hawk's "Who Do You Love" along with (on the right day) QMS "Happy Trails" LP. I do have a particular dislike for Caldonia and Night Train, though - I admit that - and some of the other entries in my list go hand in hand with them as other pieces of music I dread having to play at a gig.

Number 10 was originally going to read like this but I thought it a bit vicious:

10 - Absolutely ANYTHING from the catalogue of CANNED HEAT (Popular in UK blues band sets probably because they were the only bona fide USA act to actually sound as plodding, lumpen and turgid as a British blues band).


Entered at Sat Jan 29 13:39:19 CET 2011 from (74.82.68.34)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Not So Perfect Sound and Not Forever

John: Sony recently announced it was closing down one of its largest CD manufacturing plants here in the U.S. While production will be shifted to another facility, the move seems to indicate smaller production runs are the norm nowadays. In the mean time, although demand for vinyl remains a niche market, the production of new and reissue LPs continues to rise.


Entered at Sat Jan 29 13:23:16 CET 2011 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: John D: Digital, or digitalis

My cd collection (dating from 1987) is mostly fine (except when little sticky fingers got hold of it)... but there is plenty of evidence that cds (particularly those on cheap cds) are deteriorating.

I'm of the cd generation, so like the physicality of them, and that they are portable, generally crisper and clearer than vinyl, and also more resilient (though degrade.) /n PutEmUp will disagree with all of the above - he makes valid points. I'd suggest you start making backups of your cds - probably best onto iTunes or Windows, or any of hte digital services. This will protect your music, and you can burn new cds.

I'm not disparaging vinyl, btw - i've just never been a big owner of it. (I had maybe 8 records as a teenager - my music collection started when I started working and could afford to finally buy music, rather than listen to radio after midnight (when I could pick up city and international stations..) or go to the Sydney Conservatorium Library (when I first moved).

as a result, I have a soft spot for cds... but you should start backing them up... before you have to replace them on iTunes...



Entered at Sat Jan 29 12:52:05 CET 2011 from (99.254.209.45)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Future of the CD format

A friend of mine recently did a study on the future of the CD. Not so much the physical aspect; but will the music continue to live on this round disc. He was met with a few chuckles; from some heavy sound experts. The answer of course was NO.

This morning I woke up and for whatever reason had an itching to listen to The Muddy Waters Woodstock Album. I slid it into the machine and within seconds the skipping began. Hadn't played this CD in a long, long time. By the way the disc was sparkling clean. I'm hearing that the little zeroes; or whatever that make up the music are just fading away; with time!

This first happened to me a number of years ago; with the "Best of Buddy Holly." The we got a warning that Vol 5 of a 5 CD bootleg series of Dylan was fading away. Physically you could see it. I managed to move it to another CD in time. I am a big collector of vinyl and CD's and now mp3's. I am getting worried that I may outlive a lot of my CD's. Meanwhile vinyl that I own that goes back decades and decades (while having a few scratches and pops) continues to play on.

Any thoughts; or experiences; from others?


Entered at Sat Jan 29 04:05:34 CET 2011 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Joan and BEG - glad you enjoyed it...

I'm wearing a panama hat... other members of the dlew clan are next to me...

Love the idea of the flash feeding... hopefully the mall got the idea...


Entered at Sat Jan 29 02:49:34 CET 2011 from (76.68.81.26)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Here's another one from Robbie's latest....

The instrumental "Madame X".
"A dose of mellow."


Entered at Sat Jan 29 02:41:18 CET 2011 from (68.171.233.229)

Posted by:

Bill M

RtO: Referring to my question to you yesterday, does your near-blanket condemnation of Bo Diddlyish music mean that you don't like Jimmy McGriff"s "I Got A Woman" from '62?


Entered at Sat Jan 29 01:18:14 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The Weight - how much "weight"

Lars!.....I been wondering for a while now????? Do you reckon any of these guys here ever actually do any work?? All they ever do is bullshit on this page......all day...every day.


Entered at Sat Jan 29 00:22:23 CET 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Kevin

I can't deny anything you say about the MUSICAL contribution RR made to The Band.He was & is a musician first & a master songwriter.And,noone lives their lives perfectly.I guess i just don't see such a negative connotation to his being a "businessman" & calling him that ought not negate or minimize that he's about the music.I just sat down & listened to Planet Waves.RR's guitar playing is original & powerful--can't deny his musical greatness no matter his other abilities!!


Entered at Sat Jan 29 00:06:24 CET 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Kevin, there are different aspects to be being a businessman. Robbie certainly has some of the qualities ansd abilities that can contribute to success in business. There is no one formula for anything. But the ability to schmooze, having chutzpah,a strong desire to succeed, hunger, and a sizeable ego, are some of the qualities that alot of successful businessmen have. Not saying this is bad. And yes, there is a strong aspect of being in business to existing in the music industry milieu. You cannot ignore the business aspect of it and survive well. Robbie did pay attention to business. Not saying this is bad.

More Band Business. I've always said that levon is one helluva natural salesman. Is he the kind to sit with figures and worry about a budget? Hell no. But, I've said this before, and maybe i'm wrong, but if levon did not discover music and that he was musical, he coulda been the largest John Deere dealer in Arkansas.


Entered at Fri Jan 28 23:41:16 CET 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: NY

Subject: A hard-headed woman

According to Levon's book, Miss Fanny (from "The Weight") looked a lot like Caledonia...which doesn't help much because I don't have a clue about what either of them look like. Ronnie Hawkins described a girl named Fanny as being short and fat, but that's not to say he wasn't talking about a different Fanny. And that was a long time ago and by now she could have lost some "Weight," which brings us back full circle. All we really know about her is that Levon loves her just the same.


Entered at Fri Jan 28 23:32:32 CET 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

R T O

Subject: Over-rated standards for PV

Good shout for (not hearing) Caldonia, Pierre. Attached is my Top 10 of blues based songs a dues-paid musician should never have to play ever again:

1. NIGHT TRAIN ("Dum da-da da-da da-da dum da-da da-da da-da du...err..what was the point of the tune again? What singled it out for "timeless standard" status? Do remind me!")

2. CALDONIA ("Caldonia! Caldonia? F*ck-off-let's-play-some-thing-else!")

3. STORMY MONDAY (Okay, the whole week is bad now. Time for the hosepipe/car exhaust combo, then - and stop poxy attention seeking).

4. Anything at all by MOSE ALLISON (Think what a great frontman/organist Georgie Fame would have been without Mose's pedestrian drone as a main vocal influence).

5. MUSTANG SALLY. (Yes, I KNOW the original is great...and the tune can't be blamed for the Commitments, no...but everybody will reckon you like their version and stuck it in for that reason).

6. PRIDE & JOY (See also COLD SHOT, WALKING THE TIGHTROPE...hmm, is there a pattern emerging? Is it the late lamented figure who somehow convinced every guitar player you know that they need the loudest Fender amp they can find even for a small pub date? Yep.)

7. NEED YOUR LOVE SO BAD (When the original IS such a thing of frail beauty, the only decision wiser than having a go yourself is leaving it be).

8. DON'T GET AROUND MUCH ANYMORE (Rat Pack stuff just doesn't work in pubs when played by sweaty hairies in Little Feat T-shirts!).

9. BO DIDDLEY-type songs (when you are not The Hawk or the Quicksilver Messenger Service.

10. HELP ME ("Oh no! And I bet they expect me to segue into a few bars of Green Onions for a solo, too - and assume they are the first bunch who 'cleverly' arranged" it like that...!")


Entered at Fri Jan 28 22:48:26 CET 2011 from (70.50.64.34)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Jed………You have described the Rambles and the spirit around them perfectly……………my point was just that it’s a bit tiring to me hearing RR regularly referred to as the business guy or dismissively by his last name only at this website………while he might have had some better judgements on certain aspects of life than some of his old partners he was no businessman…….the ingredient he brought to the party was songwriting – primarily – and it is that songwriting that has endured and the reason there is this website and rambles to go to, etc. …….Have a good weekend everyone…….


Entered at Fri Jan 28 22:47:39 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: Some people live in the hope that someday she'll set out exactly what makes her big head so hard. I've moved on to other topics, but I understand the compulsion.


Entered at Fri Jan 28 22:31:59 CET 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: More Rambles

Forgot to distinuish Ramble Road which certainly attracts more hit seekers.Rambles in the Barn,perhaps partially attributed to cost,tend to attract harder core fans who see a larger picture beyond the hits.All conjecture on my part!!


Entered at Fri Jan 28 22:28:17 CET 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Rambles

Kevin--perhaps casual fans want to hear the "hits",but are you certain us long time Band people,who remained involved with the solo & reformed Band of the 90's,are there for the hits? As for me,no denying the hits are great(because they ARE great songs--excuse the tautology!),but again,musically,the diversity & range of the setlist & performers,evolution of the songs,the high calibre musicians & musicianship,the reworking of songs,Levon's spirit & energy,the good time vibe,the beauty of the mountains,the sense of a comeback from difficult life problems,etc.--it's all much more than a Band "oldies & goodies" night.


Entered at Fri Jan 28 22:13:53 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Same Old Blues

In one of his rare live performances, out of all the possibilities, Robbie played "Who Do You Love" with Eric Clapton at the Crossroads Guitar Festival.


Entered at Fri Jan 28 21:41:08 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

No one wants to hear "Caldonia" surely?


Entered at Fri Jan 28 21:31:04 CET 2011 from (70.50.64.34)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Jed – precisely my point………..the principle reason the shows – rambles barn and rambles road - draw is because people want to hear Rockin Chair and It Makes No Difference and The Weight…………………Let’s not kid ourselves here.


Entered at Fri Jan 28 21:12:14 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Todd: Admitting that it's just conjecture (as Jed said), I'm with you in thinking that Levon didn't just get up and leave because he was no longer the leader, but because the group had been sidetracked. As Peter V and I were speculating a couple of weeks ago, Levon and the Hawks were just hitting the charts with a serious-label record of their own, and rather than touring to promote that, the other four were happy to stay as somebody else's back-up band - AND get booed! As justifiable as Levon's position may have been in the short term, I see the other four's decision as the right one in the long run, because the Dylan connection allowed there to be a long run - as opposed to the chance to be, oh, the Turtles. Once he was back in the fold, I see no sign of Levon having objected to backing others at times - Dylan at the Woody concert, Dylan in the UK, Dylan on tour ... I don't recall him whining about TLW on those terms, and I don't see why anyone in his right mind would see backing up such a cast of characters in such a setting for such a reason as demeaning.


Entered at Fri Jan 28 20:58:32 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Is my head on backwards???????

Maybe it is! Maybe I'm totally adverse to what you meant Kevin. If that is the case I humbly apologize for that remark (seriously).

Y'know with this whole dragged on and on mess. People for the most part try to say things diplomatically. Lets cut to the chase. We are not discussing a bunch of choir boys here. You don't start your career playing music with Ronnie Fucking Hawkins as an apprentiseship to be a choir boy.

With the exception of Garth Hudson, who probably never indulged in any of the "perks" of being a Rock Star. These were a group of bad ass, take no prisoners, take all you can get guys. They learned by experience everything they did. There wasn't any set of rules around when they were doing what they did.

With all repect to Rick Danko, Richard Manuel, and Levon Helm watching what those guys did. I would just wager that Robbie Robertson, and maybe with female help, woke up to what theye were going to become if they continued. Who knows......Hence, "This is where I get off."


Entered at Fri Jan 28 20:41:33 CET 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Rambles

The Rambles are not about playing "covers of old blues songs".First,there's nothing wrong with covering old blues songs.Not sure R&R would exist if some young Brits & Americans weren't about both covering & expanding the range of old blues songs.And,as a guy who has no grievance toward RR or Levon,i've enjoyed both of their solo work over the years.But,Levon's Rambles are musically & spiritually about way more than old blues songs.I've enjoyed three Rambles & they were terrific & current.And,Robbie having business sense doesn't belittle the greatness of his songs or music any more than Jagger being the business guy of The Stones.Mick still wrote great songs--even Keef agrees while calling him Brenda.LOL


Entered at Fri Jan 28 20:25:39 CET 2011 from (70.50.64.34)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Norm……..I love ya….but how does one politely say “missed the point”. Read the post again and if you still think I accepted his book as gospel......I'll crawl out to BC on hands and knees singing your fav B. Adams all the way....


Entered at Fri Jan 28 20:21:50 CET 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: NY

Subject: Thank you

EMPTY NOW- Thanks for that link to the "Hotel California." I'd never heard it done before with the Bob Marley influence; good cover by Majek Fashek, at first I thought it was Marley himself.

I think I've learned more about Dylan and the Band in the last two weeks than I'd picked up in the last 10 years. Thanks to all of the contributers, it's been an education.


Entered at Fri Jan 28 20:17:00 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Fantasy

Kevin, your whole line of thinking is absurd. Robbie Robertson isn't the one who went broke. Your obviously thinking everything Levon said in that book is the gospel.

How do you think you are an authority to say who was and wasn't a good business man. Give your head a shake.


Entered at Fri Jan 28 20:02:01 CET 2011 from (70.50.64.34)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Robbie Robertson - the madness must stop

No disrespect intended, but this often repeated line of “RR had the best head for business” while assigning various other musical or leadership attributes to the other four is not only tired but it borders on the ridiculous……….much like the racist undertones found in sports reporting where white quarterbacks are always described as intelligent or crafty while the great black QB’s are simply described as being extremely “athletic”…………….. Robbie clearly didn’t have a great mind for business as most musicians don’t and as Levon clearly demonstrated in his book ( the record deal the Band had was not what anyone would describe as “good business” )……….what he did have was clearly the BEST MIND FOR MUSIC – he did after all write the SONGS that defined the Band and without which none of us would be here and dare I say it Rambles would not be charging $200 a head to hear covers of old blues songs………………..

"Hear the sound, Willie boy?/ The Flying Dutchman's on the reef./ It's my belief/ We've used up all our time:/ This hill's too steep to climb/ And the days that remain ain't worth a dime" ..........This is the kind of writing that seperates the pedestrian from the glorious in rock n roll........and it is courtesy of a man referred to in these parts as just Robertson.....


Entered at Fri Jan 28 19:28:17 CET 2011 from (142.22.16.51)

Posted by:

Northern Boy

Subject: Joan

Thanks so much for that wonderful video-poem you posted a while back. It was an instant hit in our (double) English teacher household and was actually shown to one of our senior English classes this morning. NB


Entered at Fri Jan 28 19:16:44 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Leadership

I somehow get the sense that when they broke from The Hawk, Levon was the leader. After he split Robbie stepped in to the vacuum. He is the one who would be most comfortable talking to an audience. Rick was gregarious but I think willing to let Robbie take the lead. Richard was very shy and Garth doesn't speaks with his music. Also,Robbie seemed to have the best head for business. When Levon came back the new configuration was set.

DLEW thanks for the flash mob video. I like them (flash mobs) I don't know if a video of it exists, but in a shopping mall in Canada a woman was asked to leave because she was nursing her baby. A large group of women got together and had a breast feedin.


Entered at Fri Jan 28 18:52:11 CET 2011 from (70.50.64.34)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Famed producer Bob Ezrin at a music convention at some point in the1980’s……….and someone asked about the contributions of Alice Cooper……Ezrin replied “ I am Alice Cooper”……….It was a joke……sort of……..Mutt Lange might be the best example of an overwhelming sound……….but Daniel Lanois is not far behind……………Interesting in that Robbie Robertson 1987 was not as affected by this as most……….strength of personality I would guess…….Still - it was overproduced……….”Clairvoyant”, at first listens, seems to not suffer from this…….a blessing……..


Entered at Fri Jan 28 18:30:50 CET 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Not offended at all - just trying to add to the conversation.


Entered at Fri Jan 28 18:25:22 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Sales Pitch

Awwww, you're just trying to justify yourself & the existence of producers Brien. Hell....I'm only joking, some one has to take charge and sort things out.

But remember that song of the Stones from back in the 60's? The "Underassistant West Coast Promotion Man".


Entered at Fri Jan 28 18:23:16 CET 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: More on Producers

Hope i didn't offend you,Brien. Producers are most needed for many bands & individual artists for exactly the reasons you mention.The problem is when the producer & his "sound" begin to dominate or call attention away from the essence of the artist.Kind of like in Basketball,when a ref or a coach become the focus rather than the players on the court.But,I'm not suggesting there be no coach or ref--they are crucial.But,Bill Russell coached the team & played & Dylan,as one example,produces & plays too!


Entered at Fri Jan 28 17:34:20 CET 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Producer: I speak from experience having been a Producer on a variety of projects for about 15 years.


Entered at Fri Jan 28 17:32:18 CET 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Producers streamline projects. They take a lot of ideas and narrow it down to a cohesive entity. They focus a group, especially if they are unorganized, have lots of ideas, bicker or have so much talent going on that someone has to be the objective decider about things - they need to see the trees through the forest. I think few people are talented enough to work well without a Producer, other than themselves, on a consistant basis but there certainly isn't a lack of ego for those who think they can.


Entered at Fri Jan 28 16:33:15 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Nipping At Your Nose

Since working with Daniel Lanois on "Time Out Of Mind" Dylan has been producing himself, using the pseudonym Jack Frost.


Entered at Fri Jan 28 16:14:46 CET 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Bashful Bill--Gregg Allman

Bashful Bill--you make some excellent points.For some reason,T-Bone's production successfully maintains that old timey acoustic blues context with a nice delta beat on Gregg's new one.That type of sound fails with other artists.Kinda like Lanois who sounds swampy no matter who he is producing.


Entered at Fri Jan 28 16:12:49 CET 2011 from (76.68.81.26)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

David P: From Expecting Rain....
Robbie Robert's Lament (Dylan) – solo electric guitar (a bit like Hendrix's "Star-Spangled Banner").


Entered at Fri Jan 28 16:10:27 CET 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Producers & other stuff

Wasn't it Dylan who said (to paraphrase) why bother with producers when i could do it best myself?! There's truth to that although without George Martin,The Beatles may have sounded differently. Frankly,if it was my choice to pick a "leader" & a producer for The Band,it would have to be Garth.After all,he is a music teacher(LOL) & he's clearly the most sophisticated & diverse musical mind of the members of The Band.


Entered at Fri Jan 28 15:56:44 CET 2011 from (76.68.81.26)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Robbie and Eric


Entered at Fri Jan 28 15:54:41 CET 2011 from (76.68.81.26)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Delphine Robertson

Thanks dlew919. Were you the one with the big smile?

Apparently Robbie and Carly did hang at the Chelsea bar restaurant one night. She claims that both of them were shy and a little in awe of each other. She states that she had a crush on him and was looking forward to a romance with Robbie......also hoping he'd help her get over Willie Donaldson as well. I was just disappointed that Robbie stood her up when they had made plans to get together again for the Fourth of July. She waited and waited....no show.

Rollie!! The latest crop of kidzzz loved your harp playing on "Angelina's Blues", but wanted it to be longer! When they heard how you introduced the short tune.....uh.....They all giggled.

:-D


Entered at Fri Jan 28 15:49:48 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Neil Young

Not sure if anyone has mentioned this. On this mornings news. Neil Young receives a special Juno this March.


Entered at Fri Jan 28 15:33:07 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: R.R.'s Lament

A North American distribution deal has been negotiated for the French film "My Own Love Song" which features a score by Bob Dylan. The soundtrack includes 16 short instrumental pieces written by Dylan, one of which is entitled "Robbie Robert's Lament". Reports are that it's a solo electric guitar performance.


Entered at Fri Jan 28 12:01:37 CET 2011 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Web: My link

Subject: Pat B: thanks for the notification on Charlie Louvin

Here's an obituary.


Entered at Fri Jan 28 10:26:41 CET 2011 from (41.97.230.3)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: continued / Ilkka / Lars

Ilkka: thanks, you cannot believe at what point "Subterranean Homesick Blues" and Ginsberg helped me to clarify the subject.

Technically: nothing was known in the common language as "music videos" before the VHS format in 1975.
Artistically: what I always thought as "music video" is the visual shallow far-fetched story linked to a commercial song and rewarded by the Oscar's not the Grammy's.
wow! this is said ! and it's me the author.
put a final period : the first video clip in history is "The Graduate" (1967) film of Mike Nichols, starring Dustin Hoffman, Ann Bankroft, and the best Catharine Ross ever, soundtrack S&G

I once posted about one intriguing Arab practice concerning the official patronymy. That concerning names beginning by Abu (father of) or Om (mother of) __ followed by a standard name, ex: Abu Dhabi. Seen from my mental structure I just had difficulty to understand how can somebody be named by reference to somebody visibly newer in time than him. One colleague in the Learned Society is called Abu Adam, I can't hide a furtive laughter every time he is called out.
I learned later on that though officialized in civil registers, this is more a title than a patronyme, the highest pride distinction acquired and deserved after some outstanding achievement or life meaningful act performed by the offspring.

Lars : you are the luckiest of all the GBers for having given and having educated such daughter… I just can't post my exact impression, my youtube link this morgen is exclusively for you Lars, I hope you'll appreciate.

Majek Fashek is a Nigerian singer whose incredible vocal resemblance with Marley confuses even his fans, or people of youtube don’t know what they post ?


Entered at Fri Jan 28 10:16:02 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Levon’s pretty clear in his book on his disaffection during October 1965.

“I didn’t want to be in somebody’s band.’

‘It just ain’t my ambition to be anybody’s drummer.\

Robbie: Some of this stuff is incredible. Levon: Well, I can’t always hear it.

‘There isn’t a lot for a drummer to do in this music.’

I’d been raised to belive that music was supposed to make people smile and want to party.

To me music ‘s always been some good chords and a tight rhythm section. This stuff’s too damn powerful for me.

And he only told Robbie he was leaving. The others woke to find him gone. Then Bill Avis said (quoted by Levon in his book – which indicates he agrees):

Levon left because of Albert Grossman … Levon probably also remembered that The Hawks had been his band, and he just didn’t feel comfortable not being the leader anymore.”


Entered at Fri Jan 28 06:30:03 CET 2011 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: PS... forgot to mention

Levon seems to end the conversation...


Entered at Fri Jan 28 06:05:29 CET 2011 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Bands, Politics, The Band's politics...

I think the section in TLW where they talk about the women on the road is a little instructive. I've said this before, but Robbie is in charge, and then Levon says 'We're not supposed to talk about this (or some such), and they cut to Joni Mitchell (a sly way of disproving much of what they were all talking about...).

I think when you get 2 strong people together (Lennon/McCarteny, Roberston/Helm, on and on... you get magic and tension...)

I think the point made earlier about Levon leaving, not the Hawks, but Dylan is pretty right (as much as I can know anythign about this.) In any case, has Garth ever said who was the 'leader'? I bet he hasn't, and I bet he wouldn't...


Entered at Fri Jan 28 06:00:53 CET 2011 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Web: My link

Subject: Thanks BEG for your flash mob... here's another one

Sharp-eyed observers may see yours truly as a witness (only... no singing from me), but sharper eyed observers may spot mrs dlew in this choir... Hope you enjoy...


Entered at Fri Jan 28 04:48:17 CET 2011 from (72.230.109.86)

Posted by:

Bashful Bill(again)

Location: Minoa, NY(still)

Subject: Carly

Great points, Tod, per usual.......OK - I've heard(or more accurately read)that Carly Simon has claimed that both Grossman and Johnson colluded with each other and harassed(likely a kinder word than deserved) her, but a) I've never heard anything about her and RR in the "getting close" department, and I can't access BEG's link, so what's the story there?, and b)I've also long wondered why, as well connected as she was(even pre JT)she could have been so easily blackballed. Grossman was a big fish in a small pond, for sure, but the pond was part of an ocean, so to speak. She wasn't a complete unknown with a demo tape and nothing but a waitress or barmaid job to go back to for the sin of spurning a powerful man, and Grossman's corner of the world was only one sub - corner of the music business - she couldn't scare up any other interest in her work? And, has any of that music, made dduring the Basement Tapes period If I'm not wrong, ever come to light, via bootlegs, etc?


Entered at Fri Jan 28 04:31:12 CET 2011 from (72.230.109.86)

Posted by:

Bashful Bill

Location: Minoa, NY

Subject: producers, i.e. T-Bone

Thanks for sharing re Band of Joy, Jed. I also was underwhelmed by Raising Sand and have been wondering about this one. Greg Allman's new one is growing on me since buying it last week, but only a little and I fear only because I wanted to like it. I'm not sure how to word this, but I think some producers, sometimes, get to be too prolific. Everyone lines up to work with them and they;re all over the place, whether on albums or movie soundtracks or even in interviews. One gets to recognize their "sound" as much as they might recognize certain guitar players(or any instrumentalist) or a band's , it's that identifiable. Burnette is all over the place, and has been since the O brother, where art thou days(likely before that, that's when he first got on my radar) and it's getting so I can "hear" him when he's behind the board as much as the musician's who I'm listening to. Rick Rubin and Daniel Lanois are others who immediately come to mind, and there's others who I can't think of right now(Glyn Johns - is he a producer? the name is itching at me as if he's fit this criteria). They make a well-deserved splash then they and their sound is everywhere, including places where I could have lived without it. For example, the stuff Lanois did with Emmy Lou Harris left me cold, and I'm a major and long-time Emmy Lou fan. Just a thought, and one which I just had after reading your post(and I didn't know that he did the recent Elton / Leon Russel, which I haven't heard). I'm wondering if I may appreciate Allman's new one more if Burnett's heavy hand wasn't there.


Entered at Fri Jan 28 04:07:24 CET 2011 from (69.182.87.6)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: The Band & The Bard

I agree that the time spent with Dylan was influential as part of their transformation from Hawks to The Band, but I don’t know that I’d go so far as saying that there was no longer a strong central figure. After all, their professional lives at that time revolved around Dylan, and they were on his payroll. I don’t know if there’s ever been a much stronger personality than Dylan. And I hear he made an even stronger pot of coffee. But that was a necessary time in their evolution. I think the bigger deal was having the time off from the road without having to worry too much about their basic income. Prior to that, they had been playing gigs for many years up to six nights a week. Having that free time gave them the freedom and opportunity to explore other avenues of creativity. Who among us wouldn’t like the opportunity of not having to show up for our day (or night) jobs, still collect a paycheck, and have plenty of free time to work on our art.

Even though there was no “leader” in The Band, Levon’s absence created an opportunity for Robbie to step a little more to the forefront, and that had to have affected the balance of power to some degree. I’m sure the dynamic was different that it had been. But either way, the situation worked for a while and produced some legendary music along the way.

While it’s possible that the reason Levon left, had something to do with Dylan’s music, I don’t think that’s the overriding reason. After all, Levon has enthusiastically done quite a few of Dylan’s songs over the many years since then. The booing is probably part of the reason, but I think the biggest thing is that Levon looked upon the Hawks as a unit that had been through thick and thin, had finally grown away from Ronnie, and were starting to establish themselves as a force in their own right……. and all of a sudden, they were back to playing a support role again….this time to Dylan. Perhaps Levon looked on it as a step backwards, or at least sideways. In retrospect, they got a lot out of the arrangement and their association with Dylan, but to this day, I think there is a still a perception among the general population that they got their start as Dylan’s backing band which as we all know isn’t entirely true. I think that was another one of Levon’s stated objections to The Last Waltz. They were back to being sidemen again.

I’ve said this here before, but I don’t think that Levon “left” the Hawks. I think that he left Dylan with the expectation that the Hawks would reconnect again further on up the road.


Entered at Thu Jan 27 22:53:55 CET 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: The "leader" of The Band

Musically,never seemed anyone was the leader.They were a true BAND in the sense of being a cohesive unit & the sum was more than the parts(& the parts were pretty darn good).Was there a leader in other areas? Perhaps,but how might we know beyond conjecture anyway?


Entered at Thu Jan 27 22:46:19 CET 2011 from (76.69.87.107)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

.....and on page 253, there's also a personal anecdote about Carly and Robbie....and nooooooo......I don't dig it.


Entered at Thu Jan 27 22:44:44 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: So, who's so vain?

If one continues to read further through the link that BEG posted, it seems that (excuse the nusery rhyme pun) Carly Simon met many sly men :-)


Entered at Thu Jan 27 22:37:19 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: To your earlier question, I think I have a recording date for "The Stones" around somewhere. September sticks in my mind, but it was surely after they'd met Dylan. I think all three songs from that session give evidence of different facets of the group - "He Don't Love You" was the old club Hawks, "Stones" is a statelier group with societal concerns, "Liza Jane" is an early exercise in tossing vocals around (with a bit of three-part thrown in). As for who was the leader, leadership can take many forms. In the early days Levon was the leader in name, legally and presumably financially. Later on Robbie was looked on by everyone else - and maybe by some, if not all, within the group - as the leader, but that was more an organic thing. I very much doubt that he signed for the group and/or got a leader fee.


Entered at Thu Jan 27 22:15:59 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I can readily believe that both Albert "Gross" man and Bob Johnson were interested in exploiting Carly's charms, but I wish she'd stick to one story, or even both. Elsewhere she said:

“I got involved with manager Albert Grossman. Without my dear sister's protection, I was a sitting duck. He offered me his body in exchange for worldly success. Sadly, his body was not the kind you would easily sell yourself for. My record, produced by Bob Johnson was shelved - which was a shame because it was actually quite good.

Back to The Hawks in NYC failing to make the grade. I think it was a pivotal moment, and that they were adrift without the guy registered with the musician's union as "leader" (which meant an extra cut). But maybe that was the catalyst in transforming them from The Hawks to The Band. The 90s Band called Levon "the boss". Perhaps Levon's departure led to more democracy among the other four. Levon readily admits he didn't like the music Dylan was producing. Without him, the others could be more open-minded and eventually we get the basement tapes, mainly without Levon. Bringing him back was the necessary piece of the jigsaw, but maybe they wouldn't have evolved so far or so fast if he'd been there.That hadn't struck me before today, but it makes a kind of sense. Without him, they weren't the full deal, but they needed the period without a major control figure to evolve. Then he fitted back in, contributed and took them to yet another higher level.


Entered at Thu Jan 27 22:11:31 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Carmen: Too bad they didn't have "The National Enquirer" back then. As Tommy Lee Jones says in "Men in Black", "The finest investigative journalism in America".

sadavid: A couple things. First, the fact that highway 61 runs the length of Minnesota is of far greater consequence to the Dylan story than that it also runs through Louisiana. And the fact that Bob's father really was Abe might even suggest that there's a family side (maybe a car accident?) to the thing.

Second, the initial scene-setting of "The Weight" is so much like like Joseph and Mary's arrival in another small mideastern town that you have to wonder if Robbie's abilities as a clairvoyant meant that he got to see "The Life of Brian" years and years before the rest of us.


Entered at Thu Jan 27 21:56:58 CET 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Plant:Band Of Joy

Perhaps this was already discussed here,but was wondering what GB folks think of Plant's work with Buddy Miller,Band Of Joy. It's been a real thrill to hear particularly given my disappointment with the bass/drum heavy T- Bone produced Raising Sand. T-Bone does a much nicer job on Gregg Allman's Low Country Blues and while a different type of project he produces Leon/Elton well,albeit,once again,with a heavy bottom.


Entered at Thu Jan 27 21:57:03 CET 2011 from (63.88.115.195)

Posted by:

carmen

Location: pa

Subject: Belly of a Whale

Real-Life Jonah A Man Who Survived in the Belly of a Whale About the strange event in history where James Bartley survived inside the belly of a whale much like the Biblical Jonah. The Man Who Survived the Belly of the Monster "Then the men feared the Lord exceedingly; and offered a sacrifice unto the Lord, and made vows. Now the Lord had prepared a great fish to swallow up Jonah. And Jonah was in the belly of the fish 3 days and 3 nights . . . And the Lord spake unto the fish, and it vomited out Jonah upon the dry land." --Jonah 1:16-17; 2:10 In February, 1891, the ship Star of the East was off the Falkland Islands when the crew spotted an 80' sperm whale. Two rowboats filled with crewmen were launched to capture the monster. Closing in, one harpooner let go his weapon and shafted the whale, which lashed out, almost overturning the boats. Returning to the ship with their dead whale, the crewmen realized one sailor, James Bartley, was missing. It was decided he had been tossed overboard in the fight and had drowned. Six hours later the crewmen began removing the blubber from the dead beast. By midnight the task was still unfinished, and the sailors went to bed. In the morning, they resumed their job. Then the unexpected happened. According to M. de Parville, editor of the Journal des Debats, writing in Paris in 1914, "Suddenly the sailors were startled by something in the stomach which gave spasmodic signs of life. Inside was found the missing sailor, James Bartley, doubled up and unconscious. He was placed on deck and treated to a bath of sea-water which soon revived him, but his mind was not clear and he was placed in the captain's quarters." Recovering, Bartley recalled being hit by the whale's tail and that he had been "encompassed by great darkness, and he felt he was slipping along a smooth passage that seemed to move and carry him forward. His hands came in contact with a yielding, slimy substance, which seemed to shrink from his touch. He could easily breathe, but the heat was terrible. It seemed to open the pores of his skin and draw out his vitality. The next he remembered he was in the captain's cabin." Except for the fact that his face, neck, hands had been bleached white, Bartley--like Jonah--survived the belly of the monster. Today, we are all in the belly of the monster, and the monster is everywhere, in hostile environments inside and outside the city, in the system, in government, in business, in technology, in routine. Survival is up to each of us, individually or working together, but the Almanac would like to offer a few hints to help all Bartleys emerge from the belly safely. . . . © 1975 - 1981 by David Wallechinsky & Irving Wallace Reproduced with permission from "The People's Almanac" series of books. All rights reserved.


Entered at Thu Jan 27 21:39:15 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: and another thing . . .

Speaking of influences, I'd draw a pretty direct methodological line between "God said to Abraham, kill me a son" and "I pulled into Nazareth . . . ."


Entered at Thu Jan 27 21:25:53 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: sacrilege!

Joan: whew! -- it only goes to show that you can draw a line between ANY two points. What a terrible perversion of what is perhaps the funniest verse in popular music.


Entered at Thu Jan 27 21:07:40 CET 2011 from (76.69.87.107)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Sheila Weller: Girls Like Us: Carole King, Joni Mitchell, Carly Simon

"In July 1966 Bob Dylan and Carly Simon met in a cubicle in Grossman's office. There Dylan rewrote, for Carly, some of the words of Eric Von Schmidt's Baby, Let Me Follow You Down, the anthem of the Cambridge folk scene popularized by Dave Van Ronk in the Village coffeehouses.

"Carly was struck by how "out of it" Dylan was during the session - he was "very, very wasted." But Carly continued to work daily for weeks on the album - recording the Von Schmidt song and others - with a group of tremendous musical talents just coming into their own: Paul Butterfield and, from the group the Hawks - soon to be renamed The Band - Levon Helm, Rick Danko, and Robbie Robertson." "The tracks of her album had to be mixed, and that was the job of sound engineer Bob Johnston. But Johnston held off - instead, dangling a quid pro quo: sex for sound-mixing. "If you're nice to me, I'll make you a nice record," he told Carly with casual impunity. "It was amazing to actually hear it coming out of somebody's mouth," Carly recalls. "I stood very calm, and said, 'I'm not that hungry.'" Johnston paid her back by refusing to mix the tracks and by bad-mouthing her to Grossman. "Whatever Bob said to Albert, I was shelved," she has said. "This was the end for me for a very long time. I was frozen."


Entered at Thu Jan 27 21:00:42 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Web: My link

Subject: Dylan and Murder in New Orleans

i came across this blog talking about the murder rate in NO. He manages to fit Dylan in there.


Entered at Thu Jan 27 20:37:18 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Hewdie

Well that solves it. He called himself "Hew-die". Looking at the YoutUbe, as ever comments lead to other cuts. And the one who said "Eddie does it better" is right. Eddie Cochran did the final vesion on this one.


Entered at Thu Jan 27 20:34:29 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Bob Johnston, the Uneasy Rider, Elvis & Dylan

Before his work as a producer with Dylan & others, including Leonard Cohen and Simon & Garfunkel, Bob Johnston scored a small success as a songwriter. A song he co-wrote (under the name Joe Byers) with Charlie Daniels, whom he met in Texas, entitled "It Hurts Me" was recorded by Elvis Presley. It was the B-side of the 1964 single "Kissin' Cousins" (from the soundtrack to the film of the same name). Mr. Daniels, of course, would later achieve fame himself as a recording artist and would work with Mr. Johnston on Dylan's "Nashville Skyline", "Self Portrait" and "New Morning".


Entered at Thu Jan 27 20:34:22 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: "I Got A Woman" Part 1

RtO: Here's the first part of the McGriff recording on YouTube. Part 2, which is MIA, has the "Magic Carpet Ride" material.


Entered at Thu Jan 27 20:31:21 CET 2011 from (70.50.64.34)

Posted by:

Kevin J

And in the recommendation line………..the new documentary on Phil Spector “The Agony and the Ecstasy of Phil Spector” is getting good reviews…………


Entered at Thu Jan 27 20:18:48 CET 2011 from (97.120.39.24)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Chinaberry Sidewalks

For Rodney Crowell fans: I just finished this book, it's a memoir of his early years growing up poor in Houston. It doesn't really have much to do with his music or adult life but if you're a fan I think you will really like the book and its stories very much. There's loads of well struck metaphors & white trash axioms and most are written in the dialect one would expect from that time & place.

I liked Levon's book but thought the writing was sub-par. This one is top-notch that way and without a writing helper. His songwriting chops translate well into his prose. He's within just a few weeks of my age (1950) so there's tons of relevant pop culture markers too. Highly recommended -


Entered at Thu Jan 27 20:14:43 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: Huddie, Huddie, Huddie

Peter V, dlew919: for pronunciation of Mr. Ledbetter's given name, have a listen to [My link].

Relevant phoneme @ 2:39.

By the way, for those interested in the phonemes of things, the _Globe_ notes that Keef's _Life_ is out in audiobook format (has been for a couple months, who knew): "read by Richards, Johnny Depp and Joe Hurley, Hachette, 22.5 hours on 20 CDs, unabridged, $39.98." And speaking of speaking voices, the Amazon description includes: "In a voice that is uniquely and unmistakably _him_ -- part growl, part laugh . . ." Unfortunately, it seems Keef just does intro and outro while Depp does the heavy lifting.


Entered at Thu Jan 27 20:15:55 CET 2011 from (70.50.64.34)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Certainly correct about Janis Joplin at Festival Express being great……but can one steal their own show? Did we not determine that she was the biggest star on the bill and had gone on last at the performances across the country?…..Or had The Band gone on last?………….We know Grateful Dead did not as it was daylight during their filmed sets………..Sylvia Tyson was another performer that glows in the film……….Richard looked and sounded so great as well….hard to believe – no make that impossible to believe - that The Last Waltz was only 6 short years - and some expensive haircuts - later……….A lifetime happened in those 6 years…………


Entered at Thu Jan 27 20:08:32 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Smile

The GB today made me smile. Thanks BEG for the Flash mob video. Glenn you can rant anytime. Beautiful sentiments I like the concept of "childrenizing ourselves.Peter, I like your conversation with your grandson.The other day when my great niece (age 4) was asked "What is a human" she said "Babies are human.All people are human, even grownups. Indeed!


Entered at Thu Jan 27 19:06:47 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: A Thrill's A Thrill

Kevin J: I must've seen Long John at the El Mocambo or something way back when, but have to memory of it at all. I do have a pretty clear recollection of seeing the writer of "A Thrill's A Thrill", Bill Amesbury, performing that song and others in a showcase gig for his then-new second album at the Colonial in the mid '70s. Great backing band that included two former Hawks - Scott Cushnie on piano and Bert Hermiston on sax - plus Danny Marks on guitar, Chris Vickery on bass (ex-Bearfoot, where he'd replaced Terry Danko) and Frank "Yum Yum" LoRusso on drums. And the Murphy Sisters on bgv.


Entered at Thu Jan 27 18:44:57 CET 2011 from (69.182.87.6)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: In Search of That Thin Wild Mercury Sound

PSB, Thanks for the link to your Dylan Mono set review, and Pat for the additional info re: ‘Sooner or Later’. I want to believe that’s it’s Rick on bass, and it seems like it could be based on the research, but when I listen to the track, I don’t really hear Rick’s style coming through very strongly. It sounds mostly like the bass is just hanging around on the root notes for the most part. Maybe this is partly due to the fact that it was a different drummer…..or Perhaps Rick’s bouncy style hadn’t fully emerged yet, where he doesn’t play bass, but rather fills space.

David P, That was a good read on Johnston’s recollections. Thanks.

Thanks also to BEG for the additional links on the subject. I’ll look at those in more detail tonight.

I think that Peter V. is on to something with the departure of Levon affecting the way the Hawks played on some of those early Dylan sessions. While it’s true they “could” adapt to other drummers, I have a feeling that something wasn’t quite the same without Levon. The chemistry was different. Being the senior member of the group, which was even called “Levon and the Hawks” for a while, I think that he was very much a leader figure in those early days. In one of the Ruth Albert Spencer interviews with Richard Manuel, Richard mentions that while there was no specific “leader” of The Band, Robbie was the spokesman and had the best mind for business, and that Levon was the musical leader for the most part. I think Levon not being with them was a harder adjustment than it could have been for other groups where the drummer was simply a timekeeper.

It’s worth noting that while the Hawks grew with Dylan both on the road and in the basement, it wasn’t until a key missing component came back when Levon returned, that they regained the combination of talents and chemistry that enabled them to create ‘Music From Big Pink’. Can anyone imagine that album working as well with Bobby Gregg or Mickey Jones (not to be dismissive of their talents). But there was simply more to the Hawks / Band dynamic than the drummer keeping time. The way that the bass and drums fit together is a key element of the foundation of the Band's sound and feel.

As far as the Hawks not being the Band, I think that can be said of many groups from that era (even ones who kept the same name). The Who, The Stones, The Beatles, The Hawks, and even and especially Bob Dylan, all changed quite a bit from the early 1960’s to the late 1960’s. I think that it was much more noticeable in the case of the Hawks / Band, because of the gap in time between their transformation. It didn’t happen in public, so the transition seems more abrupt. I remember reading a comment from Ronnie Hawkins in that he was surprised to hear how they sounded on MFBP.


Entered at Thu Jan 27 18:42:05 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Location: the regions
Web: My link

Subject: so much older then

Peter V: Your grandson was correct.


Entered at Thu Jan 27 18:38:57 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Why wasn't Cher at TLW?

You might be surprised, Kevin J … Aguilera can turn on a lot of power. While few can be compared to Joplin (who I maintain stole the show on Festival Express from ALL comers, Band included), there was a double-edged sword there depending on how you rate Etta James and Janis Joplin. Beyoncé got closer to Etta James. I believe Etta James was a greater vocal talent than Janis, who had a tendency to let the power run out of control and become a squawl. Well, that was her trademark. But Aguilera is very good in the film. Try "Tough Lover" or "Something's Got A Hold On Me" on iTunes … and now I feel a Cher at TLW moment coming on … both her songs are powerful in "Burlesque".

A lot of these teen stars (Kylie Minogue, Beyoncé, Christina Aguilera) turn out to be genuinely talented when they get older.


Entered at Thu Jan 27 18:22:33 CET 2011 from (138.88.133.195)

Posted by:

Jan F.

Location: metro D.C.

OK, I went back last night and read every post since the 1st of Jan. I feel a little better. Seems like, for the most part, you guys have been behaving pretty well -- which is one of the reasons I stopped showing up for a while.

Peter, your story about your grandson/rock star is priceless. Please don't let my youngest son, J.C. know that he can't be rock star. At 31, his hair is becoming a fleeting memory. He does have a long beard though -- a little different look for an indie band for sure. Looks like he belongs in Old Crow Medicine Show or such as that.

I've always thought Christine Aguilera has a great voice. She can sing with Tony Bennett and then sound just as comfortable with a rapper. I see where she is going to sing the National Anthem at the Super Bowl this year.

I'm home today b/c of the snow in D.C. It's actually not that bad but the power is out where I work. I'm afraid it's going to turn into a pity party here at my house. Better find something to do and some good music . . .

Thanks Marge and please keep checking in with us when you have time.

J.F.


Entered at Thu Jan 27 18:07:51 CET 2011 from (70.50.64.34)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Peter: You are approaching one of your “Cher in the TLW” moments……….Yikes…..while Beyoncé is a shimmeringly sexy and talented performer…. Christina Aguilera is a bow-legged embarrassment on many levels…….hurts to see her mentioned alongside the incomparable Janis Joplin………

Bill M: I watched that Long John Baldry special last year some time…..very good indeed…..what a show he was live…….”A thrill is a Thrill”


Entered at Thu Jan 27 17:59:44 CET 2011 from (90.239.115.111)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: “The Hawks were not The Band” (Peter V)

I'd like to put it this way, Peter: “The Band was not The Hawks”.

Empty Now: The first and last rock video for me is DYLAN's "Subterranean Homesick Blues". The latest ten years or so I have had great fun to watch ALLEN GINSBERG instead of Dylan in this video.

Thanks for the Blonde On Blonde link!


Entered at Thu Jan 27 17:50:59 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Burlesque

Reality TV aside, talent will out. Has anyone seen "Burlesque"? It's fascinating to watch Christina Aguilera doing two Etta James songs (and very well too), clearly following Beyoncé in "Cadillac Records." With all this recent stellar attention, the premise in Cadillac Records (that Etta James was Chess's greatest star) may prove to be a self-fulfilling truth for generations in 20 years time. I'd award the points to Beyoncé, but while Beyoncé almost "transmitted" Etta James, Aguilera is closer to a Janis Joplin version.


Entered at Thu Jan 27 17:31:32 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: How did you get so far in life, thinking that one needs talent and/or a decent singing voice to make it as a rock star?

Speaking of, last night there was a very good profile of Long John Baldry's career. Talking-head appearances from Rod Stewart, Elton John, Brian Auger, some clips of the very old days. Mentioned his days in Toronto (when his band included former Hawks Kelly Jay and Hugh Brockie - not that they were mentioned) and Vancouver, by which time he was recording for Stony Plain of Edmonton with Amos Garrett on guitar sometimes. Towards the end, when they were recapping his days as a busker in the '50s, they showed a production clip of his early idol, Leadbelly, singing "Pick A Bale" in costume. That made me wonder if John Booker, founding member of the Vipers Skiffle group and before that also a busker on Wardour Street in London, had ever renewed his acquaintance with Baldry during their 15 or so common years in Vancouver. "Pick A Bale" was also John's big party song right up to the end.


Entered at Thu Jan 27 17:23:31 CET 2011 from (70.50.64.34)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Jed……………Not even close……RR is Caruso compared to Keith Richard…….and those pirate beads he got in the habit of wearing were way worse than dye…….agree on Twilight…It is so good that it is now the only version I listen to. Keef never came close to being this affecting……..

Dylan: Imagine reaching the level of popularity that people even care who played on what obscure track dating back almost 50 years?


Entered at Thu Jan 27 17:06:13 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Twilight

With "Twilight" we can follow the evolution of the song through various releases. There's Robbie's demo version from "A Musical History" that Jed mentioned. Then there's an early slow-paced demo version that was included as a bonus cut on the 2001 Capitol remaster of "Northern Lights -- Southern Cross", with Levon singing lead on the choruses and just piano, bass & drums. The version released as a single in 1975, with a faster reggae-like rhythm and Rick taking lead, was also included on "The Best of The Band" compilation. Finally there's Rick wonderful solo version from "Live On Breeze Hill". Also worth mentioning is Shawn Colvin's great 1994 cover version, inspired by her hearing Rick's solo live performance.


Entered at Thu Jan 27 17:06:05 CET 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: Upstate NY (just north of that last snowstorm- sorry, Joan)

Subject: Robbie

I just ordered a "Carny" DVD from Amazon. I saw the movie once, a long time ago; I remember not being that impressed with it. But it will be worth it just to see RR doing his acting; I remember thinking that he seemed very natural. I guess his love of carnivals and his experience on the road served him well.

In TLW, one of my favorite scenes is with Scorcese interviewing RR and Levon about the midnight ramble tradition and the entertainment of "the duck walk" (I could be wrong about that term, but that's what I thought they said)..."It didn't just come out of thin air," said Robbie. Then Levon would explain more about the rambles and Robbie would be smiling across the table, smiling and trying to stifle his laughter, like a little kid on Christmas morning. Both of them are great storytellers.

EMPTY NOW- I've always loved Toto's "Africa" too. It has even more meaning to me now since my daughter has been over there for the last 18 months in the Peace Corp. She's mentioned a couple of times that the locals get a kick out of the way she dances her version of the "chicken dance" at the voodoo parades. She's starting to talk about staying over there if the right position presents itself.


Entered at Thu Jan 27 17:04:51 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: If you have it, dye it

I’m not one to comment really as the option of dyeing it isn’t open to me as it’s departed. My grandson told me he was going to be a rock star yesterday (he’s 5). I said “I’d like to be one too.”

Reply: ‘No, you’re too old. If you started being a rock star when you were a daddy, you could still be a rock star. But you can’t start being a rock star when you’re a grandad.”

I said, “Why?”

“Because you haven’t got hair now. You can’t start being a rock star without hair.”

Damn! I knew something was holding me back. I feared it was lack of talent probably coupled with a poor singing voice and little instrumental prowess. But now I have the excuse of no hair.


Entered at Thu Jan 27 17:03:53 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronno
Web: My link

Subject: snow in Toronto / organ music

The link's for my fellow Canuckistanis only - especially those of you in the regions.

In other news, I picked up a couple of Time/Life classic jazz CD comps at a discount store the other day, mostly stuff I don't know but thought I'd educate myself about. The most striking tune so far has been Jimmy McGriff's 1962 version of "I've Got A Woman". It started off so searingly that I was going to ask RtO here if he knew it. Then I realised that the propulsive rhythm is a jazzed-up "Bo Diddley" / "Who Do You Love" thing. Even the strong bass undertow that's on the 1963 Ronnie Hawkins and the Hawks record is there, though McGriff's bass pedals (no bassist is listed) play br-ut-dut-BOOOOM rather than BOO00M-BO00OM. I also realised that Goldy McJohn must have repurposed some of McGriff's work for the organ vamp on the extended version of Steppenwolf's "Magic Carpet Ride". Well worth checking out, all in all.


Entered at Thu Jan 27 16:58:55 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: dyeing

You were right originally. It is "dyeing your hair for the audience" to distinguish it from "dying a death at the Apollo".


Entered at Thu Jan 27 16:31:34 CET 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Dying

i was never sure on the spelling. Is it "dying" or "dyeing"? And,thankfully,Keef let his hair go natural too. Is his singing voice better or worse than RR?


Entered at Thu Jan 27 16:21:30 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

peter V

Subject: Dying it

What a dreadful allegation! The next thing you'll be saying Paul McCartney dyes his hair too and that Elton's hair isn't real!


Entered at Thu Jan 27 16:12:33 CET 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: RR's Hair

Could he be dyeing it?


Entered at Thu Jan 27 16:11:35 CET 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: RR's Voice

While critical of his singing voice in general,Robbie sings Twilight quite beautifully on The Band:A Musical History.He accompanies himself on piano & softly & sweetly sings--very powerful.


Entered at Thu Jan 27 15:44:16 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: don't get no older

Re: JRR's voice: he has a very compelling speaking voice, and I bet he could have made a very comfortable living doing nothing but voice-overs. (Or toons - take a look at L. John Baldry's list of animated credits.)

What's really quite surprising is that JRR's voice hasn't aged, any more than his hair has - listen to "He Don't Live Here No More" - that does not sound like a 67 year old man. Maybe that voodoo stuff does do something. Ironic, maybe, because in his youth he always tried to come across like the Ancient of Days, seen it all, twice.

Re: "Don't Live Here," the website sez this "features Clapton on harmony vocal and electric and slide guitars" I wonder if it's a co-write as well -- "inside of the belly of the whale" is where the prophet Jonah (who grew up just down the road from Nazareth) found a way to live In the Presence of the Lord . . . .


Entered at Thu Jan 27 15:45:46 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Blonde On Acetate

BEG/Angelina: Link above to photo of Dylan & Richard listening to an acetate test pressing of "Blonde On Blonde".


Entered at Thu Jan 27 15:34:17 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Vinyl Siding

On the turntable this week is the new LP reissue of The Jayhawks 1992 breakthrough album "Hollywood Town Hall". The group's country-rock/Americana blend of music never sounded better as presented on this nicely remastered vinyl version. An expanded Sony/Legacy CD version is also available with five bonus cuts.

In that same vein, The Jayhawks also backed Joe Henry on his great 1992 album "Short Man's Room", which also featured Nicky Hopkins on piano and Benmont Tench on organ. Mr. Henry's finely crafted songs present a mixture of music that will please many Band fans. Sadly, the CD is out-of-print, but I believe a download version is available and used copies can be acquired from third-party sellers.


Entered at Thu Jan 27 15:31:10 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Years ago, I used to get hot under the collar at the statement that “The Hawks were not The Band” but now I lean to agreeing with it. There’s a full two years between the abortive Dylan sessions and recording Big Pink, a period in which four of them toured Australia and Europe, then recorded the basement material. I used to spend hours listening to the stuff with Ronnie Hawkins and those hissy, muted live tapes. There are sublime R&R moments (Who Do You Love?) but I don’t think there were many pointers to how good they would become … except extraordinary guitar solos, which The Band never relied on anyway. From the poor quality echoes on tape, I don’t see that as a club band in the ballrooms they were instrumentally any better than Georgie Fame & The Blue Flames, Zoot Money’s Big Roll Band or half a dozen others. What they did have was the three magical voices, but Levon himself says they never really worked on that blend or contrast until they did “Ain’t No More Cane” which takes us two and a half years forward from the ballroom gigs. What they didn’t have was the original material in the 64 / 65 tapes. BUT I think The Stones I Throw / He Don’t Love You does represent a quantum leap. When exactly were they cut? Bill M. posted that CHUM chart from December 65. It was a November 1965 UK release. Does that mean they cut it AFTER they met Dylan?

In particular, the old tapes show Levon and Richard taking most of the leads. As I’ve often said, my favourite voice of the three is Rick.


Entered at Thu Jan 27 15:24:13 CET 2011 from (76.68.80.89)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

"The one other person who may have had some artistic input at this stage is Robbie Robertson - he had accompanied Dylan to Los Angeles while the rest of The Hawks flew off for a holiday in New Mexico. Robertson and Dylan were very close by this time, and given that the mix changes included some detailed editing of Robertson's lead guitar parts, it seems quite likely that he was at Dylan's side listening to the mixes, if not in the studio then via acetates or test pressings."

"The stereo mixing is even more of a mystery. Several stereo mixes were made of each track, but by Bob Irwin's account these seemed less purposeful than the progression of the mono mixes. The stereo mixes were all made in Los Angeles rather than Nashville, and were apparently subject to less artistic quality control than the mono mixes - as we shall see from the released evidence. It may be that the stereo mixing was actually done later, while Dylan was away in Australia and Europe."

"After ten days in Los Angeles, Dylan and Robertson were rejoined by the rest of The Hawks and flew north for some further concert dates. A supposedly finished mix of the record was delivered to Dylan in acetate form while he was in Vancouver to play a show on March 26, but he then postponed his world tour departure by a day to do some further work on the album around April 7."


Entered at Thu Jan 27 15:15:43 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Thanks for the Wilentz link. I got the impression that after all the attempts in the past, he'd nailed the Blonde on Blonde sessions. Krossgau's previous efforts involved the tape boxes and session sheets, ignoring the fact that such records might be inaccurate for all sorts of reason, some sins of omission, and no doubt some sins of commission. Wilentz apparently got access to the full tapes with between songs chatter. This is why he'd revise previous "pre-tape"opinions. If h says it's Rick, that's good enough for me.

That bald Dylan comment about not wanting to think the problem was the band (i.e. The Hawks) is significant. First, The Hawks were playing with a pick-up drummer (to them) just days after Levon jumped ship. The fact that this threw them does indicate how integrated the five of them were. On the other hand, they should have been able to cope with a highly-experienced session drummer … Levon may be one of the best ever, but the replacements were very good, and if the drummers will forgive me, drums is the easiest instrument to retro-fit to a band. Second, they may have done their solo sessions (as a unit) and some did John Hammond, but they had very little solid "studio tan" especially compared to their replacements in Nashville.


Entered at Thu Jan 27 13:31:16 CET 2011 from (76.67.17.2)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Wilentz: "As for the New Yorkers, Kooper was playing with the legendary New York ’60s band the Blues Project, while Robertson was, of course, playing with the Hawks. Robertson was not, though, the only member of the Hawks who appeared on Blonde on Blonde. Among those musicians uncredited on the album was Rick Danko, who played bass on the only track from the New York sessions that made the cut, “One of Us Must Know (Sooner or Later).” Also performing on that track were two veterans, like Kooper, of the Highway 61 Revisited sessions, Paul Griffin (who plays an astonishing piano) and the drummer Bobby Gregg."

Oh Carol! Can you confirm Rick's involvement or not with BOB?


Entered at Thu Jan 27 13:26:15 CET 2011 from (76.67.17.2)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Blonde on Blonde:
The Record That Can't Be Set Straight

glenn t: Your post exudes so much warmth and happiness...thanks for sharing.


Entered at Thu Jan 27 11:24:00 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Oh to avoid confusion, in the international phonetic alphabet, the character "j" is the sound "y" as in "yes."


Entered at Thu Jan 27 11:19:15 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Loved your post, Glenn T … keep rattling on. In those "if you could relive five hours of your life" quizzes, I'd choose the day my first son was born, holding him, then leaving the hospital and driving along the cliff road at 5.30 am watching the early morning light over the sea. I had "Street Legal" in the car and still whenever I hear it I feel incredible joy (this might lead to me over-rating it!).

Dlew, I parked outside a building site this morning. Something seemed oddly coincidental. Then I realized the sign read LEADBITTER LTD (bitter, not better, but near enough).


Entered at Thu Jan 27 10:03:35 CET 2011 from (41.97.242.22)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: the Official Video concept

It takes somebody 2 posts and 2 days meditation to fully reply one post of westcoaster. Too bad that I missed the Weight long talk. Now i challenge a field which is not mine, a dozen GBers can develop the subject much better than I, so I'll just expose my take of the question. I 'd never been a TV man, so the "when music videos first started up" I link it in straight line to the Madona - Michael Jackson breakthrough
I try to avoid confusion with the pictured song in general, back in the days of B/W movies where all what you see is a stage version of a hit song, I don’t think it fits the theme either.
one anguishing question waked up about the Official Video Concept - The true question

"what do they intend to sell us exactly ?"

– the music – the lyrics – the superficial motion which unlike Vangelis puts the picture after the sound.
most video clips I saw them casually. I tried before youtubing to report some milestones of my experience, not enough to fill a matinee
- 10CC Dreadlock Holliday one of my favorite songs, the official clip kill it, same thing for Toto's Africa
- U2 do good videos, Springsteen ones are remarkable of natural touch
- the best [should I say only] clip I have in clear mind is Lionel Ritchie Hello : wonderful song – poignant clip


Entered at Thu Jan 27 09:46:05 CET 2011 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Peter - I'm not saying I'm right...

It's just interesting, isn't it. I'm pretty sure I got it from Ted Gioia, and I'm now going to check! What we know for sure is that it's not Huddie... (No wonder he preferred Leadbelly. Or was it LEEDbelly... ;) )


Entered at Thu Jan 27 09:17:51 CET 2011 from (90.239.95.112)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Subject: Feud or Food? Feudie or Foodie?

I rented a car in Marseille for a time ago. We spoke English and this is what I heard:

Me: "Can you give me a diesel car, please?" Hertz officer: "No, I Canadian." Me: "How about a diesel van?" He: "No I Canadian." Me: "So you are a Canadian... how nice." He: "No I not Canadian."

This is how it was: Hertz officer said simply: "I cannot, Ian." (Ian was close enough for him.)


Entered at Thu Jan 27 08:35:17 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Feud or Food? Feudie or Foodie?

In a book called “Perfecting Sound Forever” you’d think the author would consider pronunciation! It’s hard to represent the phonetic alphabet with ordinary keystrokes but you nearly can here. Yes, I wondered about Huddie rhyming with Judy. In British English, Judy has the sound in “new” or “few”which in phonetics is approximately represented as /nju:/and /fju:/ while in American English “new” is represented as /nu:/. But few and feud are represented the same in both. Like Judy.

Hood is a different sound, the one in “good” for which there isn’t a symbol I can type. I thought at the time that “Judy” was a bad example. I’d bet it’s said as in “Hoodie” or “Goody” rather than “Judy” (in British English). When you say how something is pronounced it’s best to check … good dictionaries always give British and American variations.


Entered at Thu Jan 27 06:06:30 CET 2011 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: RtO - thanks.. Peter V...

I've read Huddie is pronoucned to rhyme with Hoodie... (as in 'Hug a Hoodie'... but I'm guessing regional variants...


Entered at Thu Jan 27 05:32:08 CET 2011 from (184.151.127.253)

Posted by:

Marge

Subject: Jan F.

Hey Jan, Of course I remember you and Steve! And I remember how bitterly cold it was in Woodstock. I too wish that we could have met again. We never know what life will bring. I am trying to focus on the happiness that we shared, but sometimes the sense of loss is overwhelming. Thanks for your words of comfort. Glenn, it warms my heart to think of you and your wife with a new baby. I'm holding on to that thought.


Entered at Thu Jan 27 04:58:24 CET 2011 from (74.118.207.176)

Posted by:

glenn t

Subject: joan: baby

because mama and baby are still at hospital, we haven't experienced that routine of late nights, interrupted sleep, diapers...and no doubt it'll be an adjustment, but we look forward to all (the good, the challenges, etc) that comes with raising children. even though my grown children could make me a grandparent any time now, i cherish the opportunity to put into practice all that i've learned in raising my two boys (as a single parent since they were 9 and 12). i wish we could reverse the trend of "adulterizing" children at ever earlier ages, and rather "childrenize" ourselves -- reclaim the joyful innocence of discovery, wonder, amazement, trust. when all is said and done, it's not as much about what we give to our children, but what we must learn from them to reclaim all that is good and pure and beautiful in this experience. we've created a fast-paced, frenetic world that often runs roughshod over the innocent and pure. we must restore childlike wonder to our daily experience, to our interactions with everyone, whether cruising down the highway, shopping, working, or networking.

oh my, i've rattled on...i love children, i love family, and i yearn for everyone everywhere to feel loved and cherished, respected and valued. this website provides a wonderful opportunity for people from all walks of life, and all over our planet to share ideas, to support and encourage each other. God bless you all!


Entered at Thu Jan 27 02:25:50 CET 2011 from (72.78.58.33)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love
Web: My link

Subject: Re: Another perspective

David, thanks for that great article on Bob Johnston and Blonde on Blonde. I do not recall Dylan ever saying what the next Chronicles will be, and as to when it happens, there's already people saying the recent accounts published in numerous places were not at all accurate.


Entered at Thu Jan 27 00:42:58 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Different strokes.........

I guess the rule applies. There is no arguement that Rick & Rickard were far more powerful singers, and their voice was more of a musical instrument than Robbie's. However, for one example, the video of "Saturday Night Live", where Robbie sings, "Further on up that lazy river", I think is great. He has a voice much more like, Joe Cocker, or Chris Rhea, only not as powerful.

There are many people that the heavy smoking affects a lot more. As well as that, there are people like Kenny Rogers, and another guy, whose name slips away at the moment. They absolutely claim that, as well as smoking, poor on stage monitors and not being able to hear yourself and yelling youself hoarse has contributed to their vocal problems. Bob Seger as well now that I remember.

Anyway, he doesn't have a powerful voice, but Robbie can sing. Anyone who thinks they should be able to sing "every" song they write just isn't seeing it. There are many pen men who write specific songs for specific singers. Many who are great vocalists in their own right. But they write a lot of songs for other people.

Joe! Are you around? I took a little cruise today. Takes me 3 hours one way to go check on my barge where it is moored. It is flat calm here. Now sunny this afternoon and about 10 degrees. It's beautiful, I think I'll have to cut my lawn soon. They had about 2 inches of snow here while we were in Mexico, so I guess winters ovee cruise today. Takes me 3 hours one way to go check on my barge where it is moored. It is flat calm here. Now sunny this afternoon and about 10 degrees. It's beautiful, I think I'll have to cut my lawn soon. They had about 2 inches of snow here while we were in Mexico, so I guess winters over......I hope.


Entered at Thu Jan 27 00:00:15 CET 2011 from (76.66.24.154)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Here's a video that one of my friends sent that was filmed at Toronto's Eaton Centre. Forward it to all the amazing women in your life.


Entered at Wed Jan 26 23:37:52 CET 2011 from (76.66.24.154)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Thanks so much Tenn.

"I'm talking to the medical profession about installing an I.V. pipeline of espresso into the studio so that Bill (guitar and bass) doesn't have to stop playing," joked Robbie Robertson, the former BAND leader who has used Dillon extensively on his three solo albums and for soundtrack work.

"Robbie Robertson has used Dillon for his Robbie Robertson, Storyville and brand new Music For The Native Americans album as well as on The Color Of Money and Jimmy Hollywood soundtracks. "One of the things we do that's extremely different is that Bill creates a sound orchestra, which frees me up to do rhythms and solos," Robertson explains. "He understands my music emotionally. He has very good taste in sounds, and he's always doing something where the band stops and says, `Who is that? What the hell is that?' It's always Bill." Dillon himself is coyly at a loss to explain his secret. "I have no idea," he laughs. "I don't know if I want to know."

"Dillon says recording with a Daniel Lanois or a Robbie Robertson requires imagination and discipline. "The challenge is trying to focus -- to step a little further aside from the general conscience. To see what's inspiring. They teach me to go where I don't always go, and to come back with the same inspiration. You just can't make mistakes."



Entered at Wed Jan 26 23:38:29 CET 2011 from (138.88.0.135)

Posted by:

Jan F.

Location: metro D.C.

Subject: Steve

Gosh, I haven't been around in a while and now find out today my friend Steve has passed away. I'm finding this difficult to comprehend almost to the point of being unbelievable. Marge, I'm not sure if you remember meeting me for the Ramble at Levon's -- it was very cold and my husband Steve and you and your Steve stayed at the old B & B in Woodstock and it was really cold (even to you guys!).

I always enjoyed debating with Steve and I know he liked giving me a hard time about Robbie -- it was all in fun and we had a lot of fun the few years I knew him here on the GB. So fortunate to have met both of you -- wish we could have gotten together again. I also enjoyed the farm pictures in the summer/spring/fall that Steve used to send.

Steve F. and I send our deepest condolences to you and your family. I can't imagine what you are going through.

Hugs,

Jan Fowler


Entered at Wed Jan 26 22:18:23 CET 2011 from (32.177.167.4)

Posted by:

JQ

Web: My link

One of the better & collectable album covers around, this from 1960. No ironic comedy ever from these guys!

I never knew that brimstone is synonymous with sulfur.


Entered at Wed Jan 26 21:58:05 CET 2011 from (32.177.167.4)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Charlie Louvin

He had just put out a record; evangelical religion (no surprise there) & right-wing politics oriented. Of the brother groups in country & bluegrass he & Ira were top notch, particularly with their harmony singing.

When we went to Levon's Midnight Ramble he was the opener and did his solo hit "See The Big Man Cry" twice.


Entered at Wed Jan 26 21:56:06 CET 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: Kevin re RR

Imagine that indeed. I think it goes further than that though: Imagine writing all those great songs and knowing you probably can't do them the vocal justice they deserve. That must be very frustrating and all credit to him for dishing them out to the appropriate performers. Even in my own semi-pro/kitchen table way I could not imagine writing even the songs I have and realising I wouldn't be the one to deliver them to an audience or a studio microphone. I'd hate it; it would scar me...!


Entered at Wed Jan 26 21:32:04 CET 2011 from (68.164.6.213)

Posted by:

Pat B

PSB, although he has made some past mistakes, it appears that Wilentz went to great lengths and called in some reinforcements to ID the players on Sooner Or Later.


Entered at Wed Jan 26 20:54:51 CET 2011 from (68.164.6.213)

Posted by:

Pat B

RIP, the great Charlie Louvin.


Entered at Wed Jan 26 20:40:41 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Spike Jones on the box...

"I can't take the way he sings, but I love to hear him talk."


Entered at Wed Jan 26 20:24:51 CET 2011 from (70.50.64.34)

Posted by:

Kevin J

To Jed’s point about the voice…….what’s interesting about RR unlike say a Dylan or Reed is that he has had to adjust in certain ways his writing to fit his voice……In other cases like much of Storyville and some numbers on this one – the first reaction one has is “Oh, wouldn’t Richard have taken this one to other worldly heights” or “Wouldn’t Rick have sounded great on this one”……..He may have had to “get off” in 1976 ( and indeed as Sebastian has told us it was a move that was greatly respected by his children ) but imagine being a writer and suddenly not having 3 of the greatest singers in the history of rock n roll to turn to?


Entered at Wed Jan 26 19:27:29 CET 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: RR New Record

The clips sound nice,good songs & some solid playing.I can even hear those sweet licks off RR's guitar.But,his voice is grating & it reminds me why Rick,Levon,& Richard did the singing. Hope my writing style didn't offend the sensitive!


Entered at Wed Jan 26 19:07:15 CET 2011 from (64.129.187.2)

Posted by:

Bashful Bill

Location: Minoa, NY

Subject: RR / punk em up

I don't think I've seen as much RR discussion in the last several years put together , focused almost strictly on his music, as in the last couple weeks or so. Cool.....And my last word to punk em up regarding his lack of respect of boundaries is that I hope you learn how to use a spellchecker. Those last couple posts were laughable especially as you were criticizing my writing skills. And while you're at it you definitely could use a fact checker, especially when you're making public comments to others about my personal life (of which you know little), and even the personal lives of others, whether the "contempable" and "paranoid" little people like me or the privacy of the celebrities about whom you so often allude to know so much. Speaking for and about me, I don't care much what anyone says unless they get it wrong, especially publicly.......


Entered at Wed Jan 26 18:56:51 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Blonde On Blonde: Another Perspective

A while back I ran across an interesting interview with Dylan producer Bob Johnston in which he recounts many details about the recording sessions for "Blonde On Blonde". The article, written by Richard Buskin, was published last May in Sound On Sound magazine (link above).


Entered at Wed Jan 26 18:56:50 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: GlennT

Glenn, congratulations on your "newbie". Is it hard going back to no sleep. late nights and diapers?


Entered at Wed Jan 26 17:56:35 CET 2011 from (70.50.64.34)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Chronicles Vol 2 - PSB - Do know any more on this?

Dylan has talked before about his possible plans for Chronicles: Volume 2, saying: "I think I can go back to the 'Blonde on Blonde' album - that's probably about as far back as I can go on the next book. Then I'll probably go forward. I thought of an interesting time.

"I made this record, 'Under the Red Sky,' with Don Was, but at the same time I was also doing the [second] Wilburys record. I don't know how it happened that I got into both albums at the same time.


Entered at Wed Jan 26 17:36:22 CET 2011 from (72.78.58.33)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love
Web: My link

Pat, I'm well aware. However when Together Through Life came out, Wilentz wrote a review, listed Dylan's keyboard players and accordion players (since the use of accordion dominated that album) and in addition to getting Paul Griffin's name wrong which was mysteriously corrected a few hours after I pointed it out on one of the Dylan boards somehow neglected to mention one of Dylan's most important keyboard players who also happened to be the first person to use an accordion with him namely one Garth Hudson. So um, ever since then, well, you know.


Entered at Wed Jan 26 17:23:31 CET 2011 from (41.97.223.246)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: the mind fading into the sunset

I often thought of this coastal branch between Cadiz and the Portuguese border as Mediterranean, I don't know why maybe of the flow
, A lad whom I knew, for his chaste convictions roaming the beach with a swimsuit was shouted out by a policeman. "Remove your swimsuit or leaves the beach !" one single way to recognize a policeman nudist; he's more tanned than everybody given that he is all the time on the beach. The fight was beforehand lost but my friend wanted to show off spirit, "I have nothing special under my swimsuit to exhibit"
"I fear you have something suspect to hide"
the agent replied There's no law in Spain which forbid nudism, that's what they said, they should just add anybody notnaked among nudists is outlaw.
in fact I realized very lately that it's in Atlantic, thanks to a post where "beach" was mentioned in echo to a post where Vangelis was mentioned, btw I also realize that Balden is nearer to Swede than to Norway, politically incorrect but the webmaster is nice these days.
I am sure nothing equals a sunset in Vancouver, but Rabida is something which anchors once you saw it "golden sand, etc… " ….and the sunset. When I first heard 1492 OST, this eponymous track led me far away and let me daydreaming, the post title stolen to westcoaster is not just a rhetoric figure, it simply matches it
, back to Vangelis, and what if we are talking about the same thing ? if the answer is yes then he gave the beach it's perfect audio coat, sublimate mood and what a power of evocation, this music is impossibly beautiful
I documented about the OSTwriting technique of Vangelis : He demands first to see the finalized footage, and hence begins the keyboard composition….
Of course, by far much succeedingly easier to put the sound after the picture


Entered at Wed Jan 26 17:17:52 CET 2011 from (70.50.64.34)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: RR's new one

BWNWITenn: Thanks for the RR link………………30 second snippets can make it tough to judge but my experience doing so at ITunes has been pretty solid………………I very much like what I hear…………some beautiful playing and really good songs………interesting if you loop that 30 second teasers……”When the Night was Young” starts to really jump out as the obvious radio hit…………………….The lead off single “He don’t Live Here No More” seems the weakest track ( though BEG is right about the startling choice of guitar that saves the song…) in that it is much like the Marilyn Monroe/Elvis one from his first album…….


Entered at Wed Jan 26 16:14:09 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Garth, Garth & Todd

joe: Producer Garth Fundis does indeed exist. He's the owner of the Sound Emporium studio in Nashville. That renovated complex was originally the legendary Jack Clement Recording Studios, where Mr. Fundis first began his recording career as an intern and later as an engineer. Among JCRS' first clients in late 1969 were Ian & Sylvia, who recorded their Great Speckled Bird album there with Todd Rundgren producing. Around the same time Mr. Rundgren remixed his first solo album "Runt" (featuring Rick & Levon on "Once Burned") there also. Years later, Burrito Deluxe, featuring Garth Hudson, recorded part of their 2004 "The Whole Enchilada" at the other Garth's Sound Emporium.

sadavid: Robbie wasn't credited on Mr. Scorsese's "The Departed", but the soundtrack did include Roger Waters' version of "Comfortably Numb" from "The Wall Live in Berlin", featuring Van Morrison, Rick, Levon & Garth. In a key scene at the end of the film, Roy Buchanan's great instrumental version of Don Gibson's "Sweet Dreams" was used.


Entered at Wed Jan 26 15:32:08 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: JRR consultants, inc

I watched a bit of the Scorsese film _Casino_ on the toob the other day. I was aware that the film was famous for use of pop-music-as-soundtrack, but I was really struck by how thick and fast Marty piles 'em up. There's a scene where the Sharon Stone character is introduced; in just a few minutes we get "Compared to What," "Slipping and Sliding," "Love is Strange" and a Stones tune. It was funny, just as you're thinking how utterly evil these characters are, you realize its the Stones on the soundtrack. I figure JRR had a large hand in picking the tunes, just on the evidence of "Slipping and Sliding" and "Ain't Got No Home," which Band members past and present seem determined to save from obscurity.

Thanks very much to B'Tenn (we don't see nearly enough of you these days) for the _Clairvoyant_ streaming snippets -- and speaking of oldies, "Madame X" reminds me of "Share Your Love." Is that Winwood behind the EC vocal on "Fear of Falling"?


Entered at Wed Jan 26 14:59:48 CET 2011 from (71.114.128.91)

Posted by:

Rick

Location: Philly

Subject: Todd Rundgren

Do members of the band you still keep in touch with Todd Rundgren?


Entered at Wed Jan 26 14:21:54 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: New Life

Glenn; Congratulations on your new child. The best experience two people can share. May he have a long and happy life.

Every one of mine have been a humbling experience. When you look at them and look inside yourself and they just make you want to be a better person.

Now with 7 grand children, each one is a new joy. My newest grand daughter Elena is so beautiful it makes my heart hurt. I just can't get enough of them.


Entered at Wed Jan 26 12:36:25 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Decemberists

Thanks, Brien. I just ordered tickets to see them in the UK in March.


Entered at Wed Jan 26 12:36:06 CET 2011 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Subject: Onion

Congratulations to you and your missus Glen. To use a local expression that might not translate well, "You're not easy". Contains elements of "You da man' and 'Rather you than me'.

Link is to shocking allegations about Van Morrison that might forever alter your perception of the 'Man'. You know, in retrospect, there were clues in '4% Pantomine'.


Entered at Wed Jan 26 12:26:47 CET 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Web: My link

Congrats Glen

Since the Decemberists have gotten some chatter in here of late - the link is to their recent concert review in NYC.


Entered at Wed Jan 26 07:42:14 CET 2011 from (198.36.218.33)

Posted by:

Jerry

Subject: Glen T

Well said about this site and the kind words for Marge..Congrats on The Band Baby...My two boys are 28 and 26 and I'm now looking forward to being a Grandpa someday, I hope sooner than later but you have to let it take it's course...


Entered at Wed Jan 26 06:34:29 CET 2011 from (74.118.207.176)

Posted by:

glenn t

Location: elsah, illinois

Subject: new arrival

I don't add comments often, but I read most posts almost daily. love the band; what a fantastic musical legacy we are blessed to hear and share with family and friends. To those of you who contribute regularly, and those who've shared your heartfelt words about steve, and to marge...God bless you for expressing the best that people can share. To those who maintain this site...my thanks to you for providing this amazing forum to discuss the band, music in general, and so many other things.

while we have experienced the loss of steve, i must share the good news of a son, born monday evening. my wife and i have both raised 2 children from previous marriages (ages 26,23,20,18), and now we start family phase 2 with this child. may he grow up to be righteous; may he grow up to be true...and may he find the joy in music, particularly by the band, that we all do.


Entered at Wed Jan 26 06:08:16 CET 2011 from (74.179.51.99)

Posted by:

BWNWITenn

Web: My link

Don't know if it's already been posted, but 429 Records is streaming clips from all of the tracks on Robbie's new album, at the link (although some of them seem to be out of sequence).


Entered at Wed Jan 26 05:54:52 CET 2011 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

PSB, Sean Wilentz makes an excellent case that Rick played on Sooner Or Later, sourcing both the taped studio banter and expert analysis by Diane Lapson, Robert Bowers, and Jeff Rosen. Similarly, he puts Bobby Gregg on drums and RR on guitar. In his own book, Al Kooper puts himself on organ and Paul Griffin on piano. Wilentz says the same thing. Btw, 18 takes.


Entered at Wed Jan 26 04:15:55 CET 2011 from (99.146.124.13)

Posted by:

Tracy

Subject: For Marge

My deepest condolences to Marge on the passing of Steve. In the words of the late Paul Godfrey, "Shine on."


Entered at Wed Jan 26 03:09:09 CET 2011 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Thanks for all the great links (Robbie, Grossman).

Ari, I'm liking what I hear. I wonder if it'll hang together as an entire album. In fact I wonder if Robbie should even bother with albums at all. Single song releases on iTunes may be his most effective musical vehicle. One a month. There's hardly a Robbie song that doesn't sound interesting at the very least when taken on its own merits. 45-60 minutes of a Robbie solo album is a different proposition.

Re Gregg Allman: I listened to his album a couple times when it was on NPR. Nothin not to like, especially that leadoff song, "Floatin Bridge' I believe it's called. Comfort music, nothing very adventurous. I don't think I'm going to spend a hard earned dollar on it. I believe I've recommended 'Hittin' the Note' before. The Allmans first recording without Dickey Betts. c2004. All killer.

'The Wurlitzer Prize'. Norm, I've heard you refer to that song a few times over the years. I hereby apologize for not suggesting it be on your 'Waylon Album'. In fact it should be the centerpiece of that album. So I think we all agree that 'Skipper Grumby' aka Westcoaster is legally liable (BC rules) for one Waylon covers album. Maybe Ralph Mooney, Wayne Moss and Garth Fundis (David, I'm sure you made that name up and are just having fun at our expense) are still around to help out. Just send them a copy of 'After All This Time' and I'm sure they'd sign on board.

More I think of it, the 'one at a time' vehicle for Robertson thing, the better it sounds. But it's been a long day and I haven't given it any real thought and it'll probabably sound weird in the morning.


Entered at Wed Jan 26 02:39:06 CET 2011 from (74.130.92.138)

Posted by:

abby

Subject: Marge's (and our) loss

Marge - I am so sorry (and terribly shocked) to hear about Steve. He was such an intelligent, clever, talented guy. A month or so ago I somehow (?) came across a photo hidden deep, deep in my computer... it was a picture of someone's bathroom! I wracked my brain trying to figure out where that picture came from. Then I remembered Steve talking online about his handyman skills and as proof he emailed me this bathroom picture. A good dad and a husband who truly loved his wife, he was. So sorry for your loss.


Entered at Wed Jan 26 02:23:40 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Just a thought

I still expect that Sebastian will some time get back in here over many questions that were asked.....but

Could it be that those questions may in any way had some influence over songs on this album? I got to get it and listen.


Entered at Wed Jan 26 02:19:36 CET 2011 from (76.68.81.114)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Robbie Re: "He Don't Live Here No More"

"It was a lifestyle of the time that most of my friends went through. Some came out the other side, and for some, the train ran off the tracks," recalls the Rock and Roll Hall of Famer. Employing a gut string guitar on the song's searing solos was just one of the many interesting choices Robertson made during the sessions for How To Become Clairvoyant."

"A lot of the making of this record was very experimental," says Robertson, who co-produced the album with long-time collaborator Marius de Vries (Massive Attack, Bjork, Rufus Wainwright). "We were not coloring inside the lines. Musically and lyrically, I went to unexpected places."

How To Become Clairvoyant – Robertson's first release in more than 10 years and his Macro-Biotic Records/429 Records debut – is perhaps the most revealing record of his storied career. It features 12 original songs – eight written by Robertson alone, three penned with longtime friend Eric Clapton and the instrumental album closer "Tango for Django," written with de Vries.

"This is Where I Get Off" marks the first time he's publicly addressed his decision to leave The Band. As the song suggests, one's past is inescapable, but it needn't impede the journey forward:

Everything you leave behind
Catches up in another time
So just pull over
To the side of the road
This is where I get off
This is where I move on


Entered at Wed Jan 26 01:19:02 CET 2011 from (72.78.58.33)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love
Web: My link

Subject: Credits

Todd, Trust neither Heylin or the credits in the booklet of the mono box which I go into in detail in this article. "One Of Us Must Know" was definitely recorded in New York. No one actually knows for sure who the bass player is, but it could very well me Danko. The drummer is probably Bobby Gregg.


Entered at Wed Jan 26 00:58:02 CET 2011 from (76.68.81.114)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Many thanks to sadavid and Joan! Here are two of his songs on one site...Maybe his latest one will be added. This last one, "He Don't Live Here Anymore"....I had to hear this song many times for it to really take ahold of me...I do like the guitar work here....wow....It's so unexpected....You've got this driving beat throughout this song but out of nowhere....Very elegant guitar playing.....and some of his lyrics are stirring up too many ghosts here....Rick's added voice would have worked great here.....

I was only trying to kill the pain
Too far gone

Many belated thanks to Blind Willie for sending in the lyrics to "When The Night Was Young".

Bashful Bill: I'm sorry what transpired....Back in the day the Road Warriors would always tell me what a sweetheart you really are.


Entered at Tue Jan 25 23:50:15 CET 2011 from (216.165.58.52)

Posted by:

Ari

What do you guys think of Robbie's few songs so far?


Entered at Tue Jan 25 22:38:19 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Albert Grossman

Albert Grossman died 25 years ago today.


Entered at Tue Jan 25 22:15:04 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: gone

Joan: thanks for the link. Intriguing parallel between the refrain 'too far gone' and the phrase 'too soon gone' . . . .


Entered at Tue Jan 25 22:07:44 CET 2011 from (70.50.64.34)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Thanks Joan…….3 songs….all very different……..not sure about the latest being the lead-off single but what do I know……”Belly” gets a new song………


Entered at Tue Jan 25 21:49:56 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Tears are not Enough

Like......right....man. When ever any one gets to talking that way..like..... It always reminds me of Neil. David Foster gets so frusutrated with him

Neil just naturally looks so bad, I doubt there is any thing much Neil Young could ever get to torqued up about, except the government at Farm Aid.

Anyway when Foster is saying to him..."Neil you're singing out of key man! Neil looks like he just got up, he's got a styrofoam coffee cup dangling in one hand, and he just looks at Foster and says........"like......that's my style man." He couldn't sound more 60's if he tried.


Entered at Tue Jan 25 21:41:04 CET 2011 from (136.167.102.118)

Posted by:

Dave H

Web: My link

The Onion AV club site has a list of 24 unconventional (i.e. non-studio) locations that albums have been recorded (in link). The basement of Big Pink is #2 and Sammy Davis Jr.'s pool house is #3.


Entered at Tue Jan 25 21:37:19 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Web: My link

Subject: Robbie's new CD

A link to the first single released from Robbie's new CD. Song's called "He don't live here no more"


Entered at Tue Jan 25 21:13:46 CET 2011 from (70.50.64.34)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Dylan…….Much like he did with Chronicles Volume 1 moving between two distinct era’s…….I have understood that Chronicles Volume 2 will be similar with the Blond on Blonde recordings being one of the highlighted periods………so more should be known then…….

Yearbooks………..…….Not sure how others feel but the terrible news of Steve’s passing brought certain things into focus for me about this GB….In short, it elevated a place that I already felt pretty good about. Elevated in that I was really impressed by how everyone reacted…those that were close to him but also those that had a rockier relationship……….A lot of good people here……..a few whacky characters to be sure but all bars have them….and a little bit of edge is ok from time to time………………………that all said…….a yearbook sounds a bit like collecting names from passengers one sits beside on a plane or at a hole-in-the-wall bar in Buenos Aires…..........a nice idea but not sure why………..I have moved a lot in life and people often ask if I miss friends……..the answer is no because one finds a way to keep in touch with friends…….but I do miss the dry cleaning lady in Kingston and the corner store guy in Manhattan Beach – but it is not possible to keep track of all these sorts of contacts……………Would knowing that Serenity looked like Bridget Bardot circa 1955 make others more tolerable of her lists ( thanks, by the way Serenity, for the heads up on Festival Express last night! )………………….only thing that might be useful is a directory of e-mails so that if this site ever closed abruptly – we could reconvene somewhere else to continue the madness……


Entered at Tue Jan 25 21:06:08 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: I'm, like, a bird ...

Or, as the guy in the Old Spice ad says, I like smell like the like man your like man could like smell like like.


Entered at Tue Jan 25 21:03:43 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Belly Laughing

Bill! I was so long winded we crossed. When I looked at that It hurt my gut I hallmos trew hup.......I laugh so.ard


Entered at Tue Jan 25 21:00:31 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Like??????? Almost like a song

Gawd Damn Sadavid.......he gets worse all the time.

Empty; You've sort of expressed my reservations about a year book....like. Remember when music videos first started up? Well you would have your own personal video of a song in your mind, (we talked about this at lenght quite a while back, regarding "The Weight'). Then with the advent of videos, watching a video, some one else's idea of a song kinda took away from your own. So that I can see the perceptions of people here in the GB could be altered by the book, maybe unfavourably.

My only reason for it, is what you talked about a couple days ago. The mind fading into the sunset, and the memories slipping away.

As I'm sure a lot of people do, I have had a great deal of communication by e mail with who I consider to be a pretty great group of folks here for the most part, so I've been given a lot of good pictures, also that Facebook. Now Mike, I know, I KNOW! my English could use some improving. It has deteriorated a lot since grade 10 when I majored in English. Since that time I've become a sailor, YO-HO-HO so lay off!

Anyway there is a lot of folks here I'd enjoy to have where I could click up a page, (someone would have to do it for me when my arthritic hands won't work.) I could just smile at all those faces through a wizened up face and say.........gawd damn all a yuz...........


Entered at Tue Jan 25 20:50:57 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Empty N: I think that the point your making is that a photo of sadavid, for example, will help us determine if he is making a point or has a keyboard that's stuck on a like macro.


Entered at Tue Jan 25 20:20:36 CET 2011 from (41.97.237.103)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Subject: yearbook

An old wise man was scolded by the Sultan who was passing near him
"knee down old man! don't you see Me ?"
"Did you ever say something interesting (/important) such that I can see you ?"

IMHO this Koan applies perfectly to this forum : feeling people just through what they write is the major(/only) part of its charm. I may understand the need of a yearbook, a question of acuity of perception.
Conversely, years ago I was drawn by the need to partially break anonymity with an elite of regulars of whom I had great opinion, about 20 GBers to whom I sent my face by email, with my sole motivation they're in right to know that the one they read every morning in Jan's is not a robot.
Isn't that widely sign of willingness ? No member of The Band cares a shit of any of us to be exhibited in a public webpage on his behalf…no

For the pleasant side of the question, i recall one definition of photography I've read somewhere :
"The art to capture the furtive moment and to confide it to eternity"

Joan, what link is that ? I just read a phrase in Sanscrit which looks like a virus injection


Entered at Tue Jan 25 20:16:20 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: speaking, with, like, conviction?

i like, like that, joan, and i'd like, like to like it if we could like, like it, here, with, you know, like, a like thing, like?


Entered at Tue Jan 25 19:43:55 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Web: My link

Subject: Like what did you say?

I came across this poem and I thought it fit nicely with our discussion a few days ago about speech today.


Entered at Tue Jan 25 19:40:05 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: B.o.B.

According to Al Kooper, Joe South played the soul guitar riffs on "...Memphis Blues Again" and the "hillbilly funk" bass on "Visions of Johanna", while Wayne Moss played the fast 16th note licks on "I Want You".

Wayne Moss' main guitar was an early '60s Fender Jazzmaster, which he used on many recordings including the lead guitar part on Waylon Jennings' "Only Daddy That'll Walk The Line". That Jazzmaster, featuring a custom Olympic white finish, was later acquired by Marty Stuart.


Entered at Tue Jan 25 19:22:54 CET 2011 from (69.182.87.6)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Dylan

Thanks Pat. I guess I'll have to check out the Wilentz book pretty soon, especially since I seem to be in a Dylan phase at the moment. I listened to the song (sooner or later) the other day, and while it sounded to my ears like it could be Rick on bass, it didn't have any of his trademark bounce. So I wasn't sure. However, the rhythmic sound of the piano sounded to me like it could have been Richard. I'll give it another listen this afternoon.


Entered at Tue Jan 25 18:55:39 CET 2011 from (68.164.6.213)

Posted by:

Pat B

Todd, supposedly Sooner Or Later started with the Hawks but Dylan brought on Paul Griffin (piano) and Al Kooper (organ) and Kept RR and Rick. I think Willentz deals with this pretty carefully in his new book.

PSB, I'm sure you also noted that Levon was mentioned in the article as one of the BT principals.


Entered at Tue Jan 25 18:44:01 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Recording

I wonder if, or how much, substance abuse affected recording in those days of the late 60's. You never heard of it too much back then.

I remember in the early 80's when country music peaked. It became a real problem in Nashville for a time. I remember some interviews with some session musicians, and in particular Roy Clark talking about it. Some of the artists themselves. I believe a good example was Hank Williams Jr who at times cost many thousands of dollars of wasted studio time due to the problem. Not getting anything accomplished because of booze & drugs.

Then there was the Frank Sinatra, or Elvis approach. When all of a sudden feeling motivated or inspired, calling up all the musicians, "get down to the studio now! we're gonna record something."


Entered at Tue Jan 25 18:38:49 CET 2011 from (69.182.87.6)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT
Web: My link

Subject: Dylan & The Hawks

I’m enjoying the Dylan / Band discussion. I recently picked up the Dylan Mono box set and have been listening to a lot of Dylan’s’ 60’s material lately. Has it ever been definitively determined that the version of ‘One of Us Must Know (Sooner of Later)’ from 'Blonde on Blonde' was recorded in NY with some of the Hawks?….specifically Robbie, Richard, and Rick. That’s how it’s noted in the Heylin Recording Sessions book. It seems odd to me that they wouldn’t be credited on the album. I can see it as an oversight on the original release, but they’ve had plenty of chances on re-releases over the years to correct it.

It’s always been my understanding that the thing Dylan appreciated and liked most of all about Robbie was his guitar playing. The mathematical guitar genius.

There’s an unreleased song / work in progress that Dylan & Robbie perform in ‘Eat The Document’ called ‘I Can’t Leave Her Behind’ (it’s the slower version - YouTube link above). To this day it’s one of my favorite Dylan vocals / melodies, and I wish a proper release existed of it. I can even hear it as a good song for Rick Danko to have tried, and I’m surprised we never heard more from it….even later as a Big Pink Basement experiment. Dylan’s always been known for his vocal phrasing, but I think on ‘I Can’t Leave Her Behind’, he really succeeds with a pure emotion in his voice which doesn’t sound at all like a gimmick…..just a pure mournful plea.

I know that Robbie & Dylan hung out together a lot during that period, but I also have the feeling that Dylan had some sort of bond with Richard Manuel. In ‘Eat The Document’ Dylan and Richard can be seen lot together, as well as in photos from that era. It seems to me that Dylan & Robbie connected musically, but that Dylan & Richard possibly had more of a friendship.



Entered at Tue Jan 25 18:22:22 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Well, all someone needs to do is open a Flickr page. However, I'd suggest that one person acts as a filter (you are limited to those who can upload anyway) and collects pictures and puts them up. You need a person as a filter … Jan had to take away the "post a picture here" feature in the early days. We might have all sorts of "disgruntled postal worker" stuff with false attributions. I'm not going to volunteer because I spend too much time every day moving images around, so it's work. But if someone wants to, it's really easy to open a free flickr account and name it and upload.


Entered at Tue Jan 25 17:59:17 CET 2011 from (72.78.58.33)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love
Web: My link

Subject: all this bob and band stuff

In the - I guess it's a review of Wilentz' book, but I can't tell from the article whether it's Wilentz' or the review author, Robbie is not one of the guitarists on "Memphis Blues Again." As to influences, of course they influenced each other to a degree, but one was the student one was the teacher. Of course Robertson had already written songs, when he met Dylan, but Dylan opened him up to a whole other approach. Of all the members of the Hawks, Robertson was the one who hung with Dylan. Dylan's influence is all over "The Weight," but then Robertson went on to develop his own unique style. As to the abandoned sessions for what turned out to be Blonde On Blonde, if you listen to the various takes of "Visions Of Johanna," the Hawks had a hard time getting away from blues riffs. At the same time, a good deal of Dylan's music is steeped in blues. The sound Dylan had onstage in '65 and '66 with The Hawks is really not all that different than the sound Robertson, Helm and Hudson had with the other musicians on John Hammond's "So Many Roads." But Dylan at that time anyway was not one for giving musical direction. His approach was get a bunch of musicians in the studio and see what happens - and as Robertson says in that interview, he didn't like to rehearse or take the time to work out arrangements.


Entered at Tue Jan 25 16:49:05 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Yearbook

Well Peter, there are these pages where you can compile a picture album I've seen. I know nothing about how to compile them. It would be nice if some one could take it on, so that everyone could just send in a picture or two as you have suggested. "The Class of 2005". There would be Steve with his pink scarf alright.

It's still a little hard, turning the machine on and having a quiet space where Steve belongs.

Having instead, the ramblings of some one who appears so mentally disturbed isn't enjoyable. Kind of embarrassing to see.

I have a friend, George Harrison, who started playing drums with me when he was about 16. Kind of like a kid brother to me as he is an only child. On Facebook this Christmas, George displayed a picture of me, playing for his high school graduation in the old community hall in Port McNeill, (the town where I met Susan actually). I was 23 in that picture, (1968). After playing the Hawk's music for years, it was the year of "Music from Big Pink. So it is appropraite. I was playing my first 335 style guitar. An Italian "Eko". I hate that guitar when I look at it. For one reason, I was foolish enough to sell my Gibson Hummingbird to buy it.

Anyway, it was that year I guess, where I was going home to Sechelt one night to visit my folks. Driving down Vancouver Island just above Campbell River where my radio would start working. I had a '63 Pontiac Parissiene convertible. I switch on my radio, station C-FUN rock & roll, and Red Robinson is introducing, THE BAND! and on comes "The Weight". I had an uncanny way of picking hits back then. From the intro licks on that guitar, for that song, I thought, HOLY SHIT!....what a song. I've played it ever since. Out here at least, and to this day that song and Up on cripple creek still hold up. They are played on our local stations all the time. Just a few weeks back as I drove along the waterfront down to my tug, kind of freaky. On the anniversary of the loss of Rick Danko, on Jet FM in Courtenay that I listen to a lot they are playing "Makes no Difference". At the end of the song, I expected this young woman who is the DJ to make some reference to Rick. She babbled away and said nothing. I was so disgusted I tried to phone her and tell her what day it was but couldn't get thru.


Entered at Tue Jan 25 16:34:08 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: _How to Become Clairvoyant_ promo clip

JRR discusses the genesis of the forthcoming release; how what was conceived as a JRR / Clapton project became a JRR project w/ Claptonian participation.


Entered at Tue Jan 25 12:33:02 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Playing stuff till it wears out … the reason I buy so many CDs is that I seek that thrill of the album you have to hear non-stop for a couple of weeks. Last year yielded none really, though Natalie Merchant got close. But the last few weeks have turned up two in quick succession … Long Live The Duke & The King, and “The King Is dead” by The Decemberists. But you keep on looking.

Where I won’t find it is magazine covermount discs. Uncut’s today is great … “the wildest New Orleans soul & R&B,” while Mojo comes in with “The Roots of Nirvana: Distorted Sounds from the Punk Underground.” The first is playing now, I doubt that the second will ever get played. Nor will the lead article on Nirvana ever be read. Think it’s probably time for Mojo to join Q and Rolling Stone in the “magazines I used to buy every issue but no longer” category. Other articles are Pearl Jam, Scritti Politti, Swans and Beady Eye (Liam Gallagher’s new band). Won’t be reading any of those. On the plus side, I will read Richard Thompson, Johnny Cash and the reviews.

YEARBOOK

Why not? Can we have two each? Portrait of the artist as a young Band fan, plus now? With most of us there is quite a gap between the two situations. I’ll see if I can turn up one without offensive neck gear. I was suddenly saddened there … I imagined Steve coming right in with a pink scarf comment. How would we do it? Is someone going to volunteer to compile it for Jan?


Entered at Tue Jan 25 11:30:06 CET 2011 from (41.97.237.103)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

westcoaster: thanks, keep it running man

----------
"ginger", origin of word: Sanskrit śrn̄gavēram, 'śrn̄gam "horn" and vẽra "body" because of the shape of its root, Prakrit singabēra, Greek ziggíberis, Latin zinziberi, eponymous name of the island
Tanganyika Zanzibar
Tan Zan i a
Tanzania

where was born Farrokh Bulsara : British citizen of Iranian roots

link above to the best adidas ads (double negative) ever


Entered at Tue Jan 25 06:11:03 CET 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Bashful Bill, I was just about to shut the computer down and call it a night, but despite my conmtempt for you, i do hope you get help with writing. And like you, i really do mean that and would never write it if I did not believe it and mean it. Your writing really is atrocious. Non logical, runon sentnces, incomplete thoughts in abundance. You would do a far better job of presenting your anger and other disturbances if you wrote better In fact, your inability to write cohesively is defintiley one of the reasons i lacked respect for your opinions, they were essentially baseless.

Succinct, honest & direct enough for you? I do feel better about giving you a moie complete answwer now, and will probably sleep better as a result.

Anything else,I'd suggest you go private. There are plenty of people we both know who could give you my email address. Some of them i respect and like, some of them i don't. But i'm not paranoid about someone I dont like having my email address.


Entered at Tue Jan 25 05:55:42 CET 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Bashful Bill, I lack the time & inclination to give you a long answer to a not very clear couple of questions. Never used a thesaurus, and dogs been dead a long time. I've never hided behind nothing, and i would say anything to your face that i would type here. I've never respected you either, not one iota. Never thought it was even worth the trouble to answer your posts or opinions really. But that's just my opinion. And, I did think you were a recovering alcoholic. Thought you had written about recovery and addiction. I would not have acknowledged or referred to the post by Old Friend if Rob did not say Cheerio. Regardless of my feelings about you, because i thought you were a recovering alcoholic, i thought the post was in bad taste and was going to ignore it, until it was in risk of becoming part of a larger conversation that might have offended a recovering alky. Whioh even though i have no repsect for you, if you were fighting addiction, I would have showed you that courtesy. Our feelings about each other have probably just about always been equal. Hope that is succinct enough for you.


Entered at Tue Jan 25 05:33:35 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Sad but true

I said a shorter version of the same thing about buying new music the other day Bill. I have so much of it now. There has to be something that really grabs me, which doesn't happen often any more.

What you have just said was the reason for my hesitation Lars. When I got back last week and watched what took place, it sours the thing here, and takes the fun out of it.

It's hard to understand how some people only seem to get enjoyment out of publicly shitting on some one. I think most of us at one time or another has tried to have a friendly meanful conversation in that quarter only to have it sour. You'll remember over 10 years ago when I started out here, I was supposed to be some sort of imposter. I wasn't who I really was and on and on it went........it is sad. From those years back then I've had e mails sent to me citing the reason for leaving here, and it was always the same.


Entered at Tue Jan 25 04:57:08 CET 2011 from (72.230.109.86)

Posted by:

Bashful Bill(again)

Location: Minoa. NY(still)

Subject: just music, this time

For starters, that was a good show yesterday. it was an all day benefit for our local jazz society, with a bunch of local bands (and even some jazz bands). Aaron played in Syracuse with Rick, some years back(97. I believe. how time flies),a fine intimate show, but he and the Crowmatix have never previously made it here. And thanks, Peter, for responding the other day. The Decemberists album will remain sealed and hidden until Valentine's Day, but the new Greg Allman album underwhelmed me. Not that it isn't any good, it's a fine album, but I'll piggyback on something you said in your post - I'm very selective about spending money on music, as in the last couple years there's so little of what I buy that I care to listen to more than a couple times. I don't know if it's me and my ears have simply changed, or grown older and more cynical, but I used to play albums into the ground and then replace them. I did buy a reissue of Commander Cody's Live From the Armadillo at that show yesterday, which is a good example - back in the day I went through 2 vinyl albums and also remember buying a couple to give away as gifts. But when I buy something now, the majority of the time it doesn't grab me. When I' find myself more interested in the liner notes and artwork, then something;s wrong. again - often it's good, but it so often doesn't have "soul"( I don't mean the r&b kind of soul - someone posted about "soul" in music here the other day. THAT kind of soul). My girlfriend often uses the word soul in this respect, if something(music, a movie, something art related)doesn't have soul, it doesn't feed her and she doesn't care for it. Even on roadtrips, when I select and pack the music there's rarely anything newish, other than the odd new live release I've picked up. I am apt to try something newish when I see it in the used bin - I was tempted by the Doobie Brothers new one the other day, it was $6 - but I'm becoming more and more hesitant to buy new music......


Entered at Tue Jan 25 04:46:30 CET 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: NY

Subject: I feel the same

Bill- That's exactly my reaction to the idea of having a Band Guestbook yearbook.


Entered at Tue Jan 25 04:28:33 CET 2011 from (72.230.109.86)

Posted by:

Bashful Bill

Location: Minoa, NY

Subject: I mostly try to avoid the drama, please don't delete this Jan? I feel a need to address this and am publicly calling Jeff on his shit and he throws enough of it around here, pleasse give me my chance to call him on it?

Whoever "an old friend" is : if you are actually an old friend or an ex-friend, I'm disappointed that you hide behind a pseudonym and also that you choose to stir a pot on this guestbook. If you don't know me personally and are just throwing the word "friend" around, I don't know what to say. If I know you, then please stop the game playing and please contact me privately. Jeff - I'd say you never cease to amaze, but you got me today. But, you have your facts wrong. Not an alcoholic, long or short-term. There's a handful of people who at least sometimes read this guestbook and several ex-Guru's who can attest that I enjoy the occasional adult beverage and the good times which can ensue. I in fact only yesterday enjoyed 3 drinks at a Crowmatix(there - something Band related and while we're at it, what does he think of the feud, Jeff? I'm sure you know - are you allowed to share what you know he knows?)and Commander Cody show(with a designated driver, of course). I'll take it further - I've never had a drinking problem or ever considered quitting my social drinking and never has anyone suggested it to me. If I was a recovering alcoholic, believe me - I wouldn't be saying that I'm not. I do have some experience with addiction and recovery, so perhaps the incisive comment is accurate. The signs are there loud and clear with you, and despite my anger and contempt regarding you, I hope you get help someday,somewhere along the line, and believe me that I wouldn't say that if I didn't believe and mean it, either. Having said that, if I were a recovering alcoholic, what you said would be a cheap shot. If you're too fearful to respond to my comment of a couple days ago, why do you feel the need and the right to take a cheap shot? I'll give a short answer to my question myself : it's part of your pattern. Only you can give a longer and honest answer. Please note that I'm not asking for a long answer - you're an expert at those long, rambling, making fun of and picking people's words apart, talking about them like they're not here, finger pointing, judgemental, finding the buttons and boundaries and pushing them, take no prisoners and definitely take no responsibility for your actions and sometimes showing your instability ad nauseum posts. I'm asking for a direct and honest reply to a direct and honest question. If you're brave enough to be capable of a sophomoric and histrionic-free and again, that word - honest reply. I'd be tempted to suggest we take it private but, to be totally frank, I don't respect you or trust you and wouldn't give you my email address. And you made your boorish side public yet again by saying what you did about someone, something innaccurate, something which would be very personal if it was true, something which is totally irrelevant to the circumstances (whether it was accurate or not), and to someone who you virtually don't know. You're brave enough to, and real good at, taking a cheap shot from behind a keyboard at someone you admit that you won't engage in dialogue, but are you brave enough to reply to my comments and answer my question. Don't worry - you're miles away and you have your keyboard and thesaurus and your dog to protect you. You're safe and secure, so show everybody how clever you think you are(I don't generally go the cheap shot route, but I'll make an exception with you - and I'd insert the word punk here to end it but I'll stop short of actual name calling out of respect for Jan's house).......


Entered at Tue Jan 25 03:38:21 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Clarification

Only the Brown Eyed Girl can do it,clarify something as she just has. I've thought about something for quite a while now. Didn't quite know how to approach it. Now with the passing of Steve, I feel it more earnestly, so I'm just going to throw it out there.

I think that maybe that Brown Eyed Girl, with some help could handle it. No.......I'm not just singling you out.........but....an Electronic Year Book, say about...2005. If everyone could send their pictures in, for some one to compile. Maybe some wish to remain anonymous but I just think it would be really cool to have a year book of this alumni, tucked away in my computer to look back on.

This is not a small thing we have all shared for many years, and some of us will be fading away some way or another. It would be just real great to look back with a warm heart over a lot of good memories..........I think.


Entered at Tue Jan 25 02:50:00 CET 2011 from (99.236.13.43)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: SORRY!!!!

"Festival Express" on at 9PM. xoxoxo


Entered at Tue Jan 25 02:46:17 CET 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: NY

Subject: Dylan & the musicians

That was great BEG. Thank you.


Entered at Tue Jan 25 01:49:08 CET 2011 from (76.69.86.8)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Interview with JASON SCHNEIDER

in the pines
Re _Whispering Pines_

CI: On Richard Manuel specifically, for people who know the music of The Band but maybe have not gone back and explored the whole chronology of events, his story is a very sad one. Is there something in his story that you can identify as a turning point for when he started to take a downward slide?

JS: I guess, to take it back to the beginning, my original intention for the book was actually to write a Robbie Robertson biography, just something dealing specifically with him because no one had really done it before. He has obviously had a long and fascinating career, but the more I thought about it, the more I felt like I didn’t want to shortchange the other guys because that’s what The Band was all about – these five guys working together. No one was the leader. When you’re talking about Richard Manuel, that band wouldn’t have been what it was without his voice.

I wrote the introduction about The Last Waltz first, before I even really knew what the book was going to be about. Once I had that opening part done, the more I read it over, I thought, ‘yeah, this book should be more than just about Robbie. These guys deserve something that represents what they were as a group’. And then that just spun off into what the book became.



Entered at Tue Jan 25 01:21:28 CET 2011 from (76.69.86.8)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Robbie: "More than anything, in my own songwriting, the thing I learned from Bob is that it's OK to break those traditional rules of what songs are supposed to be: the length of a song, how imaginative you could get telling the story. It was great that someone had broken down the gates, opened up the sky to all of the possibilities. One thing that I don't think people realize is that to write the way he does, to get that many ideas into these very distinct melodies, you had to be really good at phrasing. His vocal phrasing was special. He got these characters and images across in a way that didn't feel stiff or forced, with a musical comfort so you could just take the ride and never question it. And a lot of times there was an attitude in his voice that worked for a particular record. I remember when he played Nashville Skyline for me. I was amazed at the character that he had pulled out of the bag for that."

"There's a wonderful honesty in them. He writes about what he sees and feels, about who he is. We spent a lot of time together in the 1970s. We were both living in Malibu and knew what was going on in our respective day-to-day lives. And I know Blood on the Tracks is a reflection of what was happening to him then. When he writes songs, he's telling me things about himself, holding up a mirror — and I'm seeing it all clearly, like I've never seen it before."


Entered at Tue Jan 25 00:32:47 CET 2011 from (76.69.86.8)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Bob Dylan
After the Fall
NOVEMBER 25, 2010

Giles Harvey“Oh, the ragman draws circles Up and down the block,” Dylan cryptically drawls at the start of “Stuck Inside of Mobile with the Memphis Blues Again,” and the song holds out little hope of clarification:

I’d ask him what the matter was
But I know that he don’t talk
And the ladies treat me kindly
And furnish me with tape
But deep inside my heart
I know I can’t escape

"The mood in such a song, however, is as much a product of Robbie Robertson’s delicately spasming guitar lines and Al Kooper’s puckish organ work as of Dylan’s words."

"At the same time, Dylan owes a tremendous debt to the remarkable musicians who have played on his albums over the years. Highway 61 Revisited would be a severely diminished piece of work without Paul Griffin’s breezy barrelhouse piano, which weaves and jitters its way around “Approximately Queen Jane” and “It Takes a Lot to Laugh, It Takes a Train to Cry.” John Wesley Harding (1967) owes much of its disquieting mood (at once jaunty and funereal, forthright and evasive) to Kenny Buttrey’s bustling drums and Charlie McCoy’s playful bass riffs, which prod and propel Dylan’s sedate vocals and acoustic guitar. And The Basement Tapes (recorded in 1967 but not released until 1975) would not be The Basement Tapes without the merrily boisterous accompaniment of Rick Danko, Garth Hudson, Richard Manuel, Robbie Robertson, and Levon Helm."


Entered at Mon Jan 24 22:53:23 CET 2011 from (85.255.44.145)

Posted by:

jh

Subject: BD ---} RR

"One Too Many Mornings" ---} "The Weight"

IMHO


Entered at Mon Jan 24 21:29:43 CET 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Yes, Pat - and Bob made a show of himself by gushing his praise and adoration of the great man! Nick Lowe said that "..to be fair, if Bob hadn't have said it, i would have done".


Entered at Mon Jan 24 21:52:48 CET 2011 from (217.42.25.251)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Recording in a studio v playing on the road

What I can't get, as a non musician, why a band can perform well on the road and not do the business in the studio.

Why does this happen?


Entered at Mon Jan 24 21:45:50 CET 2011 from (99.236.13.43)

Posted by:

Serenity

Location: Below zero in Kitchener,Ont.

Subject: Hi to you all with LOVE

I've been enjoyng all your posts, and see you are all as nice as ever. LUVYA all xoxoxo

BRAVO #40 Cable, Canada: 8PM tonite "Festival Express". Didn't mention THE BAND, but the description looks like this docu.

ROBBIE'S "When The Night Was Young" is a goodie.

Keep-up the good work all you wonderful people.Your enjoyment in your posts "makes my day".

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxo


Entered at Mon Jan 24 20:48:29 CET 2011 from (68.164.6.213)

Posted by:

Pat B

RtO, yeah, I'm trying to recall the interview from a couple of decades ago, so the duration could be off, but I seem to recall Bob returning more than one to listen to them, especially one bit where Garth sat by himself for hours burning up the Lowrey while Bob hid nearby listening.


Entered at Mon Jan 24 20:43:30 CET 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

I don't think the Brinsleys put The Band up for a week; at least four independent accounts of the tale (including Bob) say it was an afternoon.


Entered at Mon Jan 24 20:27:49 CET 2011 from (68.164.6.213)

Posted by:

Pat B

RtO, Bob Andrews reported in an interview in Keyboard Magazine that the Band rented their rehearsal hall (it sounded like a barn) for a week before the big Wembley show. Andrews referenced Garth's Lowrey so the roadies must have delivered at least some of the Band's equipment.


Entered at Mon Jan 24 20:16:33 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Bummed out today because the Jets lost. Norm you're right, just a little more time. If the team that played the second half had shown up for the first half....

I was at the Weaver's concert at Carnegie Hall.I was a kid and we used to sing "Weaver's songs at camp. When I heard they were playing in NYC I asked my parents to go. They bought us tickets. I also saw their Farewell Concert at Carnegie. Everyone walking down the stairs after it was over singing "Goodnight Irene"


Entered at Mon Jan 24 19:39:00 CET 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: Brinsleys/Band (sadavid)

sadavid, that Band rehearsal chez the Brinsleys occurred after. The garden sessions date from '71 for an album released in early '72. The rehearsal occurred in '74 - I assume prior to Wembley. By this time, the Lowe & Co had quit Northwood and moved to Wilton Park Farm a little further out of NW London than Northwood, close to Beaconsfield. That's where the hallowed footsteps were taken!


Entered at Mon Jan 24 19:30:48 CET 2011 from (136.167.102.118)

Posted by:

Dave H

I'm sure the influence didn't run *all* one way, but I have a hard time quantifying RR's supposed influence on Dylan's songwriting style. Blonde on Blonde seems to me like a further development of the direction Dylan began taking on Bringing... and Highway 61 (with the difference of the Nashville setting and backing musicians), and if RR indeed told Dylan that his songs had too many words, "Memphis Blues Again" and "Sad-Eyed Lady" show that he didn't really listen.

The Hawks surely played their part in the "Dylan goes electric" story, especially by personally helping to absorb abuse for it from audiences the world over, but Dylan had moved away from protest folk songs by mid-1964 and was regularly using electric instruments in the studio by early '65. I've found it a little bit of a stretch for RR to imply in retrospect that he had much of an influence on Dylan's trajectory at that time.

What I find much more plausible is that the post-crash Basement Tapes period in Woodstock inspired Dylan's move back towards acoustic guitar and overt country-music influences on JWH and Nashville Skyline. For that I think the Band deserves some credit, if credit's the word. And I don't see Dylan as a strong stylistic influence on RR's (or Manuel's) songwriting, either, except perhaps for some of the absurdist Basement-era tunes like "Yazoo St. Scandal" or "Ferdinand."


Entered at Mon Jan 24 19:30:25 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Rankin Church & Crowe

Bill; There is a couple songs with these three ladies together. One where Cindy takes the lead, and the sound is really good, with Susan Crowe & Raylene Rankin singing harmony.


Entered at Mon Jan 24 19:09:06 CET 2011 from (68.164.6.213)

Posted by:

Pat B

In regards to the Hawks influence on Dylan and vice versa, Dylan and his NY crew of musicians had already stumbled upon the instrumentation (guitars, bass, drums. organ and piano) by the time the Hawks arrived. And although they proved to be an excellent live backing band, the Hawks couldn't cut it in the studio with Dylan's recording style. The second version of "Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window" is the only thing they actually released with all of them on it. And Dylan actually canceled some sessions when recording with the Hawks proved frustrating.

Perhaps it is only a coincidence that RR was the only group member who went to Nashville to record BoB. Perhaps not.


Entered at Mon Jan 24 18:54:53 CET 2011 from (70.50.64.34)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: He had heard us but we hadn't heard him - Levon Helm

Bob F: Bob Dylan’s importance to The Band is obvious and massive – no questions at all on that front…….the linkage gave them a certain cache that no A&R man on his best day could ever have topped……..he taught them a lot about craft and discipline as well on many fronts including songwriting………..but think about two guys sitting knee to knee in a room with guitars……..one is the much better player, more street wise and is not afraid to tell the other…”look man, this folk thing is not really working for me anymore……way .less words and a bit more cut to the songs might be the way to go”…………..does anyone not think RR had something to do with some of the songs on Blonde on Blonde? I am not suggesting that RR is the better songwriter……….just that I think he had more of an influence on Dylan than the other way around……..


Entered at Mon Jan 24 18:49:16 CET 2011 from (184.151.127.171)

Posted by:

Marge

Carl - Yes Steve was a musician. He always wanted to be the best he could be at anything he did, and put himself wholeheartedly into anything he undertook. He played an old guitar he got as a teenager until I gave him a new guitar a few Christmases ago. He played it daily, often while watching the Canadians play. Marge


Entered at Mon Jan 24 18:36:26 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Cindy oh Cindy

I left you some room there Bill. I knew when I mentioned Cindy you'd be wading in. Here is a link tho', where what Cindy does, very much reminds me of Allison Krause.

I suppose you probably saw them when her and Nathan Tinkum were still together. Nathan, a good picker in his own right, and his standup bass guy, whose name I forget.They still show up here and there out here doing some gigs, although I don't know if Nathan is still hanging his hat on the north island.

I'm pretty sure he is pretty tight with Gary Felgarrd, Valdy, and that Salt Spring Island bunch, down where Bonk and my buddy and old drummer Lorne Burns hang out.

The sound on this video is not very strong, and doesn't really do Cindy that much justice. She is one of the greatest voices I know and have ever sang with.


Entered at Mon Jan 24 18:14:49 CET 2011 from (129.42.208.177)

Posted by:

Bob F

Location: Upstate NY

Subject: Bob Dylan and Robbie

Kevin J, I'm not sure why you think Robbie was a bigger influence on Dylan then Dylan was on Robbie. Look at the songs Dylan had written before they met, including 'Like a Rolling Stone'. What had Robbie written?


Entered at Mon Jan 24 18:07:08 CET 2011 from (136.167.102.118)

Posted by:

Dave H

Subject: anniversary

According to Expecting Rain, Bob Dylan arrived in New York from Minnesota 50 years ago today.


Entered at Mon Jan 24 18:05:18 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: in a Middlesex country garden

RtO - one would have to check the chronologies, but Nick Lowe recounted (on E. Costello's _Spectacle_) how The Band once used a BS house as rehearsal space before a UK gig. Lowe said they were struck by how good their gear suddenly sounded. The footsteps of the chosen may well have trod that patch of lawn.


Entered at Mon Jan 24 17:54:38 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: Cindy Church

Cindy Church may not be a household name, but you can tell she's great just by the company she keeps. Besides her own stuff she's in at least two pretty big concert acts in Canada - Quartette with Sylvia Tyson et al, and Lunch At Allens with Murray McLauchlan (who sings lead on the link), Marc Jordan (who wrote Rod Stewart's "Rhythm Of My Heart" hit) and Ian Thomas (solo hitmaker and brother of SCTV's Dave). However, what I like best of hers is the first Great Western Orchestra album, which was really just three people with stringed instruments doing new cowboy stuff in the early '80s. They also backed Ian Tyson in concert and on one or two of his critical early 'comeback' LPs - including "Cowboyography" I think.


Entered at Mon Jan 24 17:51:08 CET 2011 from (70.50.64.34)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Bill M: A great song indeed and a talented guy……….I did see many of the Queen Street bands but not nearly as many or as often as I would have liked as I was mostly out of Toronto during that era 1979-1987 and I never saw BB Gabor..……..some like Teenage Head were impossible to miss such was their pull and power to anyone interested in music in the early 80’s….


Entered at Mon Jan 24 17:41:14 CET 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Web: My link

Subject: dlew - Unconventional recording venues

Great post David. Nice to know that you can knock out some ambient death metal while in chokey!

Brinsley Schwarz once told me that his erstwhile combo of the same name cut a couple of tracks in their garden. Many will know the story of the Fillmore fiasco and how the group reacted to it by going totally minimalist. Unabashed Band-lovers, the third album "Silver Pistol" was recorded at their communal house in Northwood, Middlesex and even the garden was pressed into service when a live feel with all participants playing ensemble was required. Ian Gomm has unearthed a photo of said event in recent years (link),


Entered at Mon Jan 24 17:18:39 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Plunkety - Plink

That gave me a chuckle Peter.....I love the banjo, but the way it was used sometimes years ago was not very inventive, and annoying. To listen to some real inventive and pleasing banjo, you need to listen to things that Bela Fleck does with his band.

The comments by Peter M, are not surprising. It seems that the people he speaks of always have to work harder to prove themselves, which shouldn't be. As I spoke about those young folks I met in Mexico, and I spent a fair amount of time speaking with several of them (who could speak English well enough) my Spanish is pretty poor. Those young folks are very proud of their jobs. I suspect if any of them slacked off there would be some one very quickly to take their place. They are pround of what they do, and no matter how menial they do it well.

One young lady named Miriam.....early 20's I would say. All she did, was, at the cabana, give out and take in beach towels with the card system. A big stout girl, very pretty and cheerful. She told me she worked 9 hours a day 6 days a week. She had been working for 10 months. She smiled and said I hope in April to have a holiday. Many of them had similar stories. There was an older man who was a host and found you your table to sit at in the dining room as there were many. Always joking, very good looking and well dressed fellow in his black slacks white shirt and green vest they wear. We took a liking to each other. The day I left, at lunch, I had a few 20 peso notes left. I caught him outside privately where he was clearing tables in the smoking area. I slipped a couple in his vest, and told him how much I enjoyed his people and their company. He very humbling shook my hand, and said we try amigo, and I have a friend I'll probably never see again.

Yeah David. That is real cool. You probably don't know of Cindy Church. I think she lives in Alberta now. She gained some moderate fame a few years back. She is a hell of a singer. Back in the early eighties, Eddy Molyski,(whose studio I recorded my CD) Eddy used to have a party, for I guess about 10 years. New Year day, for all the musicians who worked new year. Used to call it, "National Flat Top Day". No electric, acoustic guitars, figgles, standup bass, banjo. So one night I'm singing Amanda. Cindy sang that part you are referring to. Blew me away how well she did that. It sounds so good in that song.

Well Lars, you got to give 'em a nod. They didn't lay down, came back, and made a game out of it. They might have got there, and just ran out of time.



Entered at Mon Jan 24 16:58:23 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: piano songs; guitar songs

Lars: We have data on 3 songs, as far as I can recall. As you say, "Dixie" was piano -- the "Classic Albums" DVD, I think, has the bit about not waking the baby (Alexandra?). Also on that DVD, JRR insists more than once that "When You Awake" could _only_ have been written on guitar -- which also speaks, somewhat, to the question of 'which co-writer did which parts?'

Finally, we have it on pretty good authority (see[My link]) that "The Weight" was written on a Martin D-28.


Entered at Mon Jan 24 17:02:55 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Weavers at Carnegie Hall

And the sound is excellent and the copy mercifully quiet … I was joking (well, half-joking) about the banjo. As the vinyl enthusuasts will know, you can't tell what vinyl's like until you play it. Especially with 45s quite abraded-looking ones will play fine, then very clean looking ones can have awful surface noise … it's the past styluses used as much as dirty hands or surface rubbing. Goldmine says that 50s / early 60s vinyl plays better than it looks. 70s / 80s vinyl looks better than it plays.


Entered at Mon Jan 24 16:58:24 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: Moscow Drug Club

Kevin J: Did you ever see these guys? Great band, brilliant song. I was going to link to the punkish "Soviet Jewellery" but thought this'd be more Band-appropriate, what with co-writer and accordionist Denis Keldie having been on "2B3: The Toronto Sessions", playing against Bill Payne on "Life Is A Carnival" and against Richard Bell on "King Harvest".


Entered at Mon Jan 24 16:55:50 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Live at Carnegie Hall

Peter: The Weavers at Carnegie Hall Vanguard LPs and Harry Belafonte's RCA Living Stereo LP-set recorded at the same venue have long been treasured by audiophiles as great representations of life-like sound.


Entered at Mon Jan 24 16:46:38 CET 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: feels like zero outside this morning

Subject: The Band's typewriter

Just what the hell do you mean by THAT, Westie? Just kidding. The Jets tried to come back in the second half, but they came up short. Not that big of a thing in my life...I'll get over it.

We had over 50 turkeys on the cracked corn out back this morning. They all ran and some flew right over me. You'd think they would smarten up when I go out there to dump more corn, but they'll be back before they go to roost this evening. I guess that it's better that they don't trust man too much.

KEVIN- I've mentioned the Band & that typewriter a few times now, but I never meant that I thought RR didn't write "The Weight." I just have always thought that the song sounded like Bob might have influenced Robbie and maybe added something on the communal typewriter, like meeting up with a guy and asking for some help....and "he just grinned and shook my hand and 'No' was all he said." If Bob had actually done the lyrics I don't think he would have been too shy to claim credit.

It looks like that big snowstorm that was forecast to come in tomorrow night has fizzled out, which is good. We got enough snow. Now I just wish it would turn cold.


Entered at Mon Jan 24 16:45:06 CET 2011 from (70.50.64.34)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Dylan takes Martin Cathy and turns it into "Girl from the North Country"................Lars.....I have always thought that Bob got a lot more help from Robbie than the other way around......


Entered at Mon Jan 24 16:40:23 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Weighty Characters

The names of the characters in "The Weight" were based on real people from Arkansas that Levon knew, rather than invented by Robbie. Luke was former Rock Housers & Hawks' guitarist Jimmy Ray Paulman and Anna Lee (Williams) was a childhood friend from Turkey Scratch. Crazy Chester was a real-life eccentric character from Fayetteville.


Entered at Mon Jan 24 16:38:44 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Weavers

BTW, I've been listening to it and the vocal blend is great, and the songs are solid good stuff. But they really should have replaced that dreadful plunkety-plink banjo with a decent guitar player.


Entered at Mon Jan 24 16:35:54 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

My used vinyl find today might surprise … The Weavers At Carnegie Hall (1957). You don't see stuff like that in spotless condition often, and (cough) Pete Seeger is indeed on it. I was influenced by an iconic cover design.

Also partly by reading the chapter on the Lomaxes in "Perfecting Sound Forever" last week and how Good Night Irene was popularized by The Weavers. The tale of poor old Lead Belly driving the Lomax car between gigs, washing the dishes and being forced to perform (much against his will) in a convict uniform surprised me. They wouldn't let him expand his musical palette at all and very much kept him in his place. Then this morning I read a review of their new biography. The reviewer said it was "too uncritical" and that many had a negative view of them. I hadn't realized.

One note is that "Huddie" in Huddie Leabetter sounds like "Judy." How annoying it is to spell it with two "d"s then, because that SHOULD make it rhyme with "buddy" which I'd assumed. I must have read it many times but don't think I ever heard it said.


Entered at Mon Jan 24 16:21:34 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Another Garth

Norm & Joe: Recording engineer Garth Fundis sang the great high harmony part on Don Williams' early '70s version of Bob McDill's "Amanda". He later recreated the same vocal part for the Waylon Jennings version. Over the years Mr. Fundis has also become one of Nashville's most respected producers.

I hit paydirt Saturday at a used record store. Picked up a copy of the 1968 Capitol stereo LP of James Burton & Ralph Mooney's "Corn Pickin' and Slick Slidin'" ($6.00) and the 1969 mono Mala 45-single of The Boxtops' "Soul Deep" b/w "The Happy Song" ($1.00). Had the pleasure of seeing Mr. Mooney playing with Waylon & the Waylors several times back in the '70s.


Entered at Mon Jan 24 16:13:00 CET 2011 from (70.50.64.34)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Lars: Some time back – was it a year? – when Sebastian had dropped in to this crazy little café…and was answering questions. I recall Pat B asking him a question or two about specific songs and which were written on keys or guitar…….As to “The Weight” Robbie had the music ( the intro at least ) to this in 1966 and the words certainly are very much like many others he has written as Bill pointed out……


Entered at Mon Jan 24 15:55:17 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Nice to see that good people like Bashfull Bill and Carol are alive and well and checking in, however infrequently and however sad the impetus. Others not so much - but that's the way of the world.


Entered at Mon Jan 24 15:42:48 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Speed & Agility???

Peter! At our age.....what in hell difference does speed and agility make? One of us might fall down and hurt us selves.

I'm with you Empty....I don't wear shoes with laces. They are just a gawd damn nuisance. Only when I go cutting fire wood and I have my heavy safety boots on.

Y'gotta remember what it was you was gonna say! Yer killin' me man. I go from upstairs down to my music room here, or into the family room.......stand there and think, what in hell was I gonna do? Usually it's to get firewood or make up the down stairs fire......lord.

Now what am I gonna say to Lars this morning? He's sure to be surly as hell.


Entered at Mon Jan 24 11:23:48 CET 2011 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Web: My link

Subject: 24 unconventional recorded spaces for albums..

couple here you might have heard of - see link...


Entered at Mon Jan 24 11:04:58 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

On the other hand (or other foot!), they say the vast number of foot injuries, ones which put "metatarsal" into everyday English, are due to light boots designed for speed and agility. The old heavy 1950s boots went above the ankle and protected the foot more. Mind you, those were the days when shoulder charges were permissible, and we were reminded on the passing of the great Nat Lofthouse last week that he scored a goal in a cup final by shoulder charging the goalkeeper, who was holding the ball, across the line.

I remember that, because our sports teacher (we were only about eight) was taken with the story, and we practised charging the goalkeeper while he was holding the ball, and he practised not being pushed over the line. But as a junior (under 11) I once scored a goal with this technique!

Then the rules changed. For the better.


Entered at Mon Jan 24 10:51:40 CET 2011 from (41.97.183.203)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: continued

"It is not the strong one who wins, the one who wins is strong" this quote is from Franz Beckenbauer, so he has been philosopher once in his life.

I thought to post something lately about shoelaces, don't remember exactly what, it was beneath the posts where Putin was mentioned, am I becoming Alzheimer, limpid ancient memories, diffuse recent ones.. …shoelaces, shoelaces… and Putin, I don't believe it would interest any GBer either to know that most of my shoes are without laces, not exactly slippers. Anyway
It is well established by the experts that the best final ever was 1970, followed by 1954, and maybe 1966.
1954, when football was football. The Hungarians led by Ferenc Puscas (the Cannon) were favourites, as they were unbeaten for 32 consecutive matches. They met in final a modest Germany that they already won 8-3 a few days ago in the qualifications. After only 10 minutes Hungary was scoring 2-0. It started raining on the stadium, the miracle of Bern, and in the German technical staff the dude called Adolf Dassler helped his team with football shoes of his patent with exchangeable studs, for the rest of the match the unbeatable golden Hungarians were more concerned how to remain standing with the muddy turf then playing football, Germany won, Adidas won more. The only infallible publicity is the publicity confirmed by a technical success and what a success. Aftermath football progressively shifted from football to business and big money. Puscas turned Spainish. Ferenc Puscas is the harraga precursor. Though in my view the worst final was 1990 followed by 1998, given that it has been revealed…
…wait a second ! …thank you google
"At the 1970 World Cup in Mexico, Pelé, for $120,000 in return, stopped the referee with a last-second request to tie his shoelaces at the opening whistle of a finals match and knelt down to give millions of television viewers a close-up of his Puma football boots."
Poor people who are used with shoes with no lace, you have no chance to ever earn $120,000, you are just lucky to gain some seconds a day when dressing, and it's priceless


Entered at Mon Jan 24 08:36:51 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I think this is what people forget about immigration. Our entire hospital system and care for the elderly would break down tomorrow without the work of immigrants. The thing is, they settle here, and pay taxes, and often exorbitant rents to private landlords because it's harder for them to get on the housing ladder. The West gets by on a stream of people who come from “less comfortable” countries doing our dirty work. That stream is not finite, as hopefully living standards will go up everywhere. But will this current group, working hard, feel sympathy when they have to pay the taxes to support us, the idle locals, in our old age?


Entered at Mon Jan 24 06:19:12 CET 2011 from (76.99.245.65)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: by the pond

Subject: co-workers from the Third World

I work in the human services field with mentally ill patients. Many of my co-workers are guys from West Africa, Liberia, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Ivory Coast. These guys work at highway cruising speed for 65 plus hours per week. They are conscientious, caring great guys to work with. They are among the best crew I've ever had the honor of working with. We run a very good program, and they are much of the reason we excel.


Entered at Mon Jan 24 05:51:13 CET 2011 from (12.51.52.166)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Rob, I'm sure you are unaware of this, and I had forgotten. but the post by Old Friend, brought it to mind. Bashful is a long term recovering alcoholic, so the post was particularly incisive. Apparently the anonymous poster was hoping to have people thinking i made the post. Similar name.... but, as usual. i chose to ignore Bill's comment.

Cheerio to you too Rob, i'm sitting back with a Dry Sack (sherry) on the rocks.


Entered at Mon Jan 24 04:59:41 CET 2011 from (206.53.147.244)

Posted by:

Bill M

Lars: I see what you mean about "The Weight" seeming Dylanish, but I think the similarity's mostly in the colourful-sounding cast of characters, and such casts can be found throughout popular music, e.g., "Mack the Knife", "Wang-Dang-Doodle". I also think that the main strength of the lyrics is the especially dense application of a Robertson trademark - the incorporation of idiomatic expressions (I think that's the term) - "I pulled into ...", "feeling 'bout half past dead", "lay my head", "find a bed", "fix your rack", "aint nothing you can say", "waitin' on judgement day". "Rocking Chair" is full of such expressions, as is "Time To Kill". I find it interesting that TNTDODD starts with one but is otherwise free of them.

Re GenXers, I thought they were the ones who were so disgusted by my generation's irresponsible ways that they've all paired up, had two quick kids, bought fixer-upper homes in town and then fixed them up - all by age 32! It's the GenYs who are more likely to be clueless about life outside the margins of a computer monitor, no?

Re immigrants, the usual complaints are: 1) that they take our jobs; and 2) that they don't work.

thus, I'm sure. .


Entered at Mon Jan 24 02:11:10 CET 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: Bill & Old Friend

Who doesn't? I'll drink to that. Cheerio!


Entered at Mon Jan 24 01:46:22 CET 2011 from (64.12.116.204)

Posted by:

Old Friend

Bashful Bill. You need a drink to take the edge off.


Entered at Mon Jan 24 01:28:59 CET 2011 from (173.178.214.140)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

Subject: Marge

I always had an "In" with Steve as being a fellow Montrealer and being close in age, we had the same point of references for a lot of things. We did have a bit of an outside of the GB correspondence. One tale included you hiding in his dorm room while Lou Lamoriello conducted a bed check. It was Steve's description of the sound of Lou's wingtips clip-clopping their way down the hall that cracked me up. He liked tales I'd tell of people convinced that I was a certain Canadian guitar god because of a similarly spelt name, even though I look nothing like the person in question. And then, I had the misfortune of informing him that the store that I picked up the tape for the reel to reel tape recorder he had refurbished had closed and became campaign headquarters for the Progressive Conservative party, whom Steve reviled. What I will always remember was the admission on how he had cleaned up your family's garage during Thanksgiving in Rhode Island. This led to countless invites to various locales for Thanksgiving, both Canadian and American for several years afterward. He would be happy to know that we still use the term "linear solar powered dryer" for clothesline. So many stories. I am happy others are coming forward and that there will be more to come. Take care Marge and stay stroong.


Entered at Mon Jan 24 00:07:10 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Well! When I was your age.........

Bonk!.....Steve played some guitar.

David H; What your saying is very right, and understandable. Every gereration we probably get worse. However, the dope smokin' hippies of the 60's, (and I don't mean that as derogatory as it sounds) that was just a fact. They didn't seem to want to "ripoff the system" as much as they just wanted to roam the country and get more in touch with the land.

Now a days, there is much more of a "Sense of Entitlement" than ever I believe. You owe us this, society owes us! I have been self employed most of my life with crews that I have hired, up to 8 or so employees at times. There seems to be a very larger amount of people under 30 who have this attitude of being owed. Statistics show, over 100,000,000 grossly obese people in the USA, mostly young people.

The rates of crime, and gang crime are higher than ever. Just yesterday on the news, I was watching the demonstration of a new scanner people can carry concealed. It scans credit cards right inside a purse or wallet, just as they are scanned at the store. As the demonstrator walks by some one sitting at a table, and has what just looks like a small satchell as he walks by, he just waves it by a woman sitting at a table drinking coffee. Then he pulls this little electronic instrument out and shows her her credit card #'s and all her information. so now we got to buy some kind of lined wallets that can't be penetrated.

The point is, too many people would rather steal that work, and be in any way productive. If that seems , Oh sure, it's all our generation....well....it is!


Entered at Sun Jan 23 22:52:40 CET 2011 from (24.108.12.129)

Posted by:

BONK

Location: Salt Spring Island

Subject: Marge

Hello Marge. Was Steve a musician. Just wondering. Regards, Carl


Entered at Sun Jan 23 22:47:15 CET 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: PV/dLew

The one that gets me is the seeming replacement of "I wonder if you can help me?" (as a jaunty opening gambit when entering a shop, for example) with "What it is, yeah...". The temptation to snap back "What WHAT is?" is unbearable.

I can believe that about the drainage company Peter. There ought to be a scheme where the habitually unemployed are sent to him by conscription as free labour in return for their giro. This is one of my typically scattergun ideas that at first make you think "typical Thames Ditton & Esher tory-boy" but actually the sentiment behind it is quite social: you can bet your life that weighing up £30 an hour a few of them would smell the coffee, soon see the £££££s in front of their lives and get off the social and into a road-tested (from both employer and hand) job.

Yes, an important point about Eastern European labour. Many whinge about the prevalence of these folk in our towns these days but fail to see that it is only our own home-nurtured chavstock feeling above many jobs that has caused it. Besides, in a cafe near my office, the disinterested, surly and tutting London girls have been replaced by the heart-aching loveliness of Ludmilla and Illona. But I digress....


Entered at Sun Jan 23 22:26:40 CET 2011 from (217.42.25.251)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Marge

I really enjoyed the tales from the farm and like me, Steve played sport. I thought he had played ice hockey at a decent level, rather than just being a supporter, and googled nosily a couple of years ago and found his goals average if that is the correct word.

I know where his family(father's side) hailed from and enjoyed related discussions in the early days.

I really enjoyed his sense of humour and his spats with Bumbles. I always saw him and Bumbles having a British sense of humour, which I thought was unusual.

Ricky Gervaise's recent performance at the globes would be seen as British, yet look how it bombed.

So I'll miss what we Scots term his 'wind ups' and the replies from Westcoaster.

Like Joan, I see Steve as a great penpal.

I hope you can get some rest now, but I understand how difficult this must be.


Entered at Sun Jan 23 22:04:38 CET 2011 from (184.151.127.144)

Posted by:

Marge

Bashful Bill - FYI, You're wrong. Steve did recognize you. I remember him mentioning your name and pointing out a post that you had made.


Entered at Sun Jan 23 21:55:53 CET 2011 from (71.232.26.129)

Posted by:

Dave H

As a Gen-X'er myself, it amuses me to observe how so many of the complaints that the baby boom generation inspired from the generation before them are now voiced by the baby boomers about the generation that has come after. My grandparents saw my parents' generation as a bunch of lazy, entitled kids who'd rather sit around playing music and taking drugs than work hard or do something constructive. But now they've grown up and it's my generation that's slacking off! Funny how that works...'twas ever thus, I suppose. Didn't Plato complain about the same thing?


Entered at Sun Jan 23 21:51:31 CET 2011 from (184.151.127.144)

Posted by:

Marge

I want to respond to all of you who have sent their condolences. It is funny how Steve connected so deeply to so many people here on this site. It is a testament to who he was. I am still in a state of confusion and intense loss. As the confusion begins to clear a little, I am sure that I will be able to stay here on the farm. (I may not be able to keep the cows; that decision remains to be made. I was not the farmer, he was!) Dunc, Steve would have welcomed you with open arms. If you ever make your way to Canada, I would be pleased to have you stop in. You only have to let me know you are coming. The farm is beautiful, and it is Steve. He is all I think of when I look around. I could not bear to leave it... I regularly check in here to see the goings-on. Thank you all. We will all miss him terribly. Marge


Entered at Sun Jan 23 21:21:56 CET 2011 from (70.78.227.122)

Posted by:

Northern Boy

Location: Hope, BC.

Subject: A Prayer Made In Hope

Till now, I've been both too shocked and too saddened to come here and write about Steve in the past tense. The reading of others' comments was difficult enough. Probably like many of you, by now I'm a little bit over the shocked part but not at all over the saddened part.

Today I had my wife say a prayer at church for Steve and his family. I'm not religious but possibly the prayer will somehow help, (especially as it originated in a place called Hope !). My condolences to Marge and family. I know he touched many lives. It probably shouldn't be this hard to say good-bye to someone I've never met in the flesh - and yet it is. NB


Entered at Sun Jan 23 20:58:40 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: OOps!

Sorry Dee! ......forgot to say hi. I just got delivered my big bowl of butter & garlic popcorn & my iced tea. I'm all ready......here we go.


Entered at Sun Jan 23 20:54:19 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Joe Cool - The "Comeback Kid"

Through the 80's & 90's, when I watched a lot of football, and my son Craig was young & began playing football and then rugby, I was for those years the greatest fan of the SF 49'ers. For one reason only. Joe Montana. The funny thing was with his school and growing years Craid was too, and we never had discussed it.

Those years of the 49'ers was just a very exciting time. I had a subscription to SI. Craig & I shared a lot of great moments in those games.

Last night as we discussed a little of this on the phone, Craig was disgusted. Some how he has become an Eagles fan. I rarely watch games any more until playoff time. I liked the Pats quite a lot. However, (Lars & Joan), I know we won't be friends any more, but Craig says, Noo Yawk will never get by Pitts. defense......maybe. Any way I got him convinced Green Bay will hoist that cup at "the end of the day". Who was it didn't like that expression??? they'll take it all.

When you look at Joe Cool's Notre Dam stats, and he is recorded as the 3rd best football player of all time, and one of the 25 best athletes of the twentieth century.....well, to watch Joe Cool, late in a game dismantel an opposing team, it was..........Great!


Entered at Sun Jan 23 20:28:21 CET 2011 from (76.67.16.91)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

HOKUSAI SAYS

Hokusai says Look carefully.
He says pay attention, notice.
He says keep looking, stay curious.
He says there is no end to seeing.

He says Look Forward to getting old.
He says keep changing,
you just get more who you really are.
He says get stuck, accept it, repeat yourself
as long as it’s interesting.

He says keep doing what you love.
He says keep praying.
He says every one of us is a child,

every one of us is ancient,
every one of us has a body.
He says every one of us is frightened.
He says every one of us has to find a way to live with fear

He says everything is alive -
shells, buildings, people, fish, mountains, trees.
Wood is alive.
Water is alive.
Everything has its own life.
Everything lives inside us.
He says live with the world inside you.

He says it doesn’t matter if you draw, or write books.
It doesn’t matter if you saw wood, or catch fish.
It doesn’t matter if you sit at home
and stare at the ants on your verandah or the shadows of the trees

and grasses in your garden. It matters that you care.
It matters that you feel.
It matters that you notice.
It matters that life lives through you.

Contentment is life living through you.
Joy is life living through you.
Satisfaction and strength
are life living through you.
Peace is life living through you.

He says don’t be afraid.
Don’t be afraid.
Look, feel, let life take you by the hand.
Let life live through you.

~ by Roger Keyes in honour of Katsushika Hokusai
Katsushika Hokusai (1760–1849), Japanese artist, painter and print maker


Entered at Sun Jan 23 20:23:02 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Football

GO JETS!


Entered at Sun Jan 23 20:07:39 CET 2011 from (99.71.240.225)

Posted by:

Dee

Location: Wisconsin

Condolences to Marge and family.

Norm! Thank you for the nice words about the Wisconsin team known as the Green Bay Packers. I wonder if it's against the law here to wear a No.4 shirt while watching the game! But you are correct, the new quarterback is doing well.

Do you have the "To Lefty From Willie" album. It's one of my favorites. (Note I did NOT use the overworked and silly "fave")


Entered at Sun Jan 23 20:02:12 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Cranky old lady

Rob, I used to work in a yarn shop. Women would come in with their kids for help on a project and while I was working with them, the little brats were running around pulling out skeins of yarn and unraveling them. Finally at the look of exasperation on my face the mother says "Don't do that or the lady will get mad at you" Not "I'm angry and want you to stop" no the only reason they should stop is because "The Lady" didn't find it acceptable.

Peter, these is very little work ethic in a lot of the Gen Xers and their progeny. My niece upon graduating from college (the fourth one attended) in 5 1/2 years wanted to work in public relations. She got a job with one of the top firms in NY. They were even letting her write some copy, but she quit before she was there 6 months. Why? "They asked me to send faxes" She apparently felt that she should enter on the executive level.

The "drudge" jobs here in the US are held mostly by Latinos. No one else wants to cut my lawn or shovel my driveway or clean my house. I laugh when people start in about illegal immigrants taking jobs from Americans. This country would grind to a halt is these folks were not holding up the base.

Work is not fun. If it was they wouldn't call it "work", but you have to do what you have to do. These kids don't get it.


Entered at Sun Jan 23 20:01:44 CET 2011 from (91.42.243.90)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: The 'age' thing:

Joan & Mike: The 'age' thing, I see what you mean, got the same here too, Steve's passing hit me also. Embrace life, every day, just found this on the www

" Because life is not lost when we die. It is lost while we live. It is lost in opportunities that we allow to slip through our fingers. In each moment of inaction, we die bit by bit. When we waste time, we kill it." (see the link).

But it's true, time & Happiness .... "Life was a funny thing that happened to me on the way to the grave."


Entered at Sun Jan 23 19:59:41 CET 2011 from (90.239.73.219)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Subject: Strange code in Fri Jan 21 18:17:43 CET 2011 (Peter V)


 Do you see what I see?


Entered at Sun Jan 23 19:41:15 CET 2011 from (91.42.243.90)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: Germany
Web: My link

Subject: The Eiger Nordwand

In the middle of Switzerland there is the Eiger Nordwand located. The Nordwand (North Face) is almost impossible to climb they thought, killed 64 people (“Murderwand”) before the first one made it. There is a great movie made about the first climb (Die Nordwand, Germany 2008?), the leader, one of the best climbers ever died only a few feet above his rescuers cause they brought with them a rope that was too short . see below:

“They managed to give him a rope long enough to reach them by tying two ropes together. While descending, Kurz could not get the knot to pass in his karabiner. The latter tried for hours to reach his rescuers who were only a few metres below him. Then he began to lose consciousness. One of the guides, climbing on another's shoulders, was able to touch the tip of Kurz's crampons with his ice-axe but could not reach higher. Kurz was unable to descend farther and, completely exhausted, died slowly”

The first successful attempt took them several days, but now there is this Swiss guy, that did it in 2 hour and 47 minutes , see the YouTube link and watch him just sprint his way to the top, unbelievable: sport or madness?

Anyway we just booked 8 days Cram Canaria, Isle del Ingles., end of Febr. Direct flight from Munster Germany (must be the smallest airport of Germany, you park next to the one and only plain). Just looked the place up on YouTube, (it’s a party city (we didn’t know that ;-), well we live rural and can use some action I guess.

Chimney follows up: our mason advised us to isolate the chimney on the attic, to prevent condense water to be formed, because those now stoves don't warm the chimney enough.


Entered at Sun Jan 23 19:02:36 CET 2011 from (70.26.122.47)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: The 'age' thing

Belated response to Joan's post: Yeah, me, too. The 'Steve' thing (can't seem to get that out of my head for some reason); the obits-page scan, and so on. Yeah, music definitely helps.


Entered at Sun Jan 23 18:28:35 CET 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: NY

Subject: The music of The Band

I suppose the only one who could answer this is Robbie, but I wonder if RR composed his "Woodstock" era music on the piano, the guitar, or just out of thin air. I remember seeing that documentary on his composition of "Dixie" when he had to be quiet on the piano or he'd wake up his baby daughter; that led me to believe that he did a lot of it on his piano...I just wonder how much.

Also, I've always been intrigued by the "Big Pink" days when there was a typewriter for anyone to come along and help out on a song. Including, as I understand it, Dylan.

I know I'm totally outvoted on the idea that Zimmy helped out with "The Weight," but it's a hunch that just won't go away.


Entered at Sun Jan 23 14:55:55 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The same all over

Peter, here is a good example. A couple months back, I hired a guy. No interest, no skills. He had been at sea most his life. His father owned a 56 foot sail boat he grew up on. Had sailed to Hawaii 3 times, to mexico a couple. So I figured with sea time that he had, I could break him in to be of some use.

This guy is 32 years old. Acts like he is 15, and still lives with mummy & Daddy. I showed him how every thing in the galley works, and after cooking him a few meals, I told him. I'm not your mother part of your job is to do some of the cooking and cleaning up here. The answer was classic of many of these young people. He said, "Well I'm ok if I got a freezer & a microwave."

My son at the age of about 12, could cook you a nice roast chicken, make gravy & all the vegetables. Now at 30 Craig is is an aircraft maintenance engineer, and manages Helitec, a company at the Abbotsford airport building & maintaining helicopters. His wife is a nurse & they have 3 children. They are exceptional people. One year ago right now Craig had 2 weeks off, so came out with me on a 10 day trip. It was like a holiday for me, as well as the companionship.


Entered at Sun Jan 23 11:09:17 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V (aka ) Old and Grouchy

Subject: Deep Shi*

About five years ago we got our main sewer drain blocked … kids party and lots of disposable nappies (diapers) shoved down by parents either totally dumb or totally uncaring about other people’s drains. When the camera went down, we had tree root intrusion too. The guy from the drain company was in his mid-thirties, brand new truck, all the equipment. We were talking and he was saying his business was in trouble (I nearly said “deep shit” but that was literally his business). He had three trucks. He couldn’t get out to jobs fast enough. He needed two people on each job. His average assistant lasted four to five days. He told me what he was paying … £30 an hour, or SIX times the then minimum wage, or 25% of what he was charging customers. He had his two reliable guys (both in their fifties) but no one young would do the job. As he said, even with coveralls and an unlimited supply of rubber gloves they wouldn’t touch shit.

The other thing … and I’d say it’s as bad in big US cities as here … is you go into coffee shops, hotels, even retail shops, and everyone working there is East European. I’m not complaining about them … I’m complaining that apparently we have one million under-24 year olds unemployed in the UK, but they either decline to work in service industries as “beneath them” and lack the social skills to do it. I spent two days in London recently, and realized that the only native English person was the guy in the bookshop at the National theatre. None of the security guards at art museums, no one in restaurants or hotels had English as their first language.


Entered at Sun Jan 23 05:32:20 CET 2011 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Rob: LOL!

xlnt! ;)


Entered at Sun Jan 23 04:52:51 CET 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: dLew

David, it is all as I predicted in "2109", the most out-there freakout of the forthcoming CD:

"We struggled onwards for a while, living empty lives / Unable to prepare real food since the ban on kitchen knives / We all got fat; so motor-cars were confiscated next / And conversation was replaced by abbreviated text" (c) Rob Millis 2009.

And good mates of mine accused me of just writing a swampy jam as an excuse to cut loose and play sloppy 'Frisco style SG & wah wah solos over, after the discipline of the other songs. How dare they.


Entered at Sun Jan 23 04:51:03 CET 2011 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Web: My link

Subject: Up on Cripple Creek, performed by Sam Bush..

Hope you like it


Entered at Sun Jan 23 03:34:54 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Nintendo Generation

Funny.....how you fellows got to this subject. I can certainly realate to your feelings of children's bad behaviour in stores Rob.

However, I came in the house yesterday, or the day before and swithched my TV on. I watch the Knowledge network a lot. A program was in progress. This really big old fellow, a bear of a man, and his wife, (I didn't catch whether it was in Canada or the US.) these folks operated a small farm where they took in problem teenagers. This big fella, about 50's called these children "The Nintendo Generation"

All they can do is operate electronic gadgets he said. In his home there wasn't even a working TV. No phones computers, cell phones, nothing. People came and dropped off their chidlren for two weeks. This is a very stern big man, to some of those kids probably scarey, but not mean.

One very smart alexie young girl, he was getting to pile tree limbs for burning. He said, "Pick that up". she picked it up with one hand, her other on her hip. He said "get your hand off your hip, take that with both hands drag it over there and get on that pile, and don't stop until I tell you!"

At the end of the two weeks, of the group he had at that time, throught their tears, (including that girl) they all thanked him and his wife for teaching them values, discipline, and some feeling of self worth. Evereyone of them without exception.

Some families where both parents are required to work, and from fatigue don't budget their time to include these very important elements suffer greatly. The whole family does.

I was fortunate in my work, where mostly being self employed, as it was evident Steve was. My children grew up most summers on my fish boat. In camps where we had logging operations. They were involved with the work. Always learned how to cook, scrub decks, clean fish, work on mechanical rigging and engines. So that they are a kind of different breed.

As David has mentioned, we have a very real crisis with untrained, unmotivated young people. On tug boats, Captains are retiring there is no one with training to take their place. Even my little operation, finding a deck hand with any qualifications, ambition, desire to work is near impossible. It's scarey what this is all going to come to.


Entered at Sun Jan 23 02:39:08 CET 2011 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: I call it the 'My Child is special' syndrome

It breeds a sense that the parents are not more than good friends, and that the world owes the children a living. No hardship shall ever cross the child, and the difficult bits of parrenthood shall be glossed over or romanticised. Being a 'good parent' means giving your child everything and still being able to 'enjoy yourself.'

We're now dealing with young adults with no skills to deal with the world, and no idea that disappointment happens, or how to deal with it. A bunch of entitled spoiled brats. (I'm not bagging an entire generation - these complaints date back to at least 100 bc.) But due to teh rise of reality television, its more noticable and more prevalent. I have two children, whom I love. I'm lucky that they are nice kids, but we're (me and Mrs Dlew) both trying to make them know that they are not special to anyone but us (and grandparents, aunties, uncles, cousins et cetera) and that the world is a bigger and meaner and more wonderful place than a soft life of material goods will ever give...

(they're not deprived, by the way...)


Entered at Sun Jan 23 02:12:09 CET 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: BONK

Makes you sick, eh? - that was one of Richard Thompson's first attempts at songwriting!!!!


Entered at Sun Jan 23 01:22:48 CET 2011 from (24.108.12.129)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: Sandy Denny

Good one Rob. I'd forgotten all about Fairport and Sandy. Like Steve said to the fair Marge, this is the place to learn.


Entered at Sat Jan 22 23:35:59 CET 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: Further to PVs "Love You" cell phone rant...

...Peter, that is least of our worries. I was in our local Co-Op earlier and there were four unruly kids running around the store, getting under peoples feet etc.

The "parents" (in inverted commas because really all you can say about them is "the couple that had at least four shags" and ought make no mention of the skills of parenting) were too busy lugging the super duper 24 can pack of Stella Artois to the till to actually discipline the kids themselves and the (biological I would assume) "mother" said - "If you don't stop running around I SHALL GET THE MAN BEHIND THE COUNTER TO TELL YOU OFF!"

What the f**k is that all about? Getting other people to do the difficult bits for you? I guess the Stella (sole item of shopping other than a nutrition-free micro-meal each for the kids) tells the tale.


Entered at Sat Jan 22 23:26:41 CET 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Web: My link

Subject: Steve

Having steeled myself away from web chatting for a few days and forced another slew of productive evenings at the Mac, I was shocked to hear of Steve's departure in a round of direct emails between Peter V, David Lewis and myself this week. Farewell my friend and thoughts to your loved ones at this time.


Entered at Sat Jan 22 22:44:33 CET 2011 from (24.218.200.216)

Posted by:

Tim

Location: Boston
Web: My link

Subject: All our Past Times at The Last Waltz Video


Entered at Sat Jan 22 19:32:28 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Mortality

I think Steve's passing hit me harder than I thought it could. I have found my self sitting in front of the computer these past couple of days crying.I've just turned 64 last month and I had a lot of health problems the past few years.

Good friends are getting sick or passing away, and somehow that wonderful immortality we had is gone.. Now when I see the Obit page, first thing I do is make sure I'm not there. :-). But seriously, time does seem to get shorter and I guess the only thing I can say is Carpe Diem. I think the reason some people say "love you" is there is a fear that you might not get another chance, and you want them to remember that. Better to say ti too much than regret not saying it later

But enough of this maudlin rant. I'm going to go listen to some music.


Entered at Sat Jan 22 18:59:59 CET 2011 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

Professor Irwin Corey makes an appearancPr


Entered at Sat Jan 22 18:23:13 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: One more gripe

In the last few years, there has become one word that people will say to you when they are stumped for a reply, pissed off, or just generally want to be insulting, look down there nose at you. It makes me almost leap over and choke some people when they say to you.....Whatever!


Entered at Sat Jan 22 11:30:26 CET 2011 from (64.12.116.204)

Posted by:

Joe

I just heard about Steve and was so sorry to do so. He was a real chuckle. My regrets to Marge and all of Steve's family. So very hard to believe.

Jeff, I received your phone message from last week. All is well here and I'll be calling you soon. I've just been extremely busy.


Entered at Sat Jan 22 11:29:31 CET 2011 from (41.97.175.125)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Ilkka (i guess), Sadavid : thanks for the echo

high above everything else in the GB lately, the link to Monty-Python Philosophers Football is the best in it. Really refreshing
Pleased to see St-Augustine mentioned.
"Nietzsche booked for arguing with the referee" …this one is too strong
Wittgenstein was never been German, is it an allusion that between 1938 and 1942 the Austrian footballers were ordered to join the German team.

Sport commentators have stereotyped or weird expressions, of the recent weirdest ones I heard, worth the current thread, it was during the 2010 Football World Cup, shortly before the final whistle, with a bit of consternation "Netherlands is loosing its third final, several aging players won't have any more opportunity to be in a world cup before their retirement, moreover all the Netherlands has a finite number of world cups before its complete disappearance under the sea"
I never trusted those alerting nightmare scenarios, there's always a bit of exaggeration, and at the real level of what the threat might be [threqt minus the media], a human solution would be found far before…

To all Football-Monty Python fans, isn’t the linked above commentary, from the 1982 ⅛ final, a lip-synch from the Philosophers Match ? (same voice, who parodies who)


Entered at Sat Jan 22 06:56:14 CET 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(\Friend0

Kal David has a new blues record out.Cut with a chick vocalist getting steady play on Bluesville XM


Entered at Sat Jan 22 06:18:30 CET 2011 from (68.198.41.121)

Posted by:

Gene

Location: almost real time

Subject: King Harvest

Letterman's Band just broke into King Harvest during the first commercial break on tonight's show. Gotta love them.


Entered at Sat Jan 22 05:26:00 CET 2011 from (68.171.231.16)

Posted by:

Bill M

Westcoaster: been to van airpoort many times, most recently this past April, but I've never noticed the guitar. Will make a point of looking for it should an opportunity arise.

Joe J: Gotta think your subconscious has dredged up ol' Stevedore Steve from the memory banks


Entered at Sat Jan 22 04:00:09 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: I'm not here to forget you

Thanks Joe. You've picked a lot of my favourites. Somewhere back, I think I mentioned. The night before my baby Amanda was born, (there was no ultra sound or anything). I just knew somehow she was a little girl. Amanda is 28 now, with my grand daughter Elena. But that night, I was playing Amanda. I always played it much like Waylon. As I was playing it, I just thought to myself. That's what I'm going to call that little girl.

To this day, when Amanda happens to be around, and I'm playing in some bar some where. She looks at me, and I sing that song, I can't keep tears from my eyes, and pretty much her too. But, I always think of Waylon when I'm singing it. Y'know, it's part of yer life.

But.... from "Honky Tonk Heroes", that David and I were talking about, one of my all time favourite songs is, "The Werlitzer Prize".

I'm not here to forget you, I'm here to recall,

Things we used to say and do, I don't want to get over you,

I don't want to get over you......

I think you are still a little melancolia, Joe. We're gonna have to get past this. It has happened to me so many times lately, I refuse to let it drag me down.

I know that Steve wouldn't like it. Just get back up at it. We have to show Marge some strength here. I think she may be able to feel some good vibes of strength coming from a lot of really good people here.

What this keeps bringing home to me is one good expression. Today, people have been bringing up some really irritating habits of expression that have gone on for a long time. I totally agree with them. But....when I get out of the truck, with my duffel on my shoulder, and Susan looks up at me with those clear blue eyes and puts her arms around my neck and says, "You look after yourself and be safe out there". You know, I can never get tired of that...............I'm a lucky man. So you know that old saying, and through some of these really stupid arguements, we should all remember. Any day above ground is a good day.


Entered at Sat Jan 22 02:52:08 CET 2011 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: Waylon and Willie and the boys

The full moon was low on the eastern horizon so I didn't even see it til I got to the back of the hill. There was a time when I could have stayed out all night.

Here's my Waylon songs for you Norm-

Just To Satisfy You, 33rd of August (Mickey Newbury), Good Hearted Woman (w Willie), Lonesome, On'ry and Mean, Honky Tonk Heroes (BJ Shaver), You Asked Me To (Shaver), This Time, Rainy Day Woman, If You See Her (Newbury), Til I Gain Control Again

Ten songs are enough. There are so many others though. Waylon's versions of 'Amanda' and 'Lucille' just shreds the hits by Don Williams and Kenny Rogers. Remember 'Mental Revenge' from the 60s? 'The Chokin Kind'?

Anyway after a rough week I'm relaxing to one of my favourite 'spiritual' albums, Willie's 'Spirit' with some of his best pickin ever.


Entered at Fri Jan 21 22:18:23 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: A bottle of Wild Turkey on it Lars

Joe! You quit that gawd damn smoking! Sorry I didn't get to your email.....thank you. And thanks again my brother and Eddy keep pestering me to get at that project. I'm the "master" of procraster-nation. Well gawd damn....jsut while I'm typing that a picture of Eddy at his control board in his studio just flashed up on the screen saver on my other computer.

Billy Bad Ass! There is something I meant to ask you. I haven't been down to Vancouver International airport in quite a few years, and it's really changed a lot. All our local flying, we use the old south terminal. In the main concourse between departure gates 54 & 66 in the new terminal is a glass case. In the case stands two Larivier guitars on stands with a note on each with a phone #. Perhaps they are for sale I don't know. However on the one the note reads. "This is the first "Cutaway" Larivier guitar ever crafted. It was built for Bruce Cockburn.

I just thought maybe you or Jerry, Bonk, or NB may have seen it.

Well now I got more work to do. I was just down to the wharf checking my tug. A friend of mine who is one of the owners of a local shell fish farm just handed me a big bag of fresh muscles. Susan is mad about those gawd damn things. That woman is so spoilt.....just gets back from Mexico. Now she gets spread out for her, fresh muscles, stir fried vegtables, and sticky rice. Life is tough.

Y'know Joe, I was just saying to Bonk, who also is feeling quite miserable about Steve. Our mortality gets waved in our face more and more now at our age here. I would guess the average age here at 55. Three years ago, my best friend in Port Alice, Donny was at my house one night, ribbing me about golf. Next day he fell dead. One year ago, it was my friend Bill, and now Steve.

My oldest brother Howie, is 71, Buddy is 70 me 66, and Lorne just turned 55. We talk every week and lucky for me where I go in a couple of weeks up to Rivers Inlet, I get to work with Howie again for a few days. You don't pass up any change to spend a bit of time with those that are close.

Our old mum, will be 90 this year. Just the other day they had to take her in for repairs. She had a gall stone blockage they had to take care of. When Lorne headed out on his tug, he gave her strict instructions. "Don't you go dyin' on me now mum, we're making all the plans for your birthday party."


Entered at Fri Jan 21 21:45:59 CET 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: 4th and 27 from my own 3 & we're going for it

Subject: Catching up

Martin- I have a boot of that Cambridge show by Danko. Sredni was there & covered "Poor Boy." Buddy Cage was on pedal steel that night (May 14, 1988).

Norm- The Jets are going to the AFC championship game for the second year in a row. It's my personal belief that they are playing over their heads, but if they stay hot and manage to win the next two games they'll be hoisting the Lombardi Trophy on Super Sunday. The best team isn't always the winner; it all comes down to getting hot and keeping "Mo" (momentum) on your side.

No, Billy is still hanging around here at the house. Right now he's sitting in a maple over a pile of cracked corn. With all this snow the wild turkeys come in to eat the corn every late afternoon and Billy's got a fish net up there with him, just waiting for a chance to drop down on the flock when it comes. The wind is making him bob up and down on that skinny branch and right now I think the turkeys have a better chance of bagging Billy.

Norbert- it's good that your neighbor is a mason. Tell him I said hello and I was asking about his back. All masons seem to ask about each other's backs when they meet. Kind of like boxers always asking each other about their weight...or evangelists asking each other how many souls they saved last month. Good luck with the project.


Entered at Fri Jan 21 21:45:32 CET 2011 from (76.67.17.146)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Wednesday, December 1, 2010
Levon
Kathy Zimmer and how Levon has inspired her to keep on keepin' on.


Entered at Fri Jan 21 21:17:03 CET 2011 from (76.67.17.146)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

No Depression The Roots Music Authority

Some other fans' comments on hearing Robbie's "When The Night Was Young".


Entered at Fri Jan 21 20:54:43 CET 2011 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: Merle

Thanks for the vid of Merle (and Redd), Norm. I finally got a chance to see him (Merle) a couple of years ago and was amazed to hear how accomplished his band was. That what they call Western swing? The Strangers looked like a gang of retired stevedores. Big old men. They had some chops though. I remember when Merle looked to his guitar player for a solo (maybe on Kern River?) and the player shook him off as if to say 'Get on with it' and Merle laughed and continued on. Player saved his big solo for the encore.

Norm you should definitely do a Waylon album. You've got the voice. Come on now. I got a list of my favourite Waylon songs for you to cover that I'll post after I close up shop.

We've finally had some snow. If all goes well I'll strap on my skis tonight, ski up around Hospital Hill, burn a joint, have a shot of brandy, toast Steve and sashay back on down the hill. Been a rough week. A friend and neighbour dropped dead while shoveling snow last night. 58 and a health fanatic. I work out and eat right but I still smoke and drink and have no plans to change. Did I ever say that I've talked to God up on the hill. Or maybe that was Levon.


Entered at Fri Jan 21 20:37:50 CET 2011 from (79.202.163.49)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: Marge,

Sure hope you can hold on to the farm if you want that, there’s often a way. And please keep coming back here you’re part of the family now. Know we're thinking of you.

Found this nice song on Youtube (thanks to Norm’s post the other day) Daniel Lanois, Willie Nelson & Emmylou Harris .

Lars broke down the chimney in the living room today, our neighbor (5 houses up the road) is a retired mason he’s going to build a new one next week.


Entered at Fri Jan 21 19:25:34 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Love you / Love you too

"Love you" seems to be the standard UK cell phone end line. Either that or "Love you too." It grates because it's always said in public places loudly. And people seem to spend an inordinate amount of time phoning loved ones.

Just now in the supermarket I counted eight people talking on cell phones in just two aisles.

Because I'm dropping my grandkids at school, I note that there's a whole generation of 30 somethings who use "Love you" / "Love you too." instead of "Bye." when dropping off their kids. I say "Bye. Have a good day" or similar. Why do people need verbal assurance on every single phone call or brief parting?


Entered at Fri Jan 21 19:13:12 CET 2011 from (66.104.136.165)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: worsh & kworch

Wash & quash from my Iowa kin.


Entered at Fri Jan 21 19:11:43 CET 2011 from (70.50.64.34)

Posted by:

Kevin J

I travel quite a bit and some things do tend to get annoying after a while…………..In the US, a couple of expressions have become so common that no one seems to even notice anymore………….”Y’all” was used in the South and was endearing but now seems to have found its way everywhere to the point where TV anchors use it to address each other……….and greeters at hotels all over the country use it……..”So Y’all from Canada?.....when travelling alone you find yourself looking around to see if there is a group of other people standing with you!.................The other one that is epidemic in the US ( especially with people on the telephone ) is most “Thank you’s” are returned not wit “you’re welcome” but “Uh huh”………….In Canada, people adding ‘right” after saying something also grates………..the Hall of Fame for annoying is how a once great little word like “Dude” has been destroyed by inappropriate usage……….and anyone over 25 that attempts to drop hip-hop slang into a conversation should be shot on the spot……


Entered at Fri Jan 21 19:09:18 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Regional expressions

When I was in School in Ohio a lot of the people used an expression I hated "I'm waiting on you" Instead of I'm waiting for you. I always wanted to say . "OK What are the Specials for today?"


Entered at Fri Jan 21 19:02:00 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Sports

Then there are the "Yogisms" from the Famous Yogi Berra. My favorite is still "Its Deja Vu all over again"

Go Jets!!


Entered at Fri Jan 21 19:00:22 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Fender Bender

David; While listening to a few old tunes just now, I came across this vid of Merle Haggard, singing that old Lefty tune, "That's the Way Love Goes".

This is at the time Redd Volkaert, (my friend from up here in Surrey) was playing lead guitar for Merle. Watch when Redd does his solo, how he bends the gawd damn guitar in half to get his effect like using the whammy bar. The man is a gawd damn gorrilla.


Entered at Fri Jan 21 18:49:34 CET 2011 from (68.164.5.137)

Posted by:

Pat B

Sports jargon inevitably includes "Hey, I gotta tellya..." whereupon the pundit says what needs to be told. Sometimes in code.


Entered at Fri Jan 21 18:29:47 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: If it ain't broke, don't fix it...

sadavid: In the American South the all-purpose expression is "I'm fixin' to..." (do something). Often this is followed by someone urging another into action with "you go ahead on now". When I was a child my mother always used to correct me whenever I said "fixin' to" by asking me what exactly was broke that required fixing.


Entered at Fri Jan 21 18:29:28 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Parrots!

Peter; You just reminded me of an e mail some one sent me over Christmas. A picture of a beautiful big green & blue parrot with a big yellow beak. There is the voice of an old guy talking to a friend I guess. "No we don't have much family left...just a nephew, he moved to South America. Oh yeah he keeps in touch. Sent us this beautiful big bird last Christmas. It was delicious! He called, wanted to know how we liked the bird........I told him. It was delicious. He went crazy! Said....YOU ATE THAT BIRD? I said course we did. He hollered that bird cost me thousands! He was beautiful! He could speak in two languages!" I said........well.......he shoulda said something then


Entered at Fri Jan 21 18:17:43 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

In the UK, parodies of sports announcers are legion. They’re called “Colemanballs” after the sports announcer David Coleman. The term was invented by “Private Eye” which had a column listing new ones in every issue. I remember we discussed famous ones some time ago. My favourite remains the one on the Oxford – Cambridge boat race:

'Ah, isn't that nice, the wife of the Cambridge president is kissing the cox of the Oxford crew.'
(Harry Carpenter - BBC TV Boat Race 1977)

The link takes you to a fine selection. For clichés, the classic football one is “as sick as a parrot”. This was greatly beloved of players and managers.


Entered at Fri Jan 21 18:07:45 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: ultra-annoying habit of speech

" . . . gonna go ahead and . . . ."

Some folks can't say, e.g. "I'm going to move that carton," or better yet, just move the darn thing. It's got to be, "I'm gonna go ahead and move that carton now." Wow.

Re: Philosophers' Football: sheer genius. Early reviews of "The Onion Sports Network" show suggest that it is a doomed concept: sports shows are so close to self-parody that they're impossible to parody.


Entered at Fri Jan 21 17:47:21 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: What that is?

Even more annoying in the current idiom is the expression "it is what it is". I hear it used quite frequently by sports commentators on those radio programs where sports fans call in to complain about the shortcomings of their favorite teams.


Entered at Fri Jan 21 17:45:19 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: A can of Worms!

What is the difference between a burrito, & an enchalada? Holy cow! I googled it and that is a real arguement.

I had roasted half a chicken, night before last. So at the store yesterday, I got some nice whole wheat wraps, put them on the grill and warmed them. I slice up leftover chicken, suatayed it, (shit is that how you spell that, I wish Steve was here.) with mushrooms, onions and three colours of bell peppers. I spread my home made salsa on the wraps, filled 'em up with the chicken & veg. I made french fries and put 'em in front of Susan. That is so good! she says. Then she frowns and says are these burritos or enchaladas????......Well gawd damn how do I know?


Entered at Fri Jan 21 17:35:41 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Oh Yeah!

I'm a lumberjack and I'm OK!


Entered at Fri Jan 21 17:25:08 CET 2011 from (70.50.64.34)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

And for a good laugh.....see attached...


Entered at Fri Jan 21 17:20:14 CET 2011 from (68.171.234.143)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Of Meisters and Men ...

"At the end of the day", it"s a Kinks song.

sadavid: I think there's a bit of a deprecatory element to the use of "meister", though I can see why others are as annoyed by the use of the term in rockcrit - just as I am by the use of "diva" and (shudder) "maven".


Entered at Fri Jan 21 17:15:14 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Dangerous

Sadavid! It sounds like you're bordering dangerously close to "LYMRICS!!!!"...........MOSTLY


Entered at Fri Jan 21 16:58:27 CET 2011 from (70.50.64.34)

Posted by:

Kevin J

A frustrating aspect of many of the rock reviews…is the …….’best material since ‘Exile on Main Street”…..or “a return to the “Achtung Baby sound”…..which of course is almost always nonsense………….just like when you start reading that an athlete – any athlete – is “in the best shape of his career” it is a certainty that he is done like dinner…………….give Kings of Leon two more releases and we will start to hear things like “best music they have done since Only by the Night” and there will be no need to even give it a sample – you will know that they are done…….


Entered at Fri Jan 21 16:25:44 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: noncliché (w/ a 'soulful' limerickey)

I don't read much music crit anymore; hanging around here (thanks again, Dean H, and you're looking _suspiciously_ well) really gives me all the info I need.

But . . . I've recently come across a site (see [My link]) that's got (mostly) crisp, opinionated writing -- mostly on old music, which is mostly what matters mostly anyway. And some of it's in verse, which is fun: (review of a William Bell side):

"The music we know as the soulful Can be either blissful or doleful. Or sweetly erotic, Or briskly chaotic, Or narcotic like smoking a bowlful."


Entered at Fri Jan 21 14:52:08 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

At the end of the day … is also beloved of sports commentators and players. "Well, they stuffed us 7-0, but at the end of the day, we were still the better team." What does it mean?

Another rock cliché is "-meister" as in "funkmeister" or "bluesmeister". What's wrong with that English cliché "master"?


Entered at Fri Jan 21 14:51:18 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The Longest Yard - (front yard or back yard)

LARS!!!! (Excuse me for a minute fellas, I need to get Lars heart pumping). It looks like your Jets are going to make it to the big one this year. Rightfully so, but how do you feel about Chicago & Green Bay this Sunday? I'm taking Green Bay all the way this year. Mostly because of that quarterback and the way his squad is rallying around him.

There has been a big organized crime bust down your way I see. I thought I saw the Reverend Billy in handcuffs. That couldn't be..........could it??????


Entered at Fri Jan 21 14:01:52 CET 2011 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Rock cliches...

'At the end of the day... ' Not just rock, of course, but irritates me no end...

'soulful' - it shouldn't be a cliche, but most singers aren't soulful, and have other good qualities (tuneful, sad, funky, rock, whatever...)



Entered at Fri Jan 21 12:39:28 CET 2011 from (84.208.88.46)

Posted by:

Martin Hagfors

Web: My link

Subject: New link...

Maybe this time...


Entered at Fri Jan 21 12:31:52 CET 2011 from (84.208.88.46)

Posted by:

Martin Hagfors

Web: My link

Subject: Rick Danko-Nightstage, Cambridge Ma, 1988

Rick Danko in a great mood back in 1988. Enjoy. Martin


Entered at Fri Jan 21 10:36:27 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Rock writing clichés

Sorry, I was about to post this then got involved in double negatives. I was thinking about a list of classic rock journalism cliches.

A starter “It failed to trouble the charts” is used again and again in British rock magazines. It’s a shortened version of “It failed to trouble the chart compilers”, i.e. it wasn’t a hit so they didn’t have to go to the effort of typing it in the weekly Top 40 list. It’s a convoluted bit of double think. It probably dates to Chris Welch in Melody Maker in the 70s, who was inordinantly fond of this sort of thing. "It failed to dent the charts" is an alternative.

Another. Two reviews of The Decemberists record refer to them as “Portland’s finest.” Place name + finest seems to be plural, used for groups not solo artists. You can find it ten times in any month’s pile of magazines. Portishead were Bristol’s finest. The Animals were Newcastle’s finest. It just means the only fact the journalist can remember about them is their city of origin.

So any more?


Entered at Fri Jan 21 10:28:47 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Stickler Department

That's quite a mild double negative, Peter M. Don't not worry about it. Here in Dorset we frequently hear triples and even quadruples. "I ain't not doing no more of nothing no way!' David Crystal (perhaps the most influential modern grammarian) spoke on double negatives and said that they shouldn't worry us too much, as they virtually never cause misunderstanding. Unless you're an undergraduate philosophy student obsessed with your Logic course, they imply emphasis rather than reversal of meaning.

You got me thinking about "spelled wrong" though. A 1950s grammarian would have chosen "wrongly" but I think it comes close to "slow" where both "slow" and "slowly" are used as adverbs.


Entered at Fri Jan 21 09:46:55 CET 2011 from (76.99.245.65)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: The Turtle Pond

Subject: double negative

In the heat of the moment in the previous post, I used a double negative, "misspelled wrong", to my embarrassment. I can't imagine what Steve's reaction would be to that gaffe!


Entered at Fri Jan 21 09:28:30 CET 2011 from (76.99.245.65)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: by the frozen turtle pond

Subject: Hey Marge, about Steve, again, always Steve...

I never tried to contradict Steve, a master of many things musical... but, a couple of weeks ago he cited an impressive list of musicians playing on a '70's Maria Muldaur album. Among the 20+ names on the list, he mentioned David "Lynly". I was surprised that he had spelled the name of stringed musician extroardinare "David Lindley" wrong, and called him on it, citing that he usually crossed all his t's and dotted all his i's correctly. Well, he immediately posted back, saying that on the album liner notes, it was spelled "Lynly". I quickly checked in the "allmusicguide", and damn! Steve was right (as always). The liner notes had misspelled Mr. Dave's last name wrong. Ouch. By the time I was gonna fire off an apology, he was gone. Really gonna miss an extraordinary guy!


Entered at Fri Jan 21 09:11:13 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Bashful, I've been stuck on the new Decembrists all week … "rollicking" is a better description than "rocking" on the beatier tracks but it's great. I think early Fairport fans would love it. Track one, "Don't Carry It All" with the ballooning bass sound, reminds me of "Largo" (an album with Levon and Garth contributions that is essential for Band fans).

The Elton / Leon is one I bought, played about three times, but somehow nothing stuck. It still seemed unfamiliar and too often generic Elton the third time through. At that point you either persist until the songs stick or it gathers dust. Will try again.


Entered at Fri Jan 21 06:12:06 CET 2011 from (70.90.75.179)

Posted by:

JQ

Jeff - I don't know if you thought I was criticizing Jan; I wasn't and I knew a bit of what you said too. I think this is a great thing because of his unselfish commitment & competence. I was only just curious if he had an opinion about that stuff that I had missed early on -


Entered at Fri Jan 21 05:34:27 CET 2011 from (72.230.109.86)

Posted by:

Bashful Bill

Location: Minoa, NY

Subject: droppin in.......

Beenawhile since I've dropped in. Sad news about Steve. I don't think I ever interacted with him, and I doubt he'd even recognize my name, but I recollect him speaking fondly of his family, his lifestyle, and especially about Marge. RIP. Life is short, indeed......Also, sadly, same old, same old re the conflicts. Not that I think the feud should be an off limit topic, but I scrolled back a week or so and it's the same old person stirring the same old pot, in the same nonsensical ways(going around in circles, making cryptical statements but never really saying anything, insisting that this post is the last post on the subject, and pointing fingers at anyone else they can think of for "starting it"). It's so obviously unhealthy and compulsive behavior, I really and literally find it sad......Having vented that, the original reason I came here this evening was to share that I made rare CD purchases today : the new Greg Allman, which I haven't played yet, and the new Decemberist's, which is a present for my girlfriend, Maude (with an e), which I haven't given her yet(sshhhh!). Over the last few months I've bought Rosanne Cash's newest(disappointed), a live Charlie Louvin tribute to Gram Parsons entitled Hickory Wind(not disappointed)and a live Jerry Garcia show from 75 with Nicky Hopkins(also not disappointed). And speaking of Gram and Hopkins(I respect him, even though I use his last name) I was given Keef's autobio for Xmas and that was a fun read. Did you guys discuss it here, when it was fresh? I've wondered about the new Robert Plant(I was way underwhelmed by his collaboration with Alison Krause)and that Elton John / Leon Russel album, which I also would bet were made note of here on the old GB but again,I haven't been around much. Thumbs up, or thumbs down?


Entered at Fri Jan 21 03:56:29 CET 2011 from (12.51.52.166)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Jan

JQ. Jan is the patron saint of The Band on the internet. He works for free, and puts in long hours. When he visits the U. S. and sees Band related shows, & visits with Band members., he does so at his own expense. I believe last year some magazine or some such sent him here on assignment.But other than that, his own time, his own dime.I've met him a few times, he's fun, conversational, interested & interesting. He's been a friend to me on a professional level and personal level. And to lots of other people i know of also.


Entered at Thu Jan 20 23:21:40 CET 2011 from (66.104.136.165)

Posted by:

JQ

Is our webmaster solidly in Levon's camp? I notice in the "what's new" section that JRR is normally referred to as "Robertson" only. Is that not the same thing Levon calls him, with impled vitriol and a lack of respect, eh? I believe it's just JRR that is referred to by his last name only there.


Entered at Thu Jan 20 23:19:05 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Stacked Deck - The Beautiful Lie

David; I'm betting you know this song real well. I had to take a little trip to the store just now. I had ARA in the player, and on the way home, was listening to "The Beautiful Lie"

That's about as country blues as you could get wouldn't you say? Sneaky Pete has some steel licks in their that give you the blues.


Entered at Thu Jan 20 22:58:46 CET 2011 from (85.255.44.145)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Subject: Your webmaster...

...made one of his rare TV appearances on the regional Norwegian Ostfold Channel yesterday (link above, skip to midway into the clip).

Next up, in February: A news flash historical documentary (sort of) about the Band web site, on our state-controlled NRK channel. Stay tuned!


Entered at Thu Jan 20 19:47:46 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Old Blue Eyes & the Blues

Pat: Ronnie Hawkins expressed it more crudely, but Sinatra was a showbiz criterion as a chick magnet. So I guess he saw his share fly in & out of his coop. (As today is the 50th anniversary of John F. Kennedy's inauguration as President, we need not go into detail regarding the Marilyn Monroe connection.) In addition to several wives, he no doubt saw an infinite number of others come & go. His widow Barbara, his fourth wife, had previouly been married to Zeppo Marx, the handsome straight man of the Marx brothers. Sticking with the fowl imagery, there's the classic Marx brothers film "Duck Soup". The title is a slang expression for an easily accomplished task. No doubt Mr. Sinatra could change that to Chick Soup, as a recipe for the blues :-)


Entered at Thu Jan 20 19:45:07 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: The Farmer Song

A tribute to Steve from Neil Young & Willie Nelson......

For his values of conservation, use of energy, home and family, the world could use more like Steve.


Entered at Thu Jan 20 19:01:56 CET 2011 from (66.104.136.165)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: A Dawson - W Cromarte - E Valentine

In addition to hockey Steve knew his baseball stuff well and I recall specifically that he had very solid stats & opinions about the late 70's Expos, which I'd suspect was his team.

A solid argument also on Andre Dawson and The Hall of Fame -


Entered at Thu Jan 20 18:42:30 CET 2011 from (68.164.5.137)

Posted by:

Pat B

I believe Sinatra defined the blues thusly: "When the chick flies the coop...and takes all the bread." Although this might be code for the opposite.

I had no idea Steve was such a good hockey player but I could tell he knew the sport. Anyone who could reference Pierre Pilote was good enough for me.


Entered at Thu Jan 20 18:38:00 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Take a download off Fanny

JQ: The guestbook is now downloading faster since Jan removed the December posts to the archives.


Entered at Thu Jan 20 17:46:45 CET 2011 from (90.239.106.96)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: EMPTY NOW: Seventh Seal, of Ingmar Bergman, Swedish movie with the infamous chess scene, the very chess game.

...but did you know that the scenes on the beach were shot in Swedish northwest coastal region only 200 Miles (appr. 325 km) south of Halden were Mr. Hoiberg's historical site is located. - This motion picture is my favorite. Thanks for mention it.


Entered at Thu Jan 20 17:42:31 CET 2011 from (66.104.136.165)

Posted by:

JQ

Marge, I'm sorry I'm late to weigh-in with my profound sympathies. I felt a real kinship with Steve on his political POVs and, like that last poster, I'm one too that really likes the politics, civics & history related digressions the site takes occasionally. And Steve was a real leader here in those discussions.

But that's my selfish appreciation of Steve, your loss is the real one and I'm so sorry.

We live in the sticks and can't get high-speed, except, marginally, with this AT&T plug-in device. But last week AT&T cut us off for going over our damn limit and that's a new problem for us now - anybody else?


Entered at Thu Jan 20 17:03:37 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: dare to use 'the blues'

Empty Now: you might enjoy [My link] -- it's a very free translation; in the original, Mr. House says:

" . . . ain't but one kind of blues, and that consisted between male and female that's in love -- in love, just like I sung one of them songs while ago and I put a verse in there, say that love hide all fault and make you do things you don't want to do, love sometime will leave you feelin' sad and blue -- I'm talkin' 'bout the _blues_, now, I ain't talkin' about monkey junk, and it consisted between male and female and that means two people supposed to be in love and one or the other deceives the other through their love."

See also the youtube clip titled "B-L-U-S-E - Son House at Newport Folk Festival (Festival! 1967)" where Mr. House offers an alternate, extended and even more poetic definition . . . .


Entered at Thu Jan 20 15:18:20 CET 2011 from (90.239.84.233)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: My condolences

I am not so much for the music anymore. Politics and history and religion are keeping me here. I hadn't visited this GB for many days but today I thought: "Hmmm... Obama is meeting Chinese leaders, STEVE must have something to say about it. I don't want to miss that!" And now this.

My condolences.


Entered at Thu Jan 20 12:22:08 CET 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Web: My link

Link is to a review of Greg Allman's solo gig in NYC.


Entered at Thu Jan 20 10:31:11 CET 2011 from (41.97.210.94)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: Pardon for this last one

A very good friend who's a professional actor told me recently the he has been there during the making of Mario Monicelli movie "Brancaleone at the Crusades",1970, which was shot in Algiers, I was interested to learn that during all those days Vangelis, who did the movie soundtrack, at the top of Aphrodite's Child rock band ( recall " rain and tears" hit) was seen all the day roaming the Casbah streets barefoot in hippie clothes, and he used to end on a seat in Le Lotus, a cafe gay at downtown. I googled about Brancaleone and learned that the comedy is mainly a satire of Seventh Seal, of Ingmar Berman, Sweddish movie with the infamous chess scene, the very chess game, not the blues label.
Another very good friend told me recently about kind of work he's doing on North-African lament songs, I reacted bitterly when he dared to use the word Blues. One can speculatively find some cross-backgrounds but Blues music is unique, and the lament that underlies it is a state of mind that nobody can know but an African-American of the reconstruction era. [learned in The Band GB] " blues is the worst feeling a man can get"
"The town was asleep" respectable is the English version of Marc Almond, and respectful is to rather link it with regards to the GBers, but since it doesn't render it all and I doubt of his accent of Southport north of Liverpool, I decide to link the Brel original. After long hesitation,
In fact Brancaleone was evoked following the suicide of director Monicelli two monthes ago at age 95. He committed suicide as he was not aging well and tired of getting old, said another very good friend…

. Pardon, for this last one, I read it in Wikipedia, not everyone who writes on the internet deserves to be called very good friend by M.T


Entered at Thu Jan 20 01:13:35 CET 2011 from (67.158.178.219)

Posted by:

Lil

Hi Marge... glad to see you still posting and hope you continue to do so. I just wanted you to know that my husband died the sane way Steve did... very suddenly from a massive heart attack. No warning. If you ever want or need to talk to someone who has been through what you're going through, please don't hesitate to contact me. d_lil at hotmail dot com. (My real name is Diane). You and your family are all in my thoughts here.


Entered at Thu Jan 20 00:27:39 CET 2011 from (184.151.127.249)

Posted by:

Marge

Norbert, I may take you up on that offer to post occasionally. I hope that it will not be out of place. Steve was unique and multi-talented; there was no job around the farm that he wasn't capable of doing, no challenge too great. I have many decisions ahead of me. It is my hope that I will be able to remain here on the farm. I will keep you posted. Thank you all for your support. It has meant a lot to me.


Entered at Wed Jan 19 23:38:14 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Honky Tonk Heroes

David; You're right. I hadn't even thought of that. I have the vinyl, one of my favourites. I don't have every Waylon Album, but damn near.

This little trip brought back a lot of memories, that got set aside along the way. When I talked about outlaws, my older brothers and I have for a long time collected works of this interesting subject, because of our great grandfather.

For example, (you can find this in wikipedia even). The "Flyin' Dutchman" of Butch Cassidy & Sundance fame, was caught in the store at Union Bay here on Vancouver Island, just below Courtenay. The building, (now a heritage building housing the post office) was a store. The Dutchman tried to rob it one night, and was caught by a Mountie. Apparently both big men, the fist fight lasted for quite a long while, the Mountie the victor.

There is a story I've always known, I'll have to talk to my mum to refresh my memory. On Reid Island where mum grew up, we lived when we were small, lived a man who was one of the James Gang. I don't remember his name. Mum told us, (she knew him when she was a kid) the memorable thing was, he didn't believe in God, but he wanted to be buried in concrete with a steel bar through his heart, so the devil didn't get him..

One book I have, "Outlaws of BC" has a lot of this history which is pretty interesting. Whether it's all true or not, who knows.


Entered at Wed Jan 19 23:12:58 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Westcoaster: No package as yet. Yours got to you so quickly that it's likely the pony blew a gasket on the jog west. It'll get here yet, don't you worry.


Entered at Wed Jan 19 23:10:02 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Norm: Your Mexico posts brought to mind that great Billy Joe Shaver song "Ain't No God In Mexico", which Waylon Jennings recorded on his "Honky Tonk Heroes" album.


Entered at Wed Jan 19 22:40:58 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Fleeing Mexico....like my great grandfather before me

Well Bill through your eyes, doesn't make much sense, (did you get your package by the way). I guess I'll have to come clean. I got in a lot of trouble in Mexico.

I kept tryin' to give some of those beautiful young waitresses, Canadian Tire money for tips. They saw thru' me pretty quick. A bunch of 'em wanted to get me in a corner and work me over. I had to buy my way out.

Then one evening as we ate supper, a couple of kids about 10 - 12 were eating with their mom beside us. There was this big fountain of choclate with strawberries, marshmallows etc, on sticks you could get 'em all coated. These little guys came back with two plate loads. Suddenly I had flash backs of John Belushi.....Animal House...Porky's. I said to these little guys, we otta get a load of that stuff and start a food fight. Their eyes lit up, their mother looked at me in horror, Susan told me to sit down, shutup and behave........rats! Young host amigo slides over to me and says, "Not until tomorrow compadre, I'm on cleanup tonight!"

I don't even need to look I don't think Lars. You most likely are referring to Caddy Shack. He licks the salt and throws it over his shoulder.

Well my great grandfather came from Mexico. Saw a picture of him my Dad's old uncle had. Big sombrero, bandoleros across his chest. He was a badass. After the civil war, when so many banditos were chased out of the states into BC, he was one. Married a Salish Indian lady, so we are a bunch of half breed mutts.


Entered at Wed Jan 19 20:24:44 CET 2011 from (79.202.171.2)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: Marge

Marge, thanks for your reaction, to know and understand is a great help for me and all of us here. Must be very hard at the moment, special with the pressure of the farm also, you have to get through this, and you can handle it.

If you feel like posting here something (doesn’t matter what), please do, sometimes just talking helps.

p.s. Really didn’t know Steve was such a good hockey player too, he didn’t talk about that here (as far as I know), a talented man.


Entered at Wed Jan 19 20:12:50 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Chinese Leader Visits U.S.

Yes we had our differences, but in memory of Steve I can't resist posing the political question of the day: "Hu are you, who, who?"


Entered at Wed Jan 19 20:10:30 CET 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: NY
Web: My link

Subject: Chevy Chase's way

Norm- Try it this way.


Entered at Wed Jan 19 19:57:31 CET 2011 from (68.198.41.121)

Posted by:

Gene

Subject: David Powell / Steve H.

Thank you for the link to Gregg Allman on Letterman. Unfortunately, I fell asleep watching Letterman that night and missed it, and have regretted it.

Marge, I am truly sorry for your loss. I've had my differences with Steve, on and off, for years. Many times, I have agreed with him and been silent. Probably, as many times, I have disagreed and either kept silent, or has aired my own thoughts. I have always respected him as a 'free agent' who had the courage to post his own opinions and take consequences. May God rest his soul.


Entered at Wed Jan 19 19:49:56 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Pour me another Tequilq Shiela

Jose Quervo you are a friend of mine. Peter, one night, 'round about 1986, while playing in "Gabby's Cabaret". I had a hard introduction.

A little real honest to goodness bronk riding cowboy named Chuck came carefully to the stage as we got back up to start a set. He was carrying a shooter, trying not to spill it. He hands it up to me, and says,"Play Amarillo by Morning Norm". I said sure Chuck, and downed the shooter. The top of my head lifted off, and when I tried to talk no sound came out. I finally croaked "What in fuck was that?" He said, "That's a Prairie fire son, Jose Cuervo and Tabasco sauce."


Entered at Wed Jan 19 19:26:34 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Tequila!

In the late 70s, with Mexicans one of the largest nationalities we taught, tequila became my standard drink because the adult students were generous with parting (and arriving) gifts. I had a guy in my class from the Sauza family who presented me with a bottle of Commerativo. I praised it extravagantly. He had to go back to Mexico on business for a week, and returned with an orange half-gallon flagon, unlabelled. This, he said, was the tequila the family drank. The aged stuff that was too good to sell. I’ve never found a drink that good again.


Entered at Wed Jan 19 19:18:40 CET 2011 from (75.127.150.74)

Posted by:

Carol

Subject: Marge & Steve

I don't really check in much these days, but someone just emailed me about Steve's passing. I just wanted to say I'm so sorry to Marge, Marge & Steve's family, and his many friends here. God bless.


Entered at Wed Jan 19 19:17:00 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The sands of Mexico

“C’mon, man, This is Mexico” is one I heard a few times on educational tours, but never from Mexicans. A stereotype-breaker is that on the whole, Mexican academic talks started tighter on time than even Swiss ones. I was at a conference where everything ran like clockwork, until the last day when a round-table discussion was totally fuc*ed up. Wrong room listed, no lights in right room, no projector etc etc. Everyone was really pissed off and by then everything was 20 minutes late. The two guys organizing it said just that, “C’mon, guys, this is Mexico.” Both were from the USA. I pointed out there and then that everything the Mexican teachers had organized went like clockwork, and that the only thing that went wrong was organized by the two gringos, who immediately blamed Mexico.

Wonderful place. Most pleasant people you can ever teach, too. It is SO sad what is happening to their country now. I was also taught in Guadalajara in a bar with vast numbers of tequilas, that quality tequila is like quality Scotch … it’s for sipping on its own.


Entered at Wed Jan 19 18:49:59 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Me-hee-co

Sadavid; Your thoughts are well documented as to the conditions in (some) of Mexico. The day before we left to go there, on the news was the report of 15 decapitated bodies found. (Which of course didn't make me very comfortable.) Young men all between 25 & 30 to do with this drug war. Mazatlan seems to be a place to stay away from.

However further south down to Puerto Vallarta, things are very quiet there. During our stay, once while walking the beach, two policia on a quad, with heavy side arms came motoring slowly down the beach. For our own comfort, we just stayed at the resort and soaked up sun. It's very quiet and relaxed there. However talking to a young man at the desk one day, he was explaining to me how their resort is only at 65% capacity. So it is hurting them a lot I guess.

I got one good laugh, (I can't eat and drink the way you see some people do, and mostly Canadians as that is the largest populations there.) A young man serving the area where we were laying on louges in the sun, came by 3 or 4 times. "Can I get you a drink senor?" Nada, pour favor. Finally he got frustrated with me, he says, "C'mon man...this is Mexico!"

This "all inclusive", watching some people trolling around those buffet tables, I don't see how they can stuff that much food in their bodies and drink that much. It put me in mind of a show I happened on CBC a while back. A bunch of our politicians debating...arguing! the cost of educating our public on healthier life styles, and eating. The flip side of which is, the cost of our health care maintaining many of these people suffering all their ailments from this sort of self abuse.


Entered at Wed Jan 19 18:33:09 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Gregg Allman Band

Jeff: Mr. Jemmott was "discovered" by King Curtis, who was a close friend of Duane Allman. I've included another link above to a video of Gregg reheasring "I Can't Be Satisfied" with Scott Sharrard and the rest of his band.


Entered at Wed Jan 19 18:33:21 CET 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

PutEmUp--see them when you have a chance. I've seen them over the past 2 -3 years & this is a very tight band.Their time together has really contributed to their growth.Enjoy!


Entered at Wed Jan 19 18:11:11 CET 2011 from (12.51.52.166)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Bronx guy Jerry Jemmot been with Allman's band a few years now. He is one of the finest old time bass players still breathing, and is not a old guy. Just started real young. Floyd Mile is real blues singer, if I recall he is one of guys that taught Greg the blues. Potts did his time with Booker T & The MGs. Scotty Sharrad on guitar, will eb interestign to see. He 's a friend of Jays. ';ve seen Sharrad play several times with a drummer named Moses Patrou. In small bars ansd pizza places.Sharrad can play. He was very jazz oriented with Patrou, they were not playing jazz. May be very differeent in a band like Allman's, a good place to see what this guy can do. Clearly would not be with Allman if he shouldnlt be there. Would love to see this band of Allman's, missed a few opportunities.


Entered at Wed Jan 19 18:06:25 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Just Another Rider

Link above to video of Gregg Allman & his band performing "Just Another Rider" on David Letterman last Friday. Jay Collins is outstanding on sax. Check it out.


Entered at Wed Jan 19 18:02:28 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: covered with oil

WC: funny, someone mentions Mexico and Jimmy Buffett together, I think of "Tampico Trauma."

I don't know how it works out statistically, but the perception is certainly that south north america is getting to be a very risky destination. See [My link] -- and in related news, a 69 year old Penticton man just had his leg shattered by a bullet in a Mazatlan market - collateral damage . . . .


Entered at Wed Jan 19 17:32:14 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Westcoaster: You said No to an offer to stay with "happy, cheerful, polite people that do everything possible to please" so that you could come back to us here. Now that's loyalty!


Entered at Wed Jan 19 17:25:48 CET 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Gregg Allman/Levon/Leon

Been listening to Low Country Blues streaming on NPR for 2 weeks now & got the album too.This is Gregg's finest work since Laid Back & The Gregg Allman Tour albums from the early/mid seventies. T-Bone does an outstanding job with a very interesting mix of musicians. And,Gregg's voice kills on these old blues(& one he wrote with Warren Haynes). What struck me recently is how 3 active musicians,who disappeared from national attention have all been rediscovered in the last few years. Beginning with Levon & the huge success & attention(all merited) for the shows,the rambles,& of course,the Grammy winning albums,of which one of them--Dirtfarmer is a real "original".Then,the CBS morning show,late nite shows,& the whole media routine. Leon Russell was next--same routine as Levon--Elton & Leon chose T-Bone to produce,installed his band & off they went....again,as if Leon or Levon haven't been doing all sorts of musical stuff over the past many years. And,now Gregg--T-Bone,CBS morning show,Letterman,etc. While it's fulfilling on a certain level to see artists I've loved for over 40 years gain recognition for their work,particularly their respective recent recordings,there's a musical fascination as well. If you listen to the vibe,feel,sound & textures of Dirtfarmer,& then,Low Country Blues will sound like a musical brother of a different mother. Last night's Gregg Allman Album release party @ The Bowery was tremendous as Gregg's traveling band(Scott Sharrod,Floyd Miles,Steve Potts,Jerry Jermont,Jay Collins,& Bruce Katz) did a fine job on the songs from the album & were equally excellent on older songs as well. Enjoyable venue too!


Entered at Wed Jan 19 17:11:39 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Gregg Allman & Sundry music musings

David; Good to hear you got Gregg's new vinyl. I'll be interested to hear your thoughts on it further. While in Mexico, one evening while kicked back in our suite, I caught a resent interview with Gregg. It was really good. An hour I guess, with a lot of clips way back in the beginning with hin and Duane.

He walked down the hill where Duane took his fatal ride, explaining just what happened. It was comical how Gregg explained, all he wanted to be was a "dental mechanic". Duane talked him into joining the band. He said,"I'm only doin' this two years, and I'm going back to medical school, and gave a helluva laugh. It was an insightful interview, and I promised myself, first thing I'm going to do at home is order that new compilation.

Steve would have been proud of me. I didn't realize that where we were in Mexico is one of the beaches where the tortugas lay their eggs and hatch. Strolling along the beach, there is all these little guys trying to make it over the breakers and start a life. A couple of other old guys and I were taking them out, (it was very calm water) but they have difficulty getting over that little break on the beach. I had one in my hand and a lady came along and explained there is a place not far along where the conservation officers have rearing places where they give them a start. She said if you give him to me senor I will take him to them, I'm going that way. So I said goodbye to him, and put him in her hand.

At the resort we stayed at, every evening in the court yard by the bar, a trio of Mexican fellas set up and played. Guitar, bass & drums. The little guitar player, and he was a pretty damn good picker. They played "Hotel California" and he did a great job of those Don Felder & Joe Walsh licks.

They played, Margueritaville. I asked the guitar player if he knew any more Jimmy Buffet, he said no senor. I said can I show you a couple? He said Si! Senor. He had 3 Strats, a blue one, a red one & a blonde one. So I played A Pirate looks at 40 and Come Monday. They decided I should stay there with them. I convinced them they didn't need an old wreck like me around there.

All the Mexican people who staffed that place, waiters waitresses, bartenders, house keepers, grounds keepers are well groomed great looking people. They certainly know their hospitality business. They are happy , cheerful, polite people that do everything possible to please.


Entered at Wed Jan 19 16:50:23 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Low Country Blues

Peter: Mr. Allman's "Low Country Blues" was recorded at The Village Recorder in L.A., where Dylan recorded "Planet Waves" with The Band years ago. Robbie has also maintained an office/studio there. The album cut "My Love Is Your Love" is a Magic Sam song. Producer T Bone Burnett, an advocate of analog warmth and live in-the-room studio recording, has recreated the sound of that bygone era of records. Several times while listening to "Low Country Blues" last night I felt that "chill factor", not from the sharp coldness of digital sound, but rather from that warmth of excitement up & down the spine that you feel upon hearing recorded sound so life like that it seems to emanating from right before you in the listening room.


Entered at Wed Jan 19 16:21:25 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Speaking of Colin Linden, he and co-writer Paul Reddick (whose latest album Colin produced) won the songwriting award at the MapleBlues Awards on Monday evening. At the break, musician/friend Brian Blain gave me a copy of his brand-new CD, "New Country Blues", which comes in a very clever retro Fauxkways cover. I was listening to it on the way to work yesterday and turned the car off in the middle of Brian's song about Lenny Breau, "The Last Time I Saw Lenny". I was going to post something about the album, mostly to bring Steve's attention to it because Steve and Brian had some twice-removed connections and Steve had seen Brian's old Eastern Townships band, Oliver Klaus, play back circa '70. Of course yesterday's news derailed that plan. Leaving the office yesterday, very heavy of heart, I got into the car, turned on the key, and what should be the first sound out of the speakers but the following line:

"When he died we lost his presence."


Entered at Wed Jan 19 16:04:17 CET 2011 from (24.173.65.97)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Subject: Steve

My condolences to Marge. I woke up this morning rested, in an exceptionally good mood and happy to be flying home later today and had this nagging feeling something would bring me down. Having checked into the GB this morning I have discovered just what that would be.


Entered at Wed Jan 19 16:00:44 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Decemberists

Greg Allman's "My love Is Your love" is on The Word covermount disc this month. It's got a strong sense of "the room" which caught my attention, as did the fluid guitar.

But the one I'm listening to is The new Decemberists "The King Is Dead." They never quite made it for me before, just a tad too clever in places (though I didn't buy the last one, which I've just ordered as I hear it's their best). This new one though they really have got right. The melodies are as strong as the lyric concept (while sometimes in the past they seemed a little forced to the words). Great playing, great songs … and like The Duke & The King, the whole comes in at just the requisite 40 minutes. No padding.


Entered at Wed Jan 19 15:51:43 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Vinyl Siding: Low Country Blues

Picked up the Rounder 2-LP version of Gregg Allman's new release "Low Country Blues" produced by T Bone Burnett. It features covers of old blues/R&B gems and one new original song co-written by Mr. Allman with Warren Haynes entitled "Just Another Rider".

The core backing band includes Dr. John/Mac Rebennack on piano, Doyle Bramhall II on guitar (from Eric Clapton's band) and the rhythm section of Dennis Crouch on acoustic bass & Jay Bellerose on drums, who previously worked with Mr. Burnett on the "Raising Sand" project with Robert Plant & Alison Krauss. Friend of The Band Colin Linden plays dobro on three tracks, Skip James' "Devil Got My Woman", Muddy Waters' "Can't Be Satisfied" and "Rolling Stone". The latter is not the Muddy Waters tune, but rather another traditional blues song arranged by Allman/Burnett/Rebennack.

This is Mr. Allman's first solo release in 14 years and is an excellent showcase for his great talents as a vocalist, organist and rhythm guitarist. His performances of these classics, which he hand-picked from a large digital cache suggested by Mr. Burnett, prove that Mr. Allman remains one of the best contemporary bluesmen. His recent appearances on David Letterman & CBS Sunday Morning (with his own band featuring Amy Helm's husband Jay Collins on sax) show that he is back in fine form with a vengeance following his liver transplant last June.

Getting the vinyl version was a no-brainer for me, not only for the sound, but because it features two bonus cuts, Magic Sam's "Out of Bad Luck" and Lowell Fulson's "Reconsider Baby".


Entered at Wed Jan 19 14:27:01 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Me too … lump in the throat. I was doing my fruit for breakfast and thinking of how Steve could tell me why old-style apples go brown one day, and then the number of bullets per “kill” in Iraq another … almost his last post. Because I have the GB set as my home page, and because I’m Googling frequently to research stuff while working, I tend to see the posts not long after they appear. The morning is often me and Dlew (well, it’s his evening), then Steve was often the earliest North-American poster. I miss seeing Steve this week, and wondering (with a mild smile often) what reaction he’ll cause. It’s a terrible shock when someone goes so young and so suddenly, and my heart goes out to Marge and the children. I agree with what Lil said yesterday. Life is indeed short, and in the big picture we should realize we argue here … about the feud or whatever … because it’s interaction and we enjoy interacting. Behind every post there is a person and a family and we need to keep that in perspective. And thanks for that link, Norm.


Entered at Wed Jan 19 06:16:43 CET 2011 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: 'Gawd damn yuh...'

Now, in all seriousness, that put a lump in my throat.

One of the things with death (or funerals) is that you get to see people you haven't seen for ages. It's the wrong reason, but it's nice to see everyone.


Entered at Wed Jan 19 05:59:31 CET 2011 from (98.111.18.128)

Posted by:

Jaynie

Subject: Steve

I am so very sorry to hear of Steve's passing. I always enjoyed his stories about his family and his home so much. Even though I don't check in as much as I used to, it just won't be the same not seeing his name. He will be missed. My deepest condolences to Marge and his family.


Entered at Wed Jan 19 05:43:44 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: It's another Tuquilq Sunrise.........

That gawd damn farmer! Prooved one more time he was right. You got to live every day as hard as you can. On leaving only a week ago, and making a comment on how I was going to miss that farmer, how could you know it was going to be forever.

Steve and I shared family pictures. I have pictures of him and his family sking, the moonlight on his farm. Those pictures will remain there forever, they were going to anyway.

I was going to have something clever to say when I came home. Now the lump in my throat is in the way. Just as many, I didn't agree with everything Steve said. What in hell fun would that have been anyway. Steve could take it all, he was man enough.

I don't think it is inanppropriate for every one to share their favourite post that Steve put down. It is very easy for me. After I sent him my CD, he had it in his Walkman, and was singing along. He posted to me. "You and I were singing today. I'm getting better, you're not!" That was a good laugh for me.

Marge, our sympathies are sincere. It is hard for me to think of you and your wonderful children to adjust to carrying on without the man that put it all together. It is one year since I went thru' the same thing with my friend Bill who died, and left a loving family who have been my friends for over 40 years.

This link I have posted, is something that is heart warming to me, when thinking of my farming friends.

Good bye Steve.......gawd damn yuh. I hope you rest in comfort and know that you will be missed.......N/J


Entered at Wed Jan 19 04:25:50 CET 2011 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Web: My link

Subject: I know there's not a lot of electronic music enthusiasts here...

But you might like this creative use of iPad, Ipod, Moog, and Apple... Very garth-ish... sort of...


Entered at Wed Jan 19 04:55:52 CET 2011 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: Marge

I'm so glad you got back to us with a second (and third) post. I hope you choose to remain part of our community with an occasional update from the farm.

Steve and I couldn't be more far apart on some issues but we tended to come together on the important ones like family, music and hockey. I know that if we were neighbours we would have been good neighbours.

It's presumptous on my part to believe that I have anything to offer you but I do have some facility in financial matters. Advice, for what its worth, is yours for the asking. Remember, the only foolish question is the one unasked. jjennings@persona.ca.


Entered at Wed Jan 19 04:45:36 CET 2011 from (99.236.13.43)

Posted by:

Serenity

Location: Kitchener, Ontario CANADA
Web: My link

Subject: Steve

Dear Marg;-

There is no death! the stars go down

To rise upon some other shore,

And bright in Heaven's jeweled crown

They shine forever more.

Steve is one of these stars.

My deepest sympathies to you, Katie, Robert, Stephen and the families. May he RIP

LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxo


Entered at Wed Jan 19 04:21:14 CET 2011 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Hey Jeff:

Don't spend it all in the one shop... ;)


Entered at Wed Jan 19 04:12:36 CET 2011 from (12.51.52.166)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Just found out, class action lawsuit against XM for 5 million.


Entered at Wed Jan 19 03:50:45 CET 2011 from (12.51.52.166)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Okay. Mystery solved. They pay about 9/10 of a cent for the stream. Now they are also paying mechanical royalties, about 1.5 tenths of a cent for mechanical royalties per stream. And they re playing catch up.


Entered at Wed Jan 19 03:45:27 CET 2011 from (12.51.52.166)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Eureka!

I have a steady stream of income from Rhapsody. I can generally count on payments accumulating a solid 10 to twenty cents every month or two. They pay like 9 tenths of a cent per stream. I don 't know what the hell happened, but in the last 6 weeks I've received about two bucks in rhapsody payments. I feel like i struck gold and made the charts!


Entered at Wed Jan 19 01:12:28 CET 2011 from (76.66.126.247)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Hi Marge. Steve and I had our love of reggae music on this site. He was also the only one I could call Comrade because of our mutual pinko politics. I'll really miss all the times he shared about all of you having family reunions on the farm. I always wanted to know more....

Like others here....I was so shocked and stunned....and have been feeling sad all day as a lot of us here are of a certain vintage.....and.....I'm so very sorry. I know his light will continue to shine on you and your family.

Loving-kindness meditation

May I be safe from harm
May I find peace and ease
May I feel strength in my body as it is
May I take care of myself with joy

Naomi Shihab Nye, Words Under the Words, Eighth Mountain Press, 1995


Entered at Wed Jan 19 00:36:17 CET 2011 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Marge: please accept my deepest condolences for your loss.


Entered at Wed Jan 19 00:26:44 CET 2011 from (184.151.127.158)

Posted by:

Marge

Oh yeah, one more thing to add: He was a hell of a great hockey player!!


Entered at Wed Jan 19 00:14:12 CET 2011 from (184.151.127.158)

Posted by:

Marge

Subject: For Norbert: Steve

Thank you all for your kind words. I hesitated to post the news, but I thought that some of you would want to know. Steve was my soul-mate, and I will never be the same without him in my life. He could always make me laugh,and always make me think. Your descriptions of him and your reactions to him match mine in so many ways. He loved life and filled the room when he entered. He died of a heart attack at around 6:15 am. There was no warning and nothing out of the ordinary in the days preceding. His passing has left a huge void in all our lives. I have realized with his passing that he touched almost everyone with whom he came into contact. The world is a lesser place without him. Thank you again for your expressions of sympathy, as it somehow helps to ease the pain. Best regards to you all, Marge


Entered at Wed Jan 19 00:05:22 CET 2011 from (12.51.52.166)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Marge, you, better than anyone, know how unique your husband was. He was a good cohort here, and in his own way, the life of the party. Like Norbert says, i had the feeling that a real life neighbor or friend could count on steve if the chips were down. My deepest condolences to you & your family. Todd, same here. Last night I was thinking he must be visiting family, etc


Entered at Tue Jan 18 23:42:40 CET 2011 from (24.108.12.129)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: STEVE

I cried to-day. Not really sure why. So I spent a few hours going through Steve's old posts. And through the tears he made me laugh long and hard. Rest in peace man...


Entered at Tue Jan 18 23:02:22 CET 2011 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Steve...

What a terrible shock. I always enjoyed his posts. My deepest condolences to Marge and their family. I will miss him.


Entered at Tue Jan 18 22:59:45 CET 2011 from (166.216.162.95)

Posted by:

Deb

Subject: Steve

Marge, I'm shocked and saddened to hear of Steve's passing. He was one of my favorite people here. He was always up for a debate and I always enjoyed the pleasure he took in exchanging opinions. I will miss Steve on these pages. My deepest sympathy to you and all the family.


Entered at Tue Jan 18 22:57:56 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: playing "Let's Frolic Again"

Dunc: Good idea; now I am too.


Entered at Tue Jan 18 22:49:27 CET 2011 from (70.26.122.47)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

My condolences to Steve's family for their loss. I'm gonna miss the Comma King. Tugboat Guy probably will miss him even more. One thing about Steve, he stood his ground despite the heat from his critics, usually shots fired across the border. Not bad for a Lennoxville farmboy. Too soon gone.


Entered at Tue Jan 18 22:43:24 CET 2011 from (217.42.25.251)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Bill M

I always remember Steve correcting me when I misquoted that great line when I said 'Down at the Henry Moore'

Steve's legacy for me, as well as remembering his posts,is a love of BARK.

Your and Steve's enthusiasm with Garth's involvement and reading how the guys liked John Martyn took me into what will be a lifelong commitment to BARK.

So I'm playing one of his favourite albums, 'Let's Frolic Again' just now.


Entered at Tue Jan 18 22:05:26 CET 2011 from (217.42.25.251)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Marge

So sorry to hear the news, Marge. I really enjoyed Steve's posts.

Always wanted to visit you.


Entered at Tue Jan 18 21:29:43 CET 2011 from (67.4.181.240)

Posted by:

Jerry

Subject: Steve

Marge...I'm mostly just an observer and never really talked to Steve even in here. Steve was one of a few posters that I always made sure to read. I liked the fact that he said what was on his mind and didn't care if it was popular or not. His back and forth with a few of the others in here were always a highlight for me. His love for The Band and his general knowledge will be missed...My condolences to you and your family...


Entered at Tue Jan 18 21:30:38 CET 2011 from (91.42.246.201)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: Germany

Subject: Steve

Steve I’m shocked to hear this, my deepest sympathy to Marge and family.

I’m saddened ,would like to know what happened, to give it a place. I didn’t know he was a hockey player and just learned he was only 56 (I’ll turn 53 next month).

I think Steve was one of the best writers here, a fast, almost hyper and smart guy, with a great sense of humor. Of course I often didn’t agree with him and it took me a few years to see through his provokive way of writing, to understand it. Once that done I could see, as Marge already said, behind the bits and bites stood a great character. Steve has had a ”jousting” with almost all of us and although I never met him in person, I know that, in need, he would be your brothers keeper. Sometimes you just feel those things, he was a good guy.

Thanks for the good times, I'll never forget you and I’m verry sorry to not have known you better Steve. R.I.P. brother.


Entered at Tue Jan 18 21:25:49 CET 2011 from (70.50.64.34)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Marge

We are just names on a screen and yet in some ways we get to know the names and look forward to their take on life…….........Loved that goofy hat in the picture Marge and shall miss his tales of life on the farm and those parties that he used to plan with the family…….I remember that joke years ago ( now dated ) about Bob Marley arriving in Heaven and asking John Lennon what it was like……..Lennon replied “Well. all in all…..not that bad………but Bobby Sands arrived a few weeks ago and he’s been eating all the available food since!”……………..Here’s hoping that Heaven has a shortage of right-wingers or things are about to get heated!................................Marge: .My deepest sympathies to you and the family………….I shall play some Bruce Cockburn tonight and think of that radical, provocative, often frustrating but always honest old man of yours……….


Entered at Tue Jan 18 21:15:11 CET 2011 from (69.182.87.6)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Steve

I’m stunned and saddened to hear the news about Steve’s passing. I was thinking about him last night as I realized that I hadn’t seen a post from him lately.

Marge, thank you for letting us know. My deepest condolences to you and your family. Steve and I had many debates about things like politics and religion over the years, and I always knew I could get a different perspective on things from him. One thing we always seemed to agree on was The Band, and I’ll miss the enthusiasm and humor he always seemed to have plenty of. He will be missed.


Entered at Tue Jan 18 21:03:34 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Water, my favourite!!

Marge: Deepest condolences on your loss. I already feel the loss of Steve's laughter, which I could almost always hear behind his posts - even the political pot-stirring ones. He really was a treasure here at the GB, and will truly be missed.


Entered at Tue Jan 18 20:39:26 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Marge

Marge, I am so sorry. Steve was a very central part of this Guestbook, from his farming tips, music, opinions, etc. down to his Salsa recipe, he shared a great deal with us. I never met Steve, but like many others here I feel like I knew him. Sometimes I think that this Guestbook is kind of like having penpals around the world. I will miss Steve. My deepest condolences to you and your family.


Entered at Tue Jan 18 19:57:08 CET 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: NY

Subject: Pump

MARGE- Deepest sympathy to you and your family.


Entered at Tue Jan 18 19:32:03 CET 2011 from (75.224.38.133)

Posted by:

Claire

Subject: Steve

Marge, I am so sorry for your loss. We will miss Steve too. I was always amazed at how active he was, physically and intellectually, and at his instant recall of things we wrote, some of which we could barely remember ourselves. He seemed to live and enjoy life at its fullest. You and your family have my deepest sympathy.


Entered at Tue Jan 18 19:32:23 CET 2011 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

See link. Steve scores hat trick against Brown U.


Entered at Tue Jan 18 18:50:54 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

I'm saddened to hear the news of Steve's passing. My condolences to you Marge & your family. I did my share of jousting with Steve, but came to realize it was just his way of provoking lively discussion on a wide variety of topics that interested him.

"The old neighborhood just ain't the same."


Entered at Tue Jan 18 18:36:16 CET 2011 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Marge, I'm so sorry. My heart goes out to you and your family. Steve was an old friend of this place and he will be missed.


Entered at Tue Jan 18 18:27:01 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Marge, I am simply stunned and so deeply sorry for your loss. I will miss Steve very much. We never met and never spoke, but after years of debate here, I really felt I knew him. I always looked forward to seeing his radical view on things. And I’ve very often quoted him in conversation too.

Jersey Girl said it all so much better than I can. My thoughts are with you and your family.


Entered at Tue Jan 18 18:20:00 CET 2011 from (67.158.178.219)

Posted by:

Lil

Thank you Sadavid, for the link to Steve's obituary. I didn't know him, I didn't know much about his thoughts or opinions here, and still I feel a sense of loss since the common bond was surely a love of The Band and the music. It's so easy at times to think of people here as simply names on a computer screen and even easier at times to dismiss the fact that they are real people with families and people who love them. Something like this just really brings that point home. I don't even know why I'm posting this, except that I guess I've learned that the arguing, bickering, name-calling.. both past and present.. are all so inconsequential in the big picture. I am not a regular poster here anymore and I have no plans to become one again, although I do feel the need to say thank you to everyone I've met through this site over the years and for so many wonderful friendships that will always mean a lot to me. And along those same lines, I'd also like to apologize to those here who I've had words with in the past. Life is short. I wish you all happiness.


Entered at Tue Jan 18 18:12:40 CET 2011 from (67.85.169.75)

Posted by:

Jersey Girl

Subject: Steve

Please accept my most sincere condolences, Marge. Steve was a very central figure in this place, and I'm sure his frequent posts expressing his broad knowledge of subjects musical and pastoral, and his deeply held philosophical and political beliefs, will be missed. He never missed an opportunity for a good argument, but always seemed to engage in the debate with good humor and a wink. He often spoke of you and his whole family with great love and pride. He will be remembered well.


Entered at Tue Jan 18 17:55:12 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: RIP

A sad, sad day.


Entered at Tue Jan 18 17:52:34 CET 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Oh my goodness.., i know we didn't see eye to eye but you never want to hear something like this. My prayers and thoughts of comfort and strength are with you.


Entered at Tue Jan 18 17:38:15 CET 2011 from (70.28.32.74)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

Very sorry to hear of your loss Marge.


Entered at Tue Jan 18 17:30:42 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Marge, I am very sorry for your loss. I wish you and your family strength.


Entered at Tue Jan 18 17:23:52 CET 2011 from (68.164.5.137)

Posted by:

Pat B

Marge, I'd like to wish you my sincerest condolences.


Entered at Tue Jan 18 17:16:28 CET 2011 from (67.158.178.219)

Posted by:

Lil

Wow.. I haven't been here in awhile and just decided to check in since roads are coated with ice here and I'm stuck inside. Saw your post Marge. Sincere condolences on the loss of your husband. I lost mine suddenly 15 years ago, so I know what you're feeling. I wish you strength.


Entered at Tue Jan 18 16:56:37 CET 2011 from (184.151.127.158)

Posted by:

Marge

Subject: Steve

I am posting simply to let you know that Steve will no longer be posting; he passed away suddenly last week. He always enjoyed the jousting and never meant anyone any harm. He recently mentioned that he had learned a lot from his participation. I will miss his laughter and his love immensely.


Entered at Tue Jan 18 16:44:50 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P.

Subject: Why not Wang Dang Doodle (all night long)

Howlin' Wolf's "Smokestack Lightning" is currently featured in a Viagra commercial. When I first heard it I couldn't help but wonder why they didn't choose his version of "Wang Dang Doodle" instead? I guess they didn't want to encourage one of those four-hour mishaps. :-):-)


Entered at Tue Jan 18 16:38:27 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The Sound of Dollars

Several years ago the music of the late Nick Drake was resurected from near obscurity into the limelight when his song "Pink Moon" was used in a Volkswagen commercial. Around that same time the music of Louis Prima (with his band including Keely Smith, Sam Butera and The Witnesses) was introduced to a new generation of listeners when the song "Jump, Jive and Wail" was used in a Gap commercial and covered by the Brian Setzer Orchestra.

More recently, a snippet of Simon & Garfunkel's "The Only Living Boy in New York" is being used in a Honda Accord commercial. Those not that familiar with the song may have a hard time indentifying it though, as only S&G's brief multi-tracked echo chamber chorus part singing the "ahh-ahh-ahhs...here I am" is used.


Entered at Tue Jan 18 16:28:42 CET 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

I think you may off there Jeff on the output. If you look at material written, RR is light years ahead post LW. The post LW Band, I don't think wrote enough material on their own to fill one cd (take away co-writing with outside members and you might not be able to fill a side of an LP). Even their solo stuff (aside from Ricks first) was light on original material. The guys were collaborators, arrangers and great players - not meaning to sell any of it short.


Entered at Tue Jan 18 16:14:12 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: cellular is sweeter

Peter V: and then there's "Green Onions" (credited to Jones / Cropper / Steinberg / Jackson Jr., according to W'pedia) -- which now graces our airwaves (in a graceless, breathless, high-speed version) as the soundtrack to an incontinent-adult-undergarment TV advertisement. Oy.


Entered at Tue Jan 18 16:05:35 CET 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: The Feud

Who really cares about a feud we really know little about beyond public statements that reveal partial truths. Perhaps,best to focus on the great music they gave us,the wonderful rambles Levon does,the excellent work of Garth's new album,& the upcoming album by J. Robbie. Having seen The Band many times,& recently attending a few rambles,it's a joy to know the music still lives despite silly GB postings.


Entered at Tue Jan 18 15:58:29 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Call Me The Breeze

One upside of being a songwriter is that you hold a permanent lottery ticket. Last night I was watching yet again the Citroen advert with J.J. Cale's "Call Me The Breeze." Then a few years back, Vashti Bunyan was wrenched from obscurity when her "Diamond Day" was rediscovered and used in an advert. Or Ernie K-Doe when "Here Come The Girls" was used by Boots pharmacy ads. It came from Soul Jazz's "New Orleans Funk" 2 CD compilation set which charted here. "Here Come The Girls" was so popular that they re-sequenced the albums moving it from CD2, second from last track to CD1 first track. OK, in many cases the rights will have been signed away decades ago, but new CDs come out and interest is revived.


Entered at Tue Jan 18 15:44:39 CET 2011 from (12.51.52.166)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Todd, to take what you said and just frame it differently. The Band members approached the songs as they were their songs. Now honestly, that is what a paid session player should do. Take every ounce of creative juice, every molecular bit of genius in his her cells and put it into the parts they create ( if in fact that is what the session calls for), and that does happen in sessiobns and jn recording. But what happened int he case of The Band songs is different.Not a session, they grew the songs. And They were not paid session players. They were members of a band that had lived together as equals and partners for 8 years before they even became The Band. Again, running out of time, so I'll try to say what I want to, may fall short. Yes, like you say, what The Band accomplished in their songwriting was beyond the norm. It was/is the greatest of the great. It is beyond compare.Now I personally, don't feel band members that are not getting paid as arrangers for their time should be expected to put in the amount of time, effort, musicality , and genius, into another band membwrs song, without giving them some kind of songwriting, or paying them. The old fairness factor. I believe that Sebastian has claimed in these pages that RR split the publishing portion (that did not go to the publisher)equally among all 5 band members. I could be wrong.even so, that is still different. But, there is more to this story than just songwriting credits. It's the manner in which RR has attmepted to hog the credit for The Band's songwriting and for The Band's success. It's the manner in which he often has portrayed the band, as he and 4 guys, often even as 4 guys that he directed etc etc etc.(Not enough time to be more properly descriptive). Then there is the way he has tried to hog Band publicity/headlines since. That would be very irksome to men like Rick, Richard, Levon & Garth.Especially since they were all equals and all indispensable to the music. I tihnk that is a big part of this, and, that was a huge affront to the other Band members.Wanting out, well, wanting out is fine. But it is different from saying, me, me,me,me hey look at me, it was me, it was me, me , me, me. Just listen to Rrs outoput since, you know, it wasn't, me, me me, me, me, me, me. Listen to the others output since. What does it all speak to?... it was them, them, them, them them.

This getting to be time consuming again. Would some body please ban me? I mean really, Angelina should be able to keep passive /aggressively pushing The Feud envelope as long as she wants to, as many times as she wants to, without anyone calling her on it, all these years. So comparing her to Peter's dog may not have seemed flattering to some, but considering how I feel about dogs, I placed Angelina in some very high company.Not every dog is that persistent or focused. Some just like to run and play in the sun and snow without working so hard. And there were no overtones, it's not like I asked her to bark, or anything like that. But I do think that if somneone is going to repeatedly push the envelope to The Feud, it should be noted and appreciated for what it is.


Entered at Tue Jan 18 10:38:43 CET 2011 from (41.97.209.79)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: Jeopardy Answer

solution in the link. i forgot that Steve is not here these days


Entered at Tue Jan 18 10:36:42 CET 2011 from (41.97.209.79)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: last day i crossed Chuck

Question 1 (not jeopardy) : at the end of the take of Yazoo Street Scandal (Music From Big Pink, 2000 Digital Remaster) – Levon talks something. What is exactly the phrase he says, and what's its religious dimension ?

-------------

About one month ago, I was waiting late in the evening in the central bus station of Constantine, called Station Mohamed Khemisti. In this deserted foggy atmosphere suddenly everything was illuminated by the diffuse enlightenment coming from the front-panel of a bus "Ligne 8 : Aeroport Boudiaf – Station Khemisti". It was not the line I was waiting for, and a trite signaling panel in definitive. For the Band Connection, the very expensive ecologic busses of the municipal company are made in Finland (yes VanHool but made in Finland, the market of the century Ilkka). Of course, the yellowish letters from the bus panel dominate everything in the nocturne landscape. and… Geez! It has been long that I forgot the fate association in the between. I got the chills !, it was a really strange moment, meditating how evocative a single bus panel could be, strongly regretting there was nobody to share my feeling and to understand,… it's all about fellings. and the mute voice of Chuck Berry started annoying my mind from the inside, a looping tape in my head

"Maybe someday your name gonna be in light"

Never the line from Johnny B Good sounded as substantial, turned this meaning, remaining late in the evening "Maybe someday your name will be in light….your name will be in light….your name will be in light….your name will be in light….

Question 2 : (Jeopardy, – google allowed) What do Mohamed Boudiaf (International Airport) and Mohamed Khemisti (Central Bus Station) have in common, apart their first name


Entered at Tue Jan 18 07:12:00 CET 2011 from (76.99.245.65)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: The Turtle Pond

Subject: snow tires

So far I'm good on good radial winter tires. But the music has been great. Ok all around.


Entered at Tue Jan 18 07:03:40 CET 2011 from (69.182.87.6)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Thanks Peter M.
Did you ever get snow tires? We're supposed to get some nasty weather tomorrow. Snow and ice...at least here in CT.


Entered at Tue Jan 18 06:57:03 CET 2011 from (76.99.245.65)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: by the pond

Subject: Todd

As we say in zydeco, "yeah you right!"


Entered at Tue Jan 18 06:46:23 CET 2011 from (69.182.87.6)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: The Circular Magic of The Band

Yikes, I guess I should have put my parting words, in my previous post from this morning of “play nice” in all caps or something. I hereby resign from my hall monitor duties.

It would be nice if we could discuss the creative process of The Band without it inevitably turning into a feud discussion. Years ago I engaged in some enthusiastic back and forth on the subject, but at some point I realized that it was a waste of time and only led to hard feelings. But it’s understandable that it will crop up from time to time.

That said, I’d like to explain where my real and genuine interest....and wonder, in the subject of the Band’s creative process is. I understand the conventional process of songwriting / arranging / performance. There is a process that may vary from group to group, although it’s typically a linear process.

But there’s something unique about the music of The Band that keeps me returning to it, time and time again, and places it head and shoulders above what any of their contemporaries were doing. (When I say music, I’m not specifically referring to the lyric, or the chords, or the vocals or a solo. I’m using “music” to refer to the entire work….the art….the finished piece…..the thing that’s on the wall in a frame, but not to any one specific element.) When music really works, it works as a unified whole. When the Band was operating together as a well oiled machine, the music they made together was untouchable.

Once we dig deeper beyond the basic mechanics of songwriting/ arranging/ performance, the fascination for me is the mysterious alchemy of the process. That fine line where something crosses over from good art to great art. For me, it’s where the magic is in the creative process, and I wish I knew a little more about that part of The Band’s process. I feel like we got a glimpse of some of the process in the classic albums DVD of ‘The Band’ album, but it was only a glimpse. I suspect that the members of the Band probably can’t even completely describe it, but I'd bet that it happened more often when they were all in the room together at the same time. Raw talent and intuition are the most likely explanations. Garth referred to it as “thinking of something silly to put in” but I think it’s pretty obvious there’s more to it than that. And he’s probably the person who has the best chance of explaining it. My guess is at it's best, it became more of a circular process rather than linear. And I happen to like circles.

Whether or not that key component of the creative process…..that very thin line between success and failure, can be distilled and explained (let alone credited) is the elusive part. But I think that whether The Band knew or not, exactly how that happened doesn’t really matter. But I bet they all recognized it the moment that it did. And the fact that they were able to capture it from time to time it what I’m thankful for.


Entered at Tue Jan 18 06:43:59 CET 2011 from (12.51.52.166)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Just my opinion

Personally, I think Peter should ban me :-)

Peter, that was in good fun. Don't let these instigators get you riled up.


Entered at Tue Jan 18 06:30:58 CET 2011 from (76.99.245.65)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: by the frozen turtle pond

Subject: ladies...

Hey, BEG, ladies, (in fact ALL the ladies listed so kindly by dlew), Pat B, Lars, Peter V, Garth and especially Maud (who put it so eloquently), FTF! The last F is "feud". As Pete Rose said, "Leave it rest, Caroline!".


Entered at Tue Jan 18 05:44:44 CET 2011 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Always a pleasrue to see al the ladies here.

Joan, BEG, Jersey Girl, Serenity, Julie, Deb, Carol, Carmen, Diamond Lil, and those I've undoubtedly missed... If I ever seem to be utilising misdirected anger (I don't htink I do, but what seems to be well-reasoned comment from one end of the monitor can be hate mail from the other) please smack me down...


Entered at Tue Jan 18 05:25:31 CET 2011 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

BEG, the email wasn't from me. But send me one and I'll respond.

Hey, Jersey Girl. And Joan.


Entered at Tue Jan 18 05:22:34 CET 2011 from (24.108.12.129)

Posted by:

BONK

Location: Salt Spring Island (by way of cabbagetown)

Subject: BEG and Jersey Girl.

Hey BEG. Lost your e-mail a while ago with a fried hard drive. Coming to TO in June and would love to chat. It's been a long time since I was in the Hood! HaHa. My e-mail is carlgraham@mac.com So sorry that I missed Levon at Massey Hall. Jersey Girl. Never had the honor to talk to you but I hear what you're saying. The GB can go along for a long time and everything is just so cool and then some wanker stirs the pot. Sad! Real sad. Respect...


Entered at Tue Jan 18 04:05:39 CET 2011 from (67.85.169.75)

Posted by:

Jersey Girl

Subject: BEG

And every so often someone asks why there are so few women posters here. Yes, BEG, it happens -- always the same way and always from the same person. I'm not the Dankette you mention, but I essentially stopped posting years ago because of the same kind of disgusting and misogynistic insults from the same quarter. I return today only to express my support and admiration for you. You're a strong and centered person, and your posts are always genuine and positive. I'm sure I'm not the only one who hopes you won't be driven off by a serial bully.


Entered at Tue Jan 18 03:31:33 CET 2011 from (76.68.80.63)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Sorry! Maybe it was at C'est What instead of Jeff Healey's.....BTW, has anyone heard her cover of Robbie's "Shine Your Light"?!

NB! If I post again please email to tell me to get back to my reports.....please!!

:-D


Entered at Tue Jan 18 03:22:49 CET 2011 from (76.68.80.63)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

I just finished reading the part about The Band In _Whispering Pines_ (Thanks Bill M) and I came across Robbie mentioning GETTING OFF THE BUS once again....Not too much new here but thought I'd take the time to post it anyway before I have to really work at my report cards....Remember those NG?

"Everything proceeded more or less as planned until early September when, during a day off in Texas, Manuel injured his neck in a boating accident, forcing the cancellation of ten shows. It was during this layoff that Robertson had an epiphany.

"It is heartbreaking to see people you care about abusing themselves", he said. "I'm no saint, but I could never take it to the degree that other people could. It's just that our ideals and philosophies strayed. I just became more productive. And, eventually, I saw there was nothing I could really do about it, or wanted to. You don't want to run someone's life - these were my friends, my brothers. The best thing you can do is to walk away.

So I told everybody I wasn't interested in going on the road anymore. I'M OFF THE BUS. (my emphasis) I told them I was sick of [staying at] Howard Johnson's in the middle of nowhere, that I had nothing to learn anymore. And everyone said, 'Me too, me too.' Everyone really felt that way too. But we weren't breaking up, we said we'd still record, we'd write, we'd do projects. It's only later on that I think it sunk in. Everyone said, 'Well gee, does this mean that we'll never, ever do this again?' So I said, 'Yes, yes, THIS is what we've been talking about."

Thanks to the gentlemen on this board....who realize if you get triggered by someone's post.....It is your responsibility to deal with it in an appropriate manner instead of exhibiting misplaced anger. It happens.....Another female poster was also bullied many times until she left.....a Dankette.....Robbiesonians aren't tougher....We just bat our very dark eyes like Robbie....and mooooove on. LOL

At one of Garth's shows at former Jeff Healey's Club.....while I was sitting by Maud, the FFFFFF came up....her diplomatic response was....."We love everybody. We don't get involved."


Entered at Tue Jan 18 03:02:37 CET 2011 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

Garth in 1985 about life on the road: We (The Band reunited) won't play much; it's time for everybody to work on their own enterprise. The road's okay. I had a considerable pianotechnique built up; I was out to kill. But when I got on the road, I lost it. On the road, you don't practice. So naturally we think, well, maybe there's some little keyboard you can take into the motel room, and there is. I found that - a new keyboard - and also maybe there's something just to keep in touch with the composition end of it like a recording device or a composing device that can be carried around and that's very light, so that you can do the two types of work rather than just playing and sitting around in a chair watching television the rest of the time. It's a route to deterioration if you don't do that other kind of workPr


Entered at Tue Jan 18 02:48:41 CET 2011 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

Maud on the fued: Will Garth, Robbie and Levon be getting back together to either tour or record new songs for the boxed set? "No," Maud replied. However, she said that rumours of feuding between Robbie and the others are old news and were greatly exaggerated. Their work together on the boxed set is proof of that, she suggested.

Jeff, your inference was obvious. Perhaps you're trying to take elusiveness to a new level. Otherwise, I have no idea what you are trying to say. Did Garth speak in code%Pr


Entered at Tue Jan 18 02:32:06 CET 2011 from (12.51.52.166)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Pat, I made three very short comments. Not once did I state anything specific Garth said. Not once did I say Garth contradicted himself. You insist that I am inferring that he made comments or statements that contradicted statement he has made prior. Not so. I believe what i was told, and I know that Garth is one of the more actively verbally adept and elusive conversationalists / orators who can say exactly what he wishes in either specific terms or general terms that might be specific to a circumstance, and some people will understand, and some won't. But those who the message was for, will get the message.


Entered at Tue Jan 18 02:14:22 CET 2011 from (12.51.52.166)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Kevin, you are entitled to your opinion. I'm entitled to mine. My opinion is that you know naught of what you speak. But that's okay. And if anyone tells you to mind your own business, I'll tell them to leave the young feller alone. he's just learning, wet behind the ears, easily fooled by a woman batting her eyes at him, etc etc.


Entered at Mon Jan 17 23:59:46 CET 2011 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Web: My link

Subject: Publishing, et cetera

Came across this article with some interesting information (and links) to publishing music...


Entered at Mon Jan 17 23:20:05 CET 2011 from (68.164.5.137)

Posted by:

Pat B

Kevin J, I just noted your post and looked back at Jeff's. You are correct.


Entered at Mon Jan 17 23:17:14 CET 2011 from (68.164.5.137)

Posted by:

Pat B

Jeff, in response to RR's take on the songwriting issue, you said Garth would be the best source on the subject. All I did was quote Garth on the subject.

As far as anything else, I've never come close to revealing what was said in obviously private conversations about these matters. I don't see what that has to do with an account of a speech Garth made where he supposedly contradicted himself on the subject. I also can't see how such a speech wouldn't have made a rather large splash, given the coverage RR's daughter got for weighing in on the fued publicly at the exact same time. It's a fact that a number of nationally known rock writers would love to "expose" RR.

Jeff, I've always liked you and appreciate your POV. None of this is skin off my nose and it shouldn't be anyone else's skin except for the principals.


Entered at Mon Jan 17 23:16:35 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Jeff, I'm sure we agree that at end of day, the guys (suits, if you will) who own Purple Records (or Bearsville Records, or whatever) end up with the lion's share of the proceeds, leaving the creative people to squabble over a very small proportion.

The Fued is the great unresolvable.


Entered at Mon Jan 17 22:51:46 CET 2011 from (174.89.119.104)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Jeff…I don’t usually intervene in fueds…..but that opening line in your most recent post is way out of line and if directed at who I think it is grossly unfair and uncalled for……..come on man – no need to get nasty here……


Entered at Mon Jan 17 22:42:50 CET 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

I'm back out the door to work in a second. Don't know if it is how The Gb fucntions these days, or the very slow connection where I'm staying is to blame, but I don't see my posts till hours or half a day after I've made them sometimes. So, some ofyou may have already responded to my last,and I'm unaware. But, what i want to say is that in spite of past uncivilities between us, I've recently enjoyed having pleasant internet conversation with both of you, Peter & Pat, again. Until this last breakout. I'd like to think that we have more to offer each other as people than the upleasantness that The Fued causes.


Entered at Mon Jan 17 22:38:43 CET 2011 from (174.89.119.104)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: GB Party

And the fun we could have if we all did assemble in Toronto for some visits to the old Band haunts ( quite a tour actually )………….after everyone was good and hammered……….I could sneak down to Atlanta and nick David P’s record collection……………………………Just kidding David…..but do remember me in your Will in about 40 years’ time……………………


Entered at Mon Jan 17 22:19:46 CET 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Peter, it would have been far more accurate for you to properly credit the dog/poster who has recently kept returning us to The Feud , as in a bitch returns to her own vomit.

And no, your recent example on copyright is not applicable, but a switcheroo of subject line. You wrote to the effect that the definition of songwriting is lyric and basic melody, or you wrote something very close to that. That is what I addressed. I disagree,that does not have to be the only definition of songwriting.Perfect example, what about a song that has no lyrics, and the writer plays all the instruments, or indicates what the instrumentalists should play? what about a lyricist who wrote basic melodies who assembles a team of sympathetic musicians who wish to create their own parts ( under his or her direction) in return for songwriting credit as opposed to session fees?( In today's music ecomony it is difficult for a musician to accept that, but wise for the initial songwriter or band member. now you have that many more connections or reasons for a song to be successful, that many more interested parties. I did not bring up The Feud, and i'm not going into what was or wasn't expected then, or what was proper to the situation and why). If the guy or gal who heard the basic melody , and groove, and wrote the lyrics wants to give them songwriting, then that is the defintion of songwriting in that instance. It is often a legal agreement that is flexible, in relation to a musical agreement..

Pat, I find it odd that by inferring that Garth would be duplicitous if what I wrote about his Grammy speech had factual footing, you attempt to deny me the right to respect people's privacy that you are so quick to grant yourself in your attmept to be correct on the subject.. i don't feel the need to be considered correct. You can consider me as wrong as you like. I also don't feel the need to elaborate further on who my source was. But again, consider that as a Modern Day friend of The Hudsons, if I was not comfortable writing what I have written, I would not have written it.

I'm done with the subject. Carry on as you wish.


Entered at Mon Jan 17 21:48:45 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Dunc: And then we could all repair to the Silver Dollar to drink the night away. In the '70s it was the place to go for those looking for a bottle fight - so'd be a perfect venue for the GB.


Entered at Mon Jan 17 21:30:53 CET 2011 from (217.42.25.251)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: I like everybody

I like everybody and I wish we could all meet at a Korean restaurant after a trip to the hugest CD shop I have seen at the Annexe. Just near Robbie's old house at Bathurst and Bloor.


Entered at Mon Jan 17 20:49:51 CET 2011 from (142.22.16.53)

Posted by:

NB

Subject: Bob Whygo There?

Can't we just pretend we all like each other ? NB


Entered at Mon Jan 17 20:48:49 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Bub, we'll bow to your expertise on your OCD community, Tell us more.


Entered at Mon Jan 17 20:41:28 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Anyone here ever hear of a band called "The Duke and the King"? Apparently they are HUGE in the OCD community.


Entered at Mon Jan 17 20:05:15 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Dunc: Your presence woulda been a gas - unless of course you insisted on re-enacting the entire set of lyrics! Obesity is a big issue here but I don't recall seeing any particularly heavy young women. Lotsa chunky old guys, which is to be expected at blues shows. And nobody sat on my knee, then or afterwards. The evening out ended up fishlessly, with bibimbap at a Korean restaurant a bit farther down Spadina, so yes, Kensington Market (or the fringes thereof).


Entered at Mon Jan 17 19:50:40 CET 2011 from (217.42.25.251)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: At the Silver Dollar

Did you see the 'fat girl' Bill M? I wish I had been with you.

Maybe she'd gone down by the Henry Moore?

How did you finish your day? Fish for tea from Kensington Market?


Entered at Mon Jan 17 19:36:42 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V and Kevin J: And then there's the most excellent Rheostatics' song, "Jesus was once a teenager too":

Jesus was once a teenager too
Though he could walk on the water
He could not face the laughter
'Cause the tools of his trade
Were the size of his feet.


Entered at Mon Jan 17 19:07:27 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I can't guess, Joan … or rather I shouldn't, but I suspect it may have a little on the "road" being "a goddamn hard way of life that took some of the very best". Perhaps a soulful name check here. I will be amazed if too much is revealed … though a verse on waiting an entire day at the studio and no one else turning up is possible. He recounts that with some emotion on the video.

Favourite recent name check is (guess) The Duke & The King from "Water Spider."

Jesus walked on the water …

But so did Marvin Gaye.


Entered at Mon Jan 17 18:43:06 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: What lies beneath

I don't know what is the basis of "the feud" and I venture to guess I never will. Still, I'm very much interested in the song that is supposed to be about The Band breakup on Robbie's new CD (I think its called This is Where I Get Off) and what it may it may not "say".

Lars, Nice memories ,


Entered at Mon Jan 17 18:33:20 CET 2011 from (174.89.119.104)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: He must be the Mesiah .....Only the Mesiah would deny being the Mesiah



Entered at Mon Jan 17 18:25:37 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Yes, Jeff … "copyright", but we're only interested in the creative songwriting part of that, rather than what publishing companies had. Last week I quoted the guy from Tony Curtiss & The Tremors / Curtiss Muldoon. He and Muldoon wrote the song that Madonna altered and got 15% of the take. He says Purple Records (Deep Purple's label) had 30% and Madonna the rest. So Purple Records are the people who extrapolate to your example. They were manager, agent, music publisher and record label.

On The Duke & The King, I ran into a record dealer friend this afternoon who immediately asked me if I'd seen them … he had twice. He said the instrument swapping and vocal swapping was constant, and like me, he said "best new band for years." So persevere. A lot of the YouTube stuff is very stripped down … the latest album in particular is much more elaborate.


Entered at Mon Jan 17 17:42:44 CET 2011 from (68.164.5.137)

Posted by:

Pat B

Bill M, as usual very astute.

Since I have some time this morning, I went looking for Garth's speech at the Grammys. Here is the first quote I found from a witness: "The Band received their Lifetime Achievement Award that night and he (Garth) accepted and made a great nutty hippie speech that was awesome."


Entered at Mon Jan 17 17:24:24 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Whatever the real story is regarding songwriting credits, Pat B must be right that the true source of the fued-fight lies elsewhere. It's not as if Levon awoke from a coma to find everything gone; after all, he'd kept his wits throughout, even as others - it can be argued - lost theirs and sold their publishing to Robbie. Maybe it had something to do with control of the Band's name and the terms of its Robbie-less resurrection.

Landmark and Kevin J: We've mentioned former Mashmakhan guitarist Ray Blake a few times over the years. And I've mentioned his late '70s group with Lisa Hartt and the fact that he and Hartt play every Sunday afternoon at a coffeeshop in south Etobicoke. Early yesterday evening we dropped in for some light jazz at another coffeeshop, maybe a mile away, just as the group was doing their last couple of songs. The singer turned out to be Frankie Hart, who'd been the singer in Riverson, a group formed by two quarters of Mashmakhan when that group split up. (Of the others, drummer Jerry Mercer went with Roy Buchanan and organist Pierre Senecal called three Montrealers home from NY - Allan Nicholls from "Hair", who'd return to NY to be part of Robert Altman's core team, and two guys who'd co-written "For Yasgurs Farm" when they were part of Corky Laing's pre-Mountaing group.) And then Ray Blake himselft stopped in to say hi to Frankie.

Dunc: And on Saturday we went to the Silver Dollar - to see a couple of Yonge Street vets of the '50s and '60s, Curley Bridges and Bobby Dean Blackburn. Nobody spilled a drink at all, as far as I could tell.


Entered at Mon Jan 17 17:10:43 CET 2011 from (68.164.5.137)

Posted by:

Pat B

Todd, the "deeper stuff" is onsite also. I admit that poring through the GB archives is not the most productive time one can spend. However, Garth has spoken very plainly on this subject. It would be incumbent upon anyone who has info supposedly contradicting Garth to produce it. I myself have had contact with all the principals except RR, some more than others, and I respect their privacy on this matter.


Entered at Mon Jan 17 16:31:39 CET 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Writers write, artists create and musicians play. We are defined by what we do.


Entered at Mon Jan 17 15:56:02 CET 2011 from (69.182.87.6)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Hi Pat....cross posted there.

Yes, I've read a lot of it myself. It seemed as though there may be more to the story which may not be public. Just checking.

I've really got to run now. Play nice.


Entered at Mon Jan 17 15:51:48 CET 2011 from (69.182.87.6)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Thanks Jeff.
By the way, I'm glad that you said insightful, rather than inciteful. In any case, whatever I have, I'm "ful" of it.

Gotta run to a job now. I'll be back tonight.


Entered at Mon Jan 17 15:49:10 CET 2011 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

Todd, I have written so extensively on this subject on this GB that I haven't the time nor energy to repeat all the actual facts on the fued. The facts exist among the words the principals actually said back in the 60's, 70's, and 80's. In 1983 a number of things completely unrelated to songwriting credits occurred that started the fued. It's no mystery--it's all on this site. And the songwriting really can be boiled down to its essence.

Jeff, I have great respect for you and if you claim to have private info of Garth comletely contradicting himself, you are welcome to continue to infer it exists.


Entered at Mon Jan 17 15:33:09 CET 2011 from (12.51.52.166)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Pat, I'm perfectly content with knowing what I know to be factual and you not believing it. Todd, your intuition, interpretation, and take on the various aspects being discussed on this subject is rather insightful.Peter, legal requirments for copyright of a song are ownership of the basic melody and lyrics ( different than as you wrote:definition of songwriting.). So, if Miss A hires Mister B to write a lyric and hires Mistress C to write a melody, Miss A is the owner of the copyright to the Masterpiece. Miss A has not written anything at all, but her name is the name known to the universe as the copyright owner (which most people interpret as songwriter) of The Masterpiece. The actual two songwriters are unkown. This is an extreme example to misprove your statement, but it is possible and does happen. Defintion of songwriting, well, there might be gazillions.

Would love to banter this around, but am out of time.

Dlew, pease keep Conan, just send back the musicians.


Entered at Mon Jan 17 15:27:09 CET 2011 from (69.182.87.6)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: It's Just a Job

According to Pat:
“There were three major writers in the Band. Then there was one. Two of them made a lot of money for their efforts. One did okay.”

When I read that statement, it feels like I could be reading about the Acme Widget Company, or any other mundane business. Whether it’s true or not is kind of beside the point. Points for being concise, but you’ve managed to reduce the beauty and majesty of what these guys created together to a one-line summary of a balance sheet.
Congratulations?

This cryptic reference to “a mask for some much deeper stuff” is tantalizing, but doesn’t agree with your usual M.O. of just the facts as they stand on the public record. Unless you can point us to some facts or quotes to back that up, we’ll just have to consider it as speculation. I wouldn’t expect you to betray a trust, and I’m not asking you to, if you happen to be privy to some private information that wouldn’t be appropriate to post; but if that’s the case, then the facts behind your claim are just as valid as Jeff’s, which you seem to be dismissive of.

Aside from that, your claim seems to be in direct contradiction to Levon’s published claims, which are based on his personal involvement with a group of guys that he spent the better part of 16 years with. I think it’s fine to express our own personal opinions about it, but we should keep things in perspective.



Entered at Mon Jan 17 15:20:48 CET 2011 from (41.97.173.110)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: ?

for Historical Probity : insert a big INTERROGATION MARK at the end of the memorable quote from our Biscayan friend - it was a question, an interogative form of perception of truth as you prefer


Entered at Mon Jan 17 10:16:05 CET 2011 from (41.97.173.110)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

I remember 20 years ago, in Tarifa, town in the extreme south of Spain, where you got a full screen sight of the Moroccan skyline. It's true that the instinct you may have the first exposure, is try to establish the connection with the dashed line borders on colored maps you are used with. Nothing that looks like that in the landscape. In reality, it appears really near, a good swimmer can do the roundtrip.

A very nice guy from Pamplona, ~40 years old, at the sight of the opposite shore, with some unveiled panic mixed with a sort of delirium, started asking almost stammering, "THE MOUNT IS PLAIN TO SEE, BUT WHERE EXACTLY BEGINS AFRICA" …mechanically repeating several times the same phrase. As if he wished the answer "this mount is nothing, it's just a shield which hides an African planet located a thousand miles beyond"

Besides his astonishing figuring of the world, I also had real problems to understand, since from my own perspective, any border between countries, and even between continents, is just something to watch, and in no way can be matter to states of mind.

Pobre Mexico, Tan lejos de España y tan cerca de los Estados Unidos


Entered at Mon Jan 17 08:57:09 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: As a dog returneth to its vomit …

I haven’t heard the entire Illiad myself but have heard years of scraps and fragments. Two members of the Band have been described as “control freaks” more than once by more than one observer. A nicer way of saying it is “natural leaders with great determination.” Two out of five is one too many for peace and harmony.

Songwriting (i.e. creating something new out of the air, as Robbie said)… there are solo songwriters and many successful duos. Two works very well, especially when you have a tunesmith who is lyric-shy and a good lyricist (King/Goffin, John / Taupin, Brian Wilson / et al). When credits go beyond two, it’s diplomacy, generosity or primitive socialism in operation. All laudable, but more than two names in parentheses after the title rarely reflects genuine original creative input on composition. As we have discussed many times, the song is the basic melody line and the lyric. All else comes under “arrangement.” Which is why a radically different cover version is still "the song."


Entered at Mon Jan 17 08:51:20 CET 2011 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Australia has Conan

What a fantastic band. Jeff had mentioned that Jimmy Vivino could play anything - no doubt about it...


Entered at Mon Jan 17 05:36:07 CET 2011 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

Or Garth just meant what he said.

There were three major writers in the Band. Then there was one. Two of them made a lot of money for their efforts. One did okay.

Jeff, your point, in direct contradiction to Garth's word on the record, is kinda shaky. I myself have heard an Illiad off the record, including some impeccable sources. No matter how anyone spins it, the fued was not about songwriting. That's nothing but a mask for some much deeper stufPr


Entered at Mon Jan 17 04:43:36 CET 2011 from (69.182.87.6)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: This Thing

It sounds to me like Garth is downplaying his contribution to some degree. I suppose he wins some points for modesty, but we all know that the man is a musical genius. He may not personally or publicly put himself at the genius level, but I have a feeling that he knows there was more to what he did than “thinking of something silly” to put in. Or possibly he didn’t really want to talk about it, and that was his way of deflecting the query.

Based on that response, it doesn’t seem as though he feels he deserves songwriting credit. OK, fine….that’s his answer and his opinion…..but he says that he “didn’t contribute in the same way as everybody else”. “EVERYBODY ELSE”. He could have just said “Robbie” or “Richard” or “Robbie and Richard”, or “some of the others”, but he specifically didn’t. He said “everybody else”.

He also says that he was “around when songs were written”. Which makes it sound like songs were written in some sort of collective situation or at least enjoyed some sort of proximity of geography, rather than written in isolation, fully formed, and then brought to the group as a piece for them to simply perform. He says that maybe he was “envious of the writers who were filling up yellow legal pads”. “WRITERS” …….plural.

"The deal was made. It was a good job. And I got out of it alive.”
That doesn’t give me a particularly warm and fuzzy feeling. I have a feeling that Garth, and probably all of the others looked on this as more than a job. Yes on some levels it was a “job”, but it was also a passion, and a calling, and yes….for a few magical years, a clubhouse.

The reality is probably that one size does not fit all, and some songs had a different path than others in the journey from conception to birth. So, it’s unrealistic to apply one set of rules to every song. The thing is that some songs are just songs, and others became more than just songs. What was the key ingredient that propelled some songs to be more than just songs? In my opinion it was the group dynamic and the spirit of collective collaboration. And I’m not sure that that sometimes-intangible aspect is always well represented by a cursory look at the names on the credits.

Please note that I’m not suggesting that anyone did anything wrong, or accusing anyone of anything. It’s not my place to do so. It’s just that the complex reactions that can take place between 5 creative humans are somehow in a higher dimension than a name next to a song might suggest.


Entered at Mon Jan 17 04:01:55 CET 2011 from (173.178.214.140)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

I always like talk of the Crowmatix. I saw them playing in a parking lot in Saratoga several years ago and they were great. When I first went by, there were a couple of other people beside myself. That didn't deter them from making an effort. After supper, we went back and the lot was packed. Simply put, they rock! Wishing all of you all the best with your chimney issues. We don't make many fires in our fireplace but we do have a dependable sweep who comes every three years because we do not make many fires. We're are just finishing the reno of our basement after a minor flood. We decided to do other renos once the workers were there. It will cost us about agrand out of pocket but the benefits outweigh everything else. We are also getting rid of an extremely ugly 1960's style bar that was there when we bought the house. Another week and a half, then we move out for a couple of days while they varathane the floors. A quick clean up then all the furniture comes back. Goodnight all. Renovation talk does me in, all the time.


Entered at Mon Jan 17 03:22:16 CET 2011 from (12.51.52.166)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Pat, you can doubt what I write all you want. But some consideration would tell you, or anyone, that were I not writing from solid ground, I would not write what I wrote here, of all places.


Entered at Mon Jan 17 02:40:19 CET 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: NY

Subject: 13 years ago...

It's incredible that 13 years have passed since I went up to The Studio in Pittsfield, MA to see Levon & The Original Crowmatix. Max Creek opened for them and I'd never seen so many youngsters so psyched out about a group; you would have thought they were the Beatles.

The Crowmatix went up and played a while without Levon. Then Levon came up the stairs with his pal Butch and walked up to the stage which was about 2 feet up, if memory serves. As soon as I saw Levon trying to step up and Butch was pushing Levon and it looked like they might go backward I came over and pushed on Levon's rear pocket of his Levi jeans, and Levon went up to the stage and walked back to the empty drumkit next to Randy. I remember thinking Levon didn't have an ounce of fat where I was pushing.

Levon alternated from the drums to a stool up front where he played the mandolin. Having Randy on his drumkit allowed him to do this. Jimmy Eppard played up front and, as always, put on a great show. I liked his "300 Pounds." Mike Dunn told me later that he was a little worried about a lot of the kids in the audience throwing up in the corners of the place. He thought maybe some bad drugs had found their way inside. I watched the whole show from a place right next to the front (stage left) corner of the stage. When they finished Levon reached down and handed me a plastic pic with his name on it. He shook my hand and I felt good about that. It's possible he recognized me from other shows, but I doubt it. I think he just wanted to get home and I happened to be standing in the right place.

After the boys loaded up and headed south I went over to a little Bed & Breakfast I had lined up earlier that day. I built a fire in the fireplace (that was the reason I chose this B&B) and opened up a nice bottle of a very smooth merlot. I watched the flames and thought about the show. When I got home the next day I wrote about the show in a journal that I used to keep. Otherwise I probably wouldn't remember a show in Pittsfield on Jan 17, 1998.


Entered at Mon Jan 17 00:50:50 CET 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Thanks guys - we will probably go with replacing the whole thing as it hasn't been cleaned, ever and it kind of feels like it's falling apart.


Entered at Sun Jan 16 23:55:27 CET 2011 from (70.78.227.122)

Posted by:

Northern Boy

Subject: Woodstoves: A Possible Tip From The Great White North

Peter, I'm on my second one in this house in the last 25 years. It's a modern Scandinavian model that replaced our ugly old Canadian model, so your British and German models kind of rang a bell for me. Initially I had problems galore with the Jotul European model but have worked my way through them and consider it a gem. On discussion boards one person will swear by the very same stove that the next guy wants to throw away, so it's a perplexing thing. You say the burning newspaper first trick doesn't work, given the height of your stack. We have a very high stack being an A frame, so a lot of cold air there to dislodge. Even tougher though when your pipe goes out horizontally before going up all that distance, which is the set up we had a few years ago before I got rid of it and went back to the straight-up-the-whole way arrangement.

Given the height of our stack, and being nestled low between the surrounding mountains I actually start with a downdraft before building every fire. That is, cold air coming down the stack into the box so that whatever I burn there, newspaper first or an actual fire, smoke bellows into the living room. Or it would, if I didn't repressurize my house by opening a ground level door for about a minute first. This offsets the downflow of cold air and allows my pre-fire newspaper fire to easily heat my tall stack and dislodge any cold air sitting in it.

Now I realize that opening a door in winter, especially a Canadian winter, when you're actually trying to warm up your house is a pretty counter-intuitive thing to do but it allowed my Jotul woodstove's design, which I thought was severely flawed, to work the way it was supposed to. I have picked up a number of lesser tricks along the way too but this one was pivotal as you may well imagine. (After the first couple of living rooms filled with smoke, I can assure you that Northern Girl was non too impressed with "that new-fangled f@@king Scandinavian technology). So maybe give it a shot Peter, in combo with the newspaper trick. It may not be part of your problem there, but who knows? NB

This is not an NB prank, or trick, though it may sound like one.


Entered at Sun Jan 16 23:25:16 CET 2011 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

So we can either rely on what Garth has said or believe "reports" of something he may or may not have said. And, really, if Garth was so classy and considered when he said he had nothing to do with the songwriting--even stating he was "envious" of the songwriters--what would he be if he said the opposite?


Entered at Sun Jan 16 23:10:40 CET 2011 from (24.108.12.129)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: BRIEN

Brien, good advice from Lars. Fer Christ's sake don't start that stove up!!! Replace the WHOLE chimney from top to bottom. And forget that do it yourself cleaning shit. A good chimney sweep should charge you no more than 80 bucks but I'd replace the whole shebang from top to bottom.


Entered at Sun Jan 16 22:27:13 CET 2011 from (76.66.25.2)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link


Entered at Sun Jan 16 22:21:04 CET 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: Neutral perspective

Subject: The Billy Sol Hargis Rule for new metal chimneys or your house will burn down

BRIEN- I absolutely agree with Norbert: don't use that chimney until you get a chimneysweep to clean the creosote from your flue. Around here there is a chimneysweep who used to be a mason and he doesn't sell metal cimney liners, which is unusual. I trust him a lot more than some of the other chimneysweeps who seem to love to scare the dickens out of homeowners: "If you use a masonry liner your house will burn down." To them, ALL masonry chimneys-even the clean ones- are dangerous.

If a chimneysweep cleans a chimney they can lower a camera down the liner afterwards (after the smoke clears) and find out if the liner is cracked. Also, Brien, if your old stove hook-up took the smoke into the large chimney chamber area just below the flue, that's both hard to clean and dangerous. The smoke should go from the stovepipe directly up to the flue liner (positive connection). When the chimney is as fouled up as what you describe, perhaps you should go with a new metal liner. Peace of mind is worth something. It seems like wives are usually right about most things, at least mine is.

Sounds like the Bears are still safely ahead of the Seahawks. But I gotta keep the laundry moving. And to be honest I still haven't brought the firewood in. I'd better go.


Entered at Sun Jan 16 22:12:08 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Jeffo.....but Jimmy Jam was there and that has to count for something!

Rollie, we've been thinking of you.

Another great friend of this site is enduring a difficult time. If you are so inclined I hope you will keep him in your thoughts and prayers.


Entered at Sun Jan 16 22:07:49 CET 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Okay, Saw Shaky, 2 versions. " we were just babies when the jackson 5 grew up so fast"... interesting. I strongly disliked the songwritng in thr Felice Brothers, not positive about this yet, but,mayeb the issue is the dearth of subject matter. which may lead to a larger issue. Just seems to me that young songwriters once wrote great lyrics, maybe the availability of subject matter is at play. But still, people live. You have to have things to write about. Then you learn how to write. But, I THINK, generally, the subject matter comes first. nothign to write about, you write a different kind of song,Like wooly bully. she loves me, and I know that can't be bad, etc etc


Entered at Sun Jan 16 21:51:36 CET 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

okay Peter, wonderful bounce that girl has, you convinced me to give those other songs a look, I mean a listen. Somehow, I watched 4 or 5 vids, but missed the ones you mention.

Band I enjoy alot more that has a chick in it is The Carolina Chocolate Drops.


Entered at Sun Jan 16 21:23:51 CET 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Web: My link

Subject: Garth Pics at The Grammys

I guess Robbie's not only clairvoyant but has the ability to be invisible as well.

2008 is far more recent. Garth made his point(s) in his acceptance speech,and di so ina very strong voice ina very animated manner. RR standing right behind him, and from the report I received, seeming to look smaller & smaller, maybe wanting to become invisible.


Entered at Sun Jan 16 21:06:13 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Woody stuff

I wish I’d asked Lars … here all the installers say a metal flue is obligatory for a wood burner or otherwise you, your nearest and nearest and the ambulance people who come to pick up your bodies and those at the morgue who touch them will all die of Carbon Monoxide poisoning, as will the doctor who does the autopsy. I had that odd sense of The Reverend Billy’s Wood Advisory Service at the time. But I think it is a UK regulation for new installations. Our open fire in another room has its original 1909 liner and works perfectly. But if we fitted a closed wood burner, they’d make us put a new metal flue down (we asked).

Our trouble with the German wood burner supposedly is the height and size of the chimney (through three floors with a ten foot stack on top). Paper doesn’t warm it.

The joy of the British one is it sits where stoves have sat for 100 years before it, inset in a great big stone surround. When you let it go out, the whole surround gently radiates heat like a night-storage heater for hours.

We have everything cleaned every September. Nice chimney sweep


Entered at Sun Jan 16 20:46:43 CET 2011 from (79.202.181.189)

Posted by:

Norbert

Lars, thanks. Our chimney is about 9m (27foot?) long. In Germany the chimney cleaner has all the power, he has to aprove the stove and whole constellation. If he says no, nothing goes. I'll need your advice later on, thanks in advance, Ill sent you a picture of our house etc.

Brian, don't use that chimney before it is cleaned! (1 or 2 times a year is rule here by law). The first night in our late French farm house, the chimney stated to burn in the middle of the night, pieces of burning ash raining down in the living room .... brrr.


Entered at Sun Jan 16 18:50:47 CET 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Lars - we have a wood burning stove. It's about 30 years old. We want to replace the chimmney from the stove all the way up. It's never been cleaned and my wife fears it's beyond cleaning. I saw a kit at Lowes that takes care of the top half and of course they have the materials for the bottom portion from the stove to the ceiling. You have any reccomondations?


Entered at Sun Jan 16 18:46:48 CET 2011 from (91.42.231.35)

Posted by:

Norbert

Peter, thanks great site to burn the evening. What might help to light the fire faster is to burn 2 or 3 wrapped newspaper pages to warm up the chimney first.

Dry wood helps also of course (the wood should contain less then 20% water), although we burn after one or two years, best is to let it dry for 3 years (if possible).


Entered at Sun Jan 16 18:35:39 CET 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: The Woods

Subject: Woodstove chimneys

NORBERT- I spent most of my life building chimneys for people in my area, and burning my own firewood. Every time a client wanted a fireplace (I usually worked with stone) I'd mention at some point that a fireplace may give out heat while it's got a good fire going, but in the wee hours of the morning, when the fire turns to embers and ashes, a lot of the heat in the house will get sucked up and go out the chimney. So I think you're wise to be using a woodstove.

When you say you have an 8" x 8" stone chimney, I'm assuming you're talking about a terra cotta liner (kind of an orange colored ceramic material here in the states). As long as your liner (or flue) isn't cracked, you don't need to have a metal pipe retro-fitted down your chimney, that size flue has a good draft (I don't know how high your chimney is, or if you're located at the bottom of a mountain, etc) -generally speaking. Ask someone in the woodstove business over there WHO IS NOT TRYING TO SELL YOU A METAL LINER, for advice. Metal liners over here are becoming an unnecessary expense if an existing masonry liner is in good shape. Also, metal liners lose their warranty after only one chimney fire (a "burn-off" of the creosote....you'll know it when you see it). Masonry liners hold up to most (not all) chimney fires as long as they are laid up correctly, with some air space around them to allow for heat expansion.

I have to go bring in a few loads of firewood for my stove now. I've got next year's supply of wood lying out in my woods, oak and cherry. On a cold day in March, when the snow is gone but the woods are still frozen, I'll split the wood with a log-splitter (sorry, Norm) and move it over to my pile. My back doesn't like the work, but it's good for me. Good luck with your stove.


Entered at Sun Jan 16 18:08:00 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Link is to the company we bought it from … they do all the brands you mention too. Ours is a Clearview 750 … you can find their brochure on the site (as well as lots of others). The Clearview glass really does stay clear … the German one gets very dirty and needs constant cleaning.

We have wide stone chimneys too, and they say you have to have a flue (a metal pipe) inside the chimney to draw (pull smoke up) properly. I think the flue is a safety regulation in the UK.


Entered at Sun Jan 16 17:50:19 CET 2011 from (91.42.231.35)

Posted by:

Norbert

Peter, what brand was that? Nibe is from Sweden and in those wood-stove-review-sites praised. However I know (now) that those high efficiency burners need a narrow stone chimney or, even better, a metal tube, some 6" round, that warms and pulls the smoke though better. Seems they have complicated air systems, they talk about primair and sec. air etc. We have a stone chimney of about 8"x8" I guess, almost too big, but I'll give it a try (otherwise a metal tube must be built in).

I know of the cheap German Hase & Son (considerd cr*p here) prices under € 1.000,-. But there is also the German Haase ( 3k€ - to 4k€) which are rather good they say. (also heard of Drooff). Denmark, Finnish and Swedish stoves are considered here as the best, don't know of any Enlish brands are sold here. Also a good burner will cost here about 3k€ (the Nibe without soap stone is about that)


Entered at Sun Jan 16 17:34:53 CET 2011 from (72.71.216.39)

Posted by:

Mike & Kim Hayward

Subject: Jay Collins.

Great to see Jay Collins included in some footage during this AM/s CBS Sunday piece on Gregg Allman & the Allman Bros. Museum.


Entered at Sun Jan 16 17:15:11 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Norbert, we bought two wood-burners. One a rather ugly British one and one very cool-looking modern German one. The German one is crap and very sensitive about how dry the wood is and what size the bits are and requires 15 minutes nurturing and fiddling to get going. The British one creates a roaring fire in about three minutes and burns everything … so check beyond appearance! (This is a VERY rare case where a British piece of equipment is better than a German one. It might be unique as such.)


Entered at Sun Jan 16 16:47:34 CET 2011 from (91.42.231.35)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: Nunnauuni & the Nibe Contura 590

The next weeks I plan to tear down our old fireplace to rebuilt a more efficient one. In my search for the perfect stove I came along those great giant Finish soapstone ovens, which produce a smooth radiant heat (Tuliviki, Nunnauuni etc; miracle things). But somehow they're too big and heavy for us. We've chosen (after lots of google, long nights of hard debate and driving around as far as Essen) for the high, round and black Nibe Contura 590 from Sweden (without the soapstone on the outside). I’ve seen them work and they are great, the fire place is convenient high and to been seen from all sides of the room. They only take half the amount of wood, keep the windows clean and produce almost no ashes. Let them soak the air from outside (or the cellar) and you’ll also live longer.

I wonder how they kept Big Pink warm.



Entered at Sun Jan 16 16:14:19 CET 2011 from (91.42.231.35)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: Why there is no female The Band, Stones or Beatles

Maybe there's an hidden clue here:

"Men are known to have a "one-track mind." If a man thinks about something from the feelings side of his brain at the same time that he is talking about something from the thinking side of his brain, he stops talking because he momentarily loses his train of thought; he can operate on either side, but not on both at the same time. The woman, however, is a mental multi-tasker who can watch a soap, talk on the phone, and listen for her baby all at once. These contrasting predispositions have some basis in physical differences, since during gestation, a male baby experiences a rush of hormones that forever destroy most of the connectors between the left and right sides of his brain connectors that the woman retains throughout life. Recent thinking, however, points up a few fallacies in this characterization. For one thing, some say, men are actually quite intuitive. We know this because they seem to have a built-in compass that tells them how to find their way when they are lost without asking directions"


Entered at Sun Jan 16 15:14:33 CET 2011 from (76.66.25.2)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

If my memory serves me well....When Garth gave his long speech thanking many, many people about his musical journey at the RRHOF.....The one Band member he singled out was Robbie. I always wondered.....In anycase, I'm very thankful that soon I'll be able to hear Robbie's latest recording because of his songwriting, guitar playing and his voice.

biffalo bull: The two films I really enjoyed because the characters showed depth and therefore I found these films thought provoking. They also triggered some emotions in me which always tells me that I needed to experience these stories..."Barney's Version" and "Nowhere Boy" about Lennon.

Hey Pat B: Did you send an email awhile ago under another "sign"?

I thoroughly enjoyed Suze Rotolo's _A Freewheelin' Time A Memoir of Greenwich Village in the Sixties_.
I'm reading _Whispering Pines_ now.


Entered at Sun Jan 16 15:00:30 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Duke & The King

Jeff, won't you try just a little bit harder. The range of styles is what grabs (plus songwriting quality). Try "Shaky" for their soul edge, then "No Easy Way Down" for a bit of female Appalachian vocal starting it out, "Hudson River", then "Children of The Sun" (like psychedelic early Steve Miller), Union Street (which even reminds me of Lou Reed). The Band-like aspect is having three people who take lead vocals in very different voices, plus an expert harmony guy (well, that's more CSNY … the other band they're compared to.)

Best new band I've heard in ten years. Period!


Entered at Sun Jan 16 14:36:40 CET 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Location: Another time, another place.

Subject: Today's musicality of mediocre. Well, not even

Aside from hearing potential in their work, The Felice Brothers left me cold. That they achieved a good level of notoriety and exposure, made me sad for our culture. Aside from the fact that all the members of The Duke & The King have talent & musical ability ranging from some to plenty of , their musical appeal is lost on me. If You Ever Get Famous is a kind of good song, but, that's about it. It's rudimentary songwriting, at level one of what should be accepted as songwriting. Alot less clever and pognant than it gets recognition for. The female violinist is exceptionally talented on her instrument, but I far more enjoy her natural elasticity than I do the music the ensemble creates. The drummer with the fro is a damn good drummer, and felice has something to his voice (just something, nothing extraordinary, or even much appealing). Years ago this act wouldn't get far neyond low level local gigs. They may have gotten schooled, groomed and aided on their way, they'd get schooled & improved, or they'd diappear, or they'd be absorbed into more musical acts. They'd never get the kind of exposure they get today. Today, mediocre has a way of getting acclaim &exposure and making it onto this half assed circuit that has somehow evolved out of the nothinngess of the music industry. Certain industries supported and in support of the music industry ( for example , radio stations on the fringer, NPR stations, AAA staions) have taken up the slack that aspects of the recording and other parts of the entertainment industry that were part of or rotated around the recording industyr, let droop. And created this half assed cicruit on which they keep alive and support mediocre acts that don't deserve their support. But they promote them and keep them alive and kicking because without them these people would lose their jobs. When almost mediocre warrants popularity, it's scary.


Entered at Sun Jan 16 13:46:14 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I think "There's no 'I' in team" is a slogan devised by team leaders to persuade the other members that it's in their own interest to put in their maximum effort doing whatever the leader tells them to do.


Entered at Sun Jan 16 13:18:02 CET 2011 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: No 'I' in team...

But there's a 'me' if you mix the letters up...


Entered at Sun Jan 16 12:40:57 CET 2011 from (217.42.25.251)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Enjoyed

I enjoyed many of the recent posts. Enjoyed the last post, Peter.

I had to cross Scotland yesterday to visit elderly relatives. (Does not take long, Bob!)

I took with me 'Northern Lights Southern Cross', 'Blood on the Tracks' and 'The Best of Paul Carrack' and a download of Robbie's new song.

(Incidentally I'm playing 'I Shall Be Released' on the Bootleg series just now and I think Richard's backing singing to Dylan is great).

Anyway, if there is one lasting thing I've got out of the GB, it's that I've become a better listener.

I think the presence of Garth on NLSC is great. And remember, certain people, Hoskyns, for example, think this is the best Band album. Maybe he has a case. Listen again to the album. I absolutely love the beginning of Acadian Driftwood - Robbie's guitar, the interweaving pipes and the flute, then the emergence of the voice of an angel. Closely followed by two other great voices and a haunting fiddle that would match the best of Scottish. And is that an accordion suddenly appearing. Brilliant lyrics...'Set my compass North, I've got winter in my blood'...And who thought about the French singing.

And the great thing is, it all comes together. It is not too busy.

Maybe like 'Four Strong Winds', I would be even more proud of this song if I was Canadian. A truly great song.


Entered at Sun Jan 16 12:34:10 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Goodwood Revival

On a more modest scale, the twice-yearly "Juke Box Fairs" at Kempton Park and Brighton in the UK offer the same 60s experience. There's a line up of cars and bikes, juke boxes, records, 50s / 60s furniture and clothes, memorabilia. Many people attend dressed for the part, and at both they have a rock and roll band (with acoustic bass) in the cafeteria.


Entered at Sun Jan 16 12:30:18 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Legs

Another video of The Duke & The King. They’ve just followed Gladys Knight and if they wanted they could have had the full resources of Jools Holland’s Rhythm & Blues Orchestra. Instead they strip it down to acoustic guitar, handclaps and a shaker. And you get a lot of leg (same dress).

The other thing is three can play drums well… Simon Felice was drummer in The Felice Brothers, Nowell Haskins (the official drummer in this band) was second-generation on drums with George Clinton, and in the video on their website, Bobbie Bird (bass) is seen drumming. He also drums on their live version of Long May You Run, allowing Nowell to add soulful co-lead vocal . This is also on YouTube. Oh, and Simi Stone has the same dress on that one too. She must have bought a bunch of them for the tour. One can see why.


Entered at Sun Jan 16 12:14:47 CET 2011 from (79.202.162.215)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: 60th
Web: My link

Subject: Goodwood The Band Revival Festival

Maybe we should organize the eternal planned The Band Revival Gathering á la the annual Goodwood Revival festival in England . Dressed-up in the 50-60th, men with long hair , women in mini, your fish and chips wrapped up in a copy of the Rolling Stone 10 August 1968.

I’ll come in a long leather coat on a Triumph 500 (forget the hair).


Entered at Sun Jan 16 10:54:18 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Perfecting Sound Forever

I’m about 70 pages into Greg Milner’s “Perfecting Sound Forever” and I recommend it. There are stories about the pre-1920s debate about the reality of acoustic recording (you sing into the horn of the machine and a stylus cuts the pattern in wax) versus the artificiality of “electric recording” using a microphone and amplifying the pattern. These predate CD versus vinyl, as does Edison’s vertical recording compared to Victor’s horizontal recording (on disc). Later engineers found that Edison was right about increased fidelity, and it was another question of mass production beating higher fidelity (VHS v Beta).

Anyway, he gets on to Stokowski, who was a major innovator in realizing that you could do more than simply “capture the sound” but that you could manipulate it. Many advances were made by recording every concert of his Philadelphia Orchestra in 1931-32 … not for release, but experimenting with multiple mics, sound mixing etc. He has a lovely Stokowski 1932 quote:

“Opera today, while pleasing to the ear, is often a sore trial for the eye. Take Tannhauser for example. Venus, the most beautiful woman in the world, is using her charms to tempt Tannhauser from the narrow path of virtue. But unfortunately the lady who plays the part may sing like a nightingale, but she looks like an elephant. By no stretch of the imagination could one believe for a moment that she is Venus. Electricity will change her. We can take her voice and record it on disk. Then we can select a beautiful young lady who really may be accepted by the audience for a Venus, Then we can synchronize her voice and create a perfect illusion. Modern advances in sound recording now make it possible.”

How right Stokowski was. Milner says he foresaw Milli Vanilli and Ashley Simpson. And a LOT of others.

The other result of the 1931-32 experiments involve the orchestra. We know that an orchestra only sounds like it does because the mass of violins are all slightly differently tuned and the note slightly differently hit. They realized that early on … one violin multitracked sounds like one violin. But Stokowski did establish that six violins when recorded sound like a full forty piece section. That was the cut off point. It must be generally known, because that’s about the number of violins John Cale and Brian Wilson use when travelling with a small orchestra section. (Plus violas of course).


Entered at Sun Jan 16 09:41:44 CET 2011 from (41.97.148.242)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

David Paich : "At the beginning of the '80s I watched a late night documentary on TV about all the terrible death and suffering of the people in Africa. It both moved and appalled me and the pictures just wouldn't leave my head. I tried to imagine how I'd feel about if I was there"

Jeff Porcaro: "I was about 11 when the New York's World Fair took place, and I went to the African pavilion with my family. I saw the real thing; I don't know what tribe, but there were these drummers playing, and my mind was blown. The thing that blew my mind was everybody was playing one part. As a little kid in Connecticut, I would see these Puerto Rican and Cuban cats jamming in the park. It was the first time I witnessed someone playing one beat and not straying from it, like a religious experience, where it gets loud, and everyone goes into a trance. I have always dug those kind of orchestras, whether it be a band or all drummers. But I just love a band of guys saying one thing. "

The [awesome] video in the link dedicated to every ideologist of the "no I in a team", or " we are all I's in a team"


Entered at Sun Jan 16 06:20:09 CET 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Peter, that was really funny ;-)

Joan. Garth has commented. In his own intelligent, classy, considered manner. sometimes, it has even been on record. Unfortunately, the most high profile public comments that I know of regarding this subject do not seem to be legally distributable. But anyone in attendance at The Grammys when Garth spoke when The Band received what I believe was their lifetime acievement award got to hear some of Garth's thoughts on the subject.


Entered at Sun Jan 16 01:45:01 CET 2011 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Subject: Duke & King: Helpless

What Anton says.

And yeah, on Peter V.'s recommendation I checked out The Duke and King. Link is to her legs. Peter, I salute your impeccable taste. They sing well too, you know the singers, not her legs. I checked out a couple other great videos like 'Shaky' & 'Morning I Get To Hell' and then I replayed 'Helpless', you know to see her legs.


Entered at Sun Jan 16 00:27:00 CET 2011 from (83.222.154.240)

Posted by:

Anton Gremaud

Location: 1716 GrimBuntTollKollWald Territory
Web: My link

Subject: Rache!

Ich habe auch das Infoseitennetz, Netze mittels, / über ComputerGamesProducerTechnik realisiert, auch die eigenen Infodienste. Inspektionen, Beweise, Kontrolle ( n ) @ Aarbergergasse InetCafé @ Bern. Best lost absichltich @ with over Steg PC. Systeme Alles absichern. (6) SauMon Töter Sat, 15 January 2011 18:27:25 +0000 url email Sehr geehrte Damen und Herren Ich hatte Konflikt ( e ) mit zwei was männlichen, uniformierten Polizisten, Ordnungs- Gesetzeshütern beim, am, im Hauptbahnhof Fribourg, auch Bern, Grund, Gründe unbekannt. Mich haben diese Woche im / beim Hauptbahnhofareal Fribourg zwei was männliche Polizisten, Securitrans Bahnpolizisten, oder sonstwatt uniformierte Ordnungshüter, Gesetzeshüter verfolgt, angehalten, und kurz aufgeklärt. Ich habe nix kriminelles gemacht, angestellt, ich wollte da lediglich im, beim Arel / Umgebung ( en ) / Raum, Räüme Hauptbahnhof Fribourg ein paar bekannte Personen aufklären, dass diese die Zigarettenstümmel nicht auf den Boden werfen sollen, sondern diese mittels / über die vorgesehenen / bestimmten was Zigarettenabfall Eimer aus was Metall entsorgen, werfen sollen, weiter sind öfters auch was übelriechende Flüssigkeiten am, über dem Boden, im / beim Hauptbahnhofareal Fribourg, im Raum, oder den Räümen, Kanton Bern ebenfalls, ein bisschen überall. Ich habe die Bahnhofsordnung ( en ), Bahnhofsregel ( n ), Bahnhofsvorschrift ( en ) wahrgenommen, studiert, gelesen, und im / über mein Gehirn abgespeichert, auch mittels / über die visuelle ( n ), akustisch ( en ) Kommunikation ( en ), Signalen usw., und kenne diese somit. Ich muss zu meinen Schuhen, allgemein zu meiner selektierten Bekleidung ( en ) in Zeitrauminhalt ( en ), den Kleidungsstücken, Teile vom Ganzen, ebenfalls zum Boden vom Studio welches ich miete, auch im Trepenhaus vom ganzen Block ist Sorgfaltspflicht usw. anzuwenden, eine, mehrere Hausordnung ( en ) einzuhalten. An einem Tag vom letzten, vergangenen Jahr ging ich mich in / nach Fribourg im McDonald` s verpflegen und ein Mann hat mir einen Faustschlag ins Gesicht verpasst als ich mich auf die Rückreise begeben habe, dies grundlos, eine Körperverletzung. Zum eigenen Schutz zeige ich ab und zu mein Messer wenn ich Gefahr wahrnehme, verpühre wenn ich draussen bin, ich mich nach draussen begebe. Die Bahnhöfe waren mal was GrauZonenBahnhöfe, ich bin auch Allgemeine Plakatgesellschaft involviert, APG wird als einzelne Abkürzung verwendet, TV Direktor bin ich auch. Ich hatte ne Zeit lang, über einen Zeitrauminhalt einen Vormund, mittlerweile einen Beirat.......einfach lächerlich. Ich hätte, bin in Gedankenwelten der beste Architekt, Raumplaner, Anwendungsplaner, Stadt- usw. Planer, auch in Bezug auf Wetterverhältnisse und ne Menge mehr, immer Einzelteile vom einzelnen Ganzen. - Auch in Angelgenheiten eigens erschaffner, kreierten Grammtik ( en ), Mathe usw., Zeichenanwendung ( en ); makieren / pimpem; strukturieren, gruppieren; betonen usw. habt ihr keine Chance gegen mich. Ich kann viel besser schreiben als das hier von mir NiederGeschriebene, von oben nach unten, auch strukturierte, gruppierte, visuell sichtbare, wahrnehmbare NiederGeschriebene. Ich habe schnell was über das Thema geschrieben, niedergeschrieben, ohne gross zu überlegen, progressivem erweitern, ausbauen, oder auch korrigieren. Dieses Schreiben habe ich an mehrere Netzwerke weitergeleitet, auch an eine was Mastering Uni von der SBB weitergeleitet, weiter habe ich mitgeholfen die damaligen, ehemaligen PTT Betriebe zu reorganisieren, zu remastern; C64, Windows 7, Youtube, Google, City Engine, Unreal Torunament, Sony Ericsson, Securitrans, usw. ist auch was von mir, und ne Menge mehr. OK, ok, Ziel : KO, KO, ko, OK...... . Ich war ma in Fribourg wohnahft, mit dem angelich, möglicherweise Verwandten Buntschu Patrick, möglicherweise was Bruder, auch der angeblichen richtigen Mutter, was Madame Tschümperlin, wie die vom Centre Psycho Social, angelich was Rezeptionsangestellte, die Madame Tschümperlin, auch am wohnen mit der Drecksbande, ich wollte haben, dass diese Madame Tschümperlin was ne strenge Hure war, ist, in Zeit ( en ) Raum, Räüme, Inhalt ( en ), ich unter ihr krepieren werde, bei der Drecksbande, die Madame Tschümperlin wollte auch was haben, dass ich an der was Sexkrankheit, Sexsucht leide, dann hatte ich die Schnauze voll, vom Theater, den Theatern, zu, ab einem Zeitpunkt ging am alten Bahnhof, in Fribourg, Schweiz, hat sich ein Menschendeal, Menschenhandeltheater abgespielt, in Bezug, für mich, meine angeblich richtige Mutter, was dunkelhaarig, Hedwig Gremaud-Kolly kam, und ich ging ihr hinten nach, was voll blond, ich, ich wohnte anschliessend bei was dieser Drecksbande; Ich war ma n männlicher Knirps, ich war in nem was Bauerzimmer vom Habgut Bauernhof des angeblichen Onkels Kolly Leo, auch anderen angeblich Bauernhof Habgut beteiligten, auch den Vorgängern des Landgutes, mehrer Landgute am nachdenken und hatte blitzschnell perfekte Visionen, eine Vision einen Computer zu realisieren als, nachdem ich ne Schreibmaschiene, und nen TV sah und n Sandwich am essen war, mir hat was n George Lukas THX 1138 Netzwerk, oder was STASI mittels Elektronik zugeschaut, mitstudiert, bei mir spioniert, meine Vision, Visonen gestohlen, dies mittels, über Telepathie, und der C64 angeblich Heimcomputer wurde später realisiert, ich kriegte ihn später als Geschenk, habe diesen korrekt, einfach richtig ausgepackt, ausgelegt, habe richtig das Handbuch studiert, habe meinen angeblichen Verwandten schnell Compscience beigebracht, dann wurde das C64 Handbuch gestohlen, und die Computer, auch das Fachwissen wurde verteilt, an Wesen, ab einem späteren Zeitpunkt, zu einem späteren ZeitRaumInhalt ( en ), musste ich was mit dem Joe Miner ( möglicherweise ein Künstlername, Joe Miner ) in einem vermute ich, Block, Immo von Joe Miner als was Kind mit der angeblichen Mutter Sex praktizieren gehen, als was männliches, kindliches Drsse. Colliard-Rouiller Catherine Wesen ( Zwitter?! ), ich habe auch den Auftrag erhalten Frauen zu besamen, mein Sperma zu spenden, kriegte aber keinen Steiffen Penis, weil mir viele Personen beim angeblichen Besamungstheater möglicherweise absichtlich zuegeschaut haben, dann habe ich die Spermaentnahme mittels Metall, Mechanik, usw. Technik blitzchnell erfunden, und habe darüber ein wenig berichtet, meine angeblich richtige Mutter lernte im Bus was n Balsam Baseiru Doktor kennen, oder kannte diesen bereits, ich musste auch Auto fahren, mit der Drecksbande, ich kam wieder in den Spital, wurde was operiert, möglicherweise auch reduziert, es wurde möglicherweise auch Sperma, Spermien gestohlen, nach der OP hatte ich nen Verband um den Kopf, die Hüfregion, auch am Penis was n Verband, und ich habe die OP in Visionen gesehen, nach der OP, der Narkose, möglicherweise hat Doktor Hülsmann ( Frankenstein ?! ) usw., meinen Superkörper gestohlen, oder ausgetauscht usw., eine weitere Möglichkeit, der Zahnarzt, oder ein Intruder hat was an meinen Zähnen rumgefeilt, auch anderes; ich hatte vor kurzem Visonen, dass ich n was HeuElektroTechFetzenWasUFOWetterPilot bin, detailliert, OnMyOwn, auf dem Bett, was am bisschen stinken, mittels wenig Nahrung, am nachdenken, OnMyOwn, habe bereits beim Heuen darüber nachgedacht, wer da das Wetter be- mitbestimmt, ein Gott, Götter, oder was Menschen, ich habe in Fribourg, zu einem ZeitRaumInhalt von meinem Leben was erwachsene BrilleGlatzewesen beauftragt was Sterne am Himmel zu planen, fabrizieren usw., dies mittels Telepathie, als was Bebe ( Franz Grammatik bekannt ); Weiter frage ich mich was diese Hockeytypen für Wesen sind. Ich bin was am bisschen stinken, auch die Umgebung und habe nicht volle Leistung ( en ), auch der Faktor Lebenszeit, meine Lebenszeiten spielen eine wichtige, grosse Rolle weshalb ich nicht richtig schreibe, auch der Faktor EigenEgoIsmus, Diebstahlsöie!; Bemerkung ( en ): Der bei Wetten Dass! war aber ne Null im Rückwärtsreden, aufnehmen, und abspielen. Ich mag, will nicht zu viel drüber nachdenken, mittels / über, in Aussen- und Gedankenwelten; Ich koche fast immer selbst, habe auch Angst vor beimischen, der, den Nahrung ( en ) was beimischen, von letzt esse ich nicht viel, bin auch n bisschen was am stinken, weil ich über kein Auto verfüge, schon seit langem nicht mehr, bin aber trotzdem fit, unter angeblich, über erschwerten Bediengungen, Gegenheiten usw., und die Garage ( n ) sollte man auch selber machen, planen, bauen, das System absichern, sonst kommt die Armee abreissen und reist ab, mir wurden schon manche Autos zur Sau gemacht, und mich wollten schon viele Wesen ermorden, in, mittels Drecksbanden, WesenNetTogetherWorks, auch die Mesmerised Theaterwesen, auch DJ Lukas Kleesattel, auch Postwesen, und andere. Ich habe bei / mittels / über diesem Schreiben / E-Mail / Botschaften Fachbegriffe verwendet welche möglicherweise vielen Wesen bekannt sind, am liebsten kreiere ich die Fachbegriffe selbst, selber, alles selbst. Ich verfüge auch über Gedankenuniversen, welche vielen Wesen nur teilweise, oder auch nicht bekannt sind. Die vom McDonald` s wollten auch was haben, dass ich ne Sau war, weil ich ma bei Stress im Auto gegessen habe, über das McDrive, einmal, dann nie mehr. Muss jetzt angeblich schlafen gehen, habe in nem kleinen Fenster schnell was geschrieben, diesen TeilAufBausatz, konnte, beherrschte schon als Kind alles, for Sure, Anton Gremaud, Bonjour. Ich habe auch das InoseitenNetzwerk erfunden, mittels, über GameHerstellungstechnik ( en ). Möglicherweise abischtlich KreuzFalsch geschrieben, von mir, das hier ChaosVonMirGeschriebene. - Spionage mittels / im / über das Internet ist auch ein Thema welches mich beschäftigt, besorgt, egoistische Diebstahlsöie!, möglicherweise. - Es gibt immer viele Möglichkeiten, Anwendungszwecke, auch Angebliches, auch Notizen welche man ausbauen, erweitern, strukturieren, gruppieren, einfach sortieren kann, RotationsStangenUsw. KugelnInRäümen. Mit möglicherweise freundlichen Grüssen Sehr wenig geschrieben, mit Klementinen, klein Duft. Richtig mit dem roten Schneebob gelandet, welcher für was anderes vorgesehen war, ist usw., vor dem Tron Movie, Buranaischk Pilot. Hab mit meinem Güggel alles dominiertmarkiertdominiertundanderes. Use The Words Ruassian and Guestbook at my Güggel, also AMI Guestbook @ Page 911, American Mess. Ich habe auch das Infoseitennetzwerk, oder Netzwerke mittels, über GamesProducerTechnik erschaffen, auch eigene Infodienste. Landvogt i am also @ www.fucd.com Bin ich de Samichlous?! I bü o MS-DOS Hacker. Geroge Jungo Lucas. I have made a First made WebsiteAllKid ReSearch Instiut, Cern, allgedly Tim Berners Lee. I have also made, created the Component PC, Geiz ist geil. Rätselmaster ich bin, auch, and much more HochhausAus Sieg für ich with my NHL 10 Game @ HauptEishalle at Fribourg, Switzerland. Anton Gremaud


Entered at Sat Jan 15 23:22:41 CET 2011 from (79.202.170.215)

Posted by:

Norbert

Pat, thanks.


Entered at Sat Jan 15 23:04:59 CET 2011 from (69.182.87.6)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: The Band Out in Public

So I was out running some errands this afternoon, and stopped into the local package store to pick up some Heffenweizen for tonight. While carousing the aisles, I heard the familiar sounds of 'The Weight' being played over the store's sound system. After all these years, it's still a thrill to hear a favorite band played out in a public setting.


Entered at Sat Jan 15 22:00:21 CET 2011 from (99.247.223.210)

Posted by:

biffalo bull

Subject: soundtrax

watched the movie "leaves of grass" last night, starring ed norton, susan sarandon, tim blake nelson, kerri russell, steve earle, richard dreyfuss and more. set mainly in oklahoma, featuring some good music and one song in particular, "i shall be released", with richard manuel singing. a fairly good black comedy that gives you something to think about. i'm thinking BEG might like it, it has a few teachers in it.


Entered at Sat Jan 15 21:47:44 CET 2011 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

However, unlike his friend Helm, Hudson expresses no bitterness towards Robertson. In his 1993 memoir, This Wheel's On Fire, Helm suggests Hudson was cheated out of royalties. "That could hurt if it were true," says Garth. "I don't know how deeply a man could hurt if it were true. "But I didn't contribute in the same way as everybody else. I'd be around when songs were written, and I'd try to think of something silly to put in. Maybe I was just envious of the writers who were filling up yellow legal pads." Hudson, Danko and Manuel sold their publishing rights to Robertson. "The deal was made. It was a good job. And I got out of it alive.%Pr


Entered at Sat Jan 15 21:40:58 CET 2011 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

"What I did was add texture and variety to the music," Hudson said."Every song gave a clearly different choice of instruments that I could use. Usually, in the studio, I'd listen to the basic track, while the singers were being worked out, I'd add a bit here and there, work it out, and after a few takes, we'd decide what was good to add to the basic part of the song.%2Pr


Entered at Sat Jan 15 20:29:57 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Garth and answers

I've always had the feeling that Garth knows exactly what went on, but "Honeyboy" is never going to tell. I think he is an amazing person and somewhat above the squabbling. His main interest is in the music (that he does so well)not gossip.


Entered at Sat Jan 15 20:20:38 CET 2011 from (69.182.87.6)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: I and I

Or John Fogerty.... but I thought the whole point of the Band was that it was NOT a John Fogerty situation. At least according to Robbie.


Entered at Sat Jan 15 19:21:16 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

No "I" in team? Try telling David Beckham, Maradona, Pele etc …


Entered at Sat Jan 15 19:19:49 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Song righting

In the new "Word" Dave Atkins has a long interview. He was lead singer odf Dave Curtiss & The Tremors and Curtiss Muldoon and retired from music in 1976. His career was revived when Madonna rewrote a verse of his song "Serephyn" and recorded it as "Ray of Light." He ended up with only 15% of the writer's share royalty, but says that was between half a million and a million pounds.

Anyway, in his long career he backed Chuck Berry (as every other British musician did). I think Jeff will enjoy his comment:

"If you asked him what key something was in he'd just show you his fingers and say, 'this one.'. It wasn't easy playing with him because so many of his songs seemed like piano tunes and when you were behind him you couldn't see his fingers.'

So many of his songs seemed like piano tunes …


Entered at Sat Jan 15 18:35:19 CET 2011 from (69.182.87.6)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

There's no "I" in TEAM.

A musical group is kind of like a team......no?


Entered at Sat Jan 15 18:15:43 CET 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Subject: On Writing

An interesting read posted by BEG. I can understand RR's sentiment on writing. Recentely I authored a presentation on goals and strategies for an organization in the upcoming year. I brought it to the Exec board for approval. There were tweaks made in some of the language and the approach in which it would be presented. I still wrote it. The foundation and the body was mine, some of the wardrobe may have been changed a little but still I was given credit for writing it. Now if the plan is a great success, I wonder how many from the board will front run to take the credit for their writings? It's always interesting to watch that aspect.

Another example: while in a creative session years ago, ideas were being bantered about for promoting some sports programing. We wanted to work the on-air guys into it. One of the team came up with a general idea. However he didn't put together. I took the idea and worked it, wrote it, shaped it into a cohesive, workable campaign. I got the credit and won an award for it. He was not happy about it and always thought he should have gotten a writing credit for it. He didn't. Is that fair?


Entered at Sat Jan 15 16:30:36 CET 2011 from (12.51.52.166)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Something for all Dick &Dickless Tracys to entertain

In my humble opinion, Garth would have the most thoughtful, most legitimately scoped, most credible, and most fairminded, thoughts and history to offer on the subject of Band songwriting.

Justoffering a clue. Or a point in the direction to a clue. Garth has the answers to the mystery.


Entered at Sat Jan 15 10:27:31 CET 2011 from (41.97.215.81)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: Peter V / hoping to find some old forgotten words of ancient melodies *

Peter V. Great post (Never the Twain ) Very enlightening and priceless indications for my current field of interest. Impressing how words have a life, may change and get different visages, fade and reappear through tines and spaces.,
------------

For historic probity, my last post reports a source which somewhat summarizes the dominant opinion I developed through my so many readings on North-African anthropology. I just forgot a basic truth, that Constantine is a very special point in space and time

A song written in 1802. A most credible witnessing, and a living social portrait of the city of Constantine in year 1802, Article of André Cour "Constantine en 1802, d'après une chanson populaire de Cheikh Belqasem", in La Revue Africaine, Vol. 60 page 224 [link above]

The line 27 of the songtext, as translated by A. Cour [top-right page 235]
"Les Juifs y ont trouvé une amitié(protectrice); ils sont devenus hauts et puisssants. Ils ont des vêtements et des palais qui stupéfient"
(Translation of the translation) : "The Jews found there a friendship (protector); they became high and powerful. They have clothes and palaces which amaze"

My translation of line 27 directly from the Magrebin text [bottom-right page 229]
"The Jews enjoy sympathy; now they became high, with impressing clothes and palaces"

The reverse side of my last post. Of course now I will re-read the whole thing with new lights

WARNING : The link above is a ZIP format of a PDF file of "La Revue Africaine, Vol. 60," better download than open. My insurance given the sensitivity of the subject

* - the post subject is a line from Toto's song Africa which amazed me through its haunting atmosphere by the days I listened the album. Today I am in Africa, and my [what an exciting] job is "hoping to find some old forgotten words of ancient melodies"
FANTASY COMES TRUE


Entered at Sat Jan 15 01:58:04 CET 2011 from (76.68.81.246)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

I was thinking about Robbie's "This Is Where I Get Off"....as in leaving The Band or as in having the time of his life with The Band and was looking for some clues again in this article.

Some excerpts from "The Band Part 1 According to George Harrison Better Than the Beatles and Part 2 A Machine of Five Pieces"

Robbie: "So after we did ‘The Last Waltz’ thing and it was like, ‘Okay, here’s our time of sanctuary and really just figuring out how we can do some wonderful things together in the future’. And not so much schlepping around the country but creative things, taking things out of the air like we had done in the past and making them exist in a really powerful musical fashion. That’s what I was excited about, and if some of it could be involved with film or other progressive ideas that was exciting, but it didn’t happen. So I thought, ‘Well, this is just more of the same. I don’t know how to make this something other than what it is’, and I thought the best thing that I could do for all concerned right now is get out of the way, and that’s what I chose to do. I’m sure that Levon could have easily thought at the time that maybe I was letting him down. I didn’t mean to let him down at all, I just was in a survival mode. I just needed to get out of the way. I had other creative interests that were drawing me to them."

“"Pivotal” is absolutely the word. I mean everybody just had a unique talent and a unique character as well. I mean all of these things kind of add up to a whole, but just talking about the talent I could go on about this forever. But Garth, there’s never been anything like this in rock ‘n’ roll before or since. Just his whole approach to music and his background and what he brought to the table, the certain sophistication musically above and beyond the rest of us. And the fact that he chose to play a Lowry organ in the beginning was really unusual. And his technique on the piano, he could pull anything out of the woodwork. He played horns, tenor and soprano, the accordion and any keyboard… He was one of the first musicians to really be painting soundscapes, which back then there wasn’t a lot of people doing that. Musicians know there is no other Garth out there. And also, just who Garth is and everything, he’s just an extraordinary character. Rick was one of these people who could pick up any instrument and in ten minutes he had something going on it. He just had that ability. And nobody played bass like Rick. It was just something that he invented completely; his approach to the instrument, and of course there’s his beautiful vocal sound, which was heartbreaking. Levon had a lot of ‘feel’ in his musicality if you know what I mean. He was somebody that when he would play something, right away you could just feel it so good. It was just like, “Oh, I see where the groove is here.” He was really, really gifted in that way and an amazing vocal sound as well and the fact that he was also a good guitar player, mandolin player and all that kinda stuff. Richard was always, you know, he was considered the guy with the most legitimate voice in the group, like really a ‘singer’ singer." He was the one that had the biggest range and the fullest voice. And needless to say, besides Richard’s playing piano and organ and everything, his approach to the drums is… unchallenged! (Laughs)"

"Having all band members able to play different instruments meant lots of creative avenues opened up. Richard’s drumming on ‘Rag Mama Rag’ is so loose and funky; Levon’s guitar is rocking on ‘Jemima Surrender’. This raises the subject of song ownership, which I realise may be a sore point after all the conflicting reports and subsequent focus, but at what point does a contribution to a song deserve a co-writing credit?"

"It’s very clear when people write songs or when they don’t write songs. We have a job that we have to do as a band, just playing the songs ands performing the songs and all of that. Then there’s that other part of it where somebody goes off and takes something out of the air that didn’t exist and makes it exist. You know, I wrote quite a few songs with Richard and I wrote them with Richard because we were writing the songs together, you know? (Chuckles) I did some things on a couple of things here and there with Rick, and Levon, he wrote a song once and I helped him finish it up. But, you know, it’s pretty cut and dry. I mean this whole thing of whatever Levon has said about the songwriting and everything, it’s just silly to me."

"I know it’s quite a contentious subject…

"It’s not really that contentious at all because I was there, I know what happened. And whenever I wrote a song with Richard, Richard and I wrote the song. There was nobody questioning it. Nobody ever questioned any of the songwriting. This thing came twenty years after the fact with Levon and it’s just kind of pathetic to me that at that point twenty years later, all of a sudden he’s saying – I don’t even know what he’s saying, that he wrote the songs or something, but it’s ridiculous."

"Do you have any regrets at all about your time with The Band?

"No. Outside of what we were talking about, not at all. The Band was its own truth and I just wish that Richard and Rick were with us, that’s all."


Entered at Fri Jan 14 22:02:19 CET 2011 from (173.168.95.126)

Posted by:

Robert J.Harrigan

Location: NEW PORT RICHEY,FLORIDA.

Subject: 2011 JAZZ FESTIVALS/FLORIDA

I am looking for talent for my clients,events all of 2011, JF/Fl,3215 PLAYER DRIVE,NEW PORT RICHEY,Fl.34655-2121. Attn:R.J.Harrigan:Music Advisor/Artist Liaison.


Entered at Fri Jan 14 21:08:24 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: I can see why - they still have issues with Ophiuchus being wrenched away. Interesting name that.


Entered at Fri Jan 14 20:53:45 CET 2011 from (90.239.90.5)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Nationalities # 3

For your information: The Americans are called for "Pig Meat Yankees" in Finnish internet disgussions forums. I don't like people to be called for ANYTHING! Sorry for my compatriots.


Entered at Fri Jan 14 20:48:50 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

But of course, we could be accused of "Astrological prejudice" rather than racial prejudice. Astrological prejudice makes sense tough. Racial does not.


Entered at Fri Jan 14 20:47:20 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Bill M, any sensible woman would walk away from a Scorpio male. That's why you ask signs. I have two close aquaintances who can get a 75-90% average on guessing signs


Entered at Fri Jan 14 20:46:30 CET 2011 from (90.239.90.5)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Nationalities

Many nationalities in my recent post are controversial in political, national and religional meaning. I didn't use them knowingly. I just use these names at dinner table, right or wrong.


Entered at Fri Jan 14 20:15:31 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: native intelligence

"Racial prejudice is a terrible thing, Yossarian. It really is. It's a terrible thing to treat a decent, loyal Indian like a nigger, kike, wop or spic."

"You wouldn't believe it, Yossarian, but this used to be a pretty good country to live in before they loused it up with their goddamn piety."

--Chief White Halfoat


Entered at Fri Jan 14 20:06:10 CET 2011 from (90.239.90.5)

Posted by:

NorWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: The Sign/Nationalities

Joan, I am Bandigtarius.

To complete my answer to Peter's post, here is the list of the nationalities of my former colleagues and students: finnish, swedish, norwegian, estonian, polish, scottish, tunisian, indian(sri lanka), palestinian, slovenian, kosovian, libanese, polish, tsechien, slovakien, hungarian, canadian, chinese(vietnamien), jordanien, egyptien, algerian, uruguayian, chilean, bolivian, dutch, german, austrian, thai, somalian, sudanese, west-african(others), central-african(others), south-african(others).

POOOFF! Now I am going to spent the rest of my life in FINNISH sauna drinking FINNISH beer and eating FINNISH sausages with FINNISH mustard!!!


Entered at Fri Jan 14 19:57:03 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Joan: I wonder if any suitor, in the entire history of bar-room astrological come-ons, has ever walked away from a civil response on the grounds of anticipated incompatibility. Except for Robbie, who's got a black belt in clairvoyance - though I guess he wouldn't have to ask anyway.


Entered at Fri Jan 14 19:39:40 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: What's your sign

I'm a Capricorn, but this chart would make me a Saggitarius. I really don't care either way, but it sure will louse up the pick up line "What's your sign?" Will it now be "What was your sign?"


Entered at Fri Jan 14 19:05:55 CET 2011 from (90.239.132.164)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Entered at Fri Jan 14 14:40:36 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Got your point, Peter. - Once I had a group of students from 13 different nationalities and 4 different religions. All grown-up men who coud have been able to throw me out of the window. They all were in war with eachother in some part of the world. A West-African guy called his Finnish friend for his "N'gg'rpal". What can I say. I loved them all!!!


Entered at Fri Jan 14 18:01:05 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Limited knowledge (on my part)

Sorry … I'm so used to judging record sleeves by Inc v Ltd v Pty that I had failed to take Canada into account.


Entered at Fri Jan 14 17:40:45 CET 2011 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Subject: Too precious

Never thought I'd ever be posting a link to 'The Star Spangled Banner' but.....

Yeah , Peter, what do you mean Ltd. refers to a British company? I've been paying taxes to the wrong government all these years? In my experience companies around here tend to go 75/25 Ltd./Inc.


Entered at Fri Jan 14 16:46:18 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Last Laugh

Perhaps it's fitting that Volume 1 of Mark Twain's complete autobiography was published recently, 100 years after his death as he specified. Currently at #5 on The New York Times Nonfiction Bestseller list, it's full title includes the following: "The Complete Authentic Unexpurgated Edition, Nothing Has Been Omitted, Not Even Scandalous Passages Likely to Cause Grown Men to Gasp and Women to Collapse in Tears -- No Children Under 7 Allowed to Read This Book Under Any Circumstances".


Entered at Fri Jan 14 16:27:59 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Peter V: How does the "Ltd" tell you it's a British company?

Empty N: The Ismaili way is a pretty good example of assimilation without conversion.

We went to see Maritimes phenom Matt Andersen playing with Colin Linden the other night. Tom Wilson got up and guested too - all magic. The link above is to a solo Andersen performance in a little club; I suggest you check out one of the links to him singing "Ain't No Sunshine", his big party tune and the one that really grabbed us when we heard it on the radio early last year. Colin did a lovely version of his "Sad And Beautiful World", the original version of which had Rick Danko singing harmony and Richard Bell playing organ. He later used as the title tune for his commendable comp.

I think this astrology change is BS. All the cusp-dwellers close to me are mercurial in the extreme, which makes sense. And I'm supposed to believe that they all really belong in the stable centre of their respective new signs? Come now!

Actually, astrology has a bit of a Hawks link for me. I was even more sceptical in the mid-'70s when former Suede / former Hawk Scott Cushnie, who I'd spoken to once on the phone, took me for a coffee. He mentioned in passing that he sometimes did readings for people in the restaurant we were in. So I said something like, "Can you tell a person's sign right away? He said something like, "Yes, often." I said something like, "Well, go ahead." And he did, right away. Another friend later told me that there are only two signs who would offer up a challenge like that, so Scott had a 50/50 chance from the start, but I'm still impressed.


Entered at Fri Jan 14 15:37:34 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: bowdlering for dollars

I'm surprised how much traction this is getting. The Canadian Broadcast Standards Council decision to ban unexpurgated versions of "Money for Nothing" has annoyed a lot of people besides myself. Commentariatchiks at the CBC, anyway. The local radio drive-home-show guy was in considerable dudgeon as I drove home yesterday, Evan Solomon raised the issue on his _Power and Politics_ TV program last evening, and the local drive-to-work-show hostess brought it up again this morning. In all three instances, they said "faggot" out loud. I don't have an exact quote, but Solomon said something like, "we're not allowed to say 'faggot' on the air."

In related news, apparently an Edmonton radio station has - or will - push back by playing a loop of the uncensored version for a solid hour. (Too bad it's Edmonton; Alberta's reactionary-rightwing rep will undoubtedly cloud the issues.)

On the other hand, the GLBT community is apparently delighted with the decision -- see [My link].


Entered at Fri Jan 14 14:40:36 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Location: Never the Twain …

The N-word. When I was teaching English, there was always an issue with German speakers using the word ‘neger’ for black people. My modern German dictionary marks it as ‘derogatory’ but 30 to 40 years ago it was not used self-conciously and I don’t think it was derogatory then. Nor was negra / negro in Italian. It was just the word for ‘black.’ I guess that knowledge of the use in English has made it derogatory. It was embarassing in classes because we had French-speaking West Africans in numbers, and Swiss and Germans, and they’d happily describe their classmates by their own N-word.

So do you bowdlerize a classic? If I were doing an adaptation of a classic into simplified English for foreign learners, yes, I definitely would because you’re changing so much anyway. And you wouldn’t want learners to think it acceptable.

If I were using the original Mark Twain text it would be a travesty to change a single word, because it is a masterpiece. It’s clearly part of the theme of “Don’t sell me down the river” etc, which is central. You have to put it into context, and use it show that language evolves and changes. So for example “naughty” in Shakespeare meant “wicked” or “evil”. Now it’s a child who draws on the wall. Or in modern Britain “old bugger” is an affectionate term, where 300 years ago it suggested a sexual orientation. In both those examples, a word became “weaker”. The N-word is the opposite.

The colour description issue comes up a lot with EFL / ESL texts, because US editors insist on “African-American” however often you tell them that it doesn’t cover Africans, Afro-Caribbeans, Australian Aborigines, Melanesians, some Sri-Lankans etc. The basic rule is refer to nationalities never physical characteristics, but that wouldn’t help in (say) describing someone. I’ve seen ESL textbooks where a picture of someone is described and they fail to mention the first distinguishing characteristic at all: colour.


Entered at Fri Jan 14 14:19:29 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Welcome to the Cancerians, Joe J. This will mean more time with family instead of friends, you realize that. Oh, except that now I've just become a Gemini. The obsession with sun signs is relatively recent anyway …

Astrology sun sign columns (splitting forecasts into 12 zodiac signs) began comparatively recently with R.H.Naylor in the Sunday Express in 1930. Commissioned to write a horoscope report on the newly born Princess Margaret he included a few general remarks on those also born under Leo, mentioning that her life would be “eventful” and she might grow up to be sociable, and love to be surrounded by groups of friends. Naylor also added that events of tremendous importance to the Royal Family and the nation will come about near her seventh year. In 1936 her uncle, Edward VIII, abdicated and her father unexpectedly became king.

Such was the public interest that the editor quickly expanded it to a regular forecast for all the twelve signs. Until that point astrologers were more interested in the whole chart, and thought the characteristic of the ascendant at the time of birth more important than the sun sign.


Entered at Fri Jan 14 12:43:42 CET 2011 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Subject: What's your sign man?

I used to be a Leo but now I'm a Cancer. I knew something's been a bit off lately. Like everyone else I'd been blaming the weather.


Entered at Fri Jan 14 11:38:58 CET 2011 from (41.97.209.177)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

From a recent newspaper "Alan Gribben, a 69-year-old English professor at Auburn University Montgomery, said he would have opposed the change for much of his career, but he began using "slave" during public readings and found audiences more accepting.

" John Wallace, a teacher at the Mark Twain Intermediate School in northern Virginia, published a version of "Huck Finn" about 20 years ago that used "slave" rather than the N-word." .

In this situation, the ethics requires to add the name Gribben as coauthor or modifyor in the front cover of the edition .

It's a crime to alter the least letter from a Masterpiece text, whatever is the issue. .

Band Connection 1 : that's what I ask for concerning my GB posts.

Band connection 2: in the lyrics of El Boughi [see 2 posts of mine infra, or better listen the linked 27' song]. One verse [6:00] is

"hewedt lel bousten neghsel aagli tareb"
Translate
"hewedt in the garden to wash my amused mental"

"hewed" [the terminal "t" is removed for infinitive], translates literally "judaize".
In Constantine for the past centuries, the verb only applied to a Moslim subject, and had variant meanings "to be assimilated, to adopt the customs, to adopt the culture, to be attached,…etc… to the Israelite community.
. I can't believe it include conversion, except very rare cases, my visibility of the past is limited, but what's the difference between assimilated and converted. ? .
This is not an isolated case, and this phenomenon is a very local matter. Maybe nowadays one can easily admit it, but by 1840 and before, it could be puzzling to retrieve the objective reasons for someone to be assimilated, when "The Jews occupy the bottom of the society, have to get dressed in black, and live in a reserved district" (Jacques-Philippe Laugier de Tassy; in "Histoire du Royaume d'Alger" 1725)

I oppose to the theory "Yesterday is already History", the theory "History is an event enough in the past for which there is no more living witness and no actor".

If anybody is harmed by this post, tell them : go back and change the past


Entered at Fri Jan 14 09:48:12 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Record deals

Dave H … I was amazed when you said The Duke & The King didn't have an American record deal, but yes, both my CDs are produced and copyright Silva Screen Records Ltd. The "Ltd." indicates it's a British company. I assumed it was the normal license deal, not the original production. The praise here has been extraordinary, with both albums featuring high in "best of the year" summaries in magazines last year and this. Also both the small HMV here and the medium sized one had both albums in stock last week.

But trailing through their site and YouTube, videos are Jools Holland on BBC and Belfast. Presumably the interest in the UK should prompt a deal? According to their website (which again is UK hosted) the Rolling Stone review was great too. As I said ages ago, the latest credits Levon Helm Studios and they're a Woodstock area band.

For David P and other vinyl fans, their website store features both a single on 45, and a 180 gram vinyl LP. You can tell the LP was in their mind. It sequences like two sides even.

Their current status reminds me of Lambchop who were very much the darling of the British music press over a five year period, and sell-out shows here, though apparently most of them had to maintain their day jobs at home.


Entered at Fri Jan 14 04:20:47 CET 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Huck Finn - it's a disgrace those changes. Teach it in the context of the times it was written in.


Entered at Thu Jan 13 22:34:37 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: yoot format

Bill M: See [My link].

BTW, very disturbed that you have self-identified as one of _those_. This calls for some serious recalibration . . . .


Entered at Thu Jan 13 22:15:38 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Words can hurt. I know this from having spent a year being sneered at as a "Downtown Elite" (pronounced A-leet) by numerous fukwits - federal Conservative politicians, suburban politicians, talk-radio hosts, newspaper op-edsters and columnists ... With both federal and provincial elections in the office, I don't see much hope for 2011.

Coincidentally, as a result of our previous discussion of disc lengths I pulled out my extended version of Sly's Greatest Hits, and guess what just started: "Don't Call Me N, W". As obscure as Sly in general and this song in particular may be to modern yoots, I have to suspect that the chances of them reading Huck Finn in any form are even more remote.


Entered at Thu Jan 13 21:33:35 CET 2011 from (174.89.119.104)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Simon: Thank you……….and appreciate suggestions on all music related dvd’s………………………For Bill or anyone who has not listened to Paul Weller since The Jam….I would recommend his greatest hits compilation called “Modern Classics” – covers the 1990’s and is superb.

That story on the Newfoundlander by Sadavid who complained about the word “faggot” being used 3 times in a song and then to have the song “removed” from Canadian airwaves is absurd on too many levels to count…..but the kicker is all the radio dj’s would have to do is play the live version as linked above…. Mark Knofler himself removed the “offending” word a long time ago……… a final absurdity is that it would be unlikely that the characters delivering the fridge would have used the multiple options “queenie”, “mother” or “mama” that Knofler now does………….oh well…..


Entered at Thu Jan 13 21:23:02 CET 2011 from (216.66.9.207)

Posted by:

ded

http://www.lienscash.com/l/wrbux


Entered at Thu Jan 13 21:10:46 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

N***er Jim was always a bit of a problem in Huck Finn, but "injun" is just a pronunciation indicator for "indian". I can't see how 'indian' can possibly be different or less offensive or more PC. I can't see Huck saying "Native-American". So what do they call, Jim? Slave Jim? But he isn't a slave. The Wiki article shows it's been an issue since 1955. I don't see how you get over it. It is one of the greatest works in the language. The same word peppers every episode of "The Wire". The trouble is that at one level it's a young story, while it's also a very adult story.


Entered at Thu Jan 13 20:59:14 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: video for RtO

Here's Lance Anderson (producer of the 2B3 CD with its numerous Band connections) and drummer Mike Sloski doing Jimmy Smith's "Gospel Time" in a bar recently.


Entered at Thu Jan 13 20:35:11 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: How Long Has This Been Going On

There's also an economic factor involved, as royalty rates are based on the number of songs included and on the length of each.


Entered at Thu Jan 13 20:23:06 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Re CD lengths, I certainly wouldn't expect an artist to fill an entire CD with new material, but I'm on the side of the complainers when it comes to reissues. A lot of the complaining there is justified payback for the record companies having in the early days merely slapped the same old LP onto a disc and put it on sale at at least twice the price - without there even being studio costs to recoup. Then they got wiser and started adding bonus tracks, but not without regularly backsliding into good ol' gouging.


Entered at Thu Jan 13 20:20:30 CET 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

I went the Dukes website and looked here and there and listened here and there. One of the pieces sounded like - what would happen if Lenny Kravitz had joined Wilco. I liked what I heard.


Entered at Thu Jan 13 20:04:52 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Injun Joe, the Duke & the King, and the Royal Nonesuch

sadavid: Speaking of context & censorship -- An upcoming edition of Mark Twain's "Adventures of Tom Sawyer" and "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" (featuring the grifter characters the Duke and the King), replaces usuage of the n-word with "slave" and Injun with "Indian".


Entered at Thu Jan 13 19:41:38 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: erratum

In my previous post, I should have written "Dire Straits," not "Dire Straights." The irony was unintentional . . . .


Entered at Thu Jan 13 19:33:20 CET 2011 from (136.167.102.118)

Posted by:

Dave H

I agree that in most cases 40-45 minutes is the ideal length for an album. We might have more albums considered "classics" in the CD age if they were subject to the restrictions placed on vinyl, forcing artists to cull their best work and sequence it in a compelling way. I think there has been a move back in that direction in recent years after an era in which 60-70 minute albums had become common. Not every album is up to the standards of Blonde on Blonde, Exile on Main St., or the White Album!

Peter V: I've heard great things about the Duke & the King and have "Shaky" on an Uncut Magazine compilation; still wondering why they don't have a record deal here in the US.


Entered at Thu Jan 13 19:18:39 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: stealing from the help

This is cute. The Canuckistanian branches of the recorded-music evil multinationals recently settled (for $45M) a class-action lawsuit brought by the estate of Chet Baker. In brief, the evil multis had taken advantage of a regulatory convenience which allowed them to sell compilation recordings without first obtaining permission from copyright holders -- if the songs in question were placed on a "Pending List." Then they conveniently forgot to follow up. Of course, "the settlement is a compromise of disputed claims and is not an admission of liability or wrongdoing by the record labels."

In unrelated news, the Canadian Broadcast Standards Council, the standards branch of the Canadian Association of Broadcasters, has ruled that a St. John's, Newfoundland radio station contravened the Association's Code of Ethics by broadcasting the Dire Straights song "Money for Nothing" -- because of the use of the 'f-word' in that song. It is astonishing to me that the adjudicating panel did not allow the use under the "contextual considerations" section of their Code which allows for "legitimate artistic usage." It's legitimate to have a _character_ express bigoted attitudes, for example.


Entered at Thu Jan 13 18:54:27 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Just Another Brick in the Wall

Yet there are many who complain & feel cheated when CDs contain much less than the maximum capacity of 80 minutes of music. As a vinyl aficionado, I don't suscribe to that thought.

Another more recent development, with regard to digital downloads, involves the artistic integrity of music albums. Are individual songs just merely bricks in the wall connected only by the mortar of technology, or are they carefully assembled pieces designed to fit together as a whole concept of the recording artists?

Last year Pink Floyd filed a lawsuit against EMI contending that the download sales of "unbundled" individual tracks from their albums violated a clause in their 1967 contract preventing the record label from altering their recordings, such as "Dark Side of the Moon" and "The Wall". In addition, they joined the ranks of other musicians in alleging that they were not receiving all the royalties from online distribution that were due to them. In March the judge ruled in the group's favour, agreeing that they have the right to "preserve the artistic integrity of the albums". Last Tuesday, in a settlement of the dispute, the group negotiated a new five-year contract with EMI, allowing the label to retain distribution rights as individual iTunes tracks and complete albums. Although the exact details are confidential, it'a a good guess that the group members will receive an increase in royalties for the catalogue that includes 14 studio and 3 live albums.


Entered at Thu Jan 13 18:44:34 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Simon: Good lyrics about a sad event no doubt, but I found it hard to get past the boppiness of it all. Unlike the happy blue-and-white checked-shirt wearer in the front row who doesn't seem to be a words guy.


Entered at Thu Jan 13 18:24:07 CET 2011 from (217.44.154.182)

Posted by:

Simon

Web: My link

Kevin - Thanks for those comments on Weller. You might like the song in the above link ... one of my favourites. It concerns an old school friend of his who died far too young. I also managed to get around to watching "The Future is Unwritten" a few days ago. Great stuff. Interesting to see the footage of the Clash with Martin Scorsese. Also the Mescaleros' "Johnny Appleseed" has become a classic song for me. I'd also recommend the Julien Temple documentary on Dr Feelgood, "Oil City Confidential." It's a worthy piece of social history and a lot of fun too.

I agree about the length of CDs. I mean, 80 minutes is good for compilations and perhaps instrumentals and classical but I think 35 to 40 minutes is adequate for an album. I suppose there are a few honorable exceptions.


Entered at Thu Jan 13 17:35:06 CET 2011 from (174.89.119.104)

Posted by:

Kevin J

I have repeated this story a few times but it was an astute observation that I think about just about every time I listen to a cd….that is, Paul Simon’s story about how LP’s were perfect because one had to get up and switch sides ( or not ) but that cd’s were way too long ( he likened it to sitting through a university English class where one just needed a break after an hour or so……….He even joked that even with his own music – 7 or 8 songs in a row was all that he could take……………………..so this Ryan Adams type disease that producers fell in love with of putting 17 or 18 tracks on everyone’s new release was insane and ultimately hurt the artists – the new ones and the established ones alike……..the other thing that drove me nuts for years was the habit of producers to load up all new cd’s with the perceived strongest tracks all up front………..with no thought at all to a proper song sequence………Give the Kings of Leon credit as their latest finds the best material at position 10. 11 and 12 if memory serves………..

Simon Felice is a very special talent indeed……


Entered at Thu Jan 13 15:23:12 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: The Duke & The King

I'm completely entranced by both CDs by The Duke & The King, and realized one virtue (among many, such as having four vocalists who can swap instruments around, good songs and varied material) is that both CDs are the right length - i.e, ten tracks and the length of an LP not the length of a CD. That's why they manifestly have no "filler" material. I wish other bands would edit themselves in the same way. Highly recommended.


Entered at Thu Jan 13 15:06:11 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Bill M: I checked my LP copy and you're correct. David Wilcox on guitar and Bill Dickinson on bass, in addition to Amos Garrett and Earl Palmer.


Entered at Thu Jan 13 14:54:53 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

David P: That sounds right, thanks. I'm pretty sure that Maria Muldaur's "Sweet Harmony" version features two great guitarists - Amos Garrett and David Wilcox, Amos's replacement in Ian and Sylvia's Great Speckled Bird.


Entered at Wed Jan 12 17:33:45 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: carnival in memphis

BEG - thanks for that RRHOF link; enjoyed the snippet of Steve Cropper on "Life is a Carnival" -- what a funky tune that is!


Entered at Wed Jan 12 17:08:51 CET 2011 from (68.171.231.18)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The Staple Singers / Maria Muldaur

Bill M: Were you thinking of the Rev. W.H. Brewster's "As An Eagle Stirreth Her Nest", a gospel classic recorded earlier by The Staple Singers. Ms. Muldaur covered it on "Sweet Harmony" and her live "Gospel Nights" LP. The former version featured Amos Garrett on guitar and Earl Palmer on drums, the latter had Steve Bruton on guitar, Ron Tutt on drums and The Chambers Brothers on harmony vocals.


Entered at Wed Jan 12 13:50:03 CET 2011 from (76.68.83.206)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

The Band
Saint Paul Minnesota
1971


Entered at Wed Jan 12 13:46:02 CET 2011 from (76.68.83.206)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Robbie and Louuu!


Entered at Wed Jan 12 09:41:35 CET 2011 from (90.239.99.250)

Posted by:

NorthOuestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Youtube access and FF

Joan, there is alouays Norouegian broouser Opera. All broousers have security problems so this is not a recommendation but Opera has a sympathetic GB connection because it has a button EMPTY NOOU.


Entered at Wed Jan 12 04:21:49 CET 2011 from (80.6.205.160)

Posted by:

steven

Location: london
Web: My link

great music love all there albums. will always be remembered.


Entered at Tue Jan 11 22:52:33 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Hank wouldn't a-done it that way

Or Luke, the drifter.


Entered at Tue Jan 11 21:25:24 CET 2011 from (174.89.119.104)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Sorry Joan........No time.....Still agonizing over whether Luke the Drifter is luke the drifter or Luke the drifter………


Entered at Tue Jan 11 21:24:04 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Youtube access

I found the fix for the access to Youtube from Firefox. Here it is:

hey there, the same thing was happening to me. I linked the account and then that weird error message appeared. one thing solved the issue for me: hit Ctrl+Shift+Del (clear recent history), expand the Details and then leave only Cookies marked. click on Everything on the time range drop box. then click Clear Now. restart firefox and you can access youtube and login again! hope it helped. ;)

It worked!


Entered at Tue Jan 11 20:58:48 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Youtube accesss

Has anyone else encountered this problem?: I use Mozilla Firefox as my default browser.today when I went to Youtube, they put up a screen saying I had to join my Youtube acct. to my Google acct. I did that and then it said Youtube server was directing me to a link they couldn't make. On a hunch, I went into Google Chrome to access Youtube - No Problem. It appears that Google is attempting to knock out Firefox,

Anyone??


Entered at Tue Jan 11 18:25:50 CET 2011 from (174.89.119.104)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: Paul Weller.......Misheard Lyrics

Simon: I enjoyed your post on Paul Weller…………all true………perhaps we have been better served as fans by his lack of world wide sales as I doubt he would have been as prolific had he made multi millions in the early days……there was a period when I admittedly turned him off almost entirely because of his darling status with the British press…..but it was really just silliness on my part because he has made consistently good music for a long period of time.......

Misheard Lyrics: This could go on for years as there are many that I just always thought were there that just were not……………The line “blow a 50 amp fuse”….in ‘Can’t Always Get What You Want”….I had always thought was a clever play on the anti-alcoholic drug antabuse…..and was “blow a 1/5th of antabuse”………another one was “Out of the Blue” embarrassing this one but I had never heard the line “lonely bar” and thought Robbie was singing about some type of magical chocolate bar or something of the like……….


Entered at Tue Jan 11 17:48:47 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

David P: Your post about Maria Muldaur caused me to look on YouTube for my favourite song from her "Harmony" LP, something about an eagle. No luck, but I did find Maria and Amos Garrett doing "Somebody To Love" together in '95. Even back in the '70s this was one of Amos's big show tunes (and he sang as well as played it); he doesn't sing on this one, but he does deliver a solo that clocks in at just over a full minute.


Entered at Tue Jan 11 13:26:18 CET 2011 from (68.171.234.144)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Maria Muldaur

Garth also participated on a session for the 1973 Maria Muldaur album, playin piano on a take for Kate McGarrigle's "Work Song". However, a different take, featuring Mark Jordan on piano, was ultimately used. Garth later received special thanks on Ms. Muldaur's 1974 follow-up release "Waitress In A Donut Shop", which also featured an impressive list of backing musicians.


Entered at Tue Jan 11 12:11:49 CET 2011 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: and welcome back to Empty Now.

I've missed your posts.


Entered at Tue Jan 11 10:18:36 CET 2011 from (41.97.152.18)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: Peter V, Joan, Steve, Bill M / Vowels & Consonants

Peter V:

thanks; I am really touched by your welcome.

Joan : thanks, I was sure if there's only one Gber who wouldn’t be embarrassed by my come back, it was you.

Steve :

Actually, what drew me back is an irresistible call to amaze Bumbles.
As you know I joined lately a Learned Society whose interest is History of North-African :usic, really a bunch of impressing people, with encyclopedic knowledge. I used to jump in the GB to boast every new exciting tip I learn, these days the debate turns around El Boughi (the song written by the dead poet) with explosive discussions about a forgotten verse that no singer ever played :

"I remained in the orchard the time of an hourglass"

If you help me convert an hourglass duration in minutes, I will right know jump in the Learned Society to boast….

Bill M :

The fact is that in Arabic there are three pulmonal consonants (consonants originating from the bottom of the lungs); the only one in English there is "H" as in "Garth Hudson", and it already exists in Arabic.

Of the two remaining sounds, the first one a non-Arab speaker can only pronounce it with a cough [try it] , and the second one with a belch. .

in common Latin transcription of Spoken Arabic, the usage is that these three distinct sounds are either written "H", or more cleverly represented by the underlying vowel only.
With the growing internet culture, a recent practice is H[udson] is maintained "H" The cough is written "7" (btw I find it simply awful when I hear a beginner pronounce it with the corresponding guttural Spanish "J" ). The belch is written "3".

One a completely different issue, North-Africans use "ou" for "w". In the Middle-East the name would have been written Awabdia [more clever again]

I accept the terms and conditions for posting at this site


Entered at Tue Jan 11 06:07:26 CET 2011 from (76.99.245.65)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: by the frozen pond

Subject: apologies

I looked up the album, "Maria Muldaur" on allmusicguide (as I was really impressed by the lineup of musicians you listed). Indeed, they had Mr. Dave credited both as David Lindley and David Lynley. Ouch. Initially my guesses to your query would have been on an album in the early '70s by either Arlo Guthrie or Dave Mason. Those guys used a lot of the same personnel you cited, but certainly not all of them.


Entered at Tue Jan 11 02:06:06 CET 2011 from (68.171.233.228)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Toronto

Subject: magazines

Calvin's post reminds me that the current issue of "Penguin Eggs" magazine (with Ray Lamontagne on the cover) has a nice interview with Garth Hudson about his new album. Seems that a concert in Toronto in the spring is in the works.


Entered at Tue Jan 11 01:23:16 CET 2011 from (76.188.39.2)

Posted by:

calvin

Web: My link

Anyone pick up the latest Paste Magazine, in recognition of Robbie's Forthcoming Disc they have an article about the 10 best songs of the band, http://www.pastemagazine.com/blogs/lists/2011/01/the-10-best-the-band-songs.html

Obviously subjective as all hell, but its still nice to read. Paste has been my go to Music Mag for a few years now. For no other reason than the 20-25 song music sampler, now free download, of songs from new albums of performers who someone who likes the Band are probably goina like.


Entered at Tue Jan 11 00:56:04 CET 2011 from (184.151.127.218)

Posted by:

Steve

Gene-ethic Method= Single ply, and it makes him cry.


Entered at Mon Jan 10 23:52:08 CET 2011 from (174.109.52.73)

Posted by:

Taylor

Location: NC

Subject: Posters

I'm looking for a poster of the cover the brown album. Any leads?


Entered at Mon Jan 10 23:32:14 CET 2011 from (68.198.87.122)

Posted by:

gene

Subject: farm boy

Talk to the cows, your opinions don't really matter much to me.


Entered at Mon Jan 10 21:48:21 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: the Caledonia river

sadavid: If Richard Newell had Caledonia Ontario in mind, then the river in question would be the Grand, which meanders south of Brantford then heads east across the Six Nations Reserve to Caledonia and beyond. It's actually pretty significant for area residents, especially in the spring when it generally floods - often messily.


Entered at Mon Jan 10 21:06:35 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: out of the blue(s) highway(s)

Bill M: your comment reminded me of "Crazy River"'s refrain - "catch the blue train" - and I think that song is as much an evocation of JRR's oft-mentioned experiences on first hearing Delta music in the Delta as it is anything else.

I came across R. Newell's "Caledonia River" the other day (from the "Brown Derby album") and got to thinking of the geographical discussion in Mr. Viney's article on "Caledonia Mission." There's little doubt that Newell's river is the one that flows past the Six Nations nation - practically suburban Hamilton. But just as an exercise, I did some Googleation and discovered that exemplars of Cleveland, Kokomo, Caledonia and Yazoo St. can all be located in the great state of Mississippi. For what it's worth.

Newell's song rocks pretty good. Lyrically, it's a greazy, misogynist affair squarely in the centre of "Cripple Creek" (the folk-song psychic space, not the song) territory.


Entered at Mon Jan 10 20:17:20 CET 2011 from (85.255.44.145)

Posted by:

jh

Subject: Test

1...2...3


Entered at Mon Jan 10 19:47:38 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Peter. etal

I think its all been said. My only "correction" is according to my husband who lived there for three years, all Swiss households have a rifle, but the government keeps the ammunition. That would cut down on usage.


Entered at Mon Jan 10 19:33:22 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: what a difference an S makes

If you move the S from one word to the other, you go from the "Blues Highway" (Highway 61) to "Blue Highways", mentioned in line 1 of Robbie's "Resurrection" from "Storyville". Presumably that was a reference to William Least Heat-Moon's then-popular book about travelling secondary or tertiary highways across the US. An interesting road factoid is that Toronto's Yonge Street, which heads north from Lake Ontario, is the Province of Ontario's Highway 11, which continues north then west - way north of Lake Superior - then south again to Thunder Bay and on to the Minnesota border - where it becomes Highway 61, which of course continues south into Louisiana.


Entered at Mon Jan 10 18:35:32 CET 2011 from (206.53.153.0)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Where you want this killin' done?

In his latest song Robbie has revisited the Blues Highway once memorialized by Bob Dylan. One wonders if Robbie traveled down Highway 61 on his first youthful trip South to hook up with Ronnie Hawkins. Too wild for the Grand Ole Opry, Hank Williams drifted down to join Louisiana Hayride, where guitarists like Fred Carter Jr., James Burton and Reggie Young honed their Tele craft. And up and down that Highway, another young guitarist would blaze his way with The Hawks.


Entered at Mon Jan 10 18:19:24 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

That's odd. When you look at the GB, RR's new CD is there on the left, but when you press "Sign the GB" it goes. Anyway … misheard lyrics.

I found the EP "The Merseybeats On Stage" recently. It's not live, it's what they would have played if they were playing live according to the notes. But it's very good. Their version of "You Can't Judge A Book" has what we imagined the lyrics were at the time "I look like a bummer, but I'm a lover." We thought at the time that it was a bit rude (in the English sense of bummer, anyway), but got on and learned it. Years later I realized it was "I look like a farmer but I'm a lover."

The same song is also notable for a spoken bit with "turn your radio on … TURN IT UP!" which bears a remarkable similarity to "Caravan".


Entered at Mon Jan 10 18:10:05 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: it's all about the accordion

. . . apologies if this one is Old News, but I don't remember seeing it before . . . some great (if brief)footage from backstage at The Band's RRHOF induction . . . and a version of The Weight that isn't Old News . . . .


Entered at Mon Jan 10 17:21:16 CET 2011 from (184.151.127.218)

Posted by:

Steve

Gene, OK, since you disagree with me on everything else, that puts you into two, singular camps.

The single shooter ( Oswald)vs at least two shooters, in the Kennedy murder and the single, in the single vs two ply, toilet paper camp which might explain the irritable edge to many of your posts.


Entered at Mon Jan 10 17:15:42 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Here's a link to Danny Brooks singing his song mentioning THE Luke the Drifter, aka Hank Williams, in the first verse. Note Richard Bell on organ (and Michael Fonfara on piano).


Entered at Mon Jan 10 16:30:18 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: and another things

Re: "When the Night Was Young": it's gotta be "tent-show evangelists" plural. The terminal "s" isn't clear but grammar and logic demand it.

Should "Luke the drifter" (i.e. a drifter named Luke) be "Luke the Drifter" (i.e. _the_ Luke the Drifter)?


Entered at Mon Jan 10 16:12:26 CET 2011 from (24.222.146.233)

Posted by:

Jim McKenna

Location: Canada

Subject: Robbie

I love The Band and I love this website. It's got to be the most comprehensive guide to The Band and the solo albums on the internet. One thing - I've noticed alot of anger towards Robbie Robertson in the forums and discussions. Yes, Robbie treated the other 4 members badly at the end of the original line-up. Yes, he left Levon to suffer in poverty. Terrible treatment, to say the least. But, don't you all think it's time to let-it-go? It's been nearly 34 years. Why continue with this hatred? I noticed Robbie's upcoming CD is not even pictured to the left where all the other new CD's by Band members are. Let's all be fair, and let's all forgive. Robbie has some amazing recordings on his own and deserves our respect. The Band, from 67-77, would not have been the same without him.


Entered at Mon Jan 10 15:56:11 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: when the night was young

Our genial landlord has published a transcription of the lyrics -- see [My link]. Thanks very much to transcriber Mark Atkins.

May I suggest the following amendments: 1) "sundown light" vice "sundown line"; 2) "ON Highway 61" 3) "Delta" (capitalized); 4) "back roads" vice "back rooms"; 5) "late-night muse" vice "late night news." I also think the sun is rising "out of the sea" rather than "on the sea" but JRR's diction is not so great on this bit.

I've done a first-cut transcription for "How to Become Clairvoyant" but I'm stymied over what the protagonist was trying to do but couldn't sleep -- I'd be grateful for some clairity on this point . . . . (Note that "Crazy River" also involved some sleep issues.)


Entered at Mon Jan 10 15:52:21 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Amendments 1 to 10 came in a bunch in September 1789, so before even the Constitution was formally ratified. They were ratified in 1791 (when 3/4 of the states had agreed).

The one they should be quoting is Amendment (Revolution #) 9. "The enumeration in the Constitution of certain rights shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people."

I'd construe the "right to bear arms" denied the rights to "life" (let alone liberty or happiness) of a whole lot of people just two days ago.


Entered at Mon Jan 10 15:41:40 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

1) Dunc obviously meant to type "Scotland's Greatest GB Poster" but got carried away with the little whiff of elitism in the first couple of words.

2) Empty N: Yes, welcome back! I randomly clicked one of the follow-on links - to one by A Aouabdi (Arabic for lotsa vowels, I believe) - and was very impressed.

Peter V / Joan: Is a US constitutional amendment any easier to amend than any other part of the thing? Also, when and by whom was the amendment made? Being #2, it sounds pretty close to the source, meaning that most of the guys who wrote the original must've still been alive. Were they involved in writing the amendment and then voting for it? If not, were they asked their views? Were any of them ticked off with the change? In any case, why is such extravagant consideration given to the the views of a couple dozen (I'm guessing) very human guys who lived in a very different society two hundred plus years ago?


Entered at Mon Jan 10 15:01:13 CET 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Subject: Deadly Spin

Anyone interested in reading a book that looks into the corporate "for profit" world of Health Care should read Deadly Spin by Wendell Potter. Easy to read.


Entered at Mon Jan 10 14:39:00 CET 2011 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Health care, guns, stuff I shouldn't comment on...

the Australian medical system is great. If you need a doctor, you can get one. The free-marketeering idiots (for anyone who believes there is a free market here (which is different, btw, to wanting a free market) is an idiot) want us all to spend hundreds of dollars a month on private health care. We alreday spend hundreds on health care - every tax paying citizen puts 1.5% of their income tax into health (it's not enough, but it's fair.)

when the NHS was introduced in the UK, many people got to see the doctor for the first time. Same with medicare here. I don't see the objection to it: maybe one of our US correspondents can help me. I also think (and my late uncle will smite me for this) our gun laws are about right. If you want to own a gun, you can - automatic weapons are more or less banned, and guns over a certain calibre are banned - but if you want to own one, you need to be a farmer, or join a club. (You can form a club if you want - there's whole laws about that anyway). You need to keep the guns locked away in a safe, and the ammunition (I think) must be separate.

Many owners (including my uncle) hate this, but they feel that the legal, and law-abiding citizens are being punished for having an interest. Sort of...: for a new gun-oswner, you need to spend the extra (club membership, fixed safe) to own it. As a teenager, young adult, I did some shooting.. I hated killing animals (though I cheerfully admit I will eat them - we all have our hypocrisies...), but target shooting (even at cans) was fun. I don't really have the money for a safe (and I live in the inner city), so it's not really practical nor needful for me to have a gun. (My uncle had an extensive collection of ww2 weapons - which he very rarely fired...). (INner city trendoids find it surprising and disappointing I don't condemn gun ownership. I don't care.)


Entered at Mon Jan 10 14:07:11 CET 2011 from (76.66.124.131)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Bob Dylan & The Band
Isle Of Wight Festival 1969
EXCLUSIVE, NEVER BEFORE RELEASED.


Entered at Mon Jan 10 14:00:08 CET 2011 from (76.66.124.131)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

30 DAYS OUT
With Every Kiss You Leave A Little Shadow of Doubt

Your Sister’s (Record) Rack: Rick Danko


Entered at Mon Jan 10 13:56:29 CET 2011 from (184.151.127.210)

Posted by:

Steve

Peter, your link to the Independent had another article that caught my attention, the one about the US buying small arms munitions from Israel. 250,000 rounds fired per dead insurgent in Iraq. I guess, "hold your fire til you see the whites of their eyes" is only practiced in the movies.


Entered at Mon Jan 10 13:40:36 CET 2011 from (184.151.127.210)

Posted by:

Steve

Peter, M if you have the album, Maria Muldaur ( yes that's the one Jeff)you'll find that that a guy named, David Lynley, gets credited for playing, Hawaiian Guitar, on the first track, Any Old Time. I wondered if it was a misspell but went with what the album had printed. Such a great album, I left it out to give it a few more spins. Just wish I had one of David's turntables.

Brien, your post about PM doesn't point to an incredibly intelligent company but to the buying of politicians, which is at the bottom of most of your countries woes. While it goes on elsewhere in Western democracies it seems to be part of the culture in American politics. Didn't the Supreme court sanction it just last year?

I think the US has already saturated the third world with small arms. That probably wouldn't be an easy venue to exploit to make up for lost US sales.


Entered at Mon Jan 10 13:36:31 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

See Jonathan Raban's article in today's "Independent." Raban has written many books on the USA, where he resides. He used to teach me too. The line I like is:

"Politics is not warfare. The Democratic party is not a colonialist tyranny. Obama is not George III. To live in a slew of overheated metaphors, in language vastly disproportionate to the occasion, is to invite and license the kind of atrocity that happened the day before yesterday."


Entered at Mon Jan 10 12:37:33 CET 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Lars - excellent sentiment.

Peter - regulating a product that "for profit" companies then raised the roof on its merchandice and then shifted its attention to the third world is going to to be much harder to do with guns. If you thought a lot of lobbying, special interest, and PR spin was incorporated by the cigarette makers to delay and persuade legisilation - wait till the gun lobby gets involved. I agree with Lars on this. His sentiment reflects mine very closely.

Just to show how the cigarette companies have adapted to legislation, President Obama signed a new FDA tobacco bill in 2009 that was essentially written by Phillip Morris. In it PM was able to grandfather and protect itself from revealing its ingredients. It was able to keep the FDA from removing nicotine from cigarettes. Also, this language is in the bill: to keep the FDA from "infringing on the right of adult Americans to choose to take the risks of smoking." The bill also allows cigarette manufacturers to pretty much research and develop new ways to manipulate their product without government interference. When you can't beat them - join them. These corporations are strong. PM for example is great company to won stock in - it's a steady performer and pays a great dividend. These folks know what they are doing even though it continually looks like they are losing the race. And in the end, they may but for now they have adpated pretty well. The gun fight will be a messier battle for sure.


Entered at Mon Jan 10 10:32:16 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Thanks for the link, Pat. That’s chilling reading. The situation is much worse than I thought it was. What is this incredible fear of health care? Have they been to Germany? Or Canada? Or just about any Western country? We’ve all got it.

The Swiss statistic probably shows that suicide is irrelevant in the gun debate, in that it’s available means, and the overall rate may be similar. But how can you tolerate 26 times the gun homicide rate of Western Europe? OK, we have knife crime which the new government had vowed to stop but then they looked at the cost of prisons and cravenely decided not to. But the levels of death from crimes of violence aren’t slightly dissimilar. They’re hugely different. You’ll never stop the lunatic running amok with a knife or club or plank of wood or whatever, but you certainly restrict the damage. And of course without the guns mentality in society, we get far fewer of them. It’s irrelevant whether they’re legally purchased or not. In Europe, criminals get guns, but the average person couldn’t find an illegal one because there are so few about. When there are 100 million legal guns swashing around the system, it’s easy to steal one, buy one illegally etc. It’s not in Europe.

Canada has backwoods and bears and a frontier history but has almost as dramatic differences in levels of gun homicide as Europe.

It would be incredibly hard to “put the genii back in the bottle” which is exactly what people said about cigarette smoking twenty years ago. The progress has been unbelievable. Thirty years ago most people I knew smoked. Now almost none do, and when they do it’s standing outside in the rain, and they’re getting fed up with it. Moves are on the way to ban smoking in vehicles too. In 1960, Jaguar advertised a car by showing it travelling on a public road at 120 mph. Now we’d think that insanity. You need education that “guns are evil.” It’ll take many years, but eventually the message will permeate through, and the survivalists will be restricted to the mountain tops watching their Charlton Heston NRA videos and muttering about cold dead hands. Leave them up there.

I understand the point that if the world outside your door is full of guns, people don’t want to relinquish the one at home. But if you have the determination to stop people being slaughtered you need a staged plan. Totally ban any weapon outside your single designated home in any circumstances with serious penalties. That way you don’t have to institute gun battles to disarm insane survivalists. Then you get rid of guns in groups … assault weapons, handguns, rifles, and you just leave the limited capacity hunting weapons.

In 1865 they had to come round to the view that keeping slaves was bad and amend the constitution. You can't extrapolate a framework, written by fallible humans (some of whom owned slaves), for an expanding frontier society, which was also under threat from British, French and Spanish ambitions, to the modern day when the main internal threat has become its own people bearing arms.


Entered at Mon Jan 10 09:16:43 CET 2011 from (76.99.245.65)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: the pond

Subject: that impressive lineup, Steve

I'm surprised and hurt. You usually dot your "i's" and cross your "t's". I can't believe that YOU (of all people) spelled the name of stringed musician extroardinaire, David LINDLEY wrong!!


Entered at Mon Jan 10 06:06:32 CET 2011 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: Steve's question

was it Maria Maudier?


Entered at Mon Jan 10 06:01:44 CET 2011 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

Facts don't make someone naive. And I'm with Lars. We both know all a good Irishman has to do is yell good and loud and victory is ours.


Entered at Mon Jan 10 05:18:32 CET 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Steve- Maria Muldaur.


Entered at Mon Jan 10 05:00:55 CET 2011 from (68.198.87.122)

Posted by:

Gene

Subject: Lars

I totally agree with you. Rifles are not for self defense, but small caliber high power rifles are good for varmints (coyotes) if you have land.

If we could put the genie back in the bottle as far as firearms, I'd love it. Until then, unfortunately, there are asshole predators who are willing and able to take you down with their bare hands.

One has to choose if he (she) is willing to be a victim, or not.


Entered at Mon Jan 10 04:50:06 CET 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: US

Subject: Weapons

I used to belong to the NRA until I realized that there are some people who want ALL guns (shotguns, handguns, automatic- fire weapons, etc.) protected under the second amendment. Personally I believe it's nobody's beeswax as to what kind of a firearm collection I have, but as far as legislating my ownership, I could live with eliminating everything except shotguns and muzzleloaders. I don't really need to conceal a weapon, so I don't need a handgun. I don't need to fire more than one shot at a time, although most pump shotguns can fire five times if you remove the plug the manufacturers put in. I don't like automatic weapons or even semi-automatic shotguns. I don't think rifles should be used in areas where there are homes or highways within a half mile. Having a rifle that can shoot over two miles makes about as much sense to me as having a car that can go 300 miles an hour.

I especially don't like some of the attitudes that seem to go along with some of the pro- second Amendment proponents. It really bothers me when civilian shooting ranges have marksmen who fire their weapons at the silhouette of a human being. I can't abide by anyone who points a weapon at me, even if it's just for a fleeting second in a gunshop, when somebody might be swinging a shotgun around and getting a feel for it.

I don't entirely blame the guns for homicides. People have been killing each other since the dawn of man. Perhaps if the weapons were more restricted we could stop the deadly efficiency of the mass murderers.


Entered at Mon Jan 10 04:42:14 CET 2011 from (68.198.87.122)

Posted by:

Gene

Subject: Pat B

Sounds a little naive from a Chicago guy, but I support your right to NOT bear arms.


Entered at Mon Jan 10 04:31:55 CET 2011 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

I generally support gun rights-especially for hunters--but this is some sick stufPr


Entered at Mon Jan 10 04:15:52 CET 2011 from (68.198.87.122)

Posted by:

Gene

Subject: I'm not sure I understand your question, but...

I will defend myself and my loved ones, to the best of my ability. Whether it means being a legal licensed gun owner (recommend 40 cal Glock for carry, 12 gauge pistol grip #4 buck for home, or, when and if US gun control becomes the law, a kubotan / yawara keychain, defensive pocket knife or, a fucking cane, I will remain fit and train.

Your mileage may vary, but I'll go down fighting. I gots Lakota Sioux in my blood.


Entered at Mon Jan 10 03:18:39 CET 2011 from (166.205.142.19)

Posted by:

JQ

Is there some real advantage to being an armed nation; something those more restrictive countries and cultures could learn from? I mean, given the apparent cost, we should have a very good rationale, eh?


Entered at Mon Jan 10 02:46:55 CET 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Doing a little internet research I found that most of the stats point to less than 2% of gun crimes are committed using guns purchased legally. I found one site that claimed as little as 1/2 of 1% of gun crimes are commmitted by folks who bought guns legally. Granted this was a limited internet search of about 5 different sites with the NRA not being one of them.


Entered at Mon Jan 10 02:39:35 CET 2011 from (68.198.87.122)

Posted by:

Gene

Subject: Statistics

Statistics are easily manipulated by all groups, as any farm boy knows. Ask a Ugandan Tutsi or a Cambodian victim of the Khmer Rouge about statistics and gun control.

One thing that I agree with you about is that US Foreign policy has, for a long time, been all about military bases and petrol. I do, however, support our servicemen and value their service.

I do not, and probably never will, (except, maybe, about JRR's songwriting credit-grabbing) agree with you about anything else.


Entered at Mon Jan 10 02:31:20 CET 2011 from (68.198.87.122)

Posted by:

Scotland's Greatest

As far as my vote for the greatest cultural contribution from Scotland, it is no contest...

Craig Ferguson - the man is a comic genius.

and I say this, knowing a daughter of Billy Connolly, and having been a fan and contributer to the webpage of John Martyn.

My thoughts and prayers are with the victims of all unjust violence.


Entered at Mon Jan 10 02:11:27 CET 2011 from (184.151.127.182)

Posted by:

Steve

David, I was going to leave out all the people who preformed on the album and list the people who didn't it would have been a shorter list.

Stats are suspicious? What are they suspicious of, people with guns?

Peter, when Brien says the US has a gun culture, believe him. I have 7 brothers in law and all but one has at least 2. If you ask them why they have them they tell you they need them for the next revolution or, and this is my favorite, in case the government tries to take their guns. Pointing out that if the government sends people to take their guns they'll send trained people with much larger guns wearing body armour, people who enjoy killing people, doesn't change anything.

Their 17 year old cousin was gunned down by a guy when he smashed his car into her as he went through a red light. When the cops showed up he pulled out a gun and started shooting. Killed her instantly. And yet, as Brien said, it's part of the culture. I no longer try and convince them that having so many guns in society is dangerous and just am thankful it's not a "cultural" thing here.


Entered at Mon Jan 10 01:29:43 CET 2011 from (75.139.218.78)

Posted by:

JQ

Web: My link

Subject: Nick Lowe

Here's a 4-song deal from a month or so ago -


Entered at Mon Jan 10 00:52:12 CET 2011 from (68.171.231.21)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: (What's So Funny 'Bout) Peace, Lowe and Understanding

I would put the multi-talented Nick Lowe at the top of the rockpile as a performer, songwriter and producer. Lately I've been enjoying the Yep Roc LP reissue of his great 1994 album "The Impossible Bird". It features a song later covered by Mr. Lowe's former step-father-in-law Johnny Cash, "The Beat In Me", a true masterpiece. And did somebody mention Maria Muldaur's eponymous solo debut album? It must be Midnight At The Oasis.


Entered at Mon Jan 10 00:44:41 CET 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

People can bring out stats all they want - it's a culture thing here - guns are just too ingrained in too many areas. YOu'll have an easier time getting gun laws passed in highly populated areas but out in the rural parts of the US (which is most of the country) you are going to run into a ton of resistance. The gun laws in this country may get tweeked here and there but getting that ammendmant changed isn't happening anytime soon - right, wrong and indifferent.


Entered at Sun Jan 9 23:22:33 CET 2011 from (68.198.87.122)

Posted by:

Gene

Statistics are suspicious. Most people who top themselves don't use firearms.


Entered at Sun Jan 9 23:14:28 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

There's always a bit in the can, Gene. That's why they differ from glasses. And anyway, he was opening the next.

Guns. It’s not hard. It’s statistics.

Deaths per 100,000 people by gunshot:

USA: homicide 3.98 suicide 5.92 accident 0.36

Switzerland: homicide 0.50 suicide 5.8 accident 0.10

Canada: homicide 0.4 suicide 2.0 accident 0.04

Australia: homicide 0.24 suicide 1.34 accident 0.10

England / Wales: homicide 0.15 suicide 0.2 accident 0.03

Japan: homicide 0.02 suicide 0.04 accident 0

Revealing – the Swiss bear arms as every man has to serve 3 weeks in the army a year so has a rifle at home. Little homicide … no assualt weapons or handguns, but suicide is at US levels.

Otherwise, in all the others, yes, the criminals have guns. But just look at the statistics. The USA has 26 times the homicide rate of the UK. Mass gun ownership is insane. All those other countries don't have it.


Entered at Sun Jan 9 22:41:34 CET 2011 from (68.198.87.122)

Posted by:

Gene

Mayhaps, only partially finished?


Entered at Sun Jan 9 22:18:06 CET 2011 from (68.198.87.122)

Posted by:

Gene

Subject: Laws of Physics in London buses

Let me get this straight...the 'strong beer from the can,' 'he finished,' 'he screwed up the can and hurled it the length of the bus, where it bounced off the front window and spread a pool of beer on the floor.'

Interesting story. Was that a metal can?

Lets ban huge Russians, cell phones, girl friends, 10AM and strong beer.


Entered at Sun Jan 9 22:00:18 CET 2011 from (68.198.87.122)

Posted by:

Gene

I'll feel so much safer when only criminal have guns. Glocks have nothing to do with assault rifles. Time for another round with the gun-grabbers.


Entered at Sun Jan 9 20:58:54 CET 2011 from (184.151.127.182)

Posted by:

Steve

Hey, M T, I'm hoping we can take you off the MIA list. I'm sure it was the hockey talk that drew you back in.

Now that Norm's left the country I can make a musical post. Can anybody go back in time and come up with the answer to which artist assembled this crew to record an album, an album I just pulled out of the vinyl collection and listened to for the first time in more than 20 years. David, put your hand down and wait for the clues.

Richard Greene

Greg Prestopino

Bill Keith

Mac Rebennack

Jim Keltner

Chris Ethridge

David Nichtern

Clarence White

Ry Cooder

David Grisman

Freebo

Amos Garrett

Larry Packer

Dave Holland

David Lynley

Spooner Oldham

Clarence White

Mark Jordan

Jim Gordon

Betty(e)Lavette

Klaus Voorman

Ed Shaughnessy

Before joining in here I would have only recognized and knew anything about 3 of those people. Today I'm happy to say there were only 2 people I didn't know.


Entered at Sun Jan 9 20:23:14 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Empty Now/ Peter V

Welcome back Empty. It's been a while.

Peter, I couldn't agree with you more!


Entered at Sun Jan 9 20:17:27 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Welcome back! We've missed you.


Entered at Sun Jan 9 20:08:21 CET 2011 from (41.97.168.120)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: Nejma

an ethereal woman, object of desire and fantasy whose literal sense means ‘star’

"Boughi" may loosely translate "the one who wishes", or "the one who wants", or "the one who chooses", … title of a sung poem, written circa 1840 by a poet who just calls himself "Jaballah of Bone" in the text

The story is told by a dead man speaking at the first person. During a travel in Constantine, he of modest origin fell in love of a lady from the Moslim aristocracy, Nejma. Short after, he crossed a group of "joyful young men from the community" every one exhibiting a piece of hair of his beloved girl. Being challenged, the poet saw in this tradition an opportunity to nudge Nejma. He went in her garden begging the proof to show. Terrified, she handed him two pearls just to keep him away, and a locks of her hair that he went straightaway to show with pride. At the sight of the trophy the fellows felt frightened as they immediately understood that means for him a death sentence. He leaved the city for his hometown Bone. Three years after their unique encounter, the poet receives a surprising invitation on behalf of Nejma for the circumcision party of her son. He accepted the invitation and came literally in the lodging house of her husband. While the party was going in the evening, he saw her surrounded by guests, and he began singing overtly his love. He was immediately stabbed to death.

Though the song duration is monumental in the Western standards, but worth the listening. This passage sung by Fergani [19:00] is maybe some of the most beautiful vocal rendering I ever heard, surely the most beautiful Andalusian Classics progression.

(phonetically)
Nejma ya Nejma ma baqa lak aswab feloum aliya
Rani ghedayt legdak feshnayaa wal batel
Atbqay bel kheir yal mathouma biya
Hada akher wadaana wel waad kemel

Translate as:
Nejma O Nejma, you have no more reason to complain
I stepped into your world of prejudice and vanity
Have a good life, you the accused of me
This is our last farewell and the oath is complete


Entered at Sun Jan 9 19:57:43 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Amendments can be repealed, and have been repealed (see 17 and 21). The Constitution dates back to a period when slavery was legal and an amendment got rid of it. But the 2nd amendment is easy enough to deal with. A new amendment declares that “as existing in 1789” be inserted after “bear arms.” So you go back to the sort of arms the founding fathers envisaged people bearing. That gets rid of any repeating weapon (let alone automatic weapons), as a two barrel pistol was the most that existed then. You don’t “bear” a pistol anyway. That suggests something larger, So ban handguns. Let people bear pikes and halberds if it makes them happy. Guns are restricted to single shot muskets. Once people get used to it, you amend those away too.


Entered at Sun Jan 9 19:35:08 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Guns ande constitutions

Perhaps if the Republicans are so anxious to alter some of the amendments of our Constitution, they might take a look at the 2nd one. I truly believe that our founding fathers did not mean for people to be allowed to obtain and carry assault weapons. One Republican congressman said that he felt the Constitution was meant to be an evolving document. I agree. Once upon a time guns were necessary for protection. That is not the case anymore. I can see owning a hunting rifle if you hunt but I don't think assault weapons are necessary for our daily well being. We had a ban on assault rifles and George Bush and his Republican cronies got rid of that. I think the shooting of Congresswoman Giffords is the end result of that. The political temperature has been ginned up to boiling, and its got to stop.

I apologize for getting "political" but this one just really got to me. My prayers to out to All the victims.


Entered at Sun Jan 9 18:41:33 CET 2011 from (24.218.200.216)

Posted by:

tim

Location: Boston

Subject: Roger waters last waltz inspired poem

Press release recently announcing the relocation of Roger's show in Israel, Roger submitted a poem that he written inspired by watching The Bands Last Waltz. Its a wonderful piece, and to us its plain as day what it means, but we do not think for you. A few weeks ago I watched again Martin Scorsese's film which documented the last concert by The Band and I was inspired to write a few words i see fitting: The Last Waltz I just want that thing When voices join in harmony And in that fleeting moment, Meaning coalesces on the ear, All dark, dissolving, clouds the alleyways no more And fresh bread scent of home pervades the air No sandal soles In dust of broken homes Nor callused toes peep bloody from the garment hem, And all the big parades And shock and awe And swagger on the carrier decks and medals Jangle helpless in the face of what is fair I just want that thing When friends draw in, some living some begone, Some brittle, none forgotten All beloved everyone. Then dash the glass into the fire Then well up unashamed my heart Beyond the reach of fear Of faith, blind, bigoted and drear And then across the great divide Rise men and women unafraid To dash in loss their bracelets at the wall, And hearing them Hope holds me in its thrall. I just want that thing When empathy prevails When man evolves beyond the crass And reason comes of age When dogma, cant, and witchcraft All are banished to the past When voices join in harmony at last. All are banished to the past When voices join in harmony at last. Roger Waters


Entered at Sun Jan 9 16:43:54 CET 2011 from (67.163.118.32)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Subject: Roger Waters/The Band

Roger Waters for several months had a poem he wrote that was inspired by watching The Last Waltz on his website. I went to get the link but unfortunately it is now gone.


Entered at Sun Jan 9 16:23:46 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The facts according to Steve......joke

Part of one comment I made, "All of these players are draft players". I didn't say all the "Russian" players. There is less than half as many Russians in the NHL as there was 15 years ago.

However the four main countries.....Russia, Czeck rep. Finland and Sweden syphon a very significant amount of money from Canada, and more so the US annualy a lot of money!

This IIHF is not just for fun. They show case their talent, and make a lot of money. The bragging went on & on over the ending of this tournamnt. "This tournamnt in Buffalo has been the second most attended in history." You think this isn't about money?

I'm sure that farmer believes in the tooth fairy too. Some of the silly things he displays here. Well I'm throwin' stuff in my truck this morning and I'm leavin'. I'm sure gonna miss that farmer tho'!!.....AHHHHHAHAHAHAHA!


Entered at Sun Jan 9 15:24:19 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Well, football in general is more about business than about football.


Entered at Sun Jan 9 15:11:08 CET 2011 from (184.151.127.182)

Posted by:

Steve

Peter, Putin corrupting world football? He's just playing by FIFA's golden rule; You got the money, you get our ear. The FIFA World Cup is more about business more than football. Like The Olympics the sports are secondary to the business interests. Think it's a coincidence that Putin also has the Olympics in his pocket as well?

Putin is the oligarch of oligarchs in Russia at this point.

He and his close circle control Gaz Prom which they took control of literally at gun point. " As that dreadful Russian pop song of a few years back said, " give me a man like Putin, we need a man like Putin"


Entered at Sun Jan 9 12:13:15 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

In addition though, I've been in European cities at least four times at the same time as English football fans, and watching their aggressive progress along the street made me deeply ashamed to be English. It doesn't have to go with sport though. I once flew to Dublin on a plane full of French fans, whose behaviour was cheerful, friendly and totally non-threatening. Going back the day after the match, they were on the same plane, and again were nice people to travel with.


Entered at Sun Jan 9 12:06:04 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I don't know. Every morning I have to delete 15 to 20 SPAM messages in Cyrillic from my website. I assume they're from Russia. What's the point? I know, Google ratings.

Then you come to corrupting world football … why did Putin decide not to turn up for the vote? Because he had the votes already in his pocket.

Then you come to the way they behave in London. In the summer we got on a spotlessly clean (surprise) London transport bus. A huge Russian guy was shouting into a mobile phone, while his thin, cowed "girlfriend" shivered by the window. He was drinking strong beer from the can (10 am). When he finished, he screwed up the can and hurled it the length of the bus, where it bounced off the front window and spread a pool of beer on the floor. This is how they behave in London again and again.

It's sad for me because I've spent much time with Russian teachers who are educated, pleasant people. But the mafia thug category really gives their country a bad name. In a survey in London last year, they won the "most unpopular nationality" poll by a mile.


Entered at Sun Jan 9 05:24:28 CET 2011 from (69.177.223.122)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Blessed Are The Peacemakers

Steve, I thought we were just talking about a hockey game?

I never suggested that we should be “seeing everyone as enemies”. In fact, I specifically said that the Russians are our friends, we don’t have time for another Cold War, I mentioned that we had just signed the New Start Treaty, and that it was time to play nice…seems all pretty olive branchy, feel-good and huggy to me.

China is a valuable trade partner of ours who has been kind enough to lend us a lot of money so that we can enjoy cheap consumer goods. No reason to be worried there right?

But regardless of our good intentions, and even if we did everything “right”, I don’t doubt for a moment that there are forces in this world that would rejoice in our downfall…no matter what we do. So I agree that a path to peace is in everyone’s best interests, but we need to proceed cautiously. It can be a tough world out there. The hockey rink is just a microcosm of that.

RTO, I would consider Nick Lowe as a contemporary of Springsteen.

Norm, have a good time in Mexico.

Ray, I hadn’t seen any news today so was unaware of the situation in Arizona. Very tragic and sad, and my thoughts are with the family members affected by this. Perhaps divisive politics has reached a tipping point in this country.


Entered at Sun Jan 9 01:38:23 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: It's all good....I hope

I have been notified that I have the blessing and we're under the wing of the Right Reverend Billy Sol Hargis. That is comforting.

Ray I'm sorry, I haven't seen any news today, so I'm not aware of what you speak. God help them all.

This morning on our news, I see the discovery in Mexico of the decapitated bodies of 15 young men between the ages of 25 & 30. When will this ever end? All for drugs & the buck.

Here in our own country, on last nights news, I watched the video of an RCMP officer pull a man from a truck, make him lay down on his face, and handcuff him and then kick him in the face. They pulled him up, his face all bloody. As far as can be determinded, he did nothing. So the officer is being investigated, but still gets to work, on "administrative duty". It makes my blood boil. These smart assed snot nosed punk cops, are beyond our law. They do what ever they want at will. Our chicken s.... governments do nothing about it. Makes me want to stay at sea and become a pirate again....arggg matey.


Entered at Sun Jan 9 01:04:25 CET 2011 from (24.124.99.133)

Posted by:

ray pence

Let us all hope for the best for the surviving victims of the shooting rampage in Arizona in these United States. Let us be in solidarity with their families and with the families of those who have lost their lives. Rest in peace.



Entered at Sat Jan 8 22:46:59 CET 2011 from (91.42.232.209)

Posted by:

Norbert

Rob, thanks. Now I'm just dumb but, when time is your friend that is, explain the basics of how an electric guitar works please, so I can fit in this coil.


Entered at Sat Jan 8 22:26:49 CET 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: Great Songwriters after Springsteen

Just back tracked a little and found this thread. Does Nick Lowe count as after Springsteen because he started making money after Springsteen, or does he count as "before" because Kippington Lodge and Brinsley Schwarz were both signed bands playing his songs? Peter, full marks for Radiohead scepticism. Snake Oil.


Entered at Sat Jan 8 22:06:41 CET 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: Pickups

Norb, this is NOT a scientific discussion, just a quick laymans' answer! The "single coil" is the thin type of electromagnetic pickups that Strats, Teles, Danelectros, even some Gibsons and Gretsches (although theirs were physically bigger and sounded thicker: bigger bobbins, more wire) were fitted with. To keep it short - MOST of them are thin and twangy and the design uses just one coil of wire around a bobbin which does cause hum.

Double coil pickups, on the other hand, are what post 1953 Les Pauls, most SGs, 335s etc all have - there is a second reverse-wound coil under that metal cover and this cancels out the hum (hence the habitual nickname "humbuckers". These produce a more bell-like warmer sound and less twangy.

Example: Nashville country players like the thin twang of a Telecaster. Jazz guitarists like the plum of a humbucker. Blues guitarists see the benefits of both and these days often feature both kinds of guitar in their style - but Albert Collins visceral cutting tone was very much a single coil, whereas EC's "Beano" tone was all about the humbucker.

Naturally you get exceptions: Richie Blackmore used a Strat throughout Deep Purple and had a fairly fat tone; Dave Edmunds rocked and twanged away for years on a Gibson 335 with Humbuckers. It's all in the fingers to a certain extent....but as a general guide: for single coil think a Fender, for double coil think Gibson. Don't start a discussion on Gibson P90s or Gretsch Dearmond Dynasonics which are single coils but sound fat and middly........


Entered at Sat Jan 8 21:00:03 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Good bye cruel world.........

Awwwwwwww...Mike, now I suppose you want me to apologize to the gawd damn little (&%&&$#%^.....oh awright. Black land farmer! I'm sorry I called you a nitwit. There! yuh happy Mike.

I'm leavin' tamaury mornin. Gettin on the 737 - 09:30 Monday mornin fer MEH-HE-CO.

Come Monday it'll be alright

Come Monday, I'll be off on a flight

To spend seven sunny days,

In a margeurita haze...........


Entered at Sat Jan 8 20:49:49 CET 2011 from (91.42.232.209)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: the 60-cycle hum, & Rob to.

I just noticed this comment (at a YouTube guitar solo): "At 4:25, if you turn it up you can hear 60-cycle hum when John kicks on a pedal for the solo. God I love the tone of single coils, and the noise that comes with them....that ain't noise to me, it's just part of "the tradition."

As non musician I wonder what he means, anyone knows?

Rob, belated thanks for the beer follow-up the other day.


Entered at Sat Jan 8 20:20:41 CET 2011 from (90.239.82.112)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Robbie's solo works

I liked "The River Hymn" so I just have to like "Sign Of The Rainbow", too. In "Soap Box Preacher" the salvation army band is swinging like an elk in Nordic woods, whoever is responsible of it (Wardell Quezergue?).


Entered at Sat Jan 8 19:11:48 CET 2011 from (65.93.117.252)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: Continuing to [be] a nitwit . . .

Westcoaster, your participle was dangling a bit there. Tuck it in, man!


Entered at Sat Jan 8 17:42:10 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Woof Woof

There you go again


Entered at Sat Jan 8 17:38:53 CET 2011 from (184.151.127.144)

Posted by:

Steve

Norm calling them, " the facts according to Steve" and then saying you already know them is like the dog chasing his tail; He knows it's his tail but some how refuses to believe it and keeps going around in circles. Maybe it's just for the sport of it, that I can understand. Maybe I should start calling you "Jack".


Entered at Sat Jan 8 17:16:46 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

To add … Fallen Angel is one of the very best things Robbie's done. Funny, my favourite Storyville tracks are Soap Box Preacher and Breaking The Rules. From "Native Americans" I'd choose Twisted Hair, Golden Feather and Ghost Dance.

Between Trains is first-rate. I like the Aaron Neville / Robbie Robertson combination on Crazy Love from Phenomenon.


Entered at Sat Jan 8 17:00:14 CET 2011 from (24.124.99.133)

Posted by:

ray pence

Location: the heartland/flyover country/Lawrence, Kansas

Subject: Robbie Solo/Garth, Levon, Rick...and Waters.

Happy New Year everyone!

Thanks Brien Sz, for those "Wall" links. Despite Roger Waters' oft-stated Band fandom this remains one of the more surprising guest shots in the careers of Garth/Levon/Rick, due to the spectacle and the huge differences in music, sound and sensibility-wise, in what Waters/Floyd are about and what the Band were about. Roger W. deserves props for inviting them, this was probably some of the widest exposure the boys ever had.

The new Robbie album should be a winner, a long time in coming, I am enthusiastic about it. I don't know if I can go so far as to say that these songs I'm listing equal RR's Band writing, but they are strong and some would have been fine material for Richard/Levon/Rick.

King of Comedy Soundtrack (1983): Between Trains

Robbie Robertson (1987): Fallen Angel, Broken Arrow, Sonny Got Caught in the Moonlight

Storyville (1991): Go Back to Your Woods, What About Now, Resurrection, Sign of the Rainbow

Redboy (1998): Code of Handsome Lake, Sacrifice, Rattlebone, In the Blood, Stomp Dance, The Lights


Entered at Sat Jan 8 16:44:34 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The Facts according to Steve

Continuing to ne a nitwit, I knew that is exactly what you would say, taking it back to 72. The point was money. Sore looser? I thought the whole thing was pretty comical from the outset. But as usual you don't get it. Just as Kevin suggested to you on another subject. You're in your own bubble there, "Bubble buoy".


Entered at Sat Jan 8 15:05:50 CET 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Web: My link

Link is to an article about a group called Iron & Wine. Never heard of them but the article refers them to the likes of the Band, Allman Brothers, the Grateful Dead and Little Feet. So maybe they are worth keeping an eye on as new music goes.


Entered at Sat Jan 8 14:42:52 CET 2011 from (184.151.127.144)

Posted by:

Steve

Subject: Bob, 2 points for Crazy Chester

Norm take off your rose colored glasses. If you want to talk Russia/ Canada hockey in the modern age lets go to where it began, 1972. Stick work, well I guess the infamous Bobby Clarke two handed slash to the ankle of Valeri Kharlamov is about as nasty a piece of stick work that you'll ever see in hockey. To intentionally injure someone like that is about as low as you get in the game.

If you want classy behaviour in Canada Russia hockey you can stay with that tournament as well and look at Eagleson in the last game in Russia standing on the team bench and giving the fans the finger. This wasn't a 19 year old kid but the head of the players' union and a respected member of the Canadian bar to boot.

By the way, only a couple of those Russian kids ( maybe only one) have been drafted by NHL teams, which was probably another reason they wanted to rub it in the faces of the North American hockey establishment.

Don't be such a sore loser, give them their due.

By the way, when they took the trophy and skated over to the glass, those were Russian fans behind the glass, they weren't taunting Canadian fans. It was the family of one of the players.

Todd, western power is now brought to you by Chinese money, and we all know that whoever pays the piper calls the tune besides if there is a serious confrontation there wont be any dancers or pipers left. We have to try and get along with, rather than seeing everyone as enemies. It's better for everyone in the long run, don't you agree?.

Besides, now that the Chinese have stopped buying US T Bills because they know they are basically financing the "wars" in Afghanistan and Iraq which is allowing the US to build military bases closer and closer to China, the US will have to start getting by with a slightly smaller military which is a step in the right direction.


Entered at Sat Jan 8 08:35:50 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The Big Picture!

Thank you Todd. Now I'll expand on how I see this. First of all, I think it is quite funny, and really pathetic, and you may understand my thinking.

My following goes back to an incident on January 11, 1976. The game between Russian Red Army and the Philedelphia Flyers, when Ed van Imp defenseman of the Flyers, put a hit on Valeri Kharlamov and knocked him out. The Russian coach pulled his team off the ice refusing to play, (I watched this game at the time). The threat was, get your team back on the ice, or you will forfeit the entire salary of the series, (and they got a delay of game penalty). The threat of money.

Steve, (in his innocence) seems to think this is just teenagers blowing off steam. All of these players are "draft players" for the NHL. What we are talking about here are millions upon millions of dollars, for the tournaments, and future considerations. All of these young men are scouted constantly. What they do or don't do, is negotiating ammunition for teams and agents.

The relationships that I see, are the same in international soccer and also what every one likes to discuss here, concerning song writing credits.

Lets take for example one song, "The Weight". Would anyone like to venture a guess how much money that song has generated in airplay, record sales, etc in the 42 or so years since it's birth. And mostly what every one remembers is the unmistakeable voice of Levo Helm. I would guess that the bad taste in Levon's mouth is not over only recogniton.

A couple more examples I remember very well. James Garner's battle with Universal Studios over royalties for "The Rockford files". This is back in the days when actors were just waking up to the money of reruns on TV. Consider MASH, or Seinfeld.

As we discussed not long ago, Don Felders shoot out with Glenn Frey and Don Henley, after they tried to have their manager fire him. Remember, he was a corporate share holder. Talk about stupid!

Anyway, it's not just a hockey game, that's what to me is funny. IT'S THE ALMIGHTY BUCK.........so it's all relative to what is discussed here. A BAND Thread??


Entered at Sat Jan 8 08:06:20 CET 2011 from (69.177.223.122)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Hockey

Norm, I didn't see any of the hockey, but I believe you if you say that it was poor sportsmanship. My kids play sports, and we try to teach them that winning gracefully is just as important as losing gracefully. I know that this is only about a hockey game, but it may give a glimpse into how some parts of the world are prepared to dance on our grave should the west ever fall from power. Things could get ugly.

I had a sense that there was something more to the hockey situation, and that's what prompted me to post. I suppose I've been honing my skills at becoming clairvoyant in anticipation of the new album. I figure it's gonna take a little practice, so I may as well start now. ;-)

By the way I enjoyed the video of your bother's that you posted the other day. Really nice production values and musicianship on the tunes. Cool to see all the tugs too. The water was so rough, I thought I was watching a submarine video at one point!


Entered at Sat Jan 8 07:47:12 CET 2011 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Web: My link

Subject: How to became clairvoyant

For those of you who can read Spanish


Entered at Sat Jan 8 06:10:44 CET 2011 from (99.141.60.161)

Posted by:

Adam2

Subject: Robbie's solo work

Which songs from Robbie's solo work do you think are on the same level as his classic songs?


Entered at Sat Jan 8 05:40:26 CET 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Web: My link

Link: Garth doing great sax during The Wall concert in 1990.


Entered at Sat Jan 8 05:17:00 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Cold War Now the "Ice" War

Funny how you mentioned that Todd. It was brought up more than one time during this international tournament, how political this has become. This more or less east against west war is now played out on the ice in these tournaments.

Lets face it. As long as they are not taking up arms in any way except hockey sticks, that's a good thing. However, when you make your judgement you should have seen the on ice behaviour of those young fellows. When they were being presented the winning cup, through the ceremony, as it was being presented, the Russian captain didn't wait to have it presented to him, and shake hands in the traditonal way. He snatched it away from the presenter, took his team and skated to the boards, held it up in front of fans taunting them as some of the team gave fans the finger. This is not being a sore looser. The outcome did not surprise me. The Russians are very good come back hockey players.

What did surprise me was the behavour. I've played hockey and watched hockey my entire life, and have never seen a display like this. What you have just said is how the "Cold War" has been transported onto the ice in these tournaments. It really is a COLD WAR. The only people noticing are the people who watch hockey.


Entered at Sat Jan 8 04:55:23 CET 2011 from (69.177.223.122)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Rick and Complainers

I think that you're right Jeff that it was somewhat less strong than hate. The way I remember it is; "God don't like complainers". I've actually used that expression with my kids from time to time, and I always give Rick credit. It goes kind of like this when things are getting out of control:

"Remember kids.....as Rick Danko used to say...."God don't like complainers".

That usually gets their attention!


Entered at Sat Jan 8 04:46:23 CET 2011 from (69.177.223.122)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Norm, always remember that the Russians are our friends (even though, against all odds, we kicked their asses properly in the 1980 Olympics)....But I digress.....
I haven't been following the shenanigans lately in the world of high sticking and slap shots, but it seems like you're trying to reignite the Cold War!! We don't have time for that now. Anyway, we recently signed some sort of nuclear arms treaty with them, so it's time to place nice.....drunken skaters notwithstanding. Besides, I wouldn't have wanted anyone to judge my behavior when I was 19....although I'm pretty sure I was polite and well behaved at least 90% of the time.

To tie this all together, I'm pretty sure that I saw the fellow from Bare Naked Ladies singing 'Oh Canada' on New Year's Day at the winter classic. I think that he did a nice job, but I hadn't realized that he'd gotten himself into trouble recently, but in retrospect, it seems that he felt comfortable in the hockey world.



Entered at Sat Jan 8 03:33:50 CET 2011 from (86.168.213.12)

Posted by:

Simon

Bill, yeah "Eton Rifles" is by Paul Weller. David Cameron expressed his admiration for the song a couple of years ago and was scorned by Weller for not getting the meaning. Cameron is Eton educated. It's about a Right to Work march that started in Liverpool and passed Eton on the way to the capital. Certain agents provocateurs tried to start fisticuffs with jeering toffs and underestimated them ("all that rugby puts hairs on your chest/what chance have you got against a tie and a crest").

For me no songwriter was more astute at capturing Britain during the late 70's and the following Thatcher years. For that reason it doesn't 'travel' well, I suppose. Because I grew up during that era I can't really care very much for a lot late 70's singer songwriter solo artists/cocaine cowboys. It was hard be enthusiastic about the Eagles or Rod's Atlantic crossing or Fleetwood Mac songs about the dramas of being a member of Fleetwood Mac and the subsequent romantic entanglements of one member of Fleetwood Mac with another. Musically okay but not saying a great deal complaining about My Tortured Life As a Rock Star.

On the other hand people like Strummer/Jones, Weller, The Specials, Costello, Lydon had something they wanted to get across and the fact they didn't have perfect pitch or weren't technically brilliant was besides the point. I remember the BBC banning Elvis Costello's "Shipbuilding" and thinking they had no balls whatsoever, just toadies to the government. The Falklands war was going on but the lyrics to that song were just too close to the mark for some. War means work. "Somebody said that someone got filled in/for saying that people get killed in/the result of the shipbuildin'"

There really did seem to be something at stake back then; days when a 7" single could actually sell 250,000 copies in less than a week and go straight to number one. And Paul Weller has earned praise from Paul McCartney and Ray Davies (whose successor he is). There are no better lines about Thatcher's vandalism than "Rows and rows of disused milk floats stand dying in the dairy yard/And a hundred lonely housewives clutch empty milk bottles to their hearts/Hanging out their old love letters on the line to dry".

For me he's absolutely up there with the best of 'em.

Getting drugged up with my trendy friends
They really dig me, man, and I dig them
And the bread I spend
Is like my fame
It's quickly diminished
There's no more swimming in a guitar-shaped pool
No more reporters at my beck and cool
No more cocaine now it's only ground chalk
No more taxis now we'll have to walk
But didn't we have a nice time?

"To Be Someone" (1978)


Entered at Sat Jan 8 03:13:46 CET 2011 from (67.85.107.188)

Posted by:

Gary

Web: My link

Subject: tribute to The Band

The THE BAND Band brings the music of The Band alive with authentic, true-to-form renditions of their legendary repertoire, including "The Weight", "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down", "Up On Cripple Creek", and many others.

Saturday, January 8 at One Longfellow Square, Portland, ME.

Come on out and catch the show!


Entered at Sat Jan 8 03:00:32 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Coming to "Terms"

I'll bet Y'all remember, when we wuz young, every one had a expression, "According to Hoil!"

From this day forward! We have adopted this expression..... "The Truth! according to Steve!"


Entered at Sat Jan 8 01:52:52 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Apples & Oranges.......& Turnips

Listen!......you dumb son of a turnip! My first post addressing this subject, my comment was, "Why would you count the Russians out"......remember your reading comprehension course? Comprehension is the operative word here. When the Swedes beat Canada in the round robin, it was a shootout goal, "remember" that doesn't mean out played, out anything. That can always go eather way.

Maybe you eastern trash hockey players can excuse getting drunk and obnoxious, "Oh it was late night, early morning" all your bullshit excuses. That is not respectful of the tournament, themselves, their country or any way you want to cut it. But.........it doesn't surprise me you find it acceptable.

I'm not a Russian fan ,nor a Swedeish fan, however I have always respected their talent, and abilities. You may not recall some of the activity back in the early 70's, (I know your very young) there was a little footage here and there where there was footage shown of the physical damage dished out by Russian players to North American players in those Canada Cup tournaments for example. They were very good at "stick surgery". Perhaps you may have seen a bench clearing brawl in Russia resently, where the referees couldn't even handle it. Now they have "come out of the closet, and behave "just like NHL players" apparently.

Billy Sol Hargis receipts!.....be careful! they end up being bills that say you owe MORE!


Entered at Sat Jan 8 01:49:56 CET 2011 from (12.51.52.166)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Lars, Methinks Rick would have used a less agressive term in association with God. i.e. God doesn't like complainers.



Entered at Sat Jan 8 01:37:45 CET 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Web: My link

Link is to Rick, Levon and Garth doing Pink Floyd.


Entered at Sat Jan 8 01:28:33 CET 2011 from (184.151.127.144)

Posted by:

Steve

Norm, lets look at the facts. The Ruskies come to North America, are picked to be the #4 team in the tourney, lose their first 2 games( one of them to Canada) are trailing in the quarter finals by 3 goals when they snap to attention and beat Finland, then trail Sweden in the third period but rally to beat them.

Then they take on the team that the media and everyone else has picked to whoop them, in front of 18,500 Canadian fans in the arena, 5,000,000 more watching on TV and an equally large crowd back in Russia watching on Russia's biggest TV network.

The third period they play against Canada is a record for the biggest comeback in the history of the tourney. They go wild on the ice, quite acceptable , every other team does the same and they surely deserve to cut loose.

OK, they get off the ice at 10:30, out of the arena by 11 or 11:30, it's party time. Bring on the Vodka!

What are the chances they were going to be well behaved when they arrive at the airport for a 6:30 am flight? I'm sure in their place at 19 years old you would have been a Boy Scout.

True, Canada beat the Turnips in exhibition play but did lose to them when it counted during the round robin part of the tournament.


Entered at Sat Jan 8 01:20:48 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Billy Sol Hargis a crook? This can't be true. He sent me receipts for nearly every penny.


Entered at Sat Jan 8 00:34:33 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Post Script

The comments I meant to express, (not music or Band related, please excuse me). Who knows what Dave Cameron said to his squad before the third period, BUT he should most certainly have reminded them how the Russians came back against Finland & Sweden, they do have some country pride. The arrogance that I mentioned a while back obviously seeped into and infected the Canadian locker room.

However, if any one saw in the news this morning, their upset was just a little too much for those Russian buoys. They couldn't handle it with any amount of class & dignity. Some of 'em were so drunk they had to be carried on to the bus to the airport. They gave the bus driver such a hard time he said he was glad to be rid of them. At the New York Airport, they all got evicted from the plane their behaviour was so bad.......so much for winning.


Entered at Sat Jan 8 00:13:51 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Celestial Life Insurance Agent?????

Gawd Damn Boy!....I didn't know the "Bible Belt" streched rat up to Noo Yawk!.........lawd have mercy!

Steve! Quit being such a nitwit for a change. In the 35 years that this IIHL has been having this hockey tournament, Canada has won 15 gold, Russia now 14. Sweden 1. The Swede boys played pretty well but Canada beat them in that warmup game. Dave Cameron made a bad decision not pulling that young goalie after two goals in so short a time, (he was obviously rattled), calling a time out and settling those kids down. The out come "may have" been entirely different. There is ONE only one hard lesson to be learned, it seems the hardest lesson for many, in any number of circumstances. IT AIN'T OVER 'TILL IT'S OVER!

Well I guess I will actually have to go and buy this CD of Garth's by the sound of it. I don't buy much music anymore. I GOT LOTS! And there is just too much rehashed crap, and stuff that is put out there now a days for the allmighty buck. There fore I am selective. I don't buy stuff just to be a collector or to say "Oh yeah I got that." I got to really like it, otherwise I might just as well give my money to that crook Reverend Billy Sol Hargis.


Entered at Fri Jan 7 23:58:41 CET 2011 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

Mike & Kim Hayward

Web: My link

Jimi Hendrix's new 4-cd / 1-dvd anthology "West Coast Seattle Boy" w/ "Tears of Rage."


Entered at Fri Jan 7 23:50:35 CET 2011 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

Mike & Kim Hayward

Web: My link

Jimi Hendrix covering "Tears of Rage" blog article.


Entered at Fri Jan 7 22:59:54 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Rick knew Chester was batshit crazy.


Entered at Fri Jan 7 22:45:21 CET 2011 from (184.151.127.176)

Posted by:

Steve

Lars, did Rick say anything about the mentally ill?

Just wanted to say I got an incredible sounding set of headphones for Christmas( actually Steve The Younger did, but I can borrow them at will. What a great kid) and I finally see why everyone here makes such a big fuss about The Band. Great sound!


Entered at Fri Jan 7 22:17:27 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Bi polar

Many Bi-polar people who go undiagnosed for years, "self medicate" by using alcohol and drugs. Its not an excuse its just a fact,


Entered at Fri Jan 7 22:01:17 CET 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: the middle class

Subject: Trials and Tribulations

Wasn't it Rick who said, "God hates complainers"....????

Of course, over the years I have to admit that I've done my share of whining and complaining....which is the only reason I put up with Rev Billy.... who has assured me that I can find life everlasting if I keep buying redemption from him. He's my Celestial Life Insurance Agent.


Entered at Fri Jan 7 21:09:43 CET 2011 from (70.53.44.164)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Steve: Answer - No but Boo hoo hoo for Steven................Next up.......Phil Collins explains how he really could have been Peter Gabriel had "bi-polar" not caused him to wear clown outfits and walk backwards for 15 years in rock videos.................Freddie Mercury explains to all that he really wouldn't have worn a dress and done the vacuuming had it not been for "bipolar"................McCartney finally admits "Ebony and Ivory" was all down to "bi-polar"...................Keith Richards says fu*k em all.......he was high for 30 years and didn't cry to anyone about it...........


Entered at Fri Jan 7 21:09:57 CET 2011 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: The Band's song writing

They only reason that they (Robbie, Richard , Rick) are not more widely appreciated for their song writing is their relative lack of commercial success. Unfaithful Servant for example is at least as good as The Beatle's Yesterday.


Entered at Fri Jan 7 21:05:52 CET 2011 from (184.151.127.229)

Posted by:

Steve

What will tip the balance when this millstone hits the scales of justice?


Entered at Fri Jan 7 20:20:19 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The Weight / Laptop Dance Music

Well, Levon's 2004 lawsuit over the use of his vocals on "The Weight" in a Cingular ad campaign is still pending in the Supreme Court of the State of New York. That's a millstone with a lot of mileage.

Just recently heard a song called "Still Here" by Girl Talk (a/k/a Gregg Gillis). Mr. Gillis specializes in what's known as mashups, which include samples of other people's songs incorporated into his new "songs". This particular song begins with a sample of Procol Harum's "Whiter Shade of Pale" and later features a sped-up chunk of The Band's version of "The Weight". This coming Sunday's edition of The New York Times magazine section includes of profile of Mr. Gillis.


Entered at Fri Jan 7 20:02:20 CET 2011 from (184.151.127.229)

Posted by:

Steve

Wouldn't, The Weight, as well as TNTDODD, be more of a millstone for Levon than Robbie? That might be another thing that separates Robbie from the other songwriter/performer/singers people have been citing.

Kevin, do you know Mr. Page personally? First, Steven wasn't "busted" in the true meaning of the term since the charges were dropped. Secondly he did address that part of his life in the interview and he was quite humble about it. He said he never felt that he was a rock star taking advantage of a position he could exploit. He would have been the same regardless of what he was doing as an occupation. According to him there is nothing "romantic" about acting the way he was before he got diagnosed and found the right medication for himself.

He's suffered from depression since he was about 9 or 10, at least he's been aware of it since then.


Entered at Fri Jan 7 19:43:30 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Stone the heretic!


Entered at Fri Jan 7 18:36:07 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: sacrilege!

Well, I get tired of it. I'd be willing to bet that JRR is tired of playing it, and there's some evidence that it's lost its allure for Mr. Hudson as well.


Entered at Fri Jan 7 18:29:35 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The difference between The weight and a millstone (!) is that you get tired of hearing a true "millstone".


Entered at Fri Jan 7 18:03:48 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: the stones I can't throw

A millstone would be quite . . . the weight . . . I imagine.


Entered at Fri Jan 7 17:46:08 CET 2011 from (70.53.44.164)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Poor poor pitiful Steven Page.........busted in New York for coke possession..... ...turfed from the band he founded..........and oh so 2010.........get a radio show explaining to all that it actually is all down to "mental illness".............................Brian Wilson was legitimately ill....most others were just getting high and having fun until it wasn't fun anymore..............


Entered at Fri Jan 7 17:39:30 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Bowie, Townsend and Prince are all definitely among the elite. It’s hard to think of everyone.

Paul Weller? Not sure. But the guy has a fantastic eye for design. He designed a lot of the sleeves including the great paper sleeve for his own label, Response.

Stevie Wonder … he fits in pretty well with Robbie in some ways. Early career doing great cover versions, then blossoming as a first rate songwriter, then not doing very much for years. At least Robbie never wrote a millstone-around-the neck like “I Just Called to Say I Love you” one of the songs that made the top ten of songs that people hate most a few years back. Yes, I’d put it there with Release Me and a few other over-played turkeys. I guess Robbie tried to write similar in The Moon Struck one, but it was never high enough profile to be a millstone. Millstones are stonking international hits which the perpetrator is required to perform every time they go on stage ever anywhere. In other words, a life sentence..


Entered at Fri Jan 7 17:13:47 CET 2011 from (184.151.127.212)

Posted by:

Steve

Just listened to a program hosted by Steven Page( x Naked Ladies Front Man)on mental illness, with a focus on creative people. Page was joined by three other Canadian artists who are also bipolar; Robert Munsch, Mike McDonald and Mariette Hartley.

Getting the disease diagnosed and treated actually helps creativity according to all four rather than stifling it.

Page said that his song, Brian Wilson, while being about his time spent in bed( like Wilson)wasn't written while in crisis but after the episode had passed. They all talked about how drugs and alcohol were a way of extending that on-stage high that really brought down their level of creativity while they were doing it, that it was between bouts of mania or depression that they did their best work.

It made me think of Richard's remark about going dry which seemed to coincide with the onset of his serous drugging and drinking binge that lasted years.

The times when Richard cleaned up his life probably coincided with improvements in his mental state. The improvement in mental health leading to the drop in drug and alcohol abuse as opposed to the other way around. I know people tried to get Richard to deal with the drug and alcohol problem but it seems that mental illness was probably the angle to have approached him from.

One of them, ( Page I think)mentioned Lindsay Lohan's behaviour and all four agreed that rather than a star behaving badly in public because she's a star, what you're seeing is a woman who is having difficulty with mental illness and not coping well.


Entered at Fri Jan 7 16:49:58 CET 2011 from (69.177.223.122)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Songwriters

Not that we’re voting, and it is subjective to a large degree, but I’d include Pete Townshend in the group of “super elite” songwriters…..probably above Jagger/Richards from a critical perspective. Unfortunately I can’t listen to Townshend anymore without the nagging reminder creeping in, that he was accused of looking at unacceptable images of children on his computer. I think he was cleared of all charges with his stated reason being he was doing “research”, but it still leaves me with a very uneasy feeling. I really loved the Who at one point, and have a lot of their albums, as well as solo Townshend, but there’s definitely an uncomfortable feeling about him that I haven’t been able to shake. I know that we’re supposed to be able to judge the work independent of the person, but I also have a hard time enjoying any of Ike Turner’s music (as talented as he is) for the abuse that Tina Turner suffered while with him. I realize that a lot of these guys aren’t Saints, but some misbehavior is harder to overlook than others. I probably shouldn’t read any more rock biographies, or I’ll end up chucking half of my music collection.

I’d also include Stevie Wonder in the top tier of elite songwriters, although I own very little of his material. Personal favorites of mine (post Springsteen) are Lucinda Williams, Jeff Tweedy, and Ryan Adams, although they aren’t the household names that McCartney and Dylan are.

One of the things that stands out to me, looking at the short lists of highly rated songwriters, is that most of them have strong individual identities independent of the traditional rock “group”. Dylan, Simon, Van Morrison, Joni Mitchell, Springsteen, Taylor, Young, Newman, Cohen, Elton John etc. They all seem to me to be “solo” artists who in some cases happened to play with groups over the years. But largely, the core of their work was not defined or particularly dependent upon the “group”. Springsteen may be the exception because of his many years with the E Street Band, but a lot of solo Springsteen still sounds like “Springsteen”.

Jagger/Richards and Lennon/McCartney all have strong personal identities and styles, but their legacies are as Stones and Beatles first. I don’t doubt that they would have achieved success on their own, but it wouldn’t have been the same phenomenon that they achieved as members of groups.

Robbie is kind of in a unique situation in that his greatest work was achieved as a member of a group that conjured up a completely unique sound that would not have been the same if any one ingredient was changed. In his case the group dynamic played an integral role in making the songs as iconic as they were. Robbie still would have written songs and probably have achieved some success…..but they would not have been the same songs. This is not a songwriting argument or a knock on Robbie…..just an observation on how unique all of the Band members were to the songs in comparison to some of the other artists mentioned earlier.


Entered at Fri Jan 7 16:33:56 CET 2011 from (70.53.44.164)

Posted by:

Kevin J

While most seem to agree with the list.....I did leave out David Bowie, Pete Townsend, Roger Waters and to a lesser degree John Fogerty......all rank in any elite rock songwriting club.........as to dlew's headscrather about post Springsteen era.....I like the Paul Weller inclusion......Prince is there as well.......

As to quotes on headliners....I remember it as a Sting one and he specifically referenced Sir Paul not BD.............Dylan would not think of following Paul McCartney on stage on the best day of his performing life.....

Barney's Version: Very much worth seeing..............2 hours without explsions and no one walked uut!


Entered at Fri Jan 7 16:30:33 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronno
Web: My link

I guess I could've mentioned during our little Felix-fest earlier this week, that a more recent Corky Laing project was/is? the band Cork, formed with guitarist Eric Schenkman, likely best-known as a founding member of the Spin Doctors, who we saw a couple of weeks ago playing impressively (though on a one-time basis) with Danny Brooks. Danny, though he'd brought along his usual bassist and drummer, didn't do "Forbidden Fruit", though that may have been because he was merely the guest artist at a weekly gig hosted by singer/harpist Jerome Godboo - who I'm pretty sure was one of the artists who got up to play with Garth and Jeff Healy at Healy's club many moons ago. Maybe BEG can confirm?


Entered at Fri Jan 7 16:19:07 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: JRR the songwriter

Just to situate my comments, JRR is my favourite songwriter. Yes, he's produced some clinkers, and yes, his best work seems to be behind him -- but _his_ best is certainly among _the_ best. (Honourable Mentions, off the top of the head, to Joni and Costello -- I'd cite "Watching the Detectives.") For anyone interested in the craft, the article at [My link] is very highly recommended. (Thanks, I think, to BEG for finding it for us in the first place.) We've discussed it before, and while I don't wholly buy Clive James's argument, I think there's more than a little truth in it.

James mentions "Jawbone" -- a name that's surfaced here recently -- and I'd add an observation on that song that also applies to some others.

It's the sly humour; not jokey (though the line that James cites from "Across the Great Divide" is nearly that) but rather situational. "Jawbone" begins with the John Howard / Elizabeth Fry social-worker types frowning earnestly across the table at our miscreant, trying SO hard to understand why he does what he does. But Jawbone is no sociologist; analysis and introspection are not his thing; he takes the world as he finds it; there's no mystery at all: "I'm a thief, and I dig it!"

JRR is also apt, from time to time, to end his songs with an image, or a little stinger, that gels the rest. In "Divide" it's a bit of a punch line; in "Jawbone" it's a little more subtle, but at least as funny. Because -- even though Jawbone's hammered on the point all the way through -- there remains a great divide and the others still don't get it: "Temptation stands just behind that door, so what'ja wanna go and open it for??"


Entered at Fri Jan 7 16:05:05 CET 2011 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Location: Down East

I'm enjoying Robbie's new song and am eagerly anticipating the release of his album. Please don't include me among the Robbie bashers. If I'm critical it's just that I hold him to a higher standard.

I've taken the opportunity this week to replay all my Robbie recordings and have been much rewarded. I still have issues with 'Storyville' though. Maybe I was expecting something totally different. Word was Robbie was doing a New Orleans album and maybe I was expecting a funky gumbo of Dr. John, Allen Toussaint and Bobby Charles. I've tried hard to 'get it' but it mostly doesn't work. I like all of the songs individually but as an entity it's more difficult to take. The album is very long, about one hour. The arrangements are impeccable and the performance oh so professional. The production is spit and polish. I don't have a problem with Robbie's vocals. I do have a problem with the songwriting. There's a certain sameness to the song structures. I find it hard to differentiate between songs; I usually get bogged down halfway through and rarely finish it in one listening. And what's wrong with a snappy hook or a catchy chorus anyway?

When a lot of my peers enjoy an album (book, whatever) and I don't 'get it', I often blame myself. I shouldn't. My last word on the subject is that it's not a 'piece of shit' as I may have referred to it before but a fascinating though flawed recording that could have been so much more.

Santa filled in some of the blanks in my Stones collection. I hadn't heard much of their recent albums so 'Voodoo Lounge' was a start. Let me make the complaint again about some CDs going on far too long. Just because one can put a whole lot on a recording doesn't mean one should. There's a great album in there somewhere but a heck of a lot of filler too. Neil Young usually gets the length of an album right, think 'Le Noise'; Neil however seems to have a compulsion to put out an album every full moon whether he has anything worthwhile or not.

Currently playing 'Mumford & Sons', an English folk rock act my son thinks I would like. It seems front loaded with all the better songs at the beginning. Great vocals, good hooks and some banjo that can be very irritating. I'm trying hard though.

Christ, I just realizaed that as me Dad was named Robert that makes me a Robertson too doesn't it? And, as my son is named Rob......nah.

Have a good weekend all. I'm praying for snow so as I can get up country. Been housebound for too long.


Entered at Fri Jan 7 16:03:26 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Incense

Steve Winwood was in "The Anglos" in 1965 on Island's short-lived subsiduary Brit. The Anglos consisted of Millie Small and Steve Winwood … Island's greatest hopes at the time. The single, Incense, was reissued many times on Island, but it's the original on Brit. that commands the premiums.

Thanks for more on Alan Caddy … another, like Chas Hodges, Clem Cattini, Mitch Mitchell and Ritchie Blackmore, who appear in the Joe Meek biopic "Telstar!" A film you really have to see.


Entered at Fri Jan 7 15:27:46 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Peter V: First, do you think that the name Steve Anglo was intended as a sly reference to Al Saxon? Second, that Alan Caddy / Avenue Records stuff ties a bunch of things together for me. I've known the name Alan Caddy for a long time, but didn't know his history with the Tornados and the Pirates or that there was an Avenue label. But I had seen his name on various Toronto records from the early '70s - notably those of Abraham's Children (also known as Abie's Babies), a nationally successful band of the day (Landmark will recall their huge hit "Gypsy (Lady From Country Creek)" and those on a budget label called Avenue of America. The only AofA material I have is a boxed set of mostly lame covers of '50s rockers. I tend to pay attention to that stuff because you listen you never can tell what future-somebody was on it. This one I paid closer attention to because I recognised that the faces in the cover drawing (done in the "Deep Purple in Rock") style were those of another Caddy-related group, Abernathy Shagnaster (whose full name was Abernathy Shagnaster's Wash 'n' Wear Band, but who were generally called Abby Shag), who mutated into a big Canuckistani power trio, Triumph (who were bigger than Rush in the early days). And their guitarist in the Abby Shag days and on the very first Triumph 45 was the great Fred Keeler, one of Robbie's most talented young disciples while with David Clayton Thomas and the Shays, then the inaugural guitarist for Steppenwolf in LA, then the guitarist on the excellent 1970 Bearsville LP, "Jericho". You can tell that the one good song on the boxed set is by Abby Shag with Keeler, and the rest is recorded by others.

Brien: I'm with you in rating "Redboy" as Robbie's best.

Simon: "Eton Rifles" - is that Paul Weller?

BEG: Do you think he'll call it "Axeman" for the March 29 release?

Dunc: You're right about Robbie Robertson sounding terribly Scottish, though the Robbie part is just what a lot of Robertsons got called no matter what their real first name was. (I grew up next door to a man known to all as Willie Williams, who was really an Edwin.) Oddly enough, considering the non-Britishness of the parents who named him, Robbie's given names, Jaime Royal we now know thanks to Sebastian, seems like a reference to King James (Jaime le Roi), known generally as James I from when Scotland took over England. I was thinking of some of this yesterday morning when I noticed a reference to "cardinal sin" in a song on "Storyville"; the Philipino clergyman, Cardinal Sin, is probably the modern world's most famous man named Jaime. His name was pronounced something like Chaim, so may have satisfied Robbie's father's side, the Klagermans.


Entered at Fri Jan 7 14:02:23 CET 2011 from (76.66.26.83)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Don't forget March 29 release for Robbie and Oh Canada!

Hi ya NB!


Entered at Fri Jan 7 14:01:08 CET 2011 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Songwriters...

Hey Simon - weren't they suppossed to be known as performers as well (which narrows the field..) Elvis Costello springs to mind... (Oliver's army is one of the best songs written...)


Entered at Fri Jan 7 13:43:33 CET 2011 from (184.151.127.212)

Posted by:

Steve

Jeff, when discussing Madonna's career it's, body at work, as opposed to, body of work? Bawdy work, maybe?


Entered at Fri Jan 7 13:13:48 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

second attempt at link.


Entered at Fri Jan 7 13:09:43 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: How To Be Clairvoyant

It's linked but as it's courtesy of 429 Records, so promo, I'll cut and paste it too.

PRESS RELEASE

29 Records will release How To Become Clairvoyant, Robbie Robertson’s fifth solo album and his first record in more than 10 years. Guitar virtuosos Eric Clapton (who co-wrote three tracks with Robertson), Tom Morello and Robert Randolph guest on the album, which Robertson co-produced with Marius de Vries. How To Become Clairvoyant also features Steve Winwood and Trent Reznor as well as vocalists Angela McCluskey, Rocco Deluca, Dana Glover and Taylor Goldsmith of Dawes. Bassist Pino Palladino and drummer Ian Thomas lay down the groove throughout.

On his last two albums, Music for The Native Americans (1994) and Contact from the Underworld of Redboy (1998), Robertson explored his ancestry. Now, with How To Become Clairvoyant, he takes on his rock heritage, delivering his first-ever song about leaving The Band, the evocative “This Is Where I Get Off.” “What is lost? What is missing?” Robertson asks on “When The Night Was Young,” a poignant reflection on youthful idealism. “We could change the world/stop the war, but that was back when the night was young.”

The smoldering “Straight Down The Line” is a sly nod to rock ‘n’ roll’s early reputation as the Devil’s music, while the blistering “He Don’t Live Here No More” details a battle with addiction. The latter features Clapton on harmony vocal and electric and slide guitars alongside Robertson’s soulful gut string guitar solo.

Named one of Rolling Stone’s “100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time,” Robertson was a founding member of The Band, penning such classic songs as “The Weight,” “The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down” and “Up On Cripple Creek.” The Band’s 1976 farewell concert was documented by director Martin Scorsese in the film The Last Waltz and the group was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1994. In addition to his acclaimed solo albums, Robertson also has a long list of film credits. As Executive Soundtrack Producer for 1996′s Phenomenon, he recruited Clapton to perform “Change the World,” which subsequently won GRAMMY® awards for Song of the Year and Record of the Year. He has collaborated with Scorsese on numerous films, including Raging Bull, The King of Comedy, Casino, Gangs of New York and Shutter Island.

The track listing for How to Become Clairvoyant is as follows:

Straight Down The Line

When The Night Was Young

He Don’t Live Here No More

The Right Mistake

This Is Where I Get Off

Fear of Falling

She’s Not Mine

Madame X

Axman

Won’t Be Back

How To Become Clairvoyant

Tango For Django


Entered at Fri Jan 7 12:57:54 CET 2011 from (86.140.223.156)

Posted by:

Simon

I'm not really keen on the idea of some kind of pantheon or tier system for songwriters as it's all subjective anyway. Would it have to be limited to rock & roll though? Why not Bacharach/David? I happen to think Antonio Carlos Jobim penned some timeless evergreen songs that are both sophisticated and soulful. People would probably scoff at the mention of Benny & Bjorn but in my book they wrote some classics (as well as some irritating stuff).

Jeff, regarding the Band, well I can't help thinking of something in the liner notes of the much maligned first box set. I haven't got it to hand but there was a comment about the songs being a sort of treasure chest of old coins that will never tarnish. I include all the songs written or cowritten by Richard Manuel too.

The more recent era ... well, I'd have to say there's one who has been overlooked, somebody who has consistently written songs that speak to people, a guy who probably won't mean a damn thing to American or Canadian listeners or even British listeners over a certain age: Paul Weller. He's had some uneven patches but in my book he's one of the greats.

Dlew - Thanks for the Carny link.


Entered at Fri Jan 7 12:42:14 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

In some ways, Andy Patridge of XTC. But too reclusive and too unsuccessful to be a great.


Entered at Fri Jan 7 12:38:37 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Argh! I forgot Joni Mitchell!

I'd discount Bono and Michael Stipes too. I don't see why Radiohead got voted best band in the universe ever (or whatever) in the UK yet again.

A snippet in the paper … Liam Gallagher is touring with his new band, Beady Eyes, and has announced they will "not play any Oasis numbers." Perhaps best to book small venues then. And, no, Noel Gallagher isn't on the list either.


Entered at Fri Jan 7 12:29:40 CET 2011 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Roger - just saw your post...

Where are you?


Entered at Fri Jan 7 12:28:47 CET 2011 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Great songwriters after Springsteen

Are there any? I discount Bono and Michael stipe as their lyrics are so appalling most of the time, the good work behind them is diminished. I know there are, fo course... I'd put Cobain (ok, dead), Tracy Chapman and Damon Albarn, and of course radiohead... and my mind is blank... any ohther suggestions for the pantheon of the greats?


Entered at Fri Jan 7 11:25:28 CET 2011 from (99.141.60.161)

Posted by:

Adam2

Great news that Robbie's new album is finally turning up. I've gone through several phases of appreciation for Robbie's solo career. I started out completely uninterested, but have grown to really like some of it. I'd say I'm in the middle - I don't adore his solo work, and the best of it is really pretty good and always creative and new. Whatever you think of his work, you have to respect how he's followed his own path creatively and continued with songwriting all the way.

What songs from Robbie's first two albums can sit alongside his Band songs quality wise?

In my 18 track solo Robbie playlist, I've got 3 from the first album: Showdown At Big Sky, Broken Arrow, and Somewhere Down The Crazy River. 6 of the 10 Storyville tracks are there - I agree that it is probably the best album from Robbie. The 2 more experimental albums - Native Americans and Redboy - have interesting and creative moments for sure. Those who bash RR's solo work really need to approach it with a different attitude, as I had to. I'm glad Robbie seems to be going more traditional rock with this album. I'm not a Clapton fan but I guess it's good for Robbie to have a strong creative help that he's comfortable with - and Clapton does have a pretty big role on the album (co-writing half of it and playing on 3 tracks.)


Entered at Fri Jan 7 10:43:23 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Groucho Marx said he wouldn't want to join any club that would let someone like him in. Funnily enough, I was pondering this “top rung of the super elite” remark too. Robbie Robertson is in my top five songwriters (counting Lennon & McCartney as one) … the others being Bob Dylan, Paul Simon and Van Morrison. But I think I agree about the “body of work”not classifying Robbie among the super-elite writer / performers of the rock era. I saw Bob Geldof interviewed and he was saying that for a charity event, the joy of having either Bob Dylan or Paul McCartney is that you instantly stop the “Who’s the top of the bill?” argument. No one will consider themselves higher in the pecking order, however big their ego.

If you think of the super-elite, quantity has to come into play. Dylan, Lennon-McCartney, Simon stand in the top rank of writer / performers, though I think Paul Simon would expect Dylan to top the bill, as he did on their joint tour. I’d say slightly below come Brian Wilson, Springsteen, Jagger-Richards, James Taylor, Neil Young, Van Morrison, Robbie Robertson, Marvin Gaye, Randy Newman, Leonard Cohen, Ray Davies, Lou Reed, Elton John. But maybe Robbie’s total output is too restricted even for those peers.

I’m not including the earlier ones that didn’t really resonate far enough beyond their genre … Chuck Berry (or rather Chuck Berry and Johnnie Johnson, Jeff!), Bo Diddley … or ones cut off before their time … Eddie Cochran, Buddy Holly, Bob Marley.

That’s not based on my liking, but on generally acknowledged status. I also excluded all those teams who are more famous for writing than performing … Goffin -King, Pomus-Schuman, Leiber-Stoller, Willie Dixon, Holland-Dozier-Holland, Smokey Robinson.


Entered at Fri Jan 7 09:17:36 CET 2011 from (12.51.52.166)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Not In The Top Rung Of The Super Elite? Oh My!!

Brien, a body of work is a body of work.A body of work is not so determined because it has achieved super mass cultural success, ala Madonna. And if you ask me, Madonna, , ala becoming a household name and in the case of music, a lot of huge hits, did not have such a great body of work. But was a huge name. You don't have to be The Beatles, or Electric Light Orchestra, or The Moody Blues or The Monkees, to have a wonderful, indispensable body of work.

The Band songwriting is one of the greatest bodies of songwriting work. And yes, songs havesuperior recognition. The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down, The Weight. Up On Cripple Creek, have great song recognition. Most of the people on the street may not know who the performers of the song were, but they knowp the songs. Count This Wheel's On Fire, and I SHall Be Released, those are 5. It Makes No Difference is a borderline case.

Add in the not so well knowm songs that many people love, and you have one of the most superior bodies of songwriting work anyone could ask for. No, in quantity of well know songs it doesn't hold up to Schuman/Pomus, or to elton JOhn/Bernie Tauopin, on the levels of which you would refer, but it is one helluva body of work.And the cultural significance is greater. To say it isn't in "the top rung of the super elite" is an odd thing. The Band's songwriting is one of the most important bodies of work, but if you told the guys in the band that their songwriting wasn't in the top rung of the suoper elite, i think that atleast 4 of them would laugh their ass off or at least get a good kick out of it and have some wonderful responses. Robbie I can't gauge, he might have laugh himself, I doubt he'd care about your statement.

Not in the " top rung of the super elite" Lions & Tigers and Bears!Oh My!

Geez, I guess Springsteen is in the top rung of the super elite. Maybe John Mellencamp.

Willie Dixon? Does Willie Dixon get to be in the top rung of the super elite?


Entered at Fri Jan 7 09:01:57 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Mr Kite & Al Saxon

I found a picture of the original poster that Lennon bought (see link) and it is "For the Benefit of Mr Kite." But I'm sure John Lennon would have had a little "Ting!" of recognition. I mean, I've never met anyone called "Kite." I haven't seen the film for years but it was very popular. In fact I think I have a copy on one of those newspaper free DVDs. The Daily Mail and Daily Telegraph regularly give away an old classic DVD every day for a week, and I'm a sucker for picking them up.

Al Saxon had a few minor hits from 1959 to 1961 and the "I'm Alright, Jack" theme is the B-side of his cover of "Only Sixteen" (one of two charting British covers in 1959 … Al got to #24). He turns up again around 1970 at Avenue Records. This was a very large British budget cover version group of labels, connected in some way to Pye Records. Avenue was run by Alan Caddy (of the Tornados) and Caddy arranged everything. His best-known employee was one Reg Dwight who describes working with David Byron (Uriah Heep) and Dana Gillespie on many sessions. Byron usually did lead vocal, and Elton did all the backing voices.

Al Saxon specialized in doing the crooners and MOR stuff, and was unusual in getting his name credited (sometimes) on budget covers. His "Tribute to Frank Sinatra" EP is one I have, and interestingly for a cover version budget record, he makes no attempt to imitate, but just does the song as well as he can (not as well as Frank though!) Budget cover version EPs are a guilty pleasure. They must be for a lot of people as the late 50s / early 60s budget specialist, Embassy, just released a whole CD of their Beatles covers from 1962 to 1965.


Entered at Fri Jan 7 04:00:20 CET 2011 from (166.205.142.19)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: I'm All Right, Jack

Peter V - I just saw this 1960 movie for the 1st time - is it iconic? Was Peter Seller's Mr Kite the inspiration for the Beatles? A gent named Al Saxon sang the theme at the end in a sort of rock n roll style. Was he a pop singer or a crooner in the Al Bowlly tradition?

I think I need to see it again to fully get it.


Entered at Fri Jan 7 02:16:34 CET 2011 from (70.78.227.122)

Posted by:

NB

Location: just beyond Hope, BC

Subject: 429 Records

Had to check it out just now to be sure, but they're the label that put out the "Endless Highway" tribute album to The Band, which I wouldn't put on a par with Garth's current offering but which nonetheless has some good covers on it. My fave being John Hiatt and The North-Mississippi Allstars' take on "Ain't No More Cane", which contains an eerily Danko-like vocal. Strangely this CD came in different versions, and as I recall this cut only appeared as a "bonus track" on one version. NB.

Good to see Brown-Eyed Girls' name up on the GB marquee again. Hi A.


Entered at Fri Jan 7 00:40:39 CET 2011 from (76.66.126.96)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

"Get your heart beating in the right direction.
That's when you make a real connection.
We had dreams when the night was young.
We were believers when the night was young.

I'm digging Robbie's "When The Night Was Young".....I keep playing the song over and over and over for the second day....swayin' and groovin'....This song resonates for me as this mellow groove makes it easy to reflect on a time when the night was young for a lot of us.....Thank you Robbie.

"It's how you embrace the mystery."

Check out CD cover.

Beautiful...Angela McCluskey-Vocal
Angelyna Boyd, Daryl Johnson (worked with Emmylouuu, Lanois), Rocco Deluca- Backing Vocals


Entered at Fri Jan 7 00:11:41 CET 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Redboy - I listen to this cd more than any of RR's others. I think it is a terrific album - hypnotic, eclectic. I don't even mind the last techno-hip/hop song. I think it's creative. I thought RR's first was stronger than Storyville but I listen to Storyville more but in selected tracks. As much as I love and enjoy the Band and many of the solo projects since, I'm afraid I can't quite put them up in the echelon of some of the artists Kevin mentioned as far as song writing. Are the first three Band records as good as anything that came out of that era - certainly. But longevity and popularity also are factors that the Band haven't retained or accomplished. True, they are held in the highest esteem by the musicians of their generation and that holds a lot of water but sadly I don't think RR's songwriting can be elevated to the top wrung of the super elite - mostly because the body of work isn't there.


Entered at Thu Jan 6 23:59:01 CET 2011 from (71.62.141.173)

Posted by:

Charlie Y

Location: Down in Old Virginny

Subject: 429 Records

I don't know anything about the label, but 429 Records is now the home of both Dr. John and Robbie Robertson, and that is good. David: I caught your "blind faith" reference.

I agree on David's point about the album concept as something not many people appreciate or understand anymore. Let them download Katy Perry's "Peacock" and listen until their feathers fall out. I'll take an album of songs that hold together...


Entered at Thu Jan 6 23:36:07 CET 2011 from (217.42.25.251)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Great description of Glasgow, Kevin. Indian meals and fashion. Hope you are still playing 'Tell Tale Signs'.

Glasgow is in a bit of mourning for Gerry Rafferty. One of the national papers mentioned sadly how within two years we had lost John Martyn and Gerry Rafferty. You see what I like about a small nation is that we are proud of our stars because we don't get too many whether it be sports stars or musicians.

Sadly, one of the reasons for making Scotland great killed both of them. I'm sipping a Glenfiddich 15 year old just now. Always moderation.

And what could be a more Scottish name than Robbie Robertson. And if he was Scottish, he would be a national treasure. So how about remembering how much he has given when the album comes out?


Entered at Thu Jan 6 23:32:59 CET 2011 from (32.177.65.56)

Posted by:

JQ

Landmark - I agree with you about Everybody's Rockin'. Wonderin' is top notch rockabilly.


Entered at Thu Jan 6 23:18:13 CET 2011 from (217.42.25.251)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Neil Young

My apologies Bill.

I really like 'Comes a Time' and 'Live at Massey Hall'


Entered at Thu Jan 6 23:04:31 CET 2011 from (70.53.44.164)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Impossibility of Sainthood

I just spent close to 2 months in China........many pleasures but a striking one was just completely escaping the whole western television/twitter/facebook/reality show world that even if one does not participate in - as I do not - nevertheless infects all of us in some way anyway.......I like Brien Sz's description of this place and agree that one just has to accept the way conversations develop here..................

On to Robbie's new one....let's accept that standards are always high when dealing with someone that really has only 5 or 6 peers in this little club called elite rock n roll songwriters......McCartney, Dylan, Jagger/Richard, Young, Simon, Morrison and Davies ( a case can be made to throw in the boys from U2 and REM )................Dylan certainly and possibly Neil Young depending on your standards are the only ones from that group that have written anything close to what could be considered vintage standard in 20 years..........so where does this leave Robbie? Entirely unique in that he has taken not one but two 10 year breaks in the last 30 years............and the songs he wrote in his mid to late 40's on the RR and Storyville records at least could sit on the same self as the best material he wrote while in his 20's............Red Boy with those two Techno producers along for the ride and Shine a Light really did seem to be evidence that there was nothing left in the tank...........along comes the song "How to become a Clairvoyant" last year and while I liked it and still do I certainly understood those who thought that it was just more atmospherics and missing structure and heart....................BUT............this lead off single is quite beautiful...... sparse....Band like....lovely playing...and as with Dylan - I always like his turns of phrases..........as to looking for rock......I will take Sebastian at his word and do expect some blistering guitar on some of the tracks......that all said he really stopped with that cut to the bone violence on the instrument in the early 1960's..............there are many old timers in Toronto that still glow at the wickedness of Robbie's playing with the Hawks that are STILL pissed at the gentleness of Music From Big Pink and looked in vain for Robbie to rock out all through his career with the Band...............

Dunc: I was in Glasgow many years ago......It was quite a party ...only remember a few things..........staying at the Royal Automobile Club which had decent rooms and Jackie Stewart's old racing Helmut in the lobby................having one of the best Indian meals I have ever had somewhere downtown.....and being taken to a series of nightclubs - all in converted churches....where women would whisper in my ear that Glasgow was the fashion capital of Europe - having even surpassed Paris and Milan........I was bombed...they were beautiful so no arguments but I still remember this............never got to St. Andrews........Hope that you do Bob....one of those signature places in the world of sports.....................


Entered at Thu Jan 6 23:01:05 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Location: The Wait

To be fair, I'll be among those buying Robbie's new album as soon as it's released. I'm old school in that I like to listen to an album as a whole concept, rather than just downloading a song or two. That said, it could be that the preview two songs from "How To Become Clairvoyant" will sound better to me within the context of the entire collection of cuts. I'm particularly looking forward to hearing the collaborations with Clapton & Winwood, so you can say that I have some degree of blind faith that the album will be good and well worth the wait, or should I say weight. :-)


Entered at Thu Jan 6 22:58:47 CET 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: Neil Young

Funnily enough, this last couple of days away from the guestbook I've been tucked into Neil Young again after we were working on finishing off the cover tunes for the CD and ditched one after concluding we hadn't nailed it.

Went scurrying off to the NY albums to give Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere (the title tune of my favourite NY album) an evaluative listen, then to Harvest for Alabama and Words but settled for Danny Whitten's Come On Baby Let's Go Downtown in the end and hurriedly recorded a demo and booked a studio for tomorrow!

Some people say that you love or hate NY. I beg to differ: I reckon it is impossible to like it all but that most people could find a handful of real gems that they really like and consider among the best. For me EKTIN, H and Tonights The Night are the three essential albums: The debut and ATG nearly so but not as essential. Quite enjoyed the "Arc" dic of guitar noise that came with the expanded "Weld" set, though.

But you can shove Hey Hey My My wherever you shove nasty, hook-line heavy, Zippo-waver songs........


Entered at Thu Jan 6 22:55:40 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: giving back some glares?

Dunc: Not me. I've never had that one, aside from the original 45 of the title track, which I still have and love.

sadavid: Talking about early Neil 45s reminded me that I wanted to ask you what "Arka" means? I noticed we have an Arka Shoes store near us (in Toronto's Little Ukraine) and for a long time their was an Arka knicknack store on Queen West where they sold LPs on the V Records label in the '70s - on the back of one of which I got the titles and serial number for the Squires 45. (Sadly Arka didn't sell 45s, though "The Sultan" wouldn't've been in print anyway; tons of Mickey and Bunny though!)


Entered at Thu Jan 6 22:42:41 CET 2011 from (217.42.25.251)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Bill M

I really like Neil Young, too. I've been buying the concerts from the archives series. I have four. I thought you wrote some time ago that you didn't like Sugar Mountain. Was I wrong?


Entered at Thu Jan 6 22:40:09 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: fun with golf

During the holidays just past, my brother took his young son for an afternoon at a local black-light mini-golf emporium. The name of this venue? U-Puttz.


Entered at Thu Jan 6 22:38:19 CET 2011 from (70.28.32.74)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

Speaking of Neil, I don't care what everyone else thinks, but I always liked "Everybody's Rocking". My only complaint was that it was over too fast.


Entered at Thu Jan 6 22:36:42 CET 2011 from (217.5.150.250)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Subject: Aging bands/artists

I don't think anyone is on my 'must buy' list anymore. If the new Robbie Robertson cd is so good that I can't help but notice it I will probably buy it, but I don't even own Storyville or Electric Dirt! As much as I have loved current Jethro Tull up to as recently as 5 years ago, I think it is time for retirement. When the best an aging rock star can offer is yet another 'orchestral version' of a song for the tenth time, especially if it is Bouree which is already orchestral to begin with, then Ughh! Procol Harum can get away with it, but I don't understand the need to do orchestral versions of what is properly rock or hard folk music 30 or 40 years on to somehow prove the legitimacy of the music. Why? One song done this way is a novelty, and album's worth is like being tortured at the hands of a high school marching band at half-time, but year after year and tour after tour of 'new' orchestral versions screams 'hang it up!'.


Entered at Thu Jan 6 22:31:41 CET 2011 from (70.28.32.74)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

I saw CSN this summer, opening for Tom Petty in Saratoga and I was surprised how strong and vibrant they still sounded. They also played a full set, chock full of hits, together and solo. What I found funny was that two of their encores were "For What It's Worth" and "Love The One You're With". The third was (of course) "Teach Your Children". It was quite the magical night.


Entered at Thu Jan 6 22:05:18 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Bob W: You should also be warned that if you think you've lost your way to the course because you've wound up on a rocky, stubbly field, don't worry - you're standing on it. And leave some time for a run on the impressive beach, so you can get in touch with your inner chariot of fire.

Dunc: Not sure which concert albums your referring to. I don't recall disliking any of Neil Young's, including the ones in the Archives set. There's actually very little Neil stuff that I don't like, and I suspect that I'd now like even much of the stuff that I dumped. "Trans" comes to mind as one that I disliked, but hearing David Wilcox's lovely cover of the title song on a tribute CD and reading in "Shakey" (the book) about what Neil was getting at in doing the album that way, makes me want to hear the whole thing all over again - though not enough that I've done anything to refind it.


Entered at Thu Jan 6 21:32:37 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Dylan

Dylan … well let's exclude the Christmas album, but I've enjoyed recent studio Dylan too. I just wouldn't go to see him live ever again. The Witmark demos this year are excellent, but "Folksinger's Choice" is better. Well worth getting.

I'd love to see Neil Young again. In spite of all, I realized I didn't have a Neil Young playlist on my iPod and am in the process of correcting it. But I'd want to read a review of a concert tour first so as to avoid awful hyper-loud guitar-masturbation stuff. That started me thinking about that Band Wembley concert supporting CSNY. The one of the four I was least interested in seeing was Graham Nash, but on the night, it was his short solo set that really got through, better than anything in the rest of the CSNY set or the solo bits. I think Neil plays for himself. Sometimes that includes the audience. Sometimes not. Back to the playlist …


Entered at Thu Jan 6 21:29:21 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Thank you, Dunc. My email is bwigo(at)verizon.net

I appreciate your response.


Entered at Thu Jan 6 21:19:02 CET 2011 from (217.42.25.251)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

I really enjoyed your post, Peter, as regards Robbie and agree wholeheartedly. I think Robbie is great.

I really enjoy Neil Young, but I don't rush out and get the new albums, but have enjoyed the release of the concerts series. But I think Bill M didn't like one that I did.

I'm not good at getting into new bands. I play Richard Hawley.

I like reworkings. Really enjoy, like you, the Aaron Neville reworkings of the soul songs. Kevin and I would recommend Bob Dylan 'Tell Tale Signs'.

I really enjoy the last four Dylan albums.

Just now I'm playing Stephane Grappeli and Django Rheinhardt.


Entered at Thu Jan 6 21:11:58 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Do warn him that lime green pants, white golf shoes with tan upholstery, an orange and purple Burberry pattern sweater and a violently cerise shirt are liable to cause comment at the Royal & Ancient, Dunc. They still have standards, I believe.


Entered at Thu Jan 6 21:04:46 CET 2011 from (217.42.25.251)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Bob W:Many, many times. I was brought up 15 miles from St Andrews and played football and field hockey there. Very interesting place in lowland Scotland. Obviously that much better if you like golf. What is interesting about golf here is that it is accessible to all. (I'm thinking about dicussions on the GB about golf in America.) Remember the country is small... and very beautiful. How do I make contact with you?


Entered at Thu Jan 6 20:27:43 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: tickets for Levon in Toronto in March


Entered at Thu Jan 6 20:01:43 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Well, it's not just that the tempo is laid back, for me it lacks an emotional edge & energy. He might have something to say, mature or not, but it doesn't speak to my heart.


Entered at Thu Jan 6 19:58:25 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Dunc, have you ever visited St. Andrews? We are seriously considering a trip to Scotland and thinking about a visit there.


Entered at Thu Jan 6 19:53:18 CET 2011 from (184.151.127.232)

Posted by:

Steve

Subject: Love The Swede

Norm, the Swedish team was the only team that were better than Canada for a full 60 minutes. Canada was lucky to get to overtime against them. But the Ruskies were the best when push came to shove. They were like a team of Ovechkins when they needed goals, couldn't be stopped.Canada looked like all the hype they'd ridden on kinda evaporated when they needed it most.

This whole Junior Tournament ( especially here in Canada) is starting to feel like a new religious movement. I almost puked when Pierre McGuire referred to the Team Canada dressing room as" Sacred Ground".

Best part about the third period, when Canada was having their lunch handed to them, was we didn't have to see that couch potatoe Harper , and that hockey sweater/tent he was wearing, anymore. Hearing those Ruskie teens murder their anthem was the highlite of the tournament for me. It just doesn't get any worse. I've heard their rendition twice today on the radio and it gives me goosebumps.

Is it true that Robbie has a song on the new album that is finally, finally going to tell us why he left the Band? It was so long ago he might have trouble remembering but I guess he could have called Levon, or read Levon's book if he needed to be reminded.


Entered at Thu Jan 6 19:44:48 CET 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

The clip sounded like it belonged on Storyville. It isn't bad. I'm happy RR is back. I'll get his new release. As for "rockin" - I only expect so much out of a middle-aged man. Besides rockin is all in the eye of the beholder. I'm sure RR will have a few good uptempo songs but I doubt there'll be much to inspire a good sweat.

For me, most of yesteryears artists aren't on the "must" list. Both Niel and Van too often churn out the same ol same ol but again when you are in your sixties and livin a pretty fat life, what kind of angst and inspiration do you expect? I like U2 a lot but again, since Achtung Baby they haven't put out a great album in nearly 20 years. They have moments for sure but true classics - it's been a long time. But again, I don't expect it. If and when it happens, great! Most of the artists, for me, that put out inspired, rockin 'records' are all under 40.


Entered at Thu Jan 6 19:40:25 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: this bitter earth

Thanks Peter V. Amazing!! Hadn't even heard of it before.


Entered at Thu Jan 6 19:05:09 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Arc / Weld to When The Night

Neil Young only came off my “automatic purchase” list a year ago, so I have a very long row of CDs. He came off the list because there were too many of them below quality, or even on good ones, too much that was thrashy nonsense … how many of you seriously sit down and listen to Arc / Weld of an evening? Van Morrison (who’s still on the list) suffers from a similar problem. Their incentive to put stuff out outweighs their quality filter. In Van’s case, he sets the bar somewhat higher.

Ignoring the contractual obligation “Islands” Robbie Robertson hasn’t fallen prey to the same impulse since 1971 and “Cahoots”. He seems to me to represent “Don’t say anything unless you have something to say.” If you have nothing new to say, put out “Moondog Matinee” and do old stuff well. He is not prolific, but the four post-Band albums were all worth waiting for.

Just last year, he produced that incredible mix of Dinah Washington from the 1950s on “This Bitter Earth” combined with Max Richter’s modern classical “On The Nature of Daylight” from 2004. That took a huge leap of the imagination, followed by painstaking crafting, though I don’t know who put in the hours. Robbie, I’d assume. It was my favourite track of 2010.

Robbie is 67. Don’t you think there’s time for mature material? Like Storyville, the new streamed track seems pretty Band-like in concept to me. The sight of the haggard Dylan pretending he’s a young heavy metal guitarist is not edifying. I’d go to see Neil Young on Bill M’s main road with acoustic guitar or with a country / folkie sort of band any day, but I really don’t want to sit through thirty minutes of high volume thrash and feedback from an old bloke who’s deafened himself so comprehensively that he can play at painful megawatts and consider it musical.

In fact, if I want Neil Young, I’d continue playing the Mojo January 2011 “Tribute to Harvest” CD, which has some great cover versions on it. Or The Duke & The King, whose latest is more reminiscent of Neil at his best than it is of The Band. Though the song “Shaky” is not about Neil.


Entered at Thu Jan 6 18:43:39 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

I'd say that there's much to like in this particular song, but not to love or to inspire me to save pennies for a purchase upon release. (Howz the rest sound Steve?)

Still, it seems unfair to expect Robbie to spend all his time in the ditch, like (a case can be made) he did with Redboy and Native Americans and, going way back, Big Pink. Even His Neilship has spent a good deal of time on the asphalt, and even the centre line, as logic dictates of any journey that involves veering from ditch to ditch.


Entered at Thu Jan 6 18:10:28 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: When the Night was Neil Young

Was not to like about Robbie's new "single"? For me, there's too much needling & noodling and no rocking. Despite his name-dropping of interesting people like Luke the Drifter and Andy Warhol, maybe I'm just wishing he'd follow Neil Young's philosophy and leave the middle of the road on a rougher ride and head for the ditch along Highway 61.


Entered at Thu Jan 6 17:56:45 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: Colin Linden producing Matt Andersen at Levon's studio

MATT ANDERSEN – FRESH FROM STUART McLEAN’S
VINYL CAFÉ TOUR AND SESSIONS AT LEVIN HELM’S
WOODSTOCK STUDIOS – COMES TO HUGH’S ROOM JAN. 11
WITH PRODUCER COLIN LINDEN FOR A TWO-MAN SONG SWAP

Who: MATT ANDERSEN joins forces with COLIN LINDEN
What: A song swap/guitar pull with two guitar masters — and master songwriters.
Where: Hugh’s Room, 2261 Dundas St. W., south of Bloor St. W.
When: Tuesday January 11, 2011. Show at 8.30 p.m. (doors @ 6 p.m.)
Tickets: $26.00 in advance, $28.00 at door available at /bHugh’s Room 416-531-6604 or www.hughsroom.com. Dinner reservations not necessary, but certainly recommended.

Matt Andersen, the larger-than-life performer from New Brunswick (and now living in Sydney, Nova Scotia) is taking part in a unique show at Hugh’s Room, Toronto, on January 11.

He’ll share the stage with Colin Linden, the Canadian guitarist who has become one of the busiest roots music producers since he moved to Nashville several years ago.

The two plan a song-swap of new and old blues-based material, some powerful guitar work, and some deep roots vocals. It will be the public debut of a number of new songs Andersen has written — some with Colin.

The two have finished recording Matt’s new album at Levon Helm’s studio in Woodstock, NY — they are about to start the editing, mixing and mastering stages of the CD.

Andersen, who sold close to 10,000 copies of his Christmas album, rel;eased a month before the holiday, completed his fourth tour with Stuart McLean’s Vinyl Café show just before the holidays.


Entered at Thu Jan 6 16:02:56 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: When The Night Was Young

There often is very little reaction here … we had to wait a long time to get this week's Garth Hudson comments.

What’s not to like? Fabulous signature guitar, excellent bass playing, nice needling, noodling Wurlitzer piano sounds, and as ever Robbie knows how to set his voice between other vocalists to effect. It reminds me far more of Storylines than anything else and that’s extremely positive. I had the title track, How To Be Clairvoyant, on my 2010 playlist in the car, and it didn’t grow really. I tried hard and that’s a Cahoots sign. But this is vastly better to my ears. I'm only sorry it's streamed and not on iTunes yet, because I'd like to hear it on a decent system, not Mac speakers.


Entered at Thu Jan 6 15:55:45 CET 2011 from (12.51.52.166)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Kevin J, in my very disposable opinion, perhaps the reason for the scarcity of public reaction here, is that the song speaks volumes for itself.

I like the chick's voice.


Entered at Thu Jan 6 15:50:40 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Underwhelmed

Kevin: With regard to Robbie's "When The Night Was Young" I was merely being polite by following the old adage -- "if you can't say something nice, don't say anything at all." I have to admit that, along with "Shine A Light" and "How To Become Clairvoyant", I'm underwhelmed with Robbie's most recent output. Maybe I just anticipated too much after all these years between the trains of his releases, but I'll reserve judgment until I hear the entire album.


Entered at Thu Jan 6 15:43:30 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: great scot

dlew919: much thanks for the _Carny_ review . . . it's gratifying to know that someone else appreciates the finer points of this flawed gem . . . .

Re: "When the Night Was Young," I really like the voice of the co-singer, and the way it's used on the track. I looked up Angela McCluskey, who turns out to be a Glaswegian Angelino (or should that be "Angelina"?). Tho' comparisons are odious, her timbre and attack put me in mind of Billie H. and Amy W.

Tho' music-genre labels are odious, who can resist a colourful toy? See [My link] for a interactive 'map' of artists arranged according to genre (and the connections between the artists) and based on snapshot data from Last.fm.


Entered at Thu Jan 6 14:44:23 CET 2011 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Hey Kevin...

What did you think of the song? It was a grower for me (first time I thought - neh... second time (ooh... that's interesting...) that sent me back a third time.. (actually...)


Entered at Thu Jan 6 12:46:58 CET 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Kevin - I've said this for years. This GB is more of a pub or cafe, in that, folks here have a common interest and routine with this place. Most news about what the Band members do is received with tepidness. WHen the tangible music comes out as a body of work, then it will receive more attention. And even then, it will come to pass rather quickly - unles of course we decide to make it a controversial subject that everyone will have a genius and unique opinion on. Then there will be a lot to say.


Entered at Thu Jan 6 10:31:13 CET 2011 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Web: My link

Subject: Carny Review

You'll get the drift. Does take a while to get to Robbie and Carny. but it's worth it.


Entered at Thu Jan 6 04:02:45 CET 2011 from (86.139.104.180)

Posted by:

Simon

Web: My link

"To Kingdom Come" from the Isle of Wight. Thanks for spotting that, Charlie.


Entered at Thu Jan 6 03:13:39 CET 2011 from (72.43.141.253)

Posted by:

Charlie Y

Location: Down in Old Virginny

Subject: "To Kingdom Come," at the Isle of Wight

I can't get the link to work right now, but YouTube has--or at least earlier today had--a relatively new photo montage with the Isle of Wight audio of "To Kingdom Come." I wish someone would release the Band/Dylan Isle of Wight on CD and DVD...


Entered at Thu Jan 6 00:08:45 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Countin' yer chickens

You guys 'er really in a time warp! I'm camped out in the family room cookin' garlic sausage on a piece of aluminum foil on the woodstove. Drinkin' my ice tea and eatin' crackers. The two teams in the IIHF who concidered themselves the best and were sure they were going to win gold, just finished their game for bronze.

One of the uppity Swedish boys scoffed at the Canadian team, and said, "The USA is our only competition". Well, the Swedes won all their games and got a bye as did the US and Hey. Why would they ever count the Russians out? Russia kicked the Swedes ass. Canada played a perfect game against the USA, beating them in every department. Not long ago Canada juniors won 5 gold medals in a row. So there is a great difference, (in more than spelling) between confident and arrogant. Now let that be a lesson to uze.

Now of course you'll hear everything as it is, was, and ever will be from the stoned farmer. Did y'all know that....he writes Gomushy scripts for him?? they couldn't operate without him.


Entered at Wed Jan 5 23:39:05 CET 2011 from (70.53.44.164)

Posted by:

Kevin J

In the "ya just wouldn't believe it" category......Jan 5, 2011 marks the day that one Felix Pappalardi garnered more press on a Band Guestbook than Robbie Robertson the day after releasing his first single in 10 years..........................No other guestbook in the music biz can come close to the eccentricities and knowledge of the folks here......................although I'm afraid some of this may have gone unnoticed!


Entered at Wed Jan 5 22:49:10 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Bill M: Mylon probably recruited those two Canadian musicians upon Pappalardi recommendations. Several of the musicians who'd played on his 1969 Cotillion/Atlantic debut LP (produced by Allen Toussaint) had chosen to hook up with Buddy Buie to form the Atlanta Rhythm Section, instead of joining Mylon's band.

Mylon was receiving some nice royalty checks from a song he'd written as a teenager, "Without Him". Elvis Presley had included it on his triple-platinum gospel LP "How Great Thou Art". No doubt those royalties have increased greatly over the years as the Elvis catalog continues to generate endless reissues.


Entered at Wed Jan 5 22:08:39 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Pat B: As a normal mortal, I wait with bated breath to find out.


Entered at Wed Jan 5 21:54:25 CET 2011 from (68.164.4.147)

Posted by:

Pat B

Bill M, which begs the question as to how one becomes clairvoyant.


Entered at Wed Jan 5 21:32:26 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

NB: I can see that it's now an empty gesture. As a clairvoyant, the party in question would know zackly what you're up to. As for that magical CHUM 'booth' at the Ex, I wanted to go in '67 to see the Lords of London play there, but didn't, thus missing an early opportunity to see the future bassist for the Robin Hood's houseband, the De-boners. In fact, I didn't get to the CHUM trailer until the summer of '70, when I saw Sea Dog play their own songs plus Norman Greenbaum's classic "Canned Ham". Doubtless the same day as I saw Luke and the Apostles and Mashmakhan at the Bandshell.


Entered at Wed Jan 5 21:31:45 CET 2011 from (217.42.25.251)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Bill M

Billy Connolly is from Glasgow, but my town is joined on to Glasgow. I think he lived in this town at one point. I saw Billy Connolly many years ago when he was solo and the stories were a bigger part of the act than the singing. What's good about where I live is because of the 'green belt', in next to no time I'm into the countryside.


Entered at Wed Jan 5 21:01:49 CET 2011 from (142.22.16.50)

Posted by:

Northern Boy

Subject: Enough With All This "Chum Chart Talk" Bill, you old son of a Mun ! !

All it does is get me all nostalgic for my misspent youth, hanging around the Chum on-site broadcast trailer at The CNE with a Chum Chart in one hand, a Shopsy Corned-Beef sandwich in the other hand and a big Mountain Dew in the other hand. Wait a sec, that may not actually be anatomically correct but I think you get the drift.

Your man Danny Brooks indeed does a nice job of "Forbidden Fruit" on the Garth album. His voice, on that cut at least, reminds me and the newly retired NG of David Clayton Thomas, which isn't at all a bad thing. Have you decided yet whether I should loan Stevon Farm a bunch of blues albums, you know, for the betterment of the entire GB (wink,wink, nudge, nudge). NB


Entered at Wed Jan 5 20:56:35 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Dunc: Is Billy Connolly from your town too? He was the other main guy in the Humblebums with Rafferty, and in just about every interview I've seen he's said, generally in response to the question, How did you get into comedy, that Rafferty was getting to be so good that he needed a way to make his own mark.

David P: As I've said here before, the summer of 1971's when I saw Mylon and group, touring the LP you mentioned, I suppose. Another guy and I were our high school's 'reps' on some national see-Ottawa program, and for whatever reason the organisers bought us all second-row tickets to see Emerson, Lake and Palmer at the National Art Centre (on their Tarkus tour). Mylon was the opening act, and most of the group was blitzed - so much so that Mylon clearly had no clue why everyone laughed when he went into his standard let's-love-one-another rap, saying "Some of us are black and some of us are white. Some of us are Christians and some of us are Jews. Some of us are Catholics and some of us are Canadians."


Entered at Wed Jan 5 20:32:36 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Bill M: Mylon LeFevre and Felix Pappalardi were friends back in the day. Mr. Pappalardi produced Mylon's 1971 Columbia album, which featured the Holy Smoke Doo-Dah Band and included a cover of the Mountain song "Silver Paper".


Entered at Wed Jan 5 20:31:08 CET 2011 from (217.42.25.251)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Bob W:Thanks for the link. Happy New Year to you and your family.

Kevin:Enjoyed your post.

Thanks for posting Robbie's new song, David. Really enjoyed it.

There's been a lot about Gerry Rafferty in the news here. I really liked his work. It was great that Joe Egan, Gerry Rafferty and John Byrne came from this town.

Rab Noakes(really good) was on the news, talking about Gerry. In addition to being a songwriter, he saw Gerry as being a very good singer and guitarist.


Entered at Wed Jan 5 19:58:55 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Kevin J: To expand a bit on JB and the Playboys, two of the guys moved to Toronto in the late '60s and joined the same Big Town Boys - who are top 10 on that same CHUM chart. One of those two, bassist Lou Yachnin, stayed in town long enough to be in Lighthouse during their glory days.

David P: The other guy was the guitarist, whose place in the Playboys was taken by Jean-Pierre Lauzon, who you will have seen as part of Mylon's Holy Smoke Doo-Dah Band, a gig he'd gotten through having been one of a confusing cluster of Montreal musicians in Felix Pappalardi's circle - the best known being Corky Laing (Band link: Levon wrote the short preface for his autobiog.)

Come to think of it, another was Lauzon's fellow-Holy Smoker, Marty Simon, who went to London, instead of back to Montreal, and wound up in Sharks with Chris Spedding, Andy Fraser from Free and a singer named Snips, who I think of everytime I listen to Ian Thornley singing "Chest Fever" on the new Garth CD.


Entered at Wed Jan 5 19:26:27 CET 2011 from (184.151.127.185)

Posted by:

Steve

Subject: Unnoticed was the operative word

Kevin, I did read it careflly, I don't need to be reminded of that ever since I took the reading comprehension course that Jeff suggested many years ago.

My problem is that now I read things so carefully that I even dectect small changes like the one you just made substuting "music" for "playing" in the original post.

I think of the music as the finished product, the thing they put their name on to take credit for as their creation. Playing just gets your name on the album, as a player. Garth always gets mentioned as having had his hand into more than just playing and I find it hard for all his ontributions to the music (besides playing) to go unnoticed..

Not trying to pick a fight with you,Kevin, far from it, just trying to keep the record from getting further distorted, like my vinyl copy of Abby Road when I left it on the window sill in the sun.

I'm pretty sure Jian has not aproached Garth about doing an interview. Ive pestered him enough about it over the last three years and he has responded to other emails about other guest requests.I send him an email about every three or four months on the subject. I think it's because I'm a lone voice because he dhas mentioned getting people on because of listner support. Give a shout, can't hurt.


Entered at Wed Jan 5 19:23:39 CET 2011 from (70.53.44.164)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Bill M: It actually said 80,000 GBP which used to be over $200,000 but as of today works out to about $120,000..... but how ever you slice it that one hit song paid off well and for a very long time.........think of Don Felder having his name ( deservedly ) on "Hotel California" or more fortuitously the lovely Michelle Phillips getting 1/2 of "California Dreamin" for just holding a pen! By the way...your chart list was fun to look at - especially the "slapshot" tidbit......


Entered at Wed Jan 5 19:17:35 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Westcoaster

Great video Norm!


Entered at Wed Jan 5 18:38:07 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: the other RR

Bill M: I love trivia games when I know the answer - "Baker Street"'s saxman is one Raphael Ravenscroft.

It's just the sort of name that sticks in the head. Another one like that is Benmont Tench.


Entered at Wed Jan 5 18:31:54 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Kevin J: $120K/yr for "Baker Street" alone? No wonder Levon and John Simon are so much in favour of the in-the-room approach! I used to get sick of that song, and never really liked anything about it except the sax (by who?). Didn't like "Stuck In The Middle" all that much either, but have to note that it being a Leiber-Stoller production provides a link to our guys, or at least to Robbie and possibly Rick for John Hammond sessions. The Rafferty song that I did always like was "Open Up The Door", which was being played fairly often on CHUM-FM radio hit when I started tuning in the early '70s. Had the album at one time too.


Entered at Wed Jan 5 17:40:01 CET 2011 from (70.53.44.164)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Steve........best to read things carefully before commenting...........I specifically said that listening to the new Garth cd makes one wonder what contributions ( other than music ) he may have made to the Band that went unnoticed. I was thinking in terms of the things that stand out on his new Band celebration cd such as track order and song selection...................as to doing interviews on the CBC...........perhaps he just doesn't want to do this sort of publicity as he has never been comfortable in these settings........I would love to hear him do a track by track description of how things all fell into place........................The interviews I am most anticipating are Carol Caffin's talks with Robbie Robertson and hopefully Garth Hudson..........She is definitely doing one with RR and if she' reads this hopefully also arranges a chat with Garth as well.......

Gerry Rafferty: First paragraph of the obit in today's Globe and Mail mentioned that he was still - 30 years after being on the top of the charts - earning over $120,000 USD a year in royalties from "Baker Street".................I

'When the Night Was Young"............Is it just me or is this a similar feeling to when we heard "Between Trains" for the first time and instantly thought about The Band and great songs and which voices should go where.............time will tell but just glad to see that RR has written some real songs and not messed around with too much production..............


Entered at Wed Jan 5 17:21:02 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Tuggin' Hard

Happy New Year Bob.........glad you enjoyed it.


Entered at Wed Jan 5 15:46:50 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

BEG: The cigar's clearly a prop, providing a seductive line of smoke that with the line of the chair nicely frames the head. Likely thinking that the cloud reminds him of a girl he used to know. Of course, in light of Isaiah Mustafa the PR people might be thinking, "I am in a chair, smelling the way your old man used to smell."

My guess is that Steve already knew about the March 29 release date of "How to be a Clairvoyant".


Entered at Wed Jan 5 15:24:13 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Norm, I enjoyed the video and the music. Thank you.


Entered at Wed Jan 5 15:20:28 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: just a cigar

BEG: there's no evidence he's smoking the thing . . . perhaps it's ritual . . . the Sacrament of the Stogie . . . .


Entered at Wed Jan 5 03:49:01 CET 2011 from (76.69.86.21)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Hmmm.....Has Robbie taken up smoking again......or just never stopped?!


Entered at Wed Jan 5 03:44:24 CET 2011 from (76.69.86.21)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Many thanks to all for posting the Robbie links today.

We'll be able to get ahold of Robbie's latest recording "How to Become Clairvoyant" in Canada on March 29.

"Robertson made the new record with a number of high-profile guests including guitarists Robert Randolph and Tom Morello; Steve Winwood, who plays organ on two songs; and Eric Clapton, who co-wrote three of the album's songs and plays on six of them.

"It turned out quite extraordinary," Robertson tells Rolling Stone. "I think I’ve written some really good songs, and the boys helped me out." The real surprise, though, is an appearance by Trent Reznor, who supplies what Robertson calls "additional textures" on the instrumental "Madame X."

"It’s a really cinematic piece of music," Robertson says. "I wanted Trent to contribute something, and he understood exactly what I was talking about and did something completely beautiful and haunting."



Entered at Wed Jan 5 02:36:31 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Tuggin' Hard

This link is to a video on my brother Lorne's web site. There is a lot of good footage of a LOT of tugs, a whale, sea lions, seals some gawd awful lookin' tug boat crew, and a little over halfway thru, the Westcoaster as I passed him one day last fall.

The back ground music is songs Lorne has written. Their camera work is beginning to get a little better.


Entered at Wed Jan 5 01:45:10 CET 2011 from (99.238.58.13)

Posted by:

Mark Smith

Location: Toronto

Subject: 89 reunion

I love the band,I was at the Horseshoe Tavern in Toronto in 89 with my friend Sarah,The Toronto Star Newspaper had hinted that since Rick and Garth were playing the night before the induction into the Juno Hall of Fame,Something might go down. It did..they played Life is a carnival and The Weight My favorite rock and roll memorie.


Entered at Wed Jan 5 01:40:19 CET 2011 from (75.72.126.40)

Posted by:

Zzzz

I agree Kevin J especially on Out Of The Blue... can't stop loving that one, it's awesome... and I didn't think a different take could be as moving as Robbie on vocals. I had to Google Image the singer hehehe... You didn't mention Knockin' Lost John, very nice groove, something different. There's lots of stuff that makes me take a different look at the ole' Band songs. The Sadies are great in everything they appear on. I also think the Levon fans are gonna love Chest Fever with it's guitar slinger solos that feel like they are being lobed over the border to Larry C and Jim W like beers being passed back and forth among friends... i.e. you turn again. The women vocals are all great... and to think the music is maybe referred to as boys club, eh ;)... There's also some real edgy diverging stuff that my Metal kids are digging.


Entered at Wed Jan 5 00:22:55 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Excellent stream of When The Night Was Young. I thought When The Night Was Young, at first listen, was more promising than the title track (which I've had for months from the film series).

Madame X would be a character from Somewhere Down The Crazy River, then?


Entered at Tue Jan 4 23:16:41 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northqwest

Subject: Reservoir Dogs

Too bad about Gerry Rafferty alright.......that movie always reminds me of that gawd damn Michael Madsen. That guy is so good at being a real son of a bitch. Like in the movie Beyond the Law with Charlie Sheen. Madsen has no trouble with blasting a young Chinese girl with a gun in a convienence store.


Entered at Tue Jan 4 22:59:04 CET 2011 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: RIP Gerry Rafferty

sad news.


Entered at Tue Jan 4 22:58:30 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Stuck in the Middle on Baker Street with Reservoir Dogs

R.I.P. Gerry Rafferty


Entered at Tue Jan 4 22:41:46 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: Danny Brooks / Luke the Drifter records

Kevin J: Thanks for that post on the new Garth CD. I too was impressed with what Danny Brooks did with the song - really bringing out the sin and salvation aspects of the lyrics, which he can certainly relate to. Given his evangelical leanings and his upbringing involving large dollops of both Methodism and Hank Williams (whose Luke the Drifter records he mentions in song), it'd be interesting to see what he'd do with Robbie's new song.


Entered at Tue Jan 4 22:36:31 CET 2011 from (184.151.127.185)

Posted by:

Steve

Subject: Garth of , Garth and Wayne?

Kevin, are you kiding, Garth's contributions unnoticed ? You still hungover from New Years?

Under paid for actual contributions, probably. But contributions unnoticed? Hardly. Would you like to take another first shot at 2011.

The rest you're right about, of course.

Sounds like you should contact Jian at Q and join me in the push to have Garth on his show. Good time to do it with the new album out. Jian has mentioned the album and played a couple of tracks. But still no Garth on Q.


Entered at Tue Jan 4 21:55:58 CET 2011 from (70.53.44.164)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Robbie's lead off single

sadavid: Thank you.....a beautiful way to end the day..........lovely song with that tasty guitar..........and far far away from atmospherics of recent outings...........Sreams a Band song.........first good thing to happen in 2011 in fact......


Entered at Tue Jan 4 21:37:58 CET 2011 from (70.53.44.164)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Garth Hudson

Happy New Year to all! Some thoughts:

* Garth Hudson's celebration of the Band cd is brilliant..........while latest offerings from Kings of Leon. Jeff Beck and Townes Earle all ranked highly with me this year........The Garth cd is so good on so many levels that it strikes me as almost criminal that it has not received the credit it deserves...........think about the majority of the "Tribute" records put out over the last 20 years....at first they were a treat because it was just nice to hear superstar acts doing underappreciated artists.....but they quickly became predictable and it was rare to find a great cover......the horrific Kinks cd is a good example of how sloppy and pathetic many of these things have become ( see Bon Jovi and "Celluloid Heroes" for 7 minutes of Hell in case any is needed ) ................Enter Garth with the Band idea and just think about how this whole thing would have gone with just about anybody else.in charge.......They would have ticked off the 7 or 8 signature songs and then offered them up to the biggest of the stars assembled..............What we would have been left with is an album full of lame attempts to re-create masterpieces......an example of which is the only misfire on the album where Blue Rodeo take on King Harvest and come up well short..........a few observations on the album:

- The song selection and track order is exquisite............the more I played this the more I kept thinking about what kind of contributions Garth must have made to the Band ( far besides the great playing we all have appreciated for years ) that went unnoticed.

- Danny Brooks take on Forbidden Fruit is great and really sets the stage perfectly for the album.................Mary Margret O'Hara interpretation of "Out of the Blue" - this one took a few listens to get by the loungey feel and absence of guts that Robbie's best ever vocal conveyed but by the 10th spin or so I was completely won over...it just gets better and better in fact..........Neil Young - an astonishing take on "This Wheels on Fire" - takes a good song and makes it great ( so good that I simply would not have beloved it possible to turn this song out in the way that he and The Sadies did ) .........Suzie McNeil's blistering version of 'Ain't Got No Home" is the cut that completely establishes the brilliance of this album and the genius of Garth Hudson........who else would have chosen this song to go on a tribute record and to put a 200 mph version of it at the 5 spot on the album is inspired beyond belief....a great take that floors the Band version......................another gem is Kevin Hearn's take on :"You ain't going Nowhere" .......The Sadies do a wonderful version of "The Shape I'm In"..............the toughest assignment may have been given to Raine Maida to do "The Moon Struck One" ( let's just say Neil Young, Bruce Cockburn and Blue Rodeo were likely given their choice of material and Raine Maida was not ) anyhow.......he takes the song to heights never imagined possible and for guitar nuts amongst us throws in the only Robbie style guitar on the entire record.....a transcendent take..................Interesting sidebar: I purchased 5 copies and gave them out as Christmas gifts to some family and friends.......in all cases the reaction back was extremely favourable - with "Out of the Blue" mentioned by all and Neil Young and Kevin Hearn - also cited


Entered at Tue Jan 4 19:28:23 CET 2011 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NY

Subject: Re: new JRR track

Sadavid: thanks for the link! Some pretty Band-like harmonies on the chorus. Liking it!


Entered at Tue Jan 4 19:18:33 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

And there's the Ray Charles classic recording "Hard Times", later covered by Richard Manuel on "Whispering Pines: Live at the Getaway 1985".


Entered at Tue Jan 4 18:42:12 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: new JRR track

Dave, Brien: thanx for the heads-up . . . see [My link] for streaming audio of "When the Night Was Young."

"We shared the back roads with card-sharks and grifters / Tent-show evangelists and Luke the Drifter."


Entered at Tue Jan 4 18:07:39 CET 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Subject: Robbie cd

From Robbie's Facebook page today: The new album from Robbie, "How To Become Clairvoyant," will be released on April 5, 2011.


Entered at Tue Jan 4 18:00:16 CET 2011 from (74.74.233.128)

Posted by:

Dave H

Web: My link

Subject: RR solo album due out April 5

Apologies if someone else has posted this info but I don't remember seeing it. Robbie Robertson's forthcoming solo album, titled How to Become Clairvoyant, is due April 5 on 429 Records. Guest musicians include Eric Clapton (who co-wrote three tracks), Steve Winwood, Robert Randolph, Trent Reznor (from Nine Inch Nails) and Tom Morello (from Rage Against the Machine), among others.

More info and the complete tracklisting is in the link. Perhaps the most likely new RR song to stimulate discussion around here is a song entitled "This Is Where I Get Off," which is apparently about his decision to leave the Band.


Entered at Tue Jan 4 17:59:24 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: CHUM chart Dec 1965 "good news week"

In one form or another, I have 24 of the titles listed. I might have more on LPs and CD compilations. What a classic chart! Even without Levon & the Hawks, there are ten at least significant populat songs there.


Entered at Tue Jan 4 17:55:36 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Doctorow's "Ragtime"

David P: And then there's the father having sexual congress with an "Eskimo" - something that Ronnie Hawkins was no doubt counting on when he first came north.


Entered at Tue Jan 4 17:44:54 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Toronto
Web: My link

Subject: local groups on the CHUM chart

If you go to What's New, you'll see that Jan's already posted the chart I mentioned yesterday - with our guys at #22 in December '65. #9 is occupied by the Big Town Boys, whose core two guys had been in a group with Robbie Robertson pre Hawkins. (Speaking of Canadians on Atlantic, the BTB were formed to be the back-up group for Shirley Matthews, whose big 1963 hit, "Big Town Boy", appeared in the US on Atlantic.) At #11 we have Gordon Lightfoot singing "Tom Thumb's Blues", a well known version of which had the Hawks backing Dylan. At #21 we have Terry Black, a Vancouverite in LA who by 1970 was back north in Toronto as one of the vocalist is the group Dr Music. At #41 we have Race Marbles (really a CHUM dj) singing a parody of "Like A Rolling Stone" (see link above, which among other things indicates its currency among the garage/psych crowd; my guess is that it's the Disciples supplying the vaguely Hawksish instrumental backup.) At #48 we have Robbie's old band, Little Caesar and the Consuls. At #49 we have JB and the Playboys, led by singer Al Nicholls who wound up as the willie-waver in "Slap Shot" and in a whole bunch of Robert Altman movies, notably "Nashville". (He helped write the score of several of them too.) And at #50 we have Zal and his K-R chums.


Entered at Tue Jan 4 17:37:37 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Bobby Darin

I have been a Bobby Darin fan since high school and always will be. Over most the years of my life, I've played Mac the knife in every venue, country rooms rock & roll and every one has always taken to that song.

In 1972 while sitting in a room in Reno with my wife, we were watching a group of fellows I quite enjoyed. A brass band tenor sax, trumpet, trombone, standup bass and a very large black fellow with silver curls and a baritone sax and he was great. The singer was a white fellow, and on their break as my wife and I were about the only people in the room he came over to chat. He was from Toronto and as we got into talking about music and I told him I played, he said can you sing a song with us? I told him I loved to sing Mac the knife, he said great. One of the high lights of my life the way those fellows could play and how they backed me up with great enthusiasm and were so nice to me. I always think of Bobby Darin what agreat talent he was and a super stage presence.


Entered at Tue Jan 4 17:34:07 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Doctorow

Another Band title coincidence … Welcome to Hard Times by Doctorow, "Hard times (The Slop)" by The Band at Wembley.


Entered at Tue Jan 4 17:26:47 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Beyond the Sea

As a singer, Bobby Darin naturally is most often compared with Frank Sinatra. Coincidentally, both men are linked by date, as Mr. Darin was born on May 14, 1936 and Mr. Sinatra died on that day 62 years later.

Mr. Darin attended the prestigious Bronx High School of Science (class of 1953), graduating a year after another noted alumnus Robert Moog, the synthesizer pioneer. The school has a long list of famous alumni and there's also a Band connection -- photographer Elliott Landy (class of 1959). Then there's the writer E.L. Doctorow (class of 1948), whose novels include "The Book of Daniel" (and one can't help but add The Sacred Harp) and "Ragtime" (Mama Rag):-).


Entered at Tue Jan 4 16:47:15 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Toronto
Web: My link

Subject: Work Song

Peter V: Thanks for the link to Darin singing "Work Song". Here's a link to the first version I heard, a 1965 Hawksish one by Richie Knight and the Mid-Knights with Richard Bell on kb. The Robbie-style guitar work is by George Semkiw, who went on to be the dean of Toronto's recording engineers through the '70s and into the '80s. Richard Bell, who was in group for just this record, can be seen in a couple of the photos. Richard "King Biscuit Boy" Newell can be seen in a couple of the later ones. Bell joined Hawkins first, then, when Eugene "Jay" Smith left, Bell suggested that Hawkins hire his old bandmate, King Biscuit Boy.

Coincidentally, Eugene Smith, who I saw playing New Years Eve, can generally be counted on to do a powerful version of "Work Song" - generally with just his voice and a hand drum, sometimes with "The William Tell Overture" on harmonica thrown in.


Entered at Tue Jan 4 15:52:40 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Bobby Darin Work Song

It's on YouTube. Do try it!


Entered at Tue Jan 4 15:04:09 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Web: My link

Happy New Year, Dunc.


Entered at Tue Jan 4 14:20:19 CET 2011 from (217.42.25.251)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Bobby Darin, JQ

I always say I start off at Bobby Darin, and still play the greatest hits every so often. But I don't know much more than that collection of singles.

JQ. I think, like Peter, it's just another colour of instruments. The brass and silver bands were working class bands often linked to a colliery or factory with families remaining loyal to them. Standards at the top are high and competitions are taken seriously.

I only ever owned one related album, which I thought was great. It was by a chap called Peter Skellern backed by his piano, a brass band and a boys' choir singing the songs of Fred Astaire. I thought it was really good, but not in my normal area of interest.

But neither is what I'm playing just now...Del McCoury - Del and the Boys. Levon's recording of the Mountain got me into the Steve Earle and Del McCoury album. There's a high standard of playing in the Del McCoury band.

Last day of the New Year holiday. Back to old clothes and porridge tomorrow.


Entered at Tue Jan 4 09:32:54 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Beyond the Sea

Yet another repeat on Darin. Kevin Spacey's "Beyond the Sea" is a fine biopic, but glosses over whole chunks of Darin's range. Bobby Darin's problem was that he could play anything and sing in any style, and did. So it gets very hard to pin down the Bobby Darin you like. Is it the all-round adult entertainer of Mack the Knife and Baby Face? Or is it the rock singer of Splish Splash? Or maybe the pop idol of Multiplication or Things? Or the gospel / jazzy blues of Jailer Bring Me Water and Work Song? Or the country singer of Eighteen Yellow Roses? Or the novelty If A Man Answers? Or is it If I Were A Carpenter and Simple Song of Freedom? Spacey's picture missed out whole areas … glossing over the pop idol very fast, and missing the gospel / R&B side altogether.

The conclusion I come to, browsing through my 4CD box set (often) is that Darin was just too talented and too diverse.


Entered at Tue Jan 4 09:24:29 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Postelthwaite / Silver Bands / Darin

Pete Postheltwaite … I saw him in King Lear a couple of years ago. We had front row seats, studio theatre in the round, so we were about three feet away at times. A great, great actor. RIP.

Silver Band … I think it’s just a brass band with silver instruments. When I went to football matches (soccer) at Bournemouth in the late 50s to mid-60s, half-time entertainment was a Silver Band, and I thought it might just be a slightly superior brand name for brass bands. But I’ve never seen one with mixed colours of instruments, so it must be important in the marching band world. Brassed Off is the north of England … I’m from the south but I was at university in Yorkshire. I thought it looked right when I saw it. In fact, something we said when we heard the news last night was “must watch Brassed Off again.”

Every time Bobby Darin is mentioned, I repeat that “Earthy” is a phenomenal album, and that the version of “Work Song” on it is the definitive version. Any bass players here should seek out “Work Song” on iTunes.


Entered at Tue Jan 4 06:42:59 CET 2011 from (76.99.245.65)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: The Turtle Pond

Subject: Bobby Darin

My wife is a hardcore Bobby Darin fan. She has albums where he appeared to be breaking away from his popstar image and playing folk/rock songs from his era with a sincerity that was palpable. At that time he knew he was at the end of his life, and wanted to deliver something that was true to his vision as an artist. More to follow...


Entered at Tue Jan 4 01:38:45 CET 2011 from (166.205.142.19)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: RIP Peter Postelthwaite

He was one that always brought something superb to any movie I ever saw him in.

Dunc & Peter V - I liked Brassed Off a lot, was that true to the culture from which it came? Does the name or expression "silver band" mean anything different to a brass band?


Entered at Tue Jan 4 01:01:29 CET 2011 from (186.48.219.84)

Posted by:

Bernhard

Web: My link

Hi! I just like to wish you a very creative 2011!!


Entered at Mon Jan 3 23:59:59 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Bobby Darin

Bobby Darin was a master musician and played damn near every instrument. As well as that he was noted in every field of music, also being a folk writer and singer. We touched on him not long ago.

Tim Hardin also recorded and a had a hit with Bobby's "Simple Song of Freedom".

Was not Bobby Darin the first to receive open heart surgery if I remember right.


Entered at Mon Jan 3 23:22:27 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Koppelman and Rubin

David P: By '67 Koppelman and Rubin had their own KR label, which I've been told had some tie with Chess. The only KR releases I'm familiar with are the Mandala's first two records, the first of which, "Opportunity", was recorded at the Chess studio in Chicago with the Dells singing back-up. "Opportunity" is still a great record with a nice Robbie-ish solo from Domenic Troiano, but the true stand-out is the b-side of the second record, "From Toronto - '67" - a stunning piece of instrumental noodling among Troiano (who takes Robbie's style out into the ozone), organist Joe Chirowski (later of Crowbar), drummer Whitey Glann (later of Lou Reed's great RCA band with Hunter and Wagner) and bassist Don Elliot.


Entered at Mon Jan 3 23:06:57 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: From Lovin' Spoonfuls to Martha Stewart Living

In 1966 Bobby Darin branched out from his nightclub repertoire of standards & oldies and began recording material from young songwriters. This was largely in part through his association with the music publishing & production team of Koppelman & Rubin. They pitched him songs written by some artists they were working with, notably Tim Hardin and John Sebastian. Mr. Darin had crossed paths with Charles Koppelman and Don Rubin back in their Brill Building days. In recent years Mr. Koppelman has been chairman of Martha Stewart's media & merchandising empire.

Jimi Hendrix also covered "Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window", which Dylan had recorded with The Hawks.


Entered at Mon Jan 3 23:07:18 CET 2011 from (68.164.4.147)

Posted by:

Pat B

Naw, he played Hugo, Ann Margaret's boyfriend. It's actually an interesting study of how Broadway viewed/approached rocknroll around 1960. In an odd Band connection, Conrad Birdie is a play on Conway Twitty, although the story is strictly Elvis.


Entered at Mon Jan 3 22:09:18 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Bye Bye Birdie

Pat B: I'd not seen it at all before Xmas week, when it turned up on the movie channel that we just discovered we have access to. So I've now heard a bit of it and seen a bit more (after it was muted). Was that Bobby in gold lame in the sub-Elvis role?


Entered at Mon Jan 3 21:55:09 CET 2011 from (68.164.4.147)

Posted by:

Pat B

Loved him in Bye Bye Birdie although local fave Ann Margaret got the most of my attention.


Entered at Mon Jan 3 21:42:09 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Simon: Given that both the Hawks and Hendrix were tight with John Hammond Jr in '65-'66, I think it's likely that they crossed paths.


Entered at Mon Jan 3 21:36:43 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Pat B: Good to know where you stand re "Storyville". How do you feel about Bobby Rydell?


Entered at Mon Jan 3 21:36:20 CET 2011 from (86.139.104.180)

Posted by:

Simon

Bill, I can recall a Hendrix quote about the Band where he says something to the effect of "their music is right there". No idea what that means although the general gist of the comments was positive. I've often wondered if Hendrix ever saw the Hawks live and, conversely, if any of the Hawks caught Jimi live in his Cafe Wha! days. I did mean to ask Sebastian if Robbie had ever met Jimi but I never got round to it. I wonder if any of the others met him.

Re. the cover of "Tears of Rage" ... I've got it and feel lukewarm about it. I'd say it's inspired by the basement version, especially the harmonies. To be honest I don't think it's a song that covers well. I still love the Band's version (it's in my top ten) but other versions are just too ponderous and boring. What I've heard of the Hendrix box so far - a dozen tracks - is pretty amazing.


Entered at Mon Jan 3 21:18:33 CET 2011 from (68.164.4.147)

Posted by:

Pat B

Bill M , welcome to the civilized world that loves Storyville. In regards to ToR, Hendrix may be covering the Bob Dylan/Richard Manuel version that appeared on the Basement Tapes.


Entered at Mon Jan 3 21:12:51 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Jan H: I don't have the comp so can't be the guy for the job, but I do appreciate you confirming that it is the same ToR song. I noticed it in the same record store as mentioned below - and of course wondered. Given that Hendrix'd covered a Band tune, it's interesting what he had to say in answer to a Rolling Stone journalist's question re what he thought of the Band shortly before his death. As I posted a couple of weeks ago, it was in essence, those who like this sort of music will find this to be the sort of music they like.


Entered at Mon Jan 3 21:07:04 CET 2011 from (85.255.44.145)

Posted by:

jh

Subject: Contribution?

We need a write-up for this site on the 2010 Hendrix comp that has a cover of "Tears of Rage". Anyone?


Entered at Mon Jan 3 20:25:44 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Lotsa stuff

See Roger McGuinn's anecdotes on working with Bobby Darin … who, like Marvin Gaye, was apparently an excellent drummer.

I hadn't heard the Led Zep story. Peter Wolf has described how the J. Geils Band was told they were going on ATCO and accepted considerably worse terms (his words) to get the straight Atlantic imprint.

Didn't know The Coasters and Ben E. King were ATCO. The singles in the UK on London-American and London-Atlantic say "Atlantic."

(QUOTE) ATCO was started in 1955, when one of the original partners, Herb Abramson, returned from a two year stint in the army. He found himself sidelined by the changes in the company between 1953 and 1955, and Ahmet Ertegun and Jerry Wexler were in full control. ATCO was seen as a way of giving Abramson an area of power, so as to defuse tension. Abramson was given a couple of artists for the label, most notably Bobby Darin. Darin had little success on ATCO, and Abramson decided to drop him. Ahmet Ertegun disagreed and in his first short session with Darin cut the million-selling Splish Splash, giving Atlantic its first breakthrough into the white market. Abramson departed but ATCO remained.


Entered at Mon Jan 3 20:20:25 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: It crawled into my hand, honest!

RtO: Hard to imagine Page and co dismissing Atco in light of Cream's success with the label. But they're not necessarilly the first place to look for common sense.

I happened by the nearest mostly-new record store over Christmas and they were playing the new Garth CD over the PA. Good for them. The specific track was the appealing cover of "You Ain't Goin' Nowhere" by Kevin Hearn and Thin Buckle. Naturally I tarried, and busied myself with the nearest bin of records. And what should my hand happen upon but Kevin Hearn and Thin Buckle's "H Wing" CD. I'd seen it elsewhere but had always passed it by, but this seemed like kismet so I wandered up to the counter to buy it, lining up behind a couple and single guy. The woman asked the clerk what was playing. The clerk told her and reached around to get the cover to show. The single guy leaned over to her and said something like, "It's an excellent CD". Then I leaned over and said to her, "It IS excellent". She bought it: mission accomplished! For the record, Kevin Hearn's own album is also worth checking out, especially the very moving "The Good One", which is about a specific chemo drug of all things. The link above is to Garth accordionising along with Barenaked Ladies; that's Hearn on keyboards, BNL being his day job.


Entered at Mon Jan 3 20:05:53 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Dunc: Vaudeville died out earlier in the U.S. during the '30s with the rise of the popularity of movies, as many theatres switched to just showing films, eliminating live performances altogether.

As I recall, Bobby Darin got his start as a Brill Building songwriter.


Entered at Mon Jan 3 19:15:16 CET 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: ATCO

As the sixties progressed, I think ATCO was viewed as the "rock" imprint but viewed as the poor relation by many: Led Zep refused to sign contracts until "Atlantic" was written in place not "ATCO"!!!


Entered at Mon Jan 3 19:13:37 CET 2011 from (217.42.25.251)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Various

Bill M:Thanks. I wondered about that line and could never get the meaning. I saw Canada as 'winter in my blood'.

David P:What was the generic name given to 'variety' in the U.S.A.? Was it still called vaudeville in the 50s and 60s? Or did it die out more quickly in the States because of the earlier large scale development of TV? Did acts like Bobby Darin came out of variety. I've seen Roger McGuinn tell his tale of having the 'role' of the folk singer in the Bobby Darin touring show.

Bob - a group of us here like Robbie's solo material, but I can't help you with your request.

Peter:A pint of heavy would be true, but a hauf 'n a hauf would be a half pint of heavy and a whisky.

Enjoyed the recent record label posts.


Entered at Mon Jan 3 19:12:00 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: ATCO

Peter: ATCO was started as an affiliate label for Herb Abramson, Ahmet Ertegun's business partner, to run. It's roster was actually designed for a more pop-oriented format, in contrast to Atlantic's hardcore jazz and R&B format. The ATCO roster included many non-white artists, including The Coasters, Ben E. King and King Curtis. The U.S. label later became home to Sonny & Cher, Buffalo Springfield and Cream.


Entered at Mon Jan 3 18:08:01 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

David P: Let us not forget the Dovells' "Wildwood Days", the b-side of their classic "You Can't Sit Down", which was a staple of Hawks shows. (Both sides are at the link above.) And let us forget Bobby Rydell's rendition.


Entered at Mon Jan 3 17:47:10 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: ATCO

ATCO was used initially for "non-mainstream" acts in Atlantic's own words. Non-mainstream meant "white". The ATCO label appeared in the corner of a couple of Bobby Darin releases in Britain, but once Atlantic started up their own label, acts were Atlantic in Britain from 1964-1969, at which point the ATCO label appeared in Britain, and lasted a year (but a good year, 1969-1970, with Dr John and Lulu). Then it disappeared again until 1980.

Anyway, the Hawks gained more prestige by being on straight Atlantic.


Entered at Mon Jan 3 17:41:50 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Toronto
Web: My link

Subject: Atco

Peter V: It was likely just coincidence, but 1965 saw another Toronto artist appear on Atco - David Clayton Thomas and the Shays with "Walk That Walk". Produced by in Toronto by Duff Roman, who'd produced our guys' first post-Hawkins session in late '64. If you ever get the Atco 45, you'll see that it's shown as a Spanka production, reflecting the fact that it was Canuckistani music-biz insider Paul Anka who did the go-betweening between Duff and the US label. (It had appeared up here on Red Leaf.) If you watch the photos in the YouTube link above you'll see organist Gord Fleming (later a Hawk) in front of a young woman in a Maple Leafs uniform. That's a still from the Shays appearance on "American Bandstand" playing the song. Fleming and Robbiesque guitarist Fred Keeler were later half of the group Jericho who recorded a 1970 LP with Todd in and for Bearsville.


Entered at Mon Jan 3 17:37:07 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: The Fabulous Wailers

Very often these days I just turn my upstairs TV to, I guess it's Galaxy Jukebox Oldies. I enjoy a lot of the music I grew up with.

A couple days ago on comes one I hadn't heard in a long time. The Wailers did a great job of Louie Louie. That prompted me to look 'em up. I couldn't find them for the life of me. Like a dummy I had forgotten Northwest Bands, where I finally looked and of course found them right away as I was spelling the name wrong. These guys from Tacoma were pretty well known in the late 50's early 60's. With their own record label they did quite well. I was surprised to see they still exist.


Entered at Mon Jan 3 17:02:37 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Levon & The Hawks

Biggish label? The Stones I Throw was on Atlantic in the UK. UK Label mates included Otis Redding, The Drifters, Don Covay, Wilson Pickett, Solomon Burke. Just being on Atlantic was major credibility in the UK. They weren't the only 1965 white Atlantic artists … Sonny & Cher were the others (!). By 1967, Atlantic was signing The Young Rascals, Vanilla Fudge, Buffalo Springfield and expanding well beyond their soul base. But in 1965, for a white band to be on Atlantic, was definitely unusual.


Entered at Mon Jan 3 16:37:22 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Toronno

Bob A: Can't help you with the book, I'm afraid, and until this past weekend I would have wondered why anyone would care. But on thursday I bought it from the sale bin at a local used-record store (5 for $10) to give it yet another try - and this time it clicked. I almost feel like I've learned to love Big Brother! The main thing that struck me was that, unlike the first solo album, Robbie seems to have written it with his own voice in mind rather than that of Richard or Rick or Levon. As Robbie has acknowledged that he wrote with a singer in mind, that got me wondering if he'd gone so far as trying out some of the first-album songs with Richard or Rick in the studio - and if so whether tapes exist. Same for "Out Of The Blue" (clearly written for Richard") and "Between Trains" (i.e., a Richard-only version).

By the way, anyone looking for Roulette's post-Big Pink/Big Brown compilation LP called "Ronnie Hawkins and His Hawks" can find it in the bins at Zoinks on Bloor Street near Ossington.

In other news, I just sent Jan H a scan of the CHUM chart for Dec 13, 1965 that has "The Stones I Throw" at #22 - its high-water mark, I believe. I can't help but think that the group's inability / unwillingness to hit the road in support of a very promising biggish-label 45 (it was rising pretty quickly until it stalled unaccountably) had a lot to do with Levon's sudden departure from the Dylan tour. And I suspect that the line in "We Can Talk", "I'd rather be burned [i.e., very hot] in Canada than to freeze [i.e., be frozen in place] here in the south", was the essence of Levon's point of view in the group's discussions / arguments that must have taken place at the time.


Entered at Mon Jan 3 16:32:56 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Jenny takes a ride to the South Jersey shore...

For decades the main entertainment mecca at the New Jersey shore was the Steel Pier in Atlantic City. From the vaudeville era through the heyday of big bands, all the major acts played their, including Frank Sinatra.

In the '60s Tony Mart's club in nearby Somers Point packed in audiences for rock acts. In the summer of 1965, through Conway Twitty and manager Colonel Harold Kutlets, Levon and The Hawks were booked as the "house band", playing 3 sets a night, 7 nights a week throughout the summer. A bit of rock & roll trivia -- when The Hawks got the call to play with Dylan at the end of the summer, Mitch Ryder and the Detroit Wheels were booked to fill in over the big Labor Day weekend.

There were several other clubs off the circle in Somers Point featuring live music during the summer months. A few miles down the coast, there were also many clubs in the Wildwood area that booked rock bands. The 1968 self-titled album by Philadelphia-based group Nazz, featuring Todd Rundgren, included a song entitled "Wildwood Blues", inspired by their adventures performing there.


Entered at Mon Jan 3 12:25:02 CET 2011 from (46.1.97.211)

Posted by:

ssk prim sorgulama

Web: My link

Subject: ssk prim sorgulama

Harika bir site olmus


Entered at Mon Jan 3 10:10:17 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Norm, if ever I’m your way, let me bring you a single malt Scotch, maybe Garth’s favourite, Glenfiddich (though there are better). This could be a life-changing event … but you’re not allowed to put ice or water anywhere near it. That’s only for blended whisky.


Entered at Mon Jan 3 03:17:11 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: I's a by

Lard tunderin'.........yeah Joe, CC is ok, Gibsons...alright. Lot a guys like Wiessers.....but Crown Royal, little water and ice.....yuh.

Now I'll bet a lot of these stuff shirt guys want to try and stick Scoth in front of us. If the whole offensive line of the New England Patriots held me down, you couldn't pour that stuff down my throat.

I got one week to go, and I'm leavin' for Puerto Vallarta. I might even have a drink down there, since I already paid for it all. If I ain't back in a week, send some of the boys down after my carcass.


Entered at Mon Jan 3 03:09:01 CET 2011 from (68.171.231.19)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: Yeah, heavy - and a bottle of red. Preferably from the basement.


Entered at Mon Jan 3 03:05:09 CET 2011 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Location: Southside

Subject: Hi Bob Akers

Da fuck's wrong with ya by'? We haven't gone down that road since 1993. Ya wanna get good pizza? I can help. You wanna know about 'Storyville'? I'm pretty sure it was nothing but a sick rumour.


Entered at Sun Jan 2 21:45:29 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

A pint of heavy?


Entered at Sun Jan 2 21:37:42 CET 2011 from (217.42.25.251)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: hauf 'n a hauf, please, Peter

Thanks, Joan, this is still a big holiday today, up here.

You'll remember what Glaswegians ordered at the bar, Peter.

On a Band note, I've still to get Garth's album because it's not in the local shop yet. So that's something to look forward to. And when will Robbie's new album be released?


Entered at Sun Jan 2 20:38:48 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Bob Akers/ Dunc

Hi Bob, first off, welcome to the Guestbook. Lars is quite right. Sadly, I don't know the answer, but someone might come up with it. Hope you enjoy the repartee anyway.

Dunc, thank you for that beautiful version of Wild Mountain Thyme. Started my day off right. :-)


Entered at Sun Jan 2 19:54:31 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Now what'll I do??

All those little folks left today.....it's so quiet.....I'm wandering around here taking down Christmas decorations. Everybody has to go back to work and school tomorrow.

I don't hear anyone bragging about any New Years regulations here yet. I calls 'em regulations on accounta the lady that lives in this house has instructed me that I got to quit swearing so much and smile more! Well I'm walking around with this stupid looking grin on my face and muttering. Tell a sailor he can't swear no more?? So now I just become a doddering old idiot........I got nothing to say.....


Entered at Sun Jan 2 19:32:05 CET 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: NY (Ulster Co)

Subject: This GB

BOB AKERS- I don't know how familiar you are with this GB, but if no one addresses your question it simply means that most of the GBers don't know...and the one or two who perhaps CAN answer your query either haven't looked in yet or they don't want to divulge any information, for reasons only they know about.

If you had asked what US city has the best pizza you might have fared better.


Entered at Sun Jan 2 19:14:25 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Resorts

In the late 60s, each big industrial city closed all its factories simultaneously so families could have holidays together. So working in a seaside resort, the accents changed radically every Saturday. There'd be a Manchester week, a Glasgow week, a Birmingham week, a Newcastle week and so on. It was OK at the shows, but a problem working in bars, where you soon discovered that a beverage like "black and tan" has a different meaning in every city.


Entered at Sun Jan 2 19:10:58 CET 2011 from (217.42.25.251)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: JQ

Andy M Stewart is a critically acclaimed singer/songwriter who formally belonged to folk band, Silly Wizzard.


Entered at Sun Jan 2 18:43:08 CET 2011 from (166.205.142.19)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Andy Stewart vs Andy M Stewart

Dunc - Are there 2?


Entered at Sun Jan 2 18:38:02 CET 2011 from (217.42.25.251)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Variety

I forgot about the Barron Knights. We always had Scottish equivalents and I think the most popular was the Douglas Brown 4.

Bournemouth attracted Scots and was seen as top flight, but my family went to Aberdeen, which was a different city from today.

There were regional stars too, some huge in Scotland, but didn't conquer Britain... but others such as Stanley Baxter becoming big in British terms.

Thanks Peter, Dlew and Landmark.


Entered at Sun Jan 2 18:32:13 CET 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: dlew

Not sure about the lineage from variety to X-factor or that ilk, David. To me the old variety shows were from the old-fashioned song and dance era where an act could probably be relied upon to tell a few gags, sing, dance and maybe even a bit of magic. That "all rounder" element is, if anything, at odds with these shows that desperately search for one bit of talent in a narrow and specific field.


Entered at Sun Jan 2 18:24:18 CET 2011 from (173.178.214.140)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

I don't think the pattern shifted. More likely, it was a question of what the booking agencies were able to supply to the resorts and as well, resorts were not looking for rock or R and B acts as their predominant attraction. A great movie that according to my wife, I must see is "A Walk On The Moon" which is set at a Catskills resort while Woodstock is going on, nearby. And since I've lost my train of thought of what I wanted to write, also see "Taking Woodstock" which I thought was great. As someone who has been on quite a few cruises, I have seen more than anybody's fair share of variety acts. If nothing else, it's good to see that there is room for everyone in the entertainment field.


Entered at Sun Jan 2 13:41:59 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

One joy of playing resorts was that the audience came to you, a welcome change from the tour of one-night stands (suitcase and guitar in hand). So the artists had all day off instead of travelling. The Hawks were playing resorts too in 1964 and 1965, after all, though the ballrooms not the variety theatres. The ballrooms also thrived. Most nights there’d be a coach party or two at the variety shows, often organized by fan clubs. Maybe it was also a 60s thing where people went off on a week's holiday to a resort, took in a show some nights, went to the ballrooms others. The pattern of entertainment shifted strongly in the 70s.


Entered at Sun Jan 2 13:13:14 CET 2011 from (78.144.211.134)

Posted by:

Bob Akers

Location: England
Web: My link

Subject: Robbie Robertson's Storyville

Hello Everyone. My name is Bob and I come from England. Bobbyrob51@hotmail.com Can anyone tell me If the Book Music is available for purchase to Robbie Robertsons Storyville. Or indeed does it exist. I've searched for so long. I'd be eternally grateful for any information. Thankyou so much in anticipation... Bob.


Entered at Sun Jan 2 13:06:51 CET 2011 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Music Hall - variety...

Beatles, Kinks, Queen all had tributes to music hall on various albums. I think X-factor and Idol are direct links... though not as ... lasting...


Entered at Sun Jan 2 11:51:48 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Variety

Absolutely, Dunc. Ray Davies talked about variety in the recent TV documentary, and it’s a huge influence on McCartney definitely, as well as George Harrison’s love of the ukulele and George Formby. That’s why McCartney likes to have jugglers or whatever as a warm up act. I’d trace Bowie back to Anthony Newley and Tommy Bruce too.

There were also bands like The Barron Knights (who did pastiche medleys of current hits with new words) and The Grumbleweeds who mainly inhabited the variety sphere. In 1967 The Rockin’ Berries were on the show I was lighting, and they were at a transition point between going into more comedy pastiche, or staying as a band with harmonies. They did both … then split.

It’s a largely unrecorded area. Those shows were huge … Tom Jones was straight from his initial Las Vegas success. As I said twice nightly in a sold-out 2200 seat theatre, six nights a week for twelve weeks. That was huge exposure. Female artists benefitted especially, being propelled quickly to star billing … Anita Harris, Lulu, Cilla Black … that sort of star. Blackpool ran three shows that size, Bournemouth one that size, and a smaller 1200 seat one at the same time. In fact, in 1963, The Beatles & Epstein artistes did several one week “stands” twice nightly around the seaside resorts. The Beatles did a week at the Gaumont Cinema in Bournemouth (both variety theatres being full with the regular shows). So a twice nightly "run" was seen as the best expression of stardom.


Entered at Sun Jan 2 11:37:51 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Variety session guys

I think it was the 1968 Tom Jones show, and he was backed officially by “The Ted Heath Orchestra” a venerable British big band, but he had his regular three piece band at the centre. I got friendly with some of the horn section, who were session men most of the year, apart from the lucrative summer season when they’d join a variety backing orchestra. These guys had also just done an Island album on their own. The variety shows were twice nightly, six days a week, then on Sunday the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra played. One Saturday the manager of the symphony orchestra came and asked if the one of the sax players could play clarinet the next evening as they were short because of illness or accident. No problem. These were all session guys and could simply sit and read it, and they already had black dinner jackets from the orchestra. I went to see it. He had the longest hair, but fitted right in. I don’t suppose there can have been time for rehearsal either … definitely not a full one.


Entered at Sun Jan 2 11:33:35 CET 2011 from (217.42.25.251)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Variety

Variety was huge and the influence can be seen in some of musicians we like(we've discussed this before)... Ray Davies comes to mind, perhaps some of the 'funny' Beatles songs and I wonder perhaps the Small Faces where the song tells an amusing story such as 'Lazy Sunday Afternoon'. Maybe even the early theatricals of David Bowie. Perhaps I'm wrong with those examples?


Entered at Sun Jan 2 08:52:15 CET 2011 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Web: My link

Subject: Down South In New Orleans

musically OK ........ historically priceless


Entered at Sun Jan 2 05:18:37 CET 2011 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Rob - no, no, no...

Herbie Flowers - ok, yes. Ginger Baker and Jimmy Page...


Entered at Sun Jan 2 04:04:10 CET 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob Millis

Subject: Peter's variety band sessioneers...

So that would have been Jim Sullivan, Herbie Flowers and Tony Crombie then?


Entered at Sun Jan 2 00:31:33 CET 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: NORBERT AND BEER

Norb, not a day goes by where I don't long wistfully for for a brauhaus. A few biers brought by a fine figure of a lass and to soak it up, what better than a Regensburger wurst, creamed savoy cabbage and kartoffelnsalat.

When in Munich I avoid the Hofhaus due to popularity but am looking at a big mug from the Augustiner Brauhaus as we speak, filled with imported weissbier that my local supermarket sells.

In Freiburg this year we ate and drank in Martin's Brauhaus; strongly recommended; in Cologne we have been a few times to Peters Brauhaus - where the local tradition is not large mugs or steins but very small glasses refilled often to ensure you are always drinking fresh stuff. I can see the point of that, and if that is the way the local "kolsch" is presented, who am I to argue?

Right, new year. Time to schedule in a few trips to Germany.....


Entered at Sun Jan 2 00:17:21 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

British variety theatre was much of my early experience of professional live music, too. as I've often said, those big shows, twice nightly, in seaside resorts played to 250,000 people over a long summer season from early July to late September. I was privileged to do lights, then microphone, on them for three years. The backing bands for (e.g.) Frankie Vaughan or Tom Jones were the very best session guys available.


Entered at Sat Jan 1 23:12:08 CET 2011 from (91.42.250.14)

Posted by:

Norbert

Dunc, thanks for the link, wonderful!


Entered at Sat Jan 1 22:20:41 CET 2011 from (91.42.250.14)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: Serenity

Serenity, sorry missed your post but so good to see you again! Thanks for your wishes and also have a wonderful 2011! But one thing, please do post more often! and just know I love you.


Entered at Sat Jan 1 22:01:36 CET 2011 from (91.42.250.14)

Posted by:

N

Subject: bottle cap twist

COUNTER clockwise that is of course.


Entered at Sat Jan 1 21:55:49 CET 2011 from (217.42.25.251)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland
Web: My link

Subject: Happy New Year

Happy New Year everybody.

I can remember when the New Year holiday was bigger than Xmas in Scotland.

I also had to go with my mum and dad to the variety theatre to see Andy Stewart, but I loved the comedians during the variety years... much better than reality TV. And I'm sure it helped give me a love of live music.

And here's a New Year song for you GBers... lots of links to what we've discussed over the years... the McGarrigles, Emmy Lou, Jerry Douglas led by Dick Gaughan singing Wild Mountain Thyme.

Great celebrations in Scotland last night and I've had a great New Year meal with the family.

A guid new year to ane an 'a.


Entered at Sat Jan 1 21:35:26 CET 2011 from (91.42.250.14)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: E

Thanks for the –E Peter, that are good things to now. That's so great about this GB, we learn things from another. In return I'll give you the Germans double E from bEEr; In Germany we dearly love our fully decorated beer bottle caps, we safe them and try to get as many as we can. But even this simple cap couldn’t escape from German engineering perfection in the end.... and nowadays German beer bottles with metal cap can also be opened by hand .... simple twist the cap clockwise and it’s open ..... (sounds easy but took our best men a few years). The great thing about it is that one still can use the bottle cap opener, one can’t tell the difference from the outside, only insiders know, you’re welcome.


Entered at Sat Jan 1 20:11:50 CET 2011 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Subject: uisge

While checking out Norm's link I noticed this one: Ziggy Marley & the Chieftains. Non alcoholic.

If I could distill a decade of research into a one liner it would be that whiskey is for boozin and whisky for sippin. I tend to a couple ounces of C.C. (Crown Royal is just fine), a splash of water, no ice about a hour before bedtime.


Entered at Sat Jan 1 17:56:45 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Whiskey in the jar

Murder in a Scottish distillery.......when a body meets a body comin' thru the rye??

There's only one kind of whiskey........Crown Royal all the rest don't measure up.

An unlikely guy to be playing this song, but not a bad job. Next is the "Wild Colonial Buoy" for dlew.


Entered at Sat Jan 1 17:31:12 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Just before Dunc comes in, Norb, that would be WHISKY, not WHISKEY. If it's Scots or Canadian it doesn't have an "e". If it's Irish, it has an "e". There was a Welsh one at the airport duty free shops a few years back which was horrendously expensive and I never tried it. It was a modern concoction. Apparently the Welsh made whisky until1894, then stopped until 2000.

If none of the above and spelt with an "e", it will be some sweetened American crap and best avoided.


Entered at Sat Jan 1 17:13:18 CET 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: Norbert & P.V.

Norbert, I must stand up for Peter here. I'm a few years younger than him and even I suffered far too many New Year entertainments featuring Andy Stewart.

Kylie most definitely is an improvement, and this has as much to with simply NOT being Andy Stewart as it does with the comely pint-sized popster's rather inviting physique and flawless bottom.

Not that I mind a Jimmy Shand tune or two. But not a Shand whole two hour TV special, as Andy Stewart used to get.


Entered at Sat Jan 1 16:18:27 CET 2011 from (79.202.187.39)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: Andy’s miracle hair (head)

Peter, I wonder where did he get it all from, how does he keep it all and how does he maintain it all? (that crucial info). Is it Scottish heritage, an ancient rural Scottish legacy? Are there any special Scottish genes, did they live remote for long? Do you know if they all walk around like that? Or is it just the Scottish fresh air, the green fields, the clear water? Are you aware of any special treatment, what’s his secret? I think it has something to do with whiskey.


Entered at Sat Jan 1 14:52:17 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

But I'd like that much hair, too. But on the head rather than sprouting from the sporran.


Entered at Sat Jan 1 14:50:13 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I'd much rather be cast adrift on a Desert Island with Kylie, Norbert! "A Scottish Soldier" turns up in quantities in secondhand stores, and is always a disappointment because it's on the iconic and distinctive British red and white "Top Rank" label, so when you catch a glimpse of the label in a box, the collectors'' hands shake, and you think "Who is it? The Shirelles? Freddy Cannon? Gary US Bonds? Dion? Lee Dorsey? Maurice Williams? Dee Clark? Wilbert Harrison? B. Bumble?" (All on Top Rank in Britain)

Then nine times out of ten, you find it's a copy of "The Scottish Soldier" which causes massive disappointment. Or it's "Donald, Where's Your Troosers?" If you'd endured as many New Years with Andy as I have, you'd shudder at the sight of him!


Entered at Sat Jan 1 14:47:47 CET 2011 from (79.202.163.182)

Posted by:

N

Subject: Andy S.

... but his hair still stands, no one can touch that.


Entered at Sat Jan 1 14:42:02 CET 2011 from (79.202.163.182)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: mini kilt

The mini kilt was a little over the top, I'll take that back on second thought, sorry.


Entered at Sat Jan 1 14:28:47 CET 2011 from (79.202.163.182)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: Andy Stewart vs. Kylie Minogue

Peter, sorry I must stand up for Andy here. Just saw Mr. Steward at "A Scottish Soldier" in full batle dress and only can say the he can have it (the kilt). Bolder; I stronly belief he'd survive the mini kilt. But most of all I envy Andy's quality and amount hair (on his head).


Entered at Sat Jan 1 13:24:42 CET 2011 from (79.202.163.182)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: the soapbox

Subject: 1.1.11

1.1.11 (nice Peter) but also every day we get a new start, a new chance, in fact it's always 1.1.11.(isn't life beautiful?) Anyway first of all I want to thank Jan for all keeping up this site and GB and all his work over all these years, thanks Mr. Jan Høiberg. .

I’m not a philosopher but I’ve learned, from wiser men, that there are two most important things in life:

Time: Time is the most precious thing there is, you can only spend it once ….

Happiness: Happiness is the ultimate goal of our lives, not money or status, the rat race is a trap. Be your brother’s keeper, also for your own sake. Happiness isn’t something esoteric or mysterious. It’s real, it can even be measured (I fact they do that from the mid-50th I belief). Happiness can be forced up on and worked at to improve, there are tips and tricks how to do that. Some for free:

Mediation helps they say (I haven’t tried that one, but belief it) They say in some way it does something in your head that get things right there (no idea how it works but it does)

Good social contact is very important. A good and healthy social life is one of the best helpers and keepers. Get as many as you can, just love as many people you can in this world.

PS Lars Don’t be sad, think of all the good times you had and know he lives on, his blood in your veins, he's in your head, some what you do does he, so he is, always.



Entered at Sat Jan 1 11:41:05 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: 1.1.11

New Year’s Day. I hate the fact that in Britain it’s a “dead” day. Everything is closed. But it’s not Christmas Day, so there’s no large family lunch (though we will have a family dinner this evening) or excitement. Most people are just sleeping off the night before, but I was up and about by 8 a.m., had a long New Year bath, and a careful shave, ready to face 2011. And I'm not hungover, having stuck to wine early evening, and not toasting midnight.

Looking at the date, I want to write some cheques just to see 1.1.11 in print, but who writes cheques nowadays?

Usually we take down all our Christmas decorations today, but the grandkids are coming this evening, so we’ll leave them until tomorrow. Twelfth night, the traditional date, takes Christmas much too far into the New Year. I love putting the decorations up, but after the long, slow British Christmas, I also enjoy taking them down, putting them in the attic, clearing the decks, getting ready for the New Year.

Music, on British TV, had the New Year greeted by Wanda Jackson singing Let's Have A Party with Jools Holland. Very good, but she is getting on a bit! Last year (or the year before) was Paul McCartney duetting with Kylie Minogue, and he couldn't take his eyes off her shapely form, and made a little too much of the hugs at the end. This year Kylie was just before midnight. It's funny how Kylie has become the herald of the British New Year. In my youth, it was always Andy Stewart in kilt and sporran. The skirt suits Kylie better.


Entered at Sat Jan 1 05:59:55 CET 2011 from (61.68.63.139)

Posted by:

dlew919

Web: My link

Subject: Billy the Kid...

see link


Entered at Sat Jan 1 04:20:49 CET 2011 from (99.236.13.43)

Posted by:

Serenity

Location: Kitchener,Ontario, Canada
Web: My link

Subject: HAPPY NEW YEAR

Hi all!! This vid is for you all.

Have a very HAPPY NEW YEAR, and I wish you all the very best in 2011. I will be keep in touch now and again, as I miss you all very much.

Thanx, JH, and all the wishes from our BAND fans.

DAVID: I hope things are OK where you live. Old Mother Nature is giving you people a hard time of it.

Until Next Time PEACE AND LOVE xoxoxoxo


Entered at Sat Jan 1 01:32:00 CET 2011 from (85.255.44.145)

Posted by:

jh

Happy New Year to all of you from us here at The Band web site!


Entered at Sat Jan 1 00:38:31 CET 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: NY
Web: My link

Subject: Ezra's hair

Happy New Year Norbert. Just a sad link to watch before I leave to be with the Bush Brothers tonight.


Entered at Sat Jan 1 00:00:12 CET 2011 from (91.42.226.215)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: 2011

Happy New Year!

Lars, the link is for you.

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