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The Band: Live at the Academy of Music 1971

Levon Helm: Ramble at the Ryman

The Band: Three of a Kind

Robbie Robertson: How to Become Clairvoyant

Garth Hudson Presents a Canadian Celebration of The Band

Levon Helm: Electric Dirt

Garth and Maud Hudson: Live at the Wolf

Pulse

Dirt Farmer

Elliot Landy's Woodstock Vision

The Band Guestbook, July 2011


Entered at Sun Jul 31 21:57:36 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Crazy Heart

I did a review of this many months ago. See link.


Entered at Sun Jul 31 21:52:47 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

When Quintessence handed me a bell, I could bang it in time, which is more than any of Principal Edwards could do.


Entered at Sun Jul 31 20:31:36 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Double entendre

Well yank my crank - blame Westie for that bit :-0) - to think Richard was blessed not only with a voice to make the very finest vocalists go green at the gills but a palate to make Egon feckin Ronay wince with envy.

BTW anyone posting it was 'The Storm is pâté' will receive a weeks ban and a year's supply of Ginsters pasties.


Entered at Sun Jul 31 19:38:23 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: Al

Al, listen again - it's definitely past-a! I think you may be confusing Cornwall with the Bay of Naples, where Richard definitely spent many a summer. Clearly in Napoli, of a pleasant evening one would stroll the balmy boulevards, possibly even get the coastal train to Sorrento, there to enjoy a pizza, possibly followed by a bowl of tutti-fruitti ice cream (with limoncello liqueur for the adults, obviously).

However, on a stormy night one would take whatever the local shop (that one could just about brave the elements and run to from the self-catering cottage and come home in one piece) had. That would have been pasta, plus a jar of tomato base and whatever was left over in the fridge.


Entered at Sun Jul 31 19:29:35 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: PV

No, agreed. But they did give out indian bells and other percussion instruments to the audience and encourage them to ting/bang along...surely that counts for something?


Entered at Sun Jul 31 18:34:39 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I saw Quintessesnce. They didn't have mimes, tragic clowns, bird whistles or trees. Principal Edwards did.


Entered at Sun Jul 31 18:22:37 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: The storm is pastie

I think those analysing the lyrics and their meaning need to listen a mite closer to the track. The final syllable of the word 'past..ie' may well be nigh unintelligible... but it's there if you listen hard enough

As we now all know Richard spent many of his early summer holidays in Cornwall. Electrical storms in that neck of the woods were as common as selections of 'The Weight' in a Band afficianado's top 10 finest Band songs selection.

As one of these innumerable storms would blow itself out the locals would invariably celebrate with a feast of Cornish pasties. Richard, himself, was known to scoff as many as ten in one post storm pastie scoffing session.

Little suprise then years later that the word assocation of 'storm' and 'pastie' would come to the surface in his songwriting. The poor guy must have been salivating as he wrote down the 'storm' word.

Unbefuckinlievable huh. But true.

:-0)


Entered at Sun Jul 31 18:05:32 CEST 2011 from (91.42.240.195)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

We’re just back from a weekend Dusseldorf. The Köningallee must the most extreme shopping street in Europe. Never seen so many Ferrari’s and Porches, we’re almost run over by a roaring Mercedes SLC Gullwing (the new one, not that bad). Anyway there in this very heart of capitalism, where all women have a D-cup +, dogs wear € 900,- boots, armed doormen guide you, there in the Shadow Arkaden Mall of Malls, I found, next to a € 20.000,- coat (-10% now) TLW just for only €12,50. I don’t want to keep this for myself ….

Someone seen Crazy Heart? Is there something Bandish in this movie? (link)


Entered at Sun Jul 31 16:09:30 CEST 2011 from (59.101.14.222)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Subject: All things must passed, from pedants corner

If the storm has passed or is past it's not technically over, it's just moved... But as everything is relative I'll shut up.


Entered at Sun Jul 31 08:34:53 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: PV

IF I "do" "jazz" (or should that be 'do "jazz"'?) it HAS to be impenetrable. Lol Coxhill is a favourite. Have done al the Nucleus, If, Chris McGregor's Brotherhood of Breath stuff and Coxhill is the clear winner. Coxhill creates lovely walls of sound, of a shockingly harrowing beauty.

Principle Edwards are winners, are they? You never saw Quintessence, then?


Entered at Sun Jul 31 08:26:10 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Worst Band ever

Principal Edward's Magic Theatre are the clear winners, and through circumstances, I saw them more than once. Graham Bond's Magick were more obviously appalling than The Third Ear Band, so maybe having Magic in the title isn't good. 1969/1970 was my prime year for crap bands. The social secretary when I was at Hull (66-69) was Ed Bicknell who went on to discover Dire Straits, and every week we had fantastic bands. Then I went to UEA in Norwich, and the social secretary had an eye for total crap. We had them all. Whoever did jazz was good though, and John Surman Trio were brilliant, and Rahsaan Roland Kirk on the Volunteered Slavery tour one of the best bands I've seen. There's a "jazz" album you could try.


Entered at Sun Jul 31 07:50:39 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Morning Peter!! I reckon FF would be more inclined to do Marvin Welch & Farrar's "Lady of the Morning" myself. Can believe that Bond's Magick was among the worst bands ever. Surely Ginger Baker's Airforce would top them though? Or the Third Ear Band? And when you saw Magick, was it the early version with Victor Brox playing alpine horn?


Entered at Sun Jul 31 07:32:33 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

RTO, dunno . If I can only have three albums, and one has to be by Hot Tuna, I'd go for the first for unadorned Casady.

On Graham Bond, yes for Sound of 65, but I saw Graham Bond's Magick and they were strong contenders for 'what's the worst band you've ever seen.'

I can't see Fleet Foxes playing Foot Tapper, or Apache either. maybe Wonderful Land would do, but probably not.


Entered at Sun Jul 31 02:37:40 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: Pat, Kevin and PutEmUp

Pat, I was right: I had a Hammond anorak at the gig tonight. They pounce as soon as you stop playing and want to talk to you about the minutae of the inner workings of the instrument and bang on about their favourites. Now, I said earlier that I was going to try "Doug Ingle is a genius and Jimmy Smith is over-rated" as the bud-nipper lest any wayward and marauding jazz organ fans should try and convert me.

The guy threw a curve ball by telling me how great Graham Bond was. Bollocks - can't argue with that, one of my favourite homegrown organists and couldn't bring myself to rubbish him, however tongue in cheek, and start on about Doug Ingle. Then, a moment of clarity hit me. I was looking at the drummer, also starting to pack up....

The drummer tonight was my good friend Ed Spevock - veteran of Babe Ruth, Chicken Shack, The Peddlers and Pete Brown's Piblokto! Now, Piblokto morphed into Bond and Brown. Perfect!

"Oh, Ed used to play with Graham Bond!" I said excitedly. "He's got LOADS of stories about GRAHAM!". And with that I was free. free to load the car and wait for our wages in peace!!!!

Cruel, I know. But I drove Ed tonight as he lives a handful of streets away, so no harm done.

Also Pat, I'll concede my error and agree that, yes, I'd need about six LPs too.

Kevin, was unaware that not liking jazz leads to other unpleasant things; would be most interested in an example. Certainly, in my own case I haven't started wearing a mac and loitering outside schools with bags of sweets or anything like that. That said, I do have a customer who plays golf and likes to talk golf. Since I ditched jazz, I've also stopped being rude to him. For as we all know, there are only two things worse than jazz: poetry and golf.

Jeff, don't think that I am a dyed-in-the-wool Wilco fan as in truth I heard their tune "Theologians" on a compilation and that's the only one I like! The Gourds are my favourite "new roots rock" act; and over time I have also found issues with the Fleet Foxes. They have one dimension. A beautifully crafted, baroque dimension - but nevertheless just the one. You put their CD on and wait for the foot-tapper that never comes.



Entered at Sat Jul 30 23:49:45 CEST 2011 from (204.169.161.1)

Posted by:

Rhythm Jimmy

Location: south of here

Subject: 1004 hits

Good job, Brien.


Entered at Sat Jul 30 20:43:14 CEST 2011 from (41.97.163.131)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: Malouf

I once attended a conference whose subject was :

given the attested Andalusian roots of Malouf music, is the form it is played the current century the result of a local [Constantine] reshaping – none – partly – fully ?

the kind of egg-kitchen stories, you end very frustrated.

worse, since at the center of the debate was the evocation of the repatriation of the Moors from Spain in the 15th century, I was specially disappointed by the lecturers who in quasi unanimity present as a matter of fact the Moors repatriates as pure civilized population, and by opposition the autochthonous population as troglodytes coming straight from the stone ages. The kind of common prejudices, but that hurts when coming from allegedly historians.

As the grammar is under the spot, the term Malouf itself remains of those words that once become proper nouns, lost their original significant. The term is a fusion of two close Arab words
1 - MA-A-LOUF, meaning familiar established customary usual ordinary frequent regular conventional accustomed habitual orthodox
2 – MOU-A LEF, meaning authored composed written
In short it is question of scholar music become ordinary

For The Band connection, my first deep listening of the genre was Cheikh Raymond indeed, but I felt what this music has of uniqueness with the linked above tune, from a CD that marked the disclosure of the genre at the international stage (if you listen without shaking anything, you get a chance to escape the genre)


Entered at Sat Jul 30 18:37:56 CEST 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: The backwoods

Subject: It's a beautiful thing....

PETER- That was great. It almost makes me ask a wisen-heimer question like, "Have you ever thought about taking up grammar for a living?" which was the punch line to an old BAND story; it's been around forever and I'm sure you've heard it before.

The story/ myth goes something like this: The Band was playing a benefit for some small town's fire dept. in Arkansas and when they got done with a short set they started packing up. A local farmer walked up to Rick and said they had really sounded good. He asked Rick, "You fellas ever think of turning professional?"


Entered at Sat Jul 30 11:47:06 CEST 2011 from (99.141.22.135)

Posted by:

Adam

Wow Peter, I knew you'd hit that one out of the park. A bit confusing for me to comprehend, but as I understand it, "the storm is passed" would be the best fit as the line is passive and basically means "the storm is finished"?


Entered at Sat Jul 30 11:33:10 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: More grammar than you want …

I’d transcribe it by listening without thinking as “the storm is passed.” That’s what the lyrics on the site have. If I thought about it, I might spell out ‘The storm is past’ because the next rhyme is ‘last’. (Though passed is pronounced with a "t" sound at the end too).

An enigmatic one. It could mean “the storm is past” i.e, neither present nor future, but in the “past.” Or you could read it as “The storm is past” like “The storm is across the bay’ or ‘The storm is (going) through the valley.” i.e. the storm is geographically past our position.

“The storm is passed” would be poetic and passive, but sounds like “the storm has passed” as both in speech might be “The storm’s passed” and you’d have no way of knowing whether the contraction was “is” (making it a passive sentence) or “has” (making it a present perfect active sentence). The passive version would be the same as “the storm is gone” or “the storm is finished.” The active one would be “the storm has recently gone by us”.

All four possibilities come down to much the same thing. Let’s call it “the storm is over.” There are four ways of expressing it grammatically without shifting the meaning much. As the song is 'stately' almost in its melody, the more poetic 'The storm is passed' seems the best fit.


Entered at Sat Jul 30 10:36:44 CEST 2011 from (99.141.22.135)

Posted by:

Adam

Subject: grammar question

I have a grammar question. In "Sleeping", what would be the proper grammar for the line: "The storm is PAST/PASSED?, there is peace at last, I'll spend my whole life sleeping." Obviously the question specifically relates to the use of PAST or PASSED. Thank you for your help.

That specific line is one of the saddest, most beautiful lines I've ever heard Richard Manuel sing.


Entered at Sat Jul 30 07:31:25 CEST 2011 from (74.198.87.17)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Oh Beneta.......Please do...call it "Expecting an Update on June 13" and be sure to add a Jazz Page......


Entered at Sat Jul 30 06:51:56 CEST 2011 from (71.182.180.49)

Posted by:

Beneta

Does anyone know of any good forums or message boards relating to The Band? If none exist, I was considering making one, similar to the Bob Dylan forum at expectingrain.com/discussions


Entered at Sat Jul 30 04:48:38 CEST 2011 from (24.44.103.67)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Web: My link

My slide show music tribute to Richard and Rick broke 1,000 on YouTube.


Entered at Sat Jul 30 04:45:54 CEST 2011 from (99.141.22.135)

Posted by:

Adam

A minor observation, but it relates to the conversation about Band stage banter. I'm listening to the bootleg recording of their show on August 30 1974 - Nassau Coliseum, NY. There is no banter during most of the show, but at the end before the first encore, Levon addresses the crowd: "I'd like to say something to you. Let's have another round of applause for a fallen prince - Dayton Stratton." It took me awhile to find out the story on that, but Stratton was a legendary Arkansas music promoter who worked with Bill Graham on Tour '74, and who died in a plane crash that year. I couldn't find a date, but I would assume it occurred earlier that month.


Entered at Sat Jul 30 02:09:16 CEST 2011 from (69.124.123.123)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: On the contrary Kevin

Your descritpion of Ilka is far too mild. The man is frozen beyond eccentricity.


Entered at Sat Jul 30 02:01:47 CEST 2011 from (74.198.87.15)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Next up: Jeff quibbles with my description of Northwestcoaster as an eccentric.....His top 30 really was great!

Adam: I agree with you on Axman……..When Sebastian told us that Robbie was doing the song a year or so ago…I did tell him I would be disappointed if Roy Buchanan was not mentioned………not sure a million or so household around the world needed more exposure to Hendrix ( even if camouflaged ) and SRV….


Entered at Sat Jul 30 01:23:40 CEST 2011 from (69.124.123.123)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: On the fucking contrary Kevin, and Rob

Kevin, By no means do I find Rob contrarian. I do not agree with alot of his musical taste ( as in I think Wilco is rather poor and that The Fleet Foxes suck, but there is a modicum of hope for them) , and do find his forthrightness honest, sometimes appropriate, and sometimes overdone, but i heartily object to describing Rob as contrarian by nature.

I think Jaco was an amazing bassist, that jack bruce is one badass musician, loved felix Pappalrdi's bass playing, which I sonehow suspect Rob would not. I agree, bassists can get totally insane and carried away with themseves, but there are the odd some that play alot , and do wonders with it.


Entered at Sat Jul 30 01:14:31 CEST 2011 from (68.164.5.12)

Posted by:

Pat B

RtO, for a fellow who says he could do with just three albums, the use of the term "elitist" is pretty darn funny. I know I'd need at least six.


Entered at Sat Jul 30 01:12:07 CEST 2011 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Kevin J: A low blow - sticking that reference to 'fusion' in a place where RtO can't help but spot it.


Entered at Sat Jul 30 01:09:45 CEST 2011 from (99.141.22.135)

Posted by:

Adam

Subject: "Axman"

I love Robbie's album, but one thing that does bother me is his choices of guitarists to pay respect to in "Axman". While the fact that the names ARE easier to fit into the lyrics and are more mainstream references - Duane Allman, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Jimi Hendrix, Robert Johnson, Elmore James, Django, the 3 Kings - I think more personal, literal influences would have been much more interesting and heartfelt. I don't know how he could have fit them into the lyrics easily, but imagine that song but with Fred Carter, Roy Buchanan, Hubert Sumlin, Curtis Mayfield, Pops Staples, etc., in the lyrics. That's my one real disappointment with the album, that the track "Axman" doesn't have much more personal guitar references from Robbie.


Entered at Sat Jul 30 00:25:10 CEST 2011 from (70.53.60.108)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: RTO - Landmark

Landmark: On a one month journey to try and find a Garfield album I left in town 20 years ago! Just kidding - A mix but mostly working while spending some time and taking care of some family things in Montreal, Tremblant and Kingston. I take it you are spending August in Saratoga…….You are probably aware but there is an excellent Thai restaurant in Saratoga across from the club where Don McLean got his start……forget the name – but it is actually two restaurants one Thai/one fusion and both very good.

RTO: It’s just that the hating Jazz thing rankles me because it is so often code for a range of others things - all of which are bad……..and in your case while it fits with your contrarian nature – it doesn’t with your obvious knowledge and appreciation of music……..Just as your frustration with having to endure the countless Stevie Ray Vaughan wannabe’s in your various bands should not really have prevented you from seeing some of the real SRV’s talents – which were considerable. Look, I turned off Springsteen because I ran into too many of his fans that disturbed me just by the way they dressed – so we all have our quirks………and you are a blast to read…………………………Band connection: RR name drops SRV in “Axman” – a deep appreciation or did the name work in a lyric better than Roy Buchanan might have?


Entered at Fri Jul 29 22:37:06 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

The only time I've knowingly heard Larry Young (or Rashid Khan, I think it was at the time - and maybe still is) was McLaughlin / Santana's amazing "Love Devotion Surrender" album and tour. I thought I hated all jazz then, but loved that, including Larry / Rashid's work. Of course, I had no idea that it was jazz at the time, and only went because I won the tickets (and got the album) for being the seventh caller or whatever. Didn't make me love jazz but did blow my little head open(er). If I may sound like John Cusack in "High Fidelity" for a moment, it's still one of my top three concerts - that, a particular set of Eugene Smith and the Warm-Up Band at the Hotel California circa '78 (when Eugene was so moved by the groove and the reception that he stood up from his stool, put down his tenor guitar, tied up his hair and did "Shake", complete with the Otis Redding moves that he probably hadn't done since his days with Hawkins in the '60s), and Danny Brooks and the Rockin' Revelators at Clarke Hall in Port Credit (with Fonfars AND Bell) circa 2005.


Entered at Fri Jul 29 21:59:44 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: Kevin

Actually, I've got worse! At 19 or 20 anything was fair go for a listen, and my collection ranged from Deep Purple to Josef Lock. These days I could get by with Abbey Road, the brown Band LP and Hot Tuna's "Burgers". Sad that I have failed to diversify further? Not really; I did have an awful lot of stuff that maybe I never would have listened to ever again.

I think it the assumption of liking jazz that has made me turn on it. This would certainly not apply to the Cannonball Adderley school anywhere near as much as the Weather Report/Return to Forever/Pat Metheny "fusion" ethos. For me, fusion took all the (sorry ladies) spunk out of good, bluesy jazz and sanitised it to hi-fi protection. Give me a New Orleans funeral march and "Didn't He Ramble" any day of the week. But better still, give me Johnny Kidd and the Pirates!!!!

I think also that jazz in many forms does attract a certain amount of elitism; I bet if I ranted about not liking Danish heavy metal nobody would argue or even pull me up on it?



Entered at Fri Jul 29 21:57:57 CEST 2011 from (68.164.5.12)

Posted by:

Pat B

Bill M, can't you just ask the Hawk if he remembers why he hired Garth, other than the obvious reason?


Entered at Fri Jul 29 21:57:44 CEST 2011 from (70.28.32.74)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

Kevin,work or play?


Entered at Fri Jul 29 21:57:20 CEST 2011 from (70.28.32.74)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

Work or play?


Entered at Fri Jul 29 21:36:07 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Pat B: Hawkinss groups featured all sorts of instrumental permutations up to and including our guys. One guitar / two guitars, no bass / one bass, one drummer / two drummers**, one keyboardist (who doubled on horn) / two keyboardists (one of whom doubled on horn) / three keyboardists (one or two of whom would always be on horn) ... Among the keyboardists, Penfound joined prior to Richard or Garth, and spent a lot of his time on sax - and later all of it on sax. Why Garth was hired is one of those million-dollar questions. Hawkins didn't really need another sax-playing keybordist, and he didn't need another mouth to feed. And unless Ronnie had enough pull to be able to go to club-owners and demand more money 'cause he now had another musician, then Garth's arrival likely meant a smaller slice of pie for the others. The fact that everybody went along with the idea reflects well on both Garth's musicianship and the others' commitment to their sound as opposed to their income.

** There may be other instances, but I'm thinking of singer-drummer Matt Lucas setting up his kit beside Levon's when he did a two-week-ish guest stint with Hawkins when he was in Toronto and looking to push his cover of "Movin' On" up the charts. Levon's book mentions Hawkins thinking of bringing in Sandy Konikoff as second drummer, but Sandy has no recollection of that having been under discussion at all.


Entered at Fri Jul 29 21:29:06 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Bill Black

The bass argument came out today in my vinyl finds. Grubbing around the s/h vinyl (as Bill M and David P do) I found two singles by Bill Black’s Combo in perfect condition. The first was Don’t Be Cruel (1960), the second was Joey’s Song / Hot Taco (1962). I’d swear the latter is electric bass guitar, with a great crunchy / twangy sound too. He’s listed among Fender Precision Bass players, even though he’s an icon of stand-up bass. I just looked him up. It seems that in 1963 he employed FIVE different “Bill Black’s Combo” touring the USA.


Entered at Fri Jul 29 21:12:00 CEST 2011 from (70.53.60.108)

Posted by:

Kevin J

It is hard to take anybody seriously that “hates jazz” – period end of story really. The Gallagher brothers said a lot of crazy things all designed to get publicity…….most were entertaining but the constant droning on about “John better than Paul” just exposed them as uneducated about the very music they were making a career out of copying. I doubt RTO will hate as many things as he currently does in 10 years. Hope we are all still around here when he has that Noel Gallagher type awakening.

NUX: Thanks for the bit on Rod Stewart’s ““Every Picture Tell a Story” – a great album - and Bill - a good pick-up on the Dylan cover........I am in Montreal through August - thanks for the heads-up on show. Your support of live music is just great.


Entered at Fri Jul 29 21:09:18 CEST 2011 from (68.164.5.12)

Posted by:

Pat B

As per RR vs. Procol Harum, was the time that the pre-Band were Hawks the only time that Ronnie Hawkins had two keyboards? It seems he usually had some monster piano players who were steeped in the R&R/Rockabilly tradition but hired Richard more for his voice. I suppose he hired Garth because he could, but it doesn't seem like it was a gospel move at the time.


Entered at Fri Jul 29 20:56:00 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Ah, the old "chicken & egg" Whiter Shade vs Tears of Rage again...love it.


Entered at Fri Jul 29 20:55:23 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: things to do in the T-dot on Aug 4 ...

Kevin J / BEG / others?: As per the link above, former Hawk Eugene Smith's doing a show at the Gladstone on August 4. An 8:30 start - much appreciated by us oldies. (I see no chance of me looking so frigging youthful when I reach 67!)

Pat B: Correct - Grebb's what I was thinking. Among other links, the guy who produced the Tuf-Giam LP played bass (a fretted stand-up, I believe) on Robbie's first recording session.


Entered at Fri Jul 29 20:54:25 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Unwound G-String

And it was the legendary Spooner Oldham who played the organ on Percy Sledge's "When A Man Loves A Woman". I would guess that Mr. Oldham was trying to get a wedding processional feel to the music, so maybe that's where the Bach "Air On A G String" arrangement came in.


Entered at Fri Jul 29 20:25:44 CEST 2011 from (68.164.5.12)

Posted by:

Pat B

C'mon Bill, that's Marty Grebb playing keys with The Buckinghams. Enough Band connections to fill a good sized folder.

RtO, Doug Ingle is a genius, maybe not the genius of JZ and GH, but then he could sing.


Entered at Fri Jul 29 20:09:03 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: some people call him Maurice ...

Peter V: I didn't think that Robbie'd called himself a prophet of Americana either, though he did indicate some level of discomfort with others portraying him as such. Maybe he should write a song about it? Also, listening to your Cannonball clip, I kept waiting for Dennis Tufano's voice to kick in, but it never did. (Note to Pat B: tenuous Band link.)


Entered at Fri Jul 29 19:52:14 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P.

Subject: In Nashville The Cats Play Tic-Tac Bro

Beginning in the mid-'50s many Nashville recording sessions featured what was called a "tic-tac" bass. This was a 6-string electric bass that doubled what was played on a acoustic or standard electric bass, adding an extra punch to the botttom end. While some players used a Danelectro 6-string, others like Harold Bradley preferred the Fender VI. Along with the Nashville high-string technique use on acoustic guitars, these innovations helped add extra fullness to the wall of sound.


Entered at Fri Jul 29 19:40:20 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Robbie is a Gunslinger came because I was listening to Bo Diddley (Is A Gunslinger). I was also listening to Johnny Standley today (It's in The Book) which takes us to the prophet.

RtO, my copy of Mercy, Mercy, Mercy is the British single which is labelled prominently CAPITOL DISCOTHEQUE '67 SERIES. They must have put it out again a year after the original release. So you can safely listen to it. 'taint, jazz … it's, er, disco.


Entered at Fri Jul 29 19:21:57 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: Pat

No, Pat, not at all - and don't worry I will keep doing so! - but I do take exception to being made to feel I have shortcomings for not liking what I don't like! I have heard all of that stuff and for good or bad it is not my cup of tea. I don't like the crystal clean sounds, the perfection. Same reason I don't like Steely Dan. It's got to be that little bit more raw for me. And I'm sorry if you bore the brunt of it today - but after nearly twenty years of it I've had enough!

Can you imagine what it is to be the "Hammond player who hates jazz"? First of all, no one believes me. "Oh, stop it, you're being ironic!!!" / "No, honestly, I'm not! I like Ian McLagan and Al Kooper and genuinely couldn't give tuppence for Larry Young" / "Man, you crack me up. You must like jazz, you're an organ player!" / "No. I. F**cking. DON'T!"

I even try and tell them (which of course is topped up because even I don't believe it really) that Jimmy Smith is over-rated and if truth be told the true genius of the Hammond is Mott the Hoople's Verden Allen, and that sets them off again.

And that sets them off AGAIN! "Oh, man, you're missing out, you really should listen to so and so and so and so and so...." all jazzers, of course. "No thanks; I'll stick to Southside Johnny or Graham Parker & the Rumour...."

So, sorry if I flew at you a bit Pat. But that's what I'm up against. Every sodding time I take an organ out and people get chatting at a gig, the schtick starts all over again. This week I think i will try the logic that Doug Ingle is a genius and Joey DeFrancesco just doesn't get it; THAT might see the bastards off with their tail between their legs.


Entered at Fri Jul 29 19:18:04 CEST 2011 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

THE BAND (facebook)

Web: My link

Bob Dylan's Triumph motorcycle crash 45-yrs ago today.


Entered at Fri Jul 29 19:17:10 CEST 2011 from (69.124.123.123)

Posted by:

PuEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Prophecies 1 : Reach For The Sky

Peter- the subject/title of that post of yours "Robbie Is A Gunslinger" defintely contradicts Robbie's own declaration that he is the prophet of Americana. Gunslinger or Prophet?


Entered at Fri Jul 29 19:13:45 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V / Kevin J: I can't help but suspect that Robbie was coming at "Whiter Shade Of Pale" from the functional point of view of a bar-band musician - that it's a slow dance, and superfluous as long as couples continue to be moved by "When A Man Loves A Woman".


Entered at Fri Jul 29 18:22:48 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Robbie is A Gunslinger

There are other bits on bands that are "all jockstraps and feedback" and how West Coast groups can't play. Robbie was the new kid in town, and that's what you do. Perhaps my aversion to Jim Morrison dates back to that actual article which I read when it came out! It's all Robbie's fault.

It makes me think of when I first started writing and people would ask about the "competition" and you'd say, as you felt, that it was all crap. You need that belief to get started on something. Then you mellow. You meet the competition, as The Band did The Grateful Dead on Festival Express. You get to like them and realize you're coming from similar places.Then you stop bad-mouthing the competition.

Noel Gallagher guest edits this month's Mojo (and selects a very good cover CD too). He has something on this area, about why no one told him that Paul McCartney was good after The Beatles. He discovered Band on The Run comparatively recently and was shocked to find he likes it.


Entered at Fri Jul 29 18:22:40 CEST 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: baroque 'n' roll

Seriously weird: the mystery pickup and the hanging tailpiece.


Entered at Fri Jul 29 18:04:21 CEST 2011 from (70.53.60.108)

Posted by:

Kevin J

A few thoughts on Rick’s bass from Musician Magazine:

Musician: I noticed you've switched from the fretless bass you used in your Band days to a fretted instrument.

Danko: I'm playing rock 'n' roll now. Steele on steel is better than steel on wood for this situation. It also gives me more freedom to concentrate on my singing, because when you play fretless, you really have to be listening. With the Band, the fretless just melted into what we were doing. You kind of slide around, playing a little softer with more half-shades

……and Robbie’s infamous Howard Gladstone interview where he takes apart Jim Morrisin, Byrds and Procal Haruem…...

HG:That's what "Tears of Rage" is about, isn't it? You know, the parent-child thing, but presenting both sides of the picture. And the frustration on both sides.

RR: Well, I agree. It's from a parent's side of view. So what if your parents did you wrong? Maybe they did, but so what? Everybody's just doing what they can do, right or wrong. I'm just tired of hearing all of this-that little girl Janis Ian. You know, Jim Morrison and those people. I just think they're a drag. Even if that is their situation, who cares? That's got nothing to do with music.

HG: What do you think of Procul Harem? They have the same instrumentation as you, and on a few songs there is a similarity between both groups.

RR: Right, right, it's true. The only thing that I really know about them is that "Whiter Shade of Pale." Their whole thing to me sounds like Percy Sledge, "When a Man Loves a Woman," for ever and ever and ever. I've heard vaguely a few records by them, and they're still doing that same song. I don't know why they want to do that. Whatever the similarity, I must say we're not conscious of it. We've had organ and piano for ten years. I don't know how long they've had it. We got ours from gospel music. That doesn't have much to do with Procul Harem.

HG: What do you think of the Byrds?

RR: They're all right, I guess. Sometimes they do something nice, mostly bad.


Entered at Fri Jul 29 17:29:16 CEST 2011 from (68.164.5.12)

Posted by:

Pat B

RtO, you really think you can voice such strong negative opinions (which is fine, btw, and very entertaining) and not expect someone to point out how, uhhhhhhhhhh, rather rigid and, hmmmmmmmmm, well, ohhhhhhh, rather insulting they are to people with more, ummmmmm, ecumenical tastes?


Entered at Fri Jul 29 17:05:36 CEST 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: upright tuba

Bill M: the credits at [My link] have fifth beatle John Simon playing tuba on no fewer than four tracks. No mention of where the high school and peck horns come into it.

One of the reasons these songs stay fresh is because the narratives are ambiguous; you get the dramatic monologue but you have to supply the context yourself. For my money, 'upright' is a mishearing that nevertheless fits perfectly: the way I parse the thing, the central theme is the tension between adopting the prescribed, socially-accepted template-for-life (stay in school, get a steady job, marry a nice girl, have kids, go to church) and . . . chasing rabbits.


Entered at Fri Jul 29 16:37:25 CEST 2011 from (205.188.116.5)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: old one, hell, old two

A farmer stopped by the local mechanics shop to have his truck fixed. They couldn't do it while he waited, so he said he didn't live far and would just walk home.

On the way home he stopped at the hardware store and bought a bucket and a gallon of paint. He then stopped by the feed store and picked up a couple of chickens and a goose. However, struggling outside the store he now had a problem - how to carry his entire purchases home.

While he was scratching his head, he was approached by a little old lady who told him she was lost. She asked, 'Can you tell me how to get to 1603 Mockingbird Lane ?'

The farmer said, 'Well, as a matter of fact, my farm is very close to that house. I would walk you there but I can't carry this lot.'

The old lady suggested, 'Why don't you put the can of paint in the bucket. Carry the bucket in one hand, put a chicken under each arm and carry the goose in your other hand?'

'Why thank you very much,' he said and proceeded to walk the old girl home..

On the way he says 'Let's take my short cut and go down this alley. We'll be there in no time.' The little old lady looked him over cautiously then said, 'I am a lonely widow without a husband to defend me.. How do I know that when we get in the alley you won't hold me up against the wall, pull up my skirt, and have your way with me?'

The farmer said, 'Holy smokes lady! I'm carrying a bucket, a gallon of paint, two chickens, and a goose. How in the world could I possibly hold you up against the wall and do that?'

The old lady replied, 'Set the goose down, cover him with the bucket, put the paint on top of the bucket, and I'll hold the chickens.



Entered at Fri Jul 29 16:18:02 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Nux: Thanks for that interesting Haslop piece on "Every Picture Tells a Story". My only quibble is that it seems to be suggesting that Rod's cover of the first appearance of Dylan's "Tomorrow Is A Long Time". It certainly wasn't; I don't know whose was, but Ian and Sylvia did a nice version on their "Four Strong Winds" album in 1963. I suspect that Rod, looking back on it, would say that being dumped from the proto-Moontrekkers was a lucky break.

Re bass-playing: Can a fretless in trained hands be made to sound like a fretted?

sadavid: Isn't there a real tuba on big brown? Anyway, the song perked up my day - though I do think that at times it sounds like "get yourself upright" rather than "... a bride". While the Moral Majority does not approve of a lack of uprightness caused by drinking, it infinitely prefers that to the pre-marital sex (not to mention kids) that is implicit in the idea of simultaneously identifying a bride AND taking your children down to the riverside. Imagine!


Entered at Fri Jul 29 15:25:44 CEST 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: Rick Danko's electric bass techniques

I can't believe I failed to list this track in my submission to the Alleged Statistical Abuse Jamboree. Even after 2,131 listenings, the bass player's opening note still astonishes me - as does the rest of his performance; mostly fat, jolly tuba lines with some sexy "string bending" toward the end.

There can't be many players - of any instrument - whose work expresses so much _personality_ (tags: warm, friendly, sparkling, funny).


Entered at Fri Jul 29 15:13:52 CEST 2011 from (198.228.224.89)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Stand up bass

I watched Richard Thompson's DVD of Austin City Limits the other night and was thoroughly impressed with Danny Thompson's playing. They were but a trio - with the terrific Michael Jerome on drums - and his acoustic bass came through fine to me.

Any thoughts from the pros here on D Thompson's style & chops?


Entered at Fri Jul 29 14:51:52 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

BTW, the "live" performance actually took place before an invited audience in Capitol's larger studio. They oiled the crowd with free booze.


Entered at Fri Jul 29 14:48:31 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Mercy, Mercy, Mercy

Well now I've got myself stuck into Hejira for the day, and The Hissing of Summer Lawns is sitting on the desk next to it. But to come back on "soulful" playing, the link takes you to the Cannonball Adderley Quintet playing Mercy Mercy Mercy, just as they were when The Hawks used to watch them. Listen to the drums and the bass as well as Zawinul's piano.


Entered at Fri Jul 29 14:33:36 CEST 2011 from (86.174.115.200)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: Pat / Peter / Adam

Pat, stop trying to find shortcomings with my reasoning behind not liking certain music. I don't like it because I don't like it. I have tried to like it - given it a fair hearing over the years several times - but it just does nothing for me. I don't like music that is based on chops and not soul, and to my ears, for my own purposes, the majority of the music made by the likes of the Zawinul/Corea/Pastorious crowd fall into that category.

I'll concede that in my own band I am a dictator and will not allow things that aren't my cup of tea. If somebody doesn't want to play my songs as i want to hear them, I'll find another musician who will.


Entered at Fri Jul 29 14:31:36 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Sharing others appreciation and lack of appreciation can be problematic. A friend whose opinions I respect was talking about poetry and mentioned Jim Morrison as a poet whose work she admired. I was driving at the time and swerved so violently I was glad there wasn't a ditch or oncoming traffic. I'm afraid my instant kneejerk reaction description of Jim Morrison's singing and lyric writing will have proved offensive. I've upset people with it before :-)

It's hard to see how you can admire Jack Casady (an all-time great bass player, I agree) without seeing the virtues in Jaco though!


Entered at Fri Jul 29 14:18:01 CEST 2011 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

First off, Adam, you don't judge someone on a drunk sit in role, heck a drunk anything. Levon's performance on the Hollywood Bowl boot is pretty bad, and he explains himself in his book. Second, RTO, your opinion comes from a rigid formalism (academic, I know). At least I realize if I don't like something, I can still admire and respect not only the artist but also the talent and effort. Funny and ironic though, the Band was considered rigid formalists and RR wasn't known for his generous opinion of his contemporaries.


Entered at Fri Jul 29 12:55:11 CEST 2011 from (81.159.38.198)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: Pat / Peter / Adam

Now then Pat, you have the right to adore Jaco's playing and I have the right not to. It is as much your fault that you DO like him as it is mine that I don't.

Peter, totally agree on the upright bass. Even in good hands it can (in the wrong venue) fail to underpin a band in concert and you long for a Fender! Notoriously difficult to amply without feedback problems, it does indeed too easily descend into flatulence. BTW - the older Fender Bass VI is a completely different animal to the modern six string, more of a baritone guitar.

Adam, yes on Phil's gear. All of the Dead really - they spent millions of pounds on equipment and never sounded as good as they did on Europe 72 with a handful of Fender amps and basic Gibson/Guild/Fender guitars! Especially Phil - his graphite-this and six-string-that creations never quite topped the sound of his old Guild Starfire with Alembic tinkerings.

If I see Pino I can certainly chance a couple of questions - the trouble is that he's so damned popular you don't see him in Hampton Hill very often these days!

Oh, here's a thought - best UK bass player? Norman Watt-Roy gets my vote.


Entered at Fri Jul 29 12:40:30 CEST 2011 from (41.97.183.131)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

there’s a cartoon in four pictures showing Snoopy in an attempt to break the record of the lowest opening parachute jump – the actual event consists in jumping out of an aircraft flying at 20 miles altitude, to drop in free fall, and to wait until the minimum altitude possible for deploying the parachute, in order to land safely.
1st picture, Snoopy jumps out, an altimeter is shown in the background
2nd picture, the effect of gravitation acting and the altitude lowering, he looks stoically at the altimeter as he passes the world record (which is at 1600 ft)
3rd picture, the bumble says “the record is broken, I will push it as low as it will be hard for any rival to break it henceforth”
4th picture, Snoopy looks always as impassive, the bumble says “let's take the situation with realism, it is absolutely of no usefulness to open the parachute at this distance from the ground now”

Stunning, only four musical instruments, enough art, a bit of tradition, scraps of rhythm, snippets of melody, a great deal of passion, a lot of youyous, a total communion…
…all what is needed to get such happiness, …it never fails


Entered at Fri Jul 29 11:29:17 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Jaco

The Lone Star Jaco tape is an example of "don't lurch up and play stoned" (though it is entertaining).

To do Jaco justice on a song, you have to listen to the Hejira original of "Coyote" by Joni Mitchell. Remember, they say she kept rehearsing it because The Band couldn't get it right.


Entered at Fri Jul 29 10:37:26 CEST 2011 from (41.162.7.114)

Posted by:

nux

Location: durban South Africa

ROD STEWART Every Picture Tells A Story By Richard Haslop"

" If, as seems only fair, there exists, even on some philosophical level, a measurable qualitative standard by which rock music is judged, empirically, but separately from the success of the marketing department assigned to it, then Rod Stewart might one day be officially denounced as the artist who squandered the most talent. Without being able to claim even a passing acquaintance with several of his albums, and knowing others only by reputation and the occasional accidental glimpse on TV, I still find going through the past three decades and more of his discography a most depressing experience. Not that he could give a tinker’s toss, of course. All five volumes from his Great American Songbook series, which seems to be designed to present him as a kind of sandpaper voiced Perry Como for the terminally bored, have made the American Top Five, and, the music biz being what it is, there will no doubt be more where those came from."

" His initial attempt at a pop career was undistinguished. Producer Joe Meek had been right, to a point. He had said that if the Raiders, with the 16 year old Stewart as their frontman, ditched the singer they might make the charts. So they did … and they did, as an instrumental combo now known as the Moontrekkers, reaching No 50 in the UK in 1961 with a record banned by the BBC for being unsuitable to persons of a nervous disposition. But that, with the exception of a flirtation with the Swedish charts, was it. Stewart, on the other hand, struggled through a range of menial jobs and plenty of bluesworthy musical dues paying before emerging some years later as the voice of the highly influential Jeff Beck Group, and then remained, for the next few years, solo and in the Faces, one of rock’s greatest singers."

" He reached his artistic and, given the size of the market at the time, arguably his commercial peak with his third album, 1971’s Every Picture Tells A Story, which was No 1 in both the US and the UK at the same time as the single drawn from it, the endlessly engaging Maggie May, was replicating that achievement. Yet this success seemed almost accidental, even by the serendipitous standards of the time. The album’s loose, ramshackle but irresistible blend of soul, folk-rock and full tilt rock ‘n’ roll, with slide guitar and mandolin constituting improbable but critical instrumentation, was slightly punchier than its excellent predecessor, Gasoline Alley, but not so obviously that it could realistically have constituted a deliberate pitch for wealth and fame. "

" That it has retained its appeal and power for forty years despite Stewart’s subsequent sale of his birthright for the proverbial mess of pottage is down to the fact that it contained nothing but terrific performances of terrific songs. He had become a wonderful soul singer, blessed with natural nonchalance and superb timing, equally capable of laddish swagger and extreme tenderness, and the material, from the title track’s autobiographical clamour to Tim Hardin’s quietly ravishing Reason To Believe, was particularly well chosen. Stewart’s mentor Long John Baldry joined Madeline Bell on the chorus of the gospellish Seems Like A Long Time; Bob Dylan was beaten to the official release of his own lovely Tomorrow Is A Long Time, with Stewart setting an interpretive benchmark that was hard to match; the Faces closed ranks for a memorable version of a Temptations hit; the blues song that had been Elvis Presley’s first single rocks mercilessly; while Mandolin Wind will break your heart all night long."

" The album is currently available locally as part of a cheap double set with Gasoline Alley. There’s no artwork to speak of, but the music is good for another forty years, at least.


Entered at Fri Jul 29 10:35:35 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Bass …ically

I can see where RtO is coming from, in that it's not fretless bass guitar you see so much nowdays, it's fretless stand-up bass. In the hands of the experts, Roscoe Beck in Leonard Cohen's band, for example, it's a wonder to listen to. But in the hands of many rock revival band stand-up bassists it's a muffled sliding series of farts. A friend arranges 'big bands' for which he plays piano. They're retired or semi-retired musicians who've assembled 20 or 30 piece bands for fun. He asked me about bass once. He said that his hardest job is finding an acoustic bass player whose muffled slides don't obscure the fact that he's out of tune most of the time. He said he'd much rather have electric bass, but everyone wanted stand-up for the look of the thing.

A lot of inept stand-up bass makes you long for the springy bouncy simplicity of fretted bass guitar in the hands of a John McVie. Someone who never thinks it's a solo instrument, who has a wonderful sense of rhythm and sticks to the job in hand. I saw McVie way back in the blues days and thought him exceedingly dull, but by "Rumors" simplicity had become a virtue, and I think his propulsive playing is a lot of the appeal of that album.

But there is room for the Pino Palladino's and Jaco's. On Joe Zawinul, you should lock yourself up with a copy of Cannonball Adderley's "Mercy, Mercy, Mercy" on replay for an hour or two. That's magical and soulful playing. Why I compare Zawinul and Garth is both sought new sounds and coaxed them out of instruments. Zawinul was a synth pioneer. I saw the Zawinul Syndicate about a year before he died, and he played a synth piece where the keys brought out all sorts of human voices which became the instrument. Garth's playing on "Jupiter Hollow" is very much along Zawinul lines … as is Sea To The North. Both totally original and different to each other of course. I have a Playlist that I keep for deep relaxation when travelling. Garth's French Girls and Weather Report's Adios are side by side. Other keyboard players, like Billy Preston, can play … but I can't think of anyone with such a deep fascination with sounds as Zawinul and Garth. The Zawinul Syndicate last time around had a young bass player very much like Jaco. Incredible playing and incredible bass sound too.

Adam brings up the point on strings. Roscoe Beck plays a five-string electric bass as well as stand-up, and the 5 is the one which I keep seeing recently. The 6-string Fender was rare back then … The Hollies used it in the 60s. I had this discussion with bassists, and they agreed with Adam … you can find all the notes on a four string.


Entered at Fri Jul 29 08:51:22 CEST 2011 from (99.141.24.26)

Posted by:

Adam

By the way, if RTO is cool with Palladino, maybe we could get some inside info... a glimpse into the recording of "How To Become Clairvoyant"? Just a thought. I love Jack Cassady. Phil Lesh is good, but I also hate the whole "6/8 string bass" shit that he loves. A bass guitar is 4 strings, do with it what you can.


Entered at Fri Jul 29 08:48:19 CEST 2011 from (99.141.24.26)

Posted by:

Adam

I kind of agree with RTO. I heard Jaco play on the Lone Star bootleg, and I remember being entirely unimpressed. Different strokes, though, I suppose.


Entered at Fri Jul 29 06:09:49 CEST 2011 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

Joe Zawinul is/was a genius. Garth would tell you that. And if you ever in the same room with Jaco--no matter how big or small--you would know his playing was a gift from the divine. If you can't appreciate it, it's entirely your fault.

Music is molding melody and rhythm. To say there are "rules" that have to be followed for it to be accomplished properly is bullocks.


Entered at Fri Jul 29 04:08:16 CEST 2011 from (99.141.24.26)

Posted by:

Adam

I met Billy Preston once. He was a nice guy.


Entered at Fri Jul 29 03:36:29 CEST 2011 from (184.66.107.77)

Posted by:

Bonk

Location: Salt Spring Island (by way of cabbagetown)

Subject: Rob The Organ

WOW. BP rules on that one. I agree with you on where the bass and drums should stay. A couple of months ago I was at a great blues camp on Hornby Island here in BC and one night they threw a bunch of students together and said play. No warning, no rehearsal. The bass player and I just laid down a blues groove and said fuck it. If the rest of them can't follow this then they're wankers. It worked out pretty good. The piano player picked up on the groove and just smoked.


Entered at Fri Jul 29 01:09:42 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Web: My link

Subject: PV: "The only other keyboard player in Garth's league"

Peter, watch this. Those with God saw the true BP that those at a rock concert never saw. This is my favourite short clip of Hammond organ and it will NOT be bettered. Ever. Try not to spit your tea over your keyboard at the bass pedal run around 2 mins 56.......


Entered at Fri Jul 29 01:01:16 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: Peter

Peter, you can try but many have failed. I don't even like Zawinul on "In a Silent Way"! The whole crowd of jazzers that took to fusion leave me cold.

Now, I earn jobbing money playing bass guitar so I am allowed to say it. The rhythm section have a place and should know it. That's Jack Bruce and Jaco on my hate list along with Colin Hodgkinson. Now, Pino Palladino was one of the worst cases of fretless (for want of a better word) wank, but I know Pino and have seen him with his battered Fender playing old school simple basslines and he does it beautifully. THAT'S where he gets his name. Simple, economical class.

Nathan East! Oh, christ! Everything "wrong" about 80s Eric Clapton is the fault of Nathan East. It's not just lack of frets, it's the equally appalling trend for bass guitars to try and gain extra strings.

There are ladies on this board so a certain word may not be uttered. I will therefore pass over Mark King.

If you want bass that stretches out, give me Jack Casady: he growls and rumbles and the whole thing retains a certain (albeit acid-drenched) Motown sensibility. Check "The Other Side of this Life" from Bless It's Pointed Little Head and correct me if am wrong!


Entered at Thu Jul 28 23:31:14 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Cary: Funny that you came here to ask about that song, as the lyrics you posted are exactly the lyrics I posted a week or so again. As noted then, the writer was Stu Mitchell and the artist was Gainsborough Gallery. The record was an unsuccessful follow-up to their hit "Life Is A Song". Both 45s came out on the Reo label in Canada, as did their LP, which was recorded at Norman Petty's studio in New Mexico.

Very few of the top-30 lists posted here DON'T include at least one song that I wish I'd remembered when I did my own. Jon L's list has "No Woman No Cry" and a closey, "The Wanderer" (though I'd've listed "Runaround Sue"). Todd has "Soul Of A Man", though I'd've plumped for the Bruce Cockburn version (from his album titled "Nothing but a Burning Light", which is of course what Willie Johnson, who wrote the song, had decided what the soul of a man actually is). "Lodi" is also dear to my heart, but as the 'typing song' on account of it being what Mrs Stevenson let us practice to on Fridays in grade 9 typing class. That and "Maxwell's Silver Hammer". BEG's list has "Sweet Jane" (the Prakash/Whitey version for me thanks) and "The Thrill Is Gone".

Landmark: We were in your town Mon-Wed - to see Australian trio Oka at the buskerfest alongside Just For Laughs. Picked up vols 1 and 2 of the Great Society recordings on Columbia at Seymour Books on Peel. I should've mentioned the group when you led a discussion of "Sally Go 'Round The Roses" a couple weeks ago, as up to now the only Great Society recording I had was their version of the Jaynetts' hit, which I got on an NZ Columbia comp in Auckland in '82; a wonderful comp that also includes the Rising Sons' brilliant brilliant version of "Candy Man". It occurred to me yesterday that "Sally" and the Great Society's biggest song, "White Rabbit" both focus on the question of young women going astray. And "White Rabbit" is referred to (if obliquely) by Robbie in "The Right Mistake".


Entered at Thu Jul 28 23:31:08 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Too late to see him now, but in terms of inventiveness, Joe Zawinul was the only keyboard player who was in Garth's league. Do give Weather Report or The Zawinul Syndicate another go. Jaco's bass in Birdland has determined my purchase of hi-fi speaker for years and years. When Levon talks about The Hawks' "Cannonball period" in Toronto, I assume Zawinul was the one who took their eye. Have you heard that Jaco guest spot at the Lone Star Café in "Honest I Do"?


Entered at Thu Jul 28 23:16:01 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: David P / Ampeg

Mind you, at least he got a free SVT rig out of it! Still the best bass amp to this day, if you can be bothered to lug around the weighty head and the 8 x 10" cab.


Entered at Thu Jul 28 23:13:47 CEST 2011 from (193.35.132.13)

Posted by:

Whip Crack Away

Subject: Location

Whip Crack Away, Whip Crack Away, Whip Crack Away


Entered at Thu Jul 28 23:09:45 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Location

Subject: Ubuntu

Location Location Location


Entered at Thu Jul 28 23:08:03 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: Peter / Todd

Todd: China Cat Sunflower! Good choice. I have always numbered Dupree's Diamond Blues and Doin' That Rag among my favourites; that would earn raised eyebrows!

Peter. Ah, we are normally of similar minds but we'll have to disagree on the fretless bass and the sacking of the fretless bassist. It's precisely because of tracks like Birdland I don't like the instrument; Rick Danko's adoption of the instrument is far more tolerable as the same old Rick bass style of suiting the song and leaving the right gaps is there. And those quirky old Ampegs had a sound of their own that had very little do do with what the fretless became aurally. But there - I don't like jazz that much and fusion even less; I don't like Weather Report; I don't like Jaco and I DON'T LIKE THE DAMN FRETLESS BASS! (clears throat). Thank you.


Entered at Thu Jul 28 20:02:04 CEST 2011 from (68.148.146.36)

Posted by:

cary

Subject: Cold Steel Buildings tower over me artist/writer

Who did the song with the lyrics "Cold steel buildings tower over me / Cold steel eyes in the faces that I see / I've never felt so all alone / I think I'll catch a bus and go back home". I found a copy of this record with a blank label and would like to know who it is, who wrote it and why it just has a blank label. Please email me at ottomichetti@hotmail.com Thanks


Entered at Thu Jul 28 19:23:58 CEST 2011 from (91.189.94.156)

Posted by:

Ubuntu

Ubuntu ubuntu ubuntu


Entered at Thu Jul 28 18:37:41 CEST 2011 from (70.53.60.108)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

A shot of Georgia on my Mind – above link…….Not Richard at his best but way better than most anything else…….an interesting thought……The Band might have been unique in rock in that the individual members might well have been at their peaks as performers well before the band ( as the Band ) was introduced to the world with Big Pink. Certainly for Richard and Robbie that is the case. I’m talking singing and playing – not composing as both obviously peaked as songwriters during the 68-71 period. Listening to tapes from different era’s, I would say only Rick got better as the Band matured. In fact, Rick’s singing at just around the time the Band was winding down was at its best – at least for me and it stayed at that lofty plateau for many years thereafter.


Entered at Thu Jul 28 18:38:57 CEST 2011 from (83.249.107.72)

Posted by:

the same

ilkkajauramo at linuxmail.org


Entered at Thu Jul 28 18:37:02 CEST 2011 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

THE BAND (facebook)

Web: My link

"Back To Memphis" from Watkins Glen Summer Jam 38-yrs ago.


Entered at Thu Jul 28 18:33:08 CEST 2011 from (83.249.107.72)

Posted by:

Ilkka Jauramo

Location: Nordic countries

Subject: Mysterious posts / Linux

On a serious side. Being among the one per cent using Linux operating system I can't help but wonder some mysterious posts about ten years ago.

In TRACY's LITTLE PINK there was a post from "Ubuntu" and the message was "Ubuntu ubuntu ubuntu". There were even "spam" about Ing. Knopper's KNOPPIX system in this gb. Any information someone?


Entered at Thu Jul 28 16:58:40 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Covering the Basses

After the release of MFBP Ampeg gave The Band some equipment, including both a regular & fretless electric bass and a baby upright bass. The Ampeg AUB-1 fretless, with its distinctive scroll headstock and two large f-holes, was used extensively by Rick thereafter. He modified it with two Fender pickups and a sturdier bridge. (photo link above)


Entered at Thu Jul 28 16:54:40 CEST 2011 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Subject: Top 30 songs list

OK, this list was the tough one. The process of making it pleasantly jogged my memory of quite a lot of favorite songs, and it sometimes surprised even me which songs dropped off. If Band songs had been allowed in this list, they would have crushed everyone else...with them out of the way, Bob Dylan might well have done the same, but I tried to find a balance that felt right. I used Al's rules and ordered the songs so that the top ones here are rated the highest...which was more of a challenge, but a fun one.

The Staple Singers – I’ll Take You There
Bob Dylan – Visions of Johanna
Joan Baez – Diamonds and Rust
Beach Boys – God Only Knows
The Staple Singers – Long Walk to D.C.
Bob Dylan – A Hard Rain’s A-Gonna Fall
Bessie Smith – Nobody Knows You When You’re Down and Out
Little Feat – Dixie Chicken
Wild Thing – The Troggs
Gillian Welch – Orphan Girl
Van Morrison – Brown-Eyed Girl
Sam Cooke – Bring It On Home To Me
Bob Marley – No Woman No Cry
Beach Boys – Good Vibrations
Bob Dylan – Ain’t Talkin’
Ella Fitzgerald/Louis Armstrong – Let’s Call The Whole Thing Off
Bob Dylan – When I Paint My Masterpiece (live 1975)
Iris Dement – The Train Carrying Jimmie Rodgers Home
Al Green – Lean on Me
The Beatles – Something
Gillian Welch – One Little Song
Bettye Lavette – Choices
Bob Dylan – Nettie Moore
Milton – In the City
Chip Taylor/Lucinda Williams – Through Their Mother’s Eyes
Toshi Reagon – Kindness
Borderline – Don’t Know Where I’m Going
Paul Simon – Me and Julio Down By the Schoolyard
Dion – The Wanderer
Eric Andersen – Sheila


Entered at Thu Jul 28 16:44:06 CEST 2011 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Subject: Top 10 Band list

OK, gave this a shot. Honestly, the Band has so many quality songs that after the first five slots, it becomes pretty nearly arbitrary which songs make the cut for the second five. Nevertheless!

The Weight
We Can Talk
It Makes No Difference
Rockin’ Chair
Acadian Driftwood
King Harvest
Unfaithful Servant
The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down
Ophelia
Stage Fright


Entered at Thu Jul 28 15:35:20 CEST 2011 from (99.250.10.113)

Posted by:

GregD

Rick also occasionally played a Fender VI 6 string bass/baritone guitar in the early years, a picture of one being archived somewhere on the site I believe.


Entered at Thu Jul 28 00:17:26 CEST 2011 from (99.141.24.26)

Posted by:

Adam

Bill - wow! I had no idea that Rick play an acoustic bass as early as '61. I've seen it written in places that he had a hand in "popularizing the upright bass in rock music", but I don't think he ever played it with the OQ outside of "Thinkin' Out Loud", the Basement Tapes or guest appearances.

I've always loved Rick's fretless playing. It's appropriate that for the first two albums, he utilized the Fender fretted bass, and waited until Stage Fright to expand and allow his sound to evolve. His fretless gave an amazing sound to The Band. It always gives off an upright bass vibe for me, but with an electric sound and in the context of a rock band. I love it.


Entered at Wed Jul 27 23:45:34 CEST 2011 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Adam: if you want to hear Rick and Levon provide credible jazz accompaniment in '61, check out the Lenny Breau CD. See this site's discography.


Entered at Wed Jul 27 22:35:55 CEST 2011 from (70.53.60.108)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Updates

The lack of updates I usually put down to those extra long European vacations…….but it also brings to mind the other excellent website “Expecting Rain” in which the webmaster there holds an annual telethon of sorts in order to raise money so that he can provide as many quality updates as he does………RTO will be the featured musical guest at the first Band GB telethon…….that is if he can find a bass player….


Entered at Wed Jul 27 21:46:05 CEST 2011 from (99.254.209.45)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Update Section of this site

Is the Update section of this website still being updated? I notice it has been stuck on June 12 since.........well June 12th.


Entered at Wed Jul 27 21:44:51 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Exception that (proves?) the rule

Rob, in defence of fretless bass, "Birdland." If your guy could play fretless bass like that, sacking was the wrong move. I do know what you mean about Precision or rather precision, but there are great fretless bass moments in the hands of Jaco or Rick Danko.


Entered at Wed Jul 27 20:06:17 CEST 2011 from (69.124.123.123)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Rob

Rob, the times that a loved but disturbed and out of control Jaco joined The Band on stage at The Lone Star Cafe would have sent you into coronary arrest. Happened twice, the last time Jaco commandeered the song, into international waters so to speak.. Not easy, when you are that outnumbered.


Entered at Wed Jul 27 19:56:23 CEST 2011 from (108.41.170.6)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Tim

Thanks for that link. It brings back a lot of memories.. There was a lot of great music around back then.


Entered at Wed Jul 27 18:58:14 CEST 2011 from (24.218.200.216)

Posted by:

Tim

Location: Boston
Web: My link

Subject: The Band Palladium 76 ads

From one of my favorite blogs. Its all things classic NYC concert venues from back in the day.


Entered at Wed Jul 27 18:55:59 CEST 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: half-time toodeloo

Dlew919: thanks for the Mars Robert link; a thought-provoking piece -- I especially liked the Trethewey quote ("My South didn't lose the war. We won.")

It sent me back to Peter V's terrific piece on "TNTDODD," where Levon-via-Davies is quoted:
"This is when we started halving the beat on a lot of tunes, which gave us a distinctive thing. Instead of keeping full time rhythmically, we found if we halved the beat we could lay the lyrics in a different place."
(You could also point out that in this case it allows Levon to integrate a slow march to incredible effect.)

Which in turn sent me back to GregD’s link to the JRR guest spot on Ronnie Wood Radio, where JRR rhapsodizes – not for the first time – over the live-in-Atlanta Ray Charles “Drown in My Own Tears.” (“Ray Charles did a version of “Drown in My Own Tears” which is a slow, very slow song, and cut the tempo _in half_ - and it was already slow . . . and I don’t know to this day, that I’ve ever heard anybody do a live moment in music as stunning as this.”)

Interesting that “Tears of Rage” – The Band’s debut track – uses the same effect (which requires, I think, a tight band of skilled musicians with strong nerves).


Entered at Wed Jul 27 17:43:04 CEST 2011 from (70.53.60.108)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Oh my……….for any film buffs out there, Brian de palma’s “Blow Out” happens to be one of my favourite films and the girl in the shower scene at the start was a friend ( RIP Missy ) but that’s a whole other story……………….Dancing in the Dark was Springsteen’s first rock video and it should have screamed ‘greatest live rock musician on the planet” in the spirit that Van Halen’s “Jump” portrayed well just what they were (debate amongst yourselves what that was but it was what it was nonetheless) ……instead we got some type of soap opera sanitized dance with a girl that likely would never have been at a Springsteen show mess that missed the mark completely.

Todd: Good one and Joe Jackson was an artist I had almost forgotten about. Thank you…...He did some great stuff late 70’s/early 8o”s. On that night on the island when it is play your favourite Beatles, Dylan, Elton or Replacements – you will stand out – I’ll give you that…….CCR night – you’d have company.


Entered at Wed Jul 27 17:40:47 CEST 2011 from (69.182.78.8)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Thanks Peter. Yes, the Beatles were a tough edit. 'Paperback Writer' almost made the cut along with 'Rain', but I had to make sure I didn't end up with 10 Beatle songs on my list. Dylan was tough too....so many eras to consider.


Entered at Wed Jul 27 17:06:12 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Rain, yes, arguable. I think this is its second appearance. I was in two minds myself. Another great list. Be My Baby. You, me and Brian Wilson apparently.

Dancing in the Dark. No, I'll differ on that. Just rewatched it. It's screamingly fake now and Bruce has slapped on much to much pancake make up. But Courteney acts out the role well. The idea was that any girl could dance with Bruce, and she looked cute but not "super model" or "groupie." Remember it was 1982, a couple of years into MTV. There are some lovely shots. Clarence grooving, the two guitars going up in tandem. Today I thought the drums boringly 80s, but it was an early "VHS video EP" here and we bought one. I still like it. I also wonder if they used a front row of actors and mixed in a crowd behind … easy now, but probably not easy then.


Entered at Wed Jul 27 16:52:05 CEST 2011 from (69.182.78.8)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Top Thirty List

The Top Thirty list was ultimately fun. As tough as it was to narrow things down to 30 songs, the upside is that I now have a 10 page list handy of what must be my favorite rock/pop songs of all time....the ultimate iTunes playlist!

Here are my top thirty favorite songs:

1. I Never Loved a Man (The Way I Love You) - Aretha Franklin
2. Come To Me - Otis Redding
3. Be My Baby - The Ronettes
4. Oh Boy! - Buddy Holly
5. I Walk The Line - Johnny Cash
6. Hard Times - Ray Charles
7. Try Me - James Brown
8. Love Minus Zero/No Limit - Bob Dylan
9. Remember The Mountain Bed - Wilco
10. Soul Of A Man - Ollabelle
11. Every Little Thing - The Beatles
12. Rain - The Beatles
13. Lonestar - Norah Jones
14. Steppin’ Out - Bluesbreakers With Eric Clapton
15. Can’t You Hear Me Knocking - The Rolling Stones
16. Backstreets - Bruce Springsteen
17. Into The Mystic - Van Morrison
18. China Cat Sunflower - The Grateful Dead
19. Lodi - Creedence Clearwater Revival
20. Portland - The Replacements
21. Crescent City - Lucinda Williams
22. Windfall - Son Volt
23. In My Time Of Need - Ryan Adams
24. Coming Up Close - ‘Til Tuesday
25. (The Angles Wanna Wear My) Red Shoes - Elvis Costello
26. In Quintessence - Squeeze
27. I’m The Man - Joe Jackson
28. Jah Is Mighty - Bob Marley
29. The Lakes of Pontchartrain - The Be Good Tanyas
30. Border Song - Elton John


Entered at Wed Jul 27 16:48:54 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Say hello to my pink scarf...

A similarity between TLW and the "Dancing in the Dark" video would be that both were directed by a major Hollywood players, as Brian De Palma filmed Mr. Springsteen. In addition, Martin Scorsese's favorite star, Robert De Niro, first appeared in Mr. De Palma's "The Wedding Party".

I would agree that, as the most animated members of The Band, and due to their positioning front & center stage, Rick and Robbie were naturally focal points in TLW. However, the camera flattery of Robbie is most evident in the post-concert interview segments and it was his idea to add these to the film. Through his dominance in this added footage he frames the concert event and the history of The Band through his subjective viewpoint.


Entered at Wed Jul 27 16:33:48 CEST 2011 from (99.250.10.113)

Posted by:

GregD

Subject: Dan Peek

RIP Dan Peek. I believe he posted in this guestbook several years ago.


Entered at Wed Jul 27 16:11:34 CEST 2011 from (70.53.60.108)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Dancing in the Dark

In the history of rock n roll there have been very few more obvious “Jump the Shark” moments than the hideous/myth shattering beyond belief awful scene of Courtney Cox dancing with Bruce Springsteen………perhaps the worst video in the short not so glorious history of rock videos……..’”Streets of Philadelphia” in contrast may have been one of the very best ever done……Johnny Cash’s “Hurt” was the best I ever saw.

In one corner we have “Debt Ceiling” in the other “The Last Waltz”……………….No contest……think I will stick around………Listening to Rollie….he ate the turkey!


Entered at Wed Jul 27 16:01:42 CEST 2011 from (81.159.38.198)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: Typo

Hallowed Telecaster! There's too many guitarists on this board, so not leaving my mistake uncorrected, which was just a typo and not a mistaken notion that JRR played the thinline semi-acoustic Tele at all!!!!


Entered at Wed Jul 27 15:58:08 CEST 2011 from (81.159.38.198)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: Rod / "Tone"

Rod, thank you. It's the tone JRR used from about '74 onwards which I believe ties in roughly with the abandonment of the hollowed Telecaster in favour of that other thing Leo Fender made with offset cutaways and a synchronised tremolo.

True about Rick Danko though - bassist mates hate me for this but if ever the world could have done without an instrument it is the fretless bass. Not only do they dilute the whole essence of what a bass guitar was all about (Leo called it "Precision" for a reason) but they furthered that awful notion that the rhythm section should be allowed to be counted as lead instrumentalists. NO!

Of course, we forget that throughout the Dylan period and first two OQ albums at least, the humble Fender Jazz bass was his weapon of choice. With frets. Perfect.

But there - I am a bit of a "bass fascist". I sacked my best friend from London Country because he wanted to use a fretless. Duck Dunn or Jaco Pastorioriouorious? Duck!!!!



Entered at Wed Jul 27 14:33:02 CEST 2011 from (59.101.14.222)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Web: My link

Subject: There goes a-Robert E Lee

Interesting article on Lee


Entered at Wed Jul 27 09:21:19 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I’ve just being reading Jools Holland’s autobiography. He describes Squeeze’s first TV appearance where he had a Bowie flash painted on his face. It took ages. The film at the end of it only showed his hands on the keyboard. The pianist’s dilemma. So the next time he had flashes painted on his hands. Drummers who sit low with cymbals in front (Levon) are a nightmare. Try filming through a kit with cymbals under stage lighting. We accept the flares from the reflections for brief glimpses, but they get wearing. I can’t see many drummers wanting their kit heavily-sprayed with non-reflecting stuff either.

The lack of crowd shots is a brilliant move. Instead of watching a documentary about a performance, i.e. watching people watching the band, you ARE the audience. It sounds obvious, but directors before couldn’t help watching the crowd. A fact Springsteen brings out, or perhaps pastiches, in the Dancing in The Dark video when he brings Courteney Cox up on stageto dance with him… and I remember the smokescreen at the time when they pretended it was “authentic.” Courteney successfully looks like an “ordinary person’ dancing.

I guess Adam saw the remastered 5.1 theatrical release, and Robbie has talked about mastering the 5.1 for the DVD audio version, so you are on the stage among the band, or at least where the most forward front camera was.


Entered at Wed Jul 27 05:40:44 CEST 2011 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: The Band live

Adam, your right about Rick's style changing when he moved back to a fretted bass. If you listen to some of the better 76 shows you'll hear that Levon and Ricks sound had become alot funkier - and tighter. For my money Rick also turned in some of his best vocal peformances around this time sounding alot more disciplined. Yes Richard's performances did drop off and they didn't trust him to play drums alone on Rag Mama Rag by the time TLW came around. That must have made it hard for the rest of the group. As for Robbie - I never liked the tone he started to use after the 74 tour. It's interesting listening to Accardian Driftwood on TLW. He used a Les Paul on that one and the sound is so much warmer.

Moving onto the movies. Robbie is often accused of hamming it up for the cameras on TLW but his various moves don't seem too much different from what I've observed on The Festival Express or the Wembley show. There's some great live footage of the OQ out there. It would be great to see it released properly one day.


Entered at Wed Jul 27 02:38:04 CEST 2011 from (99.141.24.26)

Posted by:

Adam

Excellent points, Pat B. I was going to say the same thing you closed with. In the second half of their career, 1973-1978, The Band played much larger venues and atmospheres. By the time of TLW, Robbie was not the only member whose sound/style/approach had changed & evolved. Not by a long shot. Yes, his guitar playing was more up front, aggressive, and contained more lead fills and breaks. But the whole group's sound had evolved at this point. The whole sound was different from the "classic" OQ: there were less spaces, different sounds, and a different approach altogether. It was not just Robbie deciding suddenly to play different and more up-front that one night. Listen to how Rick's playing had changed - fretted bass, different/evolved playing style, etc. Same thing for Levon - more busy, jazzier drumming you might say, a different sound and approach than the "classic" years. The same applies for Garth and Richard as well, though for Richard, it had more to due with his declining abilities as a live performer.


Entered at Wed Jul 27 02:27:26 CEST 2011 from (68.164.5.12)

Posted by:

Pat B

I recall a moment at the Opera House in late 1969. After three or four songs where not a word from the group was spoken to the crowd, someone in the audience yelled out, "Talk to us!" I believe it was RR who answered, "Not in Chicago." Big cheer. I used to think it was some oblique reference to the violence at the Democratic Convention in 68 or the Days of Rage in 69. But they didn't say anything in the fall of 71, at WG in 73, or the summer of 76. But I can say that Garth wasn't much more than a lolling head behind the organ, Richard seemed small at the piano, Levon was pretty well hidden behind his drums, while RD and RR bobbed around all right in front. RR always seemed the most active onstage but he was always pretty calm, especially compared to what other guitarists were doing. A lot more active than Clapton and less self-absorbed.

The whole thing about Scorsese focusing on RR I've always considered bullocks. Anyone who saw the OQ knows that RD and RR were the natural visual focus of the group. I don't think anyone went to see the Band to see a big rock show. It was much more a musical experience, save the Dylan tour in 74. At that point they became something of an arena rock act--without the arena sound. I mean, in 75 they played with CSN&Y. In 76 they played with Fleetwood Mac, Linda Ronstadt, and Steve Miller. And, the bigger the stage, the more overwhelmed they seemed, and the need to sound bigger changed their sound.


Entered at Wed Jul 27 01:11:56 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: The Band on film

Some valid points about TLW here; PV is right about a 2-standing/3-seated format and so to is Adam that RD gets as much on screen time as JRR even if that isn't what Marty Cokespoon was aiming at.

I've been fairly critical of TLW over the years and still maintain that if you want to see what was great about the OQ, you are better off seeing Festival Express and what a match-fit, peak-form combo is truly like in concert.

I don't want to get into "Pink Scarf" turf again, but JRR in latter days had clearly lost interest; his interjections of fuzztone lead guitar in songs like UOCC on TLW are clearly indicative of this and undermine the original concept of the carefully-crafted non-gratuitous arrangements that set the OQ apart from other more self indulgent acts of the times.

As a musician, I think also that instrumentation was blighted in the mid-seventies; in the sixties you had relatively few gadgets to enhance your tone (tremolo in a guitar amp; wah-wah pedal; Leslie cabinet if you were wealthy) and by the mid seventies, electric instruments just didn't sound as earthy and fresh as they did earlier. To show that this isn't an anti-JRR post, and to flag a hero up for equal comment, Garth's horseshoe shaped H25 theatre organ SUCKED. It sounded like a cross between the pit band of a daytime TV show and the organ at a cheap municipal ice rink. Lowrey had gone to shit by about 1972 and went from being a serious Hammond contender to a peddler of nasty, reedy-sounding deluxe home accessories (with matching stool) for the blue rinse brigade.

But I take issue with Bill Graham and agree that the lack of crowd shots is a positive feature of TLW; that Marty Noseup recognised this is testimony to his skills as a director and let's face it; the whole point of TLW aside from documenting the end of an admired act was to sate the thousands that couldn't get to the gig - and wouldn't have given two shits about what the crowd looked like if they had.


Entered at Wed Jul 27 00:31:45 CEST 2011 from (24.44.103.67)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Peter is quite correct. Having photographed and done videography of some shows, the performer out front who stand and have mobility are the ones that are most likely going to exude personality and therefore attract the most camera time. When your space is limited (such as drummers and keyboard players) it is very hard to capture charisma for lengths of time - there's only so much they can do. Certain piano players who are the focal point can only do so much and there are very few who can actually attract the spotlight and hold it well - that's why you'll see some get up from behind the piano and come out front. For drummers its even tougher because they are essentially towards the back and surrounded. Very few of them can command the eye for lengths of time. Plus, from a production standpoint, its boring and the camera person can only get so much. Performers out front can be expressed in many ways and with many angles that allow space, breathability and flow. Watch any concert film with a keyboard player and there is only so much they can do - same with drummers. Very few drummer centered and keyboard centered performances for film or tv can hold an audiences attention for any great length unless one is just that enraptured with the artist or that artist is just simply that overwhelming in their magnetism.


Entered at Tue Jul 26 23:54:10 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Screen time

As I say every time this comes up, the eyes (like Scorsese's) may go to Robbie, but Rick isn't on screen much less. Try filming a live band with three seated and two standing, and it's what you're going to end up with.


Entered at Tue Jul 26 23:37:00 CEST 2011 from (99.141.24.26)

Posted by:

Adam

Looks like I'm going again tonight. Such a thrilling experience seeing TLW in theaters.

Robbie's performance throughout the night was truly amazing. One thing worth mentioning is that while he does have the most screen time, in the subsequent footage of The Band officially released (Festival Express, A Musical History), the other members are given much more screen time (which was almost certainly intentional).


Entered at Tue Jul 26 23:29:52 CEST 2011 from (69.124.123.123)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Dan Peek died Saturday. He was one of the 3 founding memebers of America, quit the band in 77. 60 years old.Died at his home in Farmington, Missouri, just about an our south of St Louis.


Entered at Tue Jul 26 22:39:43 CEST 2011 from (70.53.60.108)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: TLW

From concert promoter extraordinaire Bill Graham’s biography:and the chapter on TLW:

“I must say that Robbie and the Band were the greatest house band I ever heard. They played with everybody and switched off on each other’s instruments and musically they were brilliant. With all my tsouris with Robbie Robertson, he was the ultimate conductor-composer and the only guy who could have pulled it off.”

Later in the chapter on a topic that once got the folks here wondering aloud, Robbie notes that The Band called everyone themselves – Levon –Muddy, Robbie-Van, etc. but “The only guy who called anybody else was Emmitt Grogan. He called the poets of San Francisco…..”

The chapter ends with Bill Graham complaining bitterly about the “no crowd shots” edict of Robbie and Marty…….Understandable from a guy who did so much to decorate the hall and feed the people, but the no crowd shots is a major part of what sets TLW apart from other rock show films.

Oh, and we have Bill Graham to thank for standing up to (basically threatenning to kill!) Bob Dylan's management and preventing them from shutting down the camera's during Bob's set.


Entered at Tue Jul 26 20:54:19 CEST 2011 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon L

Location: NYC

Great list, BEG! Love 'Keep Your Distance' covered by Buddy & Julie... hadn't thought of that one in a while.


Entered at Tue Jul 26 20:37:20 CEST 2011 from (41.97.158.130)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

of course


Entered at Tue Jul 26 20:35:59 CEST 2011 from (41.97.158.130)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Hi Sadavid, it's been long

===================

Constantine's musical [ultra] conservatism = Malouf. One of the finest of the genre is the song "Salah Bey", about which I posted lengthily over The GBs. Recall briefly it's an elegy to the Ottoman Governor who rule the city between 1772 and 1792, I did read several book just to begin to enjoy the song, and I eventually reported in The GB. Canonical harmony, underlying of an incredible text whose both contemporary author just signed "An Anonymous Jew". While I've been frustrated by the lack of a quality record by the time I was truly involved, the linked above one would have suited. I just never can get enough of hearing the passage 3:45-4:25

"They were Sultans and Vizirs
They died prior to their enemies
They owned colossal fortunes
That never honored nor protected them
The days alternate between the powerful of a moment
Sole the perseverant among them had enjoyed their condition"

Footnote:
The images chosen for the clip linked above would be definitely the most beautiful slideshow ever done for the city, actually Constantine like if you were in

And definitely, I will never understand how a native of this city could ever be only touched by the idea of emigrating for other lands


Entered at Tue Jul 26 20:01:10 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Many will recall that we had to wait years for a DVD version of TLW. It had been available previously on VHS and laserdisc, but a DVD wasn't available until 2002. Turner cable division owned the broadcast rights for many years and a fine wide-screen version appeared regularly on the TCM network, usually around Thanksgiving. Now we have an abundance of riches, as a remastered HD version with a 5.1 surround sound mix is available on Blu-ray disc. But as Adam recently witnessed, the big screen theatrical experience can't be beat.


Entered at Tue Jul 26 19:17:48 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Woodstock was the first big concert one … I mean big first run cinemas … that I remember. Monterey Pop wasn't widely shown here. Don't Look Back was strictly art houses, but then only art houses in major cities. I remember Gimmie Shelter in a first run place. Mad Dogs? I don't think it was first run here. Maybe I missed it. I had the album.


Entered at Tue Jul 26 19:11:52 CEST 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: circus on screen

This came to town in one of the downtown, first-run, general-release picture palaces. It was an Event in my little universe.

Not unlike TLW in approach.


Entered at Tue Jul 26 18:49:34 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Peter V: I don't know about the distribution figures for "Don't Look Back" compared with the other films I mentioned. I do know that, when it was first shown here in Atlanta, it was in a theatre that specialized in "art" films, rather than Hollywood blockbusters. When "The Last Waltz" premiered here, I saw it in a similiar type of theatre. On its second run, TLW became a favorite at college screening rooms around here.


Entered at Tue Jul 26 18:30:56 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Rock documentary / concert movies

Gimmie Shelter and Let It Be had wide general circulation, while Don't Look Back was so limited that it doesn't count in the same way.


Entered at Tue Jul 26 17:52:26 CEST 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

I thought the tired horses were in the sun?


Entered at Tue Jul 26 17:52:14 CEST 2011 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

PLOCHMANN LANE (facebook)

Web: My link

Our new "facebook" pg as the old one has been archived by "facebook."


Entered at Tue Jul 26 17:47:16 CEST 2011 from (70.53.60.108)

Posted by:

Kevin J

…..and the “Backslash N” would like to thank “All the Tired Horses” for the day off!


Entered at Tue Jul 26 17:19:09 CEST 2011 from (83.249.107.72)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Top 30

All The Tired Horses All The Tired Horses All The Tired Horses All The Tired Horses All The Tired Horses All The Tired Horses All The Tired Horses All The Tired Horses All The Tired Horses All The Tired Horses All The Tired Horses All The Tired Horses All The Tired Horses All The Tired Horses All The Tired Horses All The Tired Horses All The Tired Horses All The Tired Horses All The Tired Horses All The Tired Horses All The Tired Horses All The Tired Horses All The Tired Horses All The Tired Horses All The Tired Horses All The Tired Horses All The Tired Horses All The Tired Horses All The Tired Horses All The Tired Horses All The Tired Horses All The Tired Horses All The Tired Horses All The Tired Horses All The Tired Horses All The Tired Horses All The Tired Horses All The Tired Horses All The Tired Horses All The Tired Horses All The Tired Horses All The Tired Horses All The Tired Horses All The Tired Horses All The Tired Horses All The Tired Horses All The Tired Horses All The Tired Horses

And I mean it, really


Entered at Tue Jul 26 16:57:33 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Elvis was still in the building...

While Elvis became the poster boy for the dangers of the road for Robbie in the interview segment filmed after TLW, the King was still alive at the time Paul Butterfield & The Band performed "Mystery Train" at the concert. However, Elvis was only a shadow, albeit large in girth, of his former self at the time, before his death some 9 months after TLW.

Addressing the point that Adam raised regarding feature-length rockumentaries focusing on one band or performer. For comparison, before TLW, we have D.A. Pennebaker's "Don't Look Back" (Dylan) and the Maysles brothers' "Gimme Shelter" (Rolling Stones), both more in the cinema verite tradition of documentary film. Then of course there's "Let It Be" (Beatles) and "The Song Remains the Same" (Led Zeppelin), released just a month before TLW concert.

Al: I should have my top 30 list narrowed down by next week.


Entered at Tue Jul 26 16:29:31 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: It's Too Late To Stop Now...

...and DP

:-0)


Entered at Tue Jul 26 16:20:56 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Big thanks..

To those who've recently taken the time and trouble to post their top 30's and top 10's. We're past the magical thirty point now ...but it's too late to stop now Todd.

:-0)


Entered at Tue Jul 26 16:18:27 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: The Hum...

...I heard it was from Adam taking off his shoes, Kev

:-0)


Entered at Tue Jul 26 16:00:36 CEST 2011 from (70.53.60.108)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Adam’s review brings back memories of summer of 1978 when my older brother and all his friends had gone to TLW……The buzz was so strong that everyone had to go see the film…..and this continued for months. Remember that this was way before MTV and seeing rock n roll on screen was a treat beyond belief.

and Adam, don’t be so sure you were the biggest Band fan in the theatre……..recall that there was a guy sitting over to your right eating popcorn, wearing a ‘”Dale Tallon Was Framed” t-shirt” and claiming he could still hear the hum from Garth’s organ…..Rumour has it his name was Pat……….


Entered at Tue Jul 26 12:18:52 CEST 2011 from (99.141.24.26)

Posted by:

Adam

Just saw The Last Waltz in the theater in downtown Chicago. It was amazing. Several thoughts come to mind. While we, as die-hard fans, tend to analyze and criticize the film often, the fact is that this film was many folks' introduction to The Band. While it is not perfect, it should be judged based on what it IS. Sure, Richard and Garth have the least amount of screen time. I think the major reason for this may be simply their placement on stage, and not a secret agenda by anyone to omit them. Some songs I truly wish there was more of Garth, but I can understand that the footage may have simply not contained a wealth of Garth material due to his position on stage and the position of the cameras. The same for Richard, though his health and performance on the night is also a major factor. He is featured well on The Shape I'm In, and he comes off with respect and class. As Robbie has said before, to feature more of him may just have made him look bad. Though Robbie has the most screen time, it's pretty accurate to say that it is an accurate documentary of The Band at the time it was filmed. You might say they weren't far away from imploding at the time, and Robbie took control and took the reins of the group, and that is mirrored in his presence in the film.

Whatever problems with the screen time of each member (and admittedly, it could have been more even), I'm sure everyone understands the special feeling of seeing The Band on the big screen. Not being born anywhere close to the original release date, it was a great experience. I never really realized that this was originally a movie released to the theaters. All the problems previously discussed seem a bit more irrelevant when you see how beautiful Scorsese immortalized The Band on film. You're sitting in the audience, hanging out with Robbie and Rick and Richard telling stories, up close with Levon as he shares some late night tales, in an atmospheric studio as Rick pours his heart out on tape. And the beautiful on stage moments. At the close of Garth's "The Shape I'm In" solo comes one of my favorite moments in the entire film: it shows Levon from behind at the drums, and Richard is seen in the distance giving a joyful smile at him, as if to say "I can't believe we're getting away with this", as you see Garth closing his eyes and playing madly with his left hand on his propped-up keyboard at the edge of the frame, and Levon reacts in turn with a joyful smile and fill. It's moments like these, which show the interaction between the musicians and their relationship on stage, that make the film magical.

I felt so proud and excited as the biggest fan of The Band in the theater. It just brought to mind how fortunate we are to have that document. Other great, classic bands of the era - the Dead, Allman Brothers Band - don't have feature length films of the same magnitude dedicated to them. (The Grateful Dead movie is a huge disappointment.) The Band were immortalized forever in Martin Scorsese's classic document.


Entered at Tue Jul 26 11:04:51 CEST 2011 from (41.97.158.130)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: a cute anecdote

Worth posting, a cute anecdote involving my friend Kamel, evoked yesterday.
As the man is a gifted musician who plays all instruments, with predilection for keyboards. Actually a band man by birth.
During a recital, for the next number I had to last minute exchange the guitar for the bass, for the reason that the bassist plays to the perfection the telecaster guitar part of the number in question, that is "Black Magic Woman", Santana's version.
I noticed then subsequently Kamel set his Yamaha keyboard in automatic and went to the drums, that what I thought as just an accompanying measure.
And we played till the last note. …What a chore my friends !
After the number ended, with more and less satisfaction regarding every band member, he looked at me with a visible severity, and said :
"I hope you understand why we had to play two drum parts, the purpose of the second (or the extra) part was only to compensate your pitiful bass playing"


Entered at Tue Jul 26 01:44:12 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

BEG's list … I was waiting for that. I knew it'd be a great one.


Entered at Tue Jul 26 01:01:17 CEST 2011 from (184.149.121.80)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Top 30 Songs (no particular order)

Sweet Jane...Louu Reed with Velvet Underground and Nico and/or Rock and Roll Animal
Tupelo Honey (Van Morrison with Tony Marcus on Violin)
Spanish Stroll...Mink DeVille
Get Up Stand Up...Bob Marley and The Wailers with Peter Tosh
Crimson and Clover... Tommy James and The Shondells
Love Is A Losing Game...Amy Winehouse
Christine (fast or slow tempo)... Garland Jeffreys
You’re A Big Girl Now...Bob Dylan
Love and Happiness... Al Green
I’ll Take You There...The Staple Singers
Someday We’ll Be Together... The Supremes
I’ll Rise...Ben Harper
My Rifle, My Pony and Me...Dean Martin and Rick Nelson
You’re So Vain...Carly Simon
Why... Annie Lennox
The Thrill Is Gone...B.B. King
Slave To Love...Bryan Ferry
Keep Your Distance (cover Richard Thompson)... Buddy and Julie Miller
Foreigner Suite... Cat Stevens
Lost In The Supermarket...The Clash
I’d Rather Go Blind...Etta James
Wang Dang Doodle...Koko Taylor
My Way...Frank Sinatra
Poor Side Of Town...Johnny Rivers
People Got To Be Free...The Rascals
Pardon...Robert Cray
Evergreen...Roy Orbison
Magic Carpet Ride...Steppenwolf
There’s Everybody Else (And Then There’s You)... Steve Forbert
The Pan Within (live)... The Waterboys


Entered at Tue Jul 26 00:54:43 CEST 2011 from (184.149.121.80)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Hi everyone. I'm really bummed out with the news coming from Norway, Amy Winehouse and Canada's NDP leader Jack Layton who will now be sidelined with cancer....again.

Top 10 Band Songs

The Weight
Out Of The Blue
It Makes No Difference
Whispering Pines
Alla Glory
Acadian Driftwood
4% Pantomime
The Shape I’m In
Stage Fright
King Harvest (Has Surely Come)


Entered at Mon Jul 25 23:26:20 CEST 2011 from (70.53.60.108)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Norway - Spalding Gray

I spent some time in Bali 20 years ago and for years afterwards whenever life was getting me down I would always think of those days and that memory of paradise and be comforted in a way - that there was a place that I could always escape to. Then, years later a group of nuts in some perverted misguided allegiance to a religion blew up a nightclub killing 200 people. I still think of the ceremonial life there and the beautiful peaceful people but it is disturbing to have myths shattered.. Now Norway……Spalding Gray once pondered that Pol Pot was the creation of a diet of “bark, bugs and a touch of Rousseau”…………………………One can only imagine how a steady diet of ‘government is bad” “taxes are bad” and “immigration is bad” with wink wink read into it what you will “even the president of the US is an immigrant” bullshit and I guess we should be happy that such incidents are so few and far between. Doesn’t help much but it is a small comfort………..


Entered at Mon Jul 25 19:36:21 CEST 2011 from (67.42.3.239)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Amy Winehouse & Bill Morrissey

Since I heard the bad news I been playing Back To Black pretty nonstop. I know the quality of this record has been told many times but I think I'm finally getting it. She reminds me of Sarah Vaughn at times in the way she can move around the rhythm & beat so well. Big loss.

Just now listening to Bill Morrissey's Handsome Molly - another young gonner now.


Entered at Mon Jul 25 18:42:49 CEST 2011 from (70.53.60.108)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Ari: I largely agree with your take on HTBC……..I do not understand why HDLHNM was the lead-off single when “Straight Down the Line” was the far superior song and would have made a better re-introduction after a 12 year break. Interestingly “Won’t Be Back” also caught my ear at first listen because it screamed out for a Richard Manuel vocal……..still love it but ‘She’s Not Mine” – which I had originally thought the production interfered with – has become a favourite. The album is a great one on long trips in the car because of its various moods and changes of pace ( an element many young bands would do well to take notice of )….....and I love the guitar throughout – even HDLHNM is saved by the clever solo Adam referenced.

“Straight Down the Line” on Jimmy Fallon was hands-down the best Robbie Robertson live performance since 1976. I’m glad I have it recorded as by the time he finishes that memoire he will be 80 and unlikely to still be rockiin!


Entered at Mon Jul 25 17:36:40 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Amy Winehouse

Perhaps too much in the papers on "The 27 Club', and also I think membership requires OD, death from excess-caused illness, or suicide … car crashes (Jesse Belvin) and electrocutions (Les Harvey) don't count.

I thought the touchingly naive statement of the day was the Daily Mail (I was in a waiting room) which said Amy had been working on an album for five years and tracks had continually been rejected but "perhaps now it will see the light of day." Where did "perhaps" come from? The only question the record execs will be asking is next week (slow month for sales but hot on the news), or early September when sales pick up or late November for Christmas?


Entered at Mon Jul 25 17:04:20 CEST 2011 from (69.177.242.99)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: The List

Al Edge, My list is still coming! This week.....

I'm just back from a much needed week of vacation at the beach in Cape Cod, MA where I was basically off of the grid for a while. No music, no television, no phones, no computers, no email, or internet. Just a lot of sand, sun, surf and a couple of Cape Cod Summer League baseball games (the best baseball experience going these days IMHO).

Also read a good chunk of the Suze Rotolo book about her time with Bobby in Greenwich Village in the early 1960's, which I found to be a fairly thoughtful and insightful memoir as far as those things go.


Entered at Mon Jul 25 13:42:08 CEST 2011 from (68.107.194.167)

Posted by:

Calvin

Not to try and oneup the death of Amy Winehouse, but the wonderful folk artist Bill Morrissey also passed this weekend.

If youve never had a chance to listen to his work you should.


Entered at Mon Jul 25 12:41:51 CEST 2011 from (41.97.224.181)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: ... and friends

The short clip in the link above is from a posthumous TV show tribute by the then surviving members of his band and intimate friends of him, so to explain the drama mood of the cut,
they are very bad actors,
they are awesomely gifted good musicians,
two of them are very good friend of mine, opportunity is given in The Band guestbook to express my recognition for Jamel [0:16-0:24], and Kamel [0:49 last picture, the 6th in the row starting from the right] for all what I have learned from them


Entered at Mon Jul 25 12:40:52 CEST 2011 from (41.97.224.181)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: KriKri

To play another musical genre in Constantine is already act of heresy.
In the citadel of prejudice and conservatism, specially musical conservatism incarnated in the classic oriental genre called Malouf,
KriKri, alias Hacen Zouaoui, was the precursor who engaged and his band in the 60's scene in Constantine, the Rock music. More than a challenge, though I haven’t knew these guys at their time, I an sure their quest was just music .
The style was technically inferior to what emerged later in Algeria, as the example of Oran, but he had the merit to keep it present early in the scene without ever reaching fame, he composed and played the kind of genuine Rock that the elite of the GB like, [link above]

On the biographical note, KriKri died a hero in Constantine when he ran by instinct to rescue a man he didn't know who was under the threat of a knife in a fight which was not of his concern, he received the fatal stab wounds instead.

bravery it ain't a planned act, there's no part-time bravery


Entered at Mon Jul 25 05:00:28 CEST 2011 from (69.124.123.123)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Dunc, Rodney, & John

Dunc, Rodney Crowell & John Jorgenson are doing a duo mini tour of Scotland, Oct 9-12. if possible, i strongly suggest you catch this. Crowelll you need no introudction to,,,, you may not be aware of Jorgenson (or Jorgensen), but he is one brilliant guitar player. I used to catch him alot during the first few years of The Desert Rose Band. He's also done long stints with Sir Elton.


Entered at Mon Jul 25 00:44:52 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Rob Fraboni speaking on TLW in Minneapolis. See link (courtesy of Ian W.)

TLW section repeated below:

Jon Bream, interview in "Star Tribune."

Even though engineer/producer Fraboni had worked closely with the Band and Dylan in the 1970s, he went to the Band's 1976 all-star farewell concert as a guest of Clapton. "I helped out Eric. When he was doing his solo in 'Further on Up the Road,' the sound guys were having an argument and his guitar wasn't loud enough in the mix and I just pushed his guitar [volume] up all the way and that caused a surge in the crowd, which kind of amazed me at the time," Fraboni recalled.

At the concert, Robbie Robertson, the Band's leader, asked Fraboni to produce the soundtrack recording. "I spent 18 months doing post-production," he said.

Of course, there were oddities dealing with a cast that included Van Morrison, Joni Mitchell, Neil Diamond and others. For instance, just before going onstage to perform, Dylan signed a release specifying which three of his songs could be used in the movie. "So he didn't let them roll camera on the other songs," Fraboni said.

When reviewing the concert's tapes, Fraboni discovered a hum on all of Garth Hudson's organ tracks. So Hudson transcribed the entire concert and then re-recorded his parts. "But it took him three months to do what he'd done in one night," Fraboni said.


Entered at Sun Jul 24 18:50:57 CEST 2011 from (184.145.71.220)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

For Jan H: I grieve for the people of Norway. My condolences. I wish you strength.


Entered at Sun Jul 24 12:56:15 CEST 2011 from (91.42.246.133)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: there is only one Englishman in the universe

Roger brought me Biffalo Bull who brought me Peter V, who postulated: "That's just me moving around very quickly."

Looks like Richard Feynman’s One-Electron Universe Hypothesis (link). A thought provoking Viney-Feynman One-Englishman (PV-Eman) theory.

The PV-Eman moves backwards and forwards in time with such an elaborate trajectory that at any moment we think we see many of them.

In other words: All Englishmen on Earth, the sun, the Milky Way and all other galaxies are composed of just one Englishman the PV-Eman (and one photon PV-Eman and one neutron PV-Eman too) seen sqillions of times over. This offers a neat explanation as to why all Englishmen appear to be identical.

This will also predict that the universe must be made up of equal amounts of Englishmen and anti-Englishmen.

From now it’s grammatically correct to pluralize Englishman as Englishman. Point noted.


Entered at Sun Jul 24 12:41:16 CEST 2011 from (41.97.172.193)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: Jan : It's just awful

this is a story I vaguely read long ago in the reader's digest, which occured in Munich during the 30's :
An old brave German citizen underwent an unfair corporal punishment because he didn’t respect the orthodoxy of some public ritual of the time. He was of those old people having the bravery of the aged people, that is those whose body is already too failing to fear anything.
So, after bearing the severe corporal punishment, he demanded surprisingly the 2 Gestapo agents to repeat a second punishment on his body, for a more serious offense he once committed, of which they are not aware, and which he will unveil only provided they inflict him the 2nd corporal punishment.
As soon as the 2 agents heard of a worst sin, not wishing to have trouble with their authority, they executed the 2nd punishment, beating the old German and not leaving him a single bone in place.
After he regained consciousness, they asked him to honor his pledge and to confess the capital sin for they punished him the 2nd time.
"for the ballot that I have put for your party in the elections of 1933" the old brave German man answered

the glamorous note of this post, the linked above video is from Dino Risi movie "I Nuovi Monstri 1977", one can appreciate all the majestic and all the details of Ornella Muti at her best
the songs are "Ti Amo" Umberto Tozzi, and "All By Myself" Eric Carmen. There were 2 songs which were very played on the radios by the days I watched TLW. I wish everybody enjoy the clip

the funny note of this post, I like this quote Ijust read on the internet "The two basic causes of memory loss are either a B12 vitamin deficiency, either"


Entered at Sun Jul 24 12:28:33 CEST 2011 from (24.218.200.216)

Posted by:

Tim

Location: Boston
Web: My link

Subject: Rob Fraboni to speak about The Last Waltz, etc

The soundtrack producer of "The Last Waltz" is coming to Minneapolis to introduce the film and talk about Clapton, Dylan and the Band.


Entered at Sun Jul 24 12:16:00 CEST 2011 from (83.249.107.72)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Send all Christian middle-aged middle-class white males in the world to Guantanamo. According to an academic survey 90 per cent of terror attacks are made by this group.


Entered at Sun Jul 24 11:54:10 CEST 2011 from (86.171.100.173)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Cornwall - at the moment

Subject: Welcome Biffalo Bull

You've probably moved on BB - we're about 6 miles south of Cornwall. If you are still in the region I'd recommend the Knee High Theatre Company - grab a local paper and visit their 'Asylum'. 10 miles or so south of Newquay and the summer season has just begun.


Entered at Sun Jul 24 11:37:57 CEST 2011 from (91.42.246.133)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: NYT: Gordon S. Wood, Historian of the American Revolution (link)

"Wood also made another discovery: This revolutionary way of thinking did not derive from small elites or large treatises. He wrote that it was “not delineated in a single book; it was peculiarly the product of a democratic society.” In newspapers and pamphlets he found evidence that Americans of all conditions joined this great debate — men like William Findley, a weaver and farmer in Pennsylvania, and William Thompson, a tavern keeper in South Carolina. "

Enough material for a song, Robbie & Levon....


Entered at Sun Jul 24 09:35:06 CEST 2011 from (59.101.14.222)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Subject: Jan: thoughts are with you

I heard the mayor of Oslo on the radio here. He was understandably devastated. It's just awful. Keep well Jan and it demonstrates extreme fundamental religion is evil.


Entered at Sun Jul 24 02:06:28 CEST 2011 from (99.141.24.143)

Posted by:

Adam

Re: Norway - it's a horrible tragedy and I will never have any words to adequately describe my feelings for those sick, psychotic, evil people who think and act in such horrible ways.

Music will always get me through. Last night I had one of the most beautiful nights of music ever. Storm clouds of warning came into view, and I prepared for the big thunderstorm by planning a night of Garth Hudson solo music. I turned all the lights off, laid back and rested my head, and watched the beautiful lightning and rain storm shine through the windows and onto the pitch-black darkness of my room & walls. I listened to The Sea To The North and Live At The Wolf in their entirety, and they are both complete masterpieces. Truly an unforgettable experience. From now on, any time there is heavy rain and thunderstorms, this will be my new tradition.

Robbie's "How To Become Clairvoyant" is, in my opinion, his most fully-realized and satisfying solo work to date. He Don't Live Here No More is wonderful, and the message behind it is truly haunting for me. I single out his gut string guitar solo as some of his absolute finest playing since The Band ended in 1978. Which is ironic, since many have singled it out as being a solo they really don't like. It's amazingly brilliant. The whole album is so nocturnal, dark and mysterious, much like Garth's solo albums. I love it.


Entered at Sun Jul 24 00:28:26 CEST 2011 from (99.235.255.183)

Posted by:

Serenity

Web: My link

Subject: Jan and Amy

JAN: Glad to hear you are OK. I hope those responsible are punished well for this. My heart goes out to the families in these heartfelt times.

My link is to the article sent to me by People mag.She had been back on drugs, but it is not known if that is what killed her. May she RIP. So sad and so young.

God Bless and keep you all. xoxoxoxo


Entered at Sat Jul 23 23:41:08 CEST 2011 from (95.150.137.247)

Posted by:

Michelle

Location: Ascot

Subject: Amy/Norway

A very sad day, my prayers and thoughts to the people in Norway, and to the family of Amy Winehouse - she was so young, beautiful and talented, same age as Jimi, Janis, Hank and Jim. Bob Marley and Buddy - in a state of shock - I cannot find the proper words to express how I feel tonight, God bless you all,you left this world too soon but what you gave us will last forever.


Entered at Sat Jul 23 20:16:37 CEST 2011 from (91.42.235.239)

Posted by:

Norbert

My heart goes out to the people in Norway.

Just heart Amy Winehous died, the most talented, the most saddest. Loved her voice. RIP little girl, turn into the better now.


Entered at Sat Jul 23 19:41:17 CEST 2011 from (74.101.157.90)

Posted by:

Ari

Kevin, I don't think I said anything in regards to Robbie's album but I do like it. I think He Don't Live Here No More is near unlistenable and I think Straight Down The Line was played infinitely better with the Roots on Jimmy Fallon. I remember hearing a little snippet of Won't Be Back before the album came out and remember saying that that was gonna be THE song. It is. If that song wasn't on the album I don't think the album would feel right. Axman is another favorite as is When The Night Was Young. Won't Be Back is best.


Entered at Sat Jul 23 19:16:49 CEST 2011 from (24.47.42.238)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: NY

Glad you and yours are OK Jan Tom


Entered at Sat Jul 23 17:38:07 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Biffalo Bill, if you drive from Cornwall to the Isle of Wight, and you have time, take the slower route across Dartmoor, rather than round it, then take the slower Southern route through Dorset nearer the coast … both Lyme Regis, and Corfe Castle are worth the detour (much better than Dorchester and Weymouth, for example).

If you ask for the Town Mill Bakery in Lyme Regis, you'll find a unique eating place. You just take what you want and pay at the end … huge bowls of fresh butter and jam along the long rectory tables. Great for breakfast.If you have time, Lulworth Cove in the middle is also worth a stop. Lovely countryside.


Entered at Sat Jul 23 15:33:54 CEST 2011 from (24.105.217.223)

Posted by:

Lil

Jan: Very glad you and your family are all ok. My heart goes out to the families and friends of all those young people killed or injured. What a horrible, senseless tragedy.


Entered at Sat Jul 23 15:21:06 CEST 2011 from (208.120.212.175)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Ditto Jan, glad you and family are OK. Unreal is right... it is too awful. Thinking of your people at this sad time.


Entered at Sat Jul 23 14:14:59 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Relieved to hear you're OK, Jan. We'd have thought Norway was the last place something like this could happen.


Entered at Sat Jul 23 14:12:00 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Several blokes that look like me? That's just me moving around very quickly.


Entered at Sat Jul 23 14:09:51 CEST 2011 from (87.63.249.10)

Posted by:

jh

Subject: Oslo tragedy

Thanks for your concern. We are OK. No reports of relatives or close friends among the 91 killed or the many people hurt. Some friends has a daughter who escaped by swimming away while being shot at. The DJ kid and girlfriend live close to the bomb site, but are also OK. Waiting for the names of the victims to be released, hoping they do not find more dead teenagers around that island.

It feels unreal that this can happen in our little country. Looks like it was only one, or maybe two, psychos from some weird nazi-religious cult behind all this, and that it was planned well. Latest news is that the shooter bought six tons(!) of fertilizer in May, the kind you can turn into explosives. Explains why he could practically blow away several government buildings in Oslo with one blast, I guess. How the hell such a person could get a license for owning machine guns (something that is VERY rare for civilians in Norway) is a mystery, though.

-- Jan H. (in Denmark at the moment)


Entered at Sat Jul 23 11:37:12 CEST 2011 from (89.242.53.244)

Posted by:

biffalo bull

Subject: cloning

having been in the jolly U.K. for a week now, i can only think if possible, an english version of The Band would be altogether splendid, home base being in Derbyshire. you folks have alot of history and beauty not to mention endless cakes, tarts, teas and alehouses. the vintage vw vans are very prevelant here in Newquay, a town bit like Port Dover On. on a lot of steroids. plenty of birds, surfers and seafood here. a few days here in Cornwall then on to the Isle of Wight, i wonder what for, then on to the big smoke for a week or so. fyi, there are several blokes that look like Mr. Viney overhere, pip pip and ta ta


Entered at Sat Jul 23 05:28:30 CEST 2011 from (99.235.255.183)

Posted by:

Serenity

Web: My link

Subject: George Harrison

Hi guys!! Been awhile,but the posts are wonderful to read as usual.

LINK: Marty Scorsese's new film of George Harrison.

JAN: Hope you are safe. PLEASE let us know? What a terrible tragedy to have happened to your beautiful country.

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxoxo

Take care and God Bless you all.



Entered at Sat Jul 23 04:41:52 CEST 2011 from (99.141.24.143)

Posted by:

Adam

Of course, Pat. I also hope Jan is safe over there in Norway.


Entered at Sat Jul 23 03:19:50 CEST 2011 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

Adam, RR is singing on it too.


Entered at Sat Jul 23 02:04:44 CEST 2011 from (75.72.126.40)

Posted by:

Dave Z

Hey Jan, hope you and yours are OK, and nobody you know has been hurt by the bombing in Norway...


Entered at Sat Jul 23 01:15:56 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Well, Adam, some of us are older and wiser. But most of us are just older.


Entered at Sat Jul 23 00:50:08 CEST 2011 from (99.141.24.143)

Posted by:

Adam

Kevin - hilarious post! last night was a doozy, for sure. i might even still have a bit of buzz going on over here. i stand by my statement though - love everyone in the GB!

"Ain't No More Cane" strikes me as being one of the greatest things The Band ever did. Levon once said how that song was when they really took ahold of the harmonies and started creating their signature vocal blend. I just love it. I tried singing it with my musician friend, whose favorite group is the Grateful Dead (and whose approach to making music is to "hit the ground running", much to my annoyance.) I told him "No, no... it's like this. That lead vocal melody - Levon's strong, simply root melody - is the foundation for the whole vocal blend. Then Richard Manuel goes up top in his falsetto harmony, sometimes doubling what Levon sings and adding the velvet falsetto harmony to the top of the mix. Then Rick Danko comes in and ties it all together, singing much fewer notes than Levon's melody - but adding that high lonesome sound, that harmonic tension that sounds so beautiful." The song can now very much be considered MY first understanding of how to create harmonies.


Entered at Sat Jul 23 00:27:52 CEST 2011 from (70.50.67.173)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Adam

This just in: Adam woke up counted 22 beer cans in the room, noted the splitting headache and decided to never listen to “Ain’t No More Cane” again……..He has also reconsidered and notes that he loves everyone at the GB except West and North Westcoaster…………………………..as to “legendary” - Wembley and Watkins Glen is nothing………seeing Rick Danko in a town you don’t know at a bar/hotel/tavern/dive on a Tuesday night minus 20 below Zero by yourself with a crowd not too big and seemingly not too Band appreciating and having that night turn out to be one for the ages is the stuff that “legendary” is all about.


Entered at Fri Jul 22 22:54:35 CEST 2011 from (83.30.171.179)

Posted by:

noclegi nad morzem

Web: My link

good site


Entered at Fri Jul 22 21:40:40 CEST 2011 from (24.44.103.67)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Hope all is well Jan..,


Entered at Fri Jul 22 21:05:41 CEST 2011 from (198.228.196.35)

Posted by:

Tom Moretti

Location: Woodstock

Prayers and thoughts to Jan and his family and friends in Norway. Peace from Woodstock. - TM


Entered at Fri Jul 22 21:02:25 CEST 2011 from (108.41.170.6)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Jan H

Are you OK? I heard the terrible news.


Entered at Fri Jul 22 20:58:07 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Pat B: One of the reasons for my reference to "The Big Book of Civil War Heroes" last week was that one of my own childhood books was volume 1 (i.e., the free introductory volume) of something like "The Golden Treasury of Knowledge", which had several pages on Robert E. Lee - complete with comicbook-like illustrations. All I recall is a reference to West Point and a description (with comicbook-like illustration) of the great man leading his charges across a dangerous lavafield at night. Very exciting to the eight-year-old me - and way better than those gory Civil War bubblegum cards. Also, have you ever come across the name Andrew Lucas, an African-American officer who moved to Brantford Ontario after the war; among his descendants was noted jazz bassist Al Lucas, whose son Eugene Smith sang regularly with our guys in the '60s.


Entered at Fri Jul 22 19:54:30 CEST 2011 from (68.164.5.12)

Posted by:

Pat B

Yes, David P, an unforgettable moment when Ted Turner grimaced, clutched his breast, and gave up the spirit. Of course, in the Civil War when you actually got shot, you generally reeled as though you got hit with a baseball bat only worse. btw, I was just informed that the Heat-Humidity Index at Manassas is 120 today.


Entered at Fri Jul 22 19:33:19 CEST 2011 from (70.28.32.74)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

Also too excited to edit my previous post.


Entered at Fri Jul 22 19:22:14 CEST 2011 from (70.28.32.74)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

Thanks for the shout-out Bill but no suggestions of burning as it is Opening Day of Saratoga's racing season. I am leaving shortly for there and am in goosd spirits. If I get hammered at the windows, Perhaps I shall be in a burning kind of mood.

Alors, behave in my absence. Bill and Jersey Girl (Hello!)hold my proxy.


Entered at Fri Jul 22 18:38:56 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Bill M: The later Patton was born in California, but was the third generation of the family to attend the Virginia Military Institute. That tie to the Southern past, however, lasted only a year, as he transferred to West Point.

Speaking of re-enactment -- the maverick media mogul Ted Turner portrayed Waller Tazewell Patton in both Turner films, "Gettysburg" and "Gods and Generals".


Entered at Fri Jul 22 18:23:55 CEST 2011 from (68.164.5.12)

Posted by:

Pat B

Yesterday was the 150th Anniversary of the Battle of First Bull Run/First Manassas, the first major battle of the Civil War. A production I'm involved with has a 3D film crew at the reenactment of the battle very near the actual field in Virginia. Close to 10,000 reenactors are scheduled to be there. Should be interesting.

Now, Adam, if I could only reenact Watkins Glen...I will say that it was exhilarating to see them that weekend as the sense of something big permeated the whole site. And I did love the performance (I was in every sense psychedelic for most of the time) but the two times I saw them before that were far more impactful as musical experiences, and the Dylan/Band show--the first of that tour--felt like history.


Entered at Fri Jul 22 17:53:32 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronno (nee York)

David P: Seems like Patton chose to define himself as an American rather than a Southerner - a well-established and totally understandable exercise in reframing. By the way, there was a little item in the news here in the past week to the effect that our federal government will be sponsoring only muted celebration of the upcoming bicentenary of the War of 1812 so as not to flame anti-Americanism. Wonder what yours will do. (Landmark will suggest that Pat B reenact the burning of York, but he's a Montrealer so has to think that way.)


Entered at Fri Jul 22 17:24:04 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: You can't raise a Caine back up when he's in defeat...

I was watching an episode of Ken Burns' "The Civil War" last night. As Pat B mentioned recently, the great writer/historian Shelby Foote was fond of The Band's TNTDODD. In this particular episode, "War Is Hell", Mr. Foote remarked:

"As a Southerner I would say one of the main importances of the war is that Southerners have a sense of defeat, which none of the rest of the country has. You see in the movie "Patton", the actor who plays Patton saying, 'We Americans have never lost a war.' That's a rather amazing statement for him to make as Patton because Patton's grandfather was in Lee's army of Northern Virginia and he certainly lost a war."

Patton's grandfather George Smith Patton was killed at the Battle of Winchester in 1864. His great-uncle Waller Tazewell Patton, who also fought with Gen. Lee, died 148 years ago yesterday as the result of wounds suffered earlier, leading a charge on Cemetary Ridge at Gettysburg. Four other Patton brothers were also officers in the Confederate Army.

Was Gen. George S. Patton Jr. haunted by the legacy of his grandfather and great-uncles and can this explain why, as a commander, defeat was not an option? This is what the real Gen. Patton said in a pep-talk to his troops on May 17, 1944:

"Men, this stuff some sources sling around about America wanting to stay out of the war and not wanting to fight is a lot of baloney! Americans love to fight, traditionally. All real Americans love the sting and clash of battle. America loves a winner. America will not tolerate a loser. Americans despise a coward; Americans play to win. That's why America has never lost and will never lose a war."


Entered at Fri Jul 22 17:05:32 CEST 2011 from (69.124.123.123)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Not to detract anything at all from Garth...I;ve been singing his praises here since my first post. What Garth hears & plays is what makes him unique, the assortment of sounds and times, melodies, types of music, where he insertshis sounds, a gazillion things. Playng different parts that will work togeter is not unusual. This is somethng many musicians do.. Think about records were the artist played every instrument... think about the great composers, writing all those parts...Garth is a geniusified composer.


Entered at Fri Jul 22 15:35:09 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Wolverton Montagne

Glenn T: Nice list. I think the closest thing we came to an overlap was "Somewhere Over The Rainbow", though I listed Israel Kame-whatever's version.

Looking at Empty's photos of Paris, I was struck by the name Christian Clavier on a marquee. Couldn't help but think of ol' Clifton Clowers, whose idea of an antidote for what plagued him (notably would-be suitors of his daughter) was a 12-gauge.

Adam: Watch the language. Saying stuff like "Garth fucking Hudson" with Al E around is bound to get his neck out of joint.


Entered at Fri Jul 22 15:06:47 CEST 2011 from (12.29.151.162)

Posted by:

glenn t

Subject: caravan

glad you enjoyed the list peter. i love the original from "moondance" and the "last waltz" version...both better than from "too late to stop now" i feel. for my list, it's the original. not sure what it is about the song but i can listen over and over and over.

i certainly could have chosen to have more songs by van, or bob, or the band, but wanted to spread things around a bit...it's a real challenge to pick just 30.


Entered at Fri Jul 22 12:09:56 CEST 2011 from (41.97.252.188)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: Lars just posted the post of the Millennium

The music I like follows the mood of the moment -- link above -- surprise?


Entered at Fri Jul 22 12:07:40 CEST 2011 from (41.97.252.188)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: Soon 33 years to the day, for Adam

after my odyssey in Peru that I reported in a sort of travelogue mixed with an ode for Robby (see in this site The Band Guestbook archives, June 2003, Subject: Essentially Football. …If I had to self-mark, that post is my best ever)

I was a Rock lover, I was a moviegoer, for a few days I was in Paris, France. My key topic in the news was the death of Pope Paul VI. I used it as a mnemonic trick to recall the day I watched The Last Waltz, if not exactly the day of His Holiness passing (Aug 6 1978), it was around.

Other mark of significance that I once interpreted as a Hollywood trendy marketing strategy, there were not less than 5 Rock related movies (of equal importance ?) screened in the theaters of Paris : Saturday Night Fever, Exodus77 Bob Marley, one of the films of The Who, American Graffiti…. …het is geen gemakkelijk!

It was Paris Les Champs-Elysees by night, there was a huge poster in front of cine Gaumont Ambassade (the angle on the 3rd picture in the link above, but under the neon-lights) TLW poster surprised my eye, the name Scorsese who retained my attention before in Taxi Driver, I was listening for weeks TLW vinyl triple album, I don’t have to undergo a queue

The fanciest cinema in France, where are traditionally screened the first venues of the best movies. The kind of theaters the ticket costs four times the average price.

33 years, including The Band and other music already discussed elsewhere, one artifices imagination to keep the barrack turning on.

Given my resume, I believe my daily partaking in The GB is rather due to the unique convivial ambiance created by Jan, he is the one who must be praised the more

Adam : You are the perfect candidate to keep the spell on


Entered at Fri Jul 22 12:05:51 CEST 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Top 10 Band songs

In no particular order. Twilight,whispering pines,it makes no difference,tntdodd,king harvest,Ophelia,unfaithful servant,the weight,rag mama rag,we Walcott,stagefright


Entered at Fri Jul 22 10:46:21 CEST 2011 from (99.141.24.143)

Posted by:

Adam

Another night, another beer (MANY more beers than last night), another post. We'll see how it goes.

I am left speechless by The Band. I just listened to the Woodstock 1969 version of "Ain't No More Cane On The Brazos" about 100 times in a row, and I can't get enough of it. The vocal harmony blend is the most amazing thing I've ever heard in my life. Rick Danko's high harmony is the work of God. To think that they felt that performance was sub-par. It's criminal that it hasn't been officially released to this date. I remember Robbie commented in Rolling Stone a couple years ago for the 40th anniversary that they played a set of "slow, haunting mountain music." That's exactly what they did. It's amazingly brilliant. For ANY other band, that performance would be the performance of a lifetime. For The Band, it was sub-par.

I can't believe the experiences some of you have had. Pat B was at Watkins Glen 1973? Peter V was at Wembley 1974? Seriously, you guys are legendary. I am so thankful that I've seen Levon (5 times!) and Garth live in concert. Garth fucking Hudson. Please excuse the language, but seriously. Have you guys ever listened to The Band and just thought, "Seriously, where the FUCK did this guy come from?" Especially Garth and Richard Manuel. And also every single one of them. I just wish I could have met Richard in some small bar, and tell him personally how much his music changed my life. Maybe things would have ended up differently for him if more people did that.

To have been in the presence of Garth Hudson was a complete honor. He even responded to a Facebook post I made on his page. I will do anything to attend the next live gig Garth plays.

Some may or may not remember, but on my recent trip to see Garth in NYC, I visited the Bethel Woods Museum. I stood 20 feet away from the spot where The Band performed at Woodstock 1969. I told my friend who traveled with me: "My vision of heaven, is to lay in this field, and watch the 1969 version of The Band play their hearts out in live performance." It was simply stunning. Bill Scheele's photos of Watkins Glen, Roosevelt Stadium, and Tour '74 were amazing.

Pat B was at Watkins Glen 1973. The 38th anniversary will be next week. Are you fucking kidding me? Legendary. I would literally cut off a toe to attend The Band's set at Watkins Glen. Pat, please share your memories of the event and the amazing experience of seeing The Band at a very unique time in their history.

Everyone hear loves The Band. I love all of you as well, and I toast every member of The Band GB tonight.


Entered at Fri Jul 22 09:09:42 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Enjoyed that list, Glenn. Which "Caravan" though? The original or the TLW? That's another conundrum.


Entered at Fri Jul 22 09:00:31 CEST 2011 from (198.36.218.33)

Posted by:

Jerry

Subject: Top Ten Band Songs

Sorry for being so tardy Al...I'll have to figure out a top 30 real soon...

To Kingdom Come...Lonesome Suzie...This Wheels on Fire...When You Awake...King Harvest (Has Surley Come)...Whispering Pines...The Weight...WS Walcott Medicine Show...It Makes No Difference...Up On Cripple Creek...


Entered at Fri Jul 22 05:36:53 CEST 2011 from (198.228.209.41)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: American Girl by Tom Petty

This is Michelle Bachman's theme song - can you imagine that gasbag Christian extremist panting to her gay (recovered) husband: "take it easy baby make it last all night!!"


Entered at Fri Jul 22 04:13:45 CEST 2011 from (75.72.126.40)

Posted by:

Zzzz

Thanks for the Garth story from Jimmie, Lars...


Entered at Fri Jul 22 03:06:03 CEST 2011 from (74.118.207.167)

Posted by:

glenn t

Subject: top THIRTY

Okay Al...here 'tis (thanks for your patience -- hope you're happier now).

in alpha order; would no doubt be different tomorrow, and the next day, etc.

American Girl – Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers

Bella Maria De Mi Alma – Los Lobos

Blind Willie McTell – Bob Dylan

Burning Down The House – Talking Heads

Can’t You Hear Me Knockin’ – Rolling Stones

Caravan – Van Morrison

Cinnamon Girl – Neil Young

Don’t Know Why (I Love You) – Jackson Five

Fields Of Gray – Bruce Hornsby

Freedom Rider – Traffic

Gimme Some Lovin’ – Spencer Davis Group

Have I Told You Lately – Van Morrison

Horse To The Water – Sam Brown (at the Concert For George)

If I Fell – Beatles

If You See Her, Say Hello – Bob Dylan

Kathy’s Song – Simon & Garfunkel (live version on Greatest Hits)

King Harvest (Has Surely Come) – The Band

On The Way Home – Buffalo Springfield

One Tree Hill – U2

Over The Rainbow – Eva Cassidy

Respect – Aretha Franklin (love it by Otis too)

Signed, Sealed, Delivered – Stevie Wonder

Sunlight – Youngbloods (live version from Ride The Wind)

The Fever – Southside Johnny & The Asbury Jukes

Thunder Road – Bruce Springsteen (Live In London, 1975)

Town Called Heartbreak – Patti Scialfa (yes, indeed)

Try A Little Tenderness – Otis Redding (live at Monterey Pop)

Waiting In Vain – Annie Lennox

Whispering Pines – The Band (should be in my Band top 10)

You’re The One – Yoko Ono (get over it!)



Entered at Fri Jul 22 02:29:50 CEST 2011 from (64.12.116.204)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: ? Spotify

As BMI member, I was offered a free memebrship to spotify. Somehow i think most people get free memberships, I don't know. So it's probabyl no big deal.But I am wondering, do i want to have a membership in spotify? Are there any advantages , disadavntages? Any one who has anything even slightly enlightening to say, I'm interested. Rememebr, I dontl listen tomusic oin a ipad, iPhone, Mp3 player, and very infrequently on the computer even.


Entered at Fri Jul 22 00:14:57 CEST 2011 from (64.12.116.204)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0)

The story Lars told..... Garth does work that way, he hears it ahead of time in his head, knows how to break up his parts so he can play them one at a time and they work out later. The story also is telling about Jimmy.He had worked with Garth before ( alot) and knew, but aside from that, Jimmy is a good person to have at any recording session. He can be excellent at hearing and editing, and at listening to what people have to say and doing something with it. Garth is a genius. Eppard is one exceptionally talented son of a gun. Not for the faint of heart to hang or work with, but a helluva guy. And know hia way aorund a studio.


Entered at Thu Jul 21 21:46:10 CEST 2011 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon L

Location: NYC

Subject: Re: Beatles fantasy

Good stuff, Bayou Sam! I like your rationales (and the alternating lead vocals) for the setlist. It's also intriguing to think that the Beatles were recording Abbey Road in the summer of '69, so that might have been well represented in the set... but on the other hand, any rehearsal time for a concert likely would have been minimal, perhaps limiting their setlist to whatever they could pull off on the fly. (I would try my hand at this too, but I'm in the hole with these lists already.) ;)


Entered at Thu Jul 21 21:23:58 CEST 2011 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

THE BAND (facebook)

Web: My link

Rick, Levon & Garth join Roger Waters for the big "The Wall" concert in Berlin 21-yrs ago today.


Entered at Thu Jul 21 21:08:37 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Beatles fantasy

Sam, what about that very rapid fire medley of I Saw Her Standing There / From Me To You / Boys / Twist & Shout / You Can’t Do That? Only three minutes 08 seconds for the lot and very tongue in cheek. Did you get stoned and miss it? It brought the crowd to their feet … then they rolled right into Revolution.


Entered at Thu Jul 21 21:03:59 CEST 2011 from (108.41.170.6)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Adam

How wonderful to look at the world through "new" eyes.I love your enthusiasm.

Lars. great story about Garth. He is a genius.


Entered at Thu Jul 21 19:35:32 CEST 2011 from (24.47.42.238)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: NY

Subject: Beatles fantasy

Hi folks. I see you have another "list" thing going on, but I'm gonna roll in and throw another one at you. It's the Beatles, and not the Band - sorry. But what the hell, there are plenty of Beedle-peeple in here. I'd be interested in seeing what some of the GB minds would come up with here.

Someone on another music board asked us to come up with a set-list that the Beatles might have done if they'd played the Woodstock Concert. As I thought about it I found it fun to imagine. I'd love to read what you think, and what your version would look like.

Here's what I posted:

OK, here’s the set I’ve come up with. This was fun. I really went into fantasy land with this thing.

My mindset was that they agreed that this would be a cool outlet for the live show idea that Macca had been pushing for. They agree to do a fairly simple set so it would not require a lot of lengthy rehearsing. They also steered clear of the big production tunes like, “A Day In The Life”. They knew it was a hastily built stage in the country and the equipment should be minimal. John kept Yoko close, but not part of the show. George resisted any thoughts of Sitar music. They all felt pretty good about playing some rock and roll onstage. The rooftop show left them wanting to do a bit more of an organized set. John and Paul were also kind if intrigued by all that George told them about the whole Dylan/Band/Woodstock experience.

They didn’t want to do any mop-top stuff. They could have an electric piano, so “Hey Jude was in. It had recently been a huge hit and was a given. They also wanted to get some real flower-power stuff in the set. John threw most of his energy into pulling of “Strawberry Field Forever” live. “Penny Lane” was out because it needed the trumpet and they weren’t going to drag someone there for one song. Paul went with the catchy, “Hello Goodbye” instead.

George stayed away from “While My Guitar Gently Weeps”, simply because he wasn’t going to come close to Clapton’s solo. Besides, he had his great “Abbey Road” songs that would be just fine.

Ringo sang two songs for the first time in a Beatles show. They did, “With A Little Help From My Friends” because it’s their song and who cares if Joe Cocker did it 24 hours earlier (do you think any of the hippies remembered?). The arrangements are so different anyway. He also did, “Yellow Sub” which the assembled hipsters loved, and all sang the chorus of.

They did a rousing “Hey Jude” with the whole crowd singing the coda. It was one of the most amazing moments of the entire three days. After it was over, only a band like the Beatles could top it.

To finish they did a stripped down version of “All You Need is Love”. No horn intro. John stepped to the mic with his acoustic guitar. He looked at the others and counted, “one, two, three, four”………then he, Paul, and George came in singing, “love, love, love…….”. The place went mad. This was the whole Woodstock message in a song. The crown sang,” love is all you need” for five full minutes at the end.

BTW – John used his Epiphone Casino for the whole show, George used his Day-Glo Strat and his Rosewood Tele, Paul used his Rickenbacker, and Ringo had the bass drum head from Magical Mystery Tour on the drum.

After the set the band was thrilled. John looked happier than ever. Paul was filled with satisfaction at getting this to happen. George cracked a smile. Ringo was blowing kisses to the crowd. Just as a little nod the “old days”, they did the famous bow.

After the show John grabbed Yoko and set about getting the hell out of there. Paul got into discussions with the Woodstock organizers about how they set the thing up. George found his way to where The Band was hanging out – and Ringo found Keith Moon and proceeded to get hammered.

SET LIST:

Sgt Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band

With A Little Help From My Friends

Yer Blues

Back in the USSR

Something

Revolution

Hello Goodbye

Strawberry Fields Forever

Here Comes The Sun

Yellow Submarine

Come Together

Hey Jude

All You Need is Love


Entered at Thu Jul 21 19:22:39 CEST 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: The dried out woods of NY

Subject: Garth

Jimmy Eppard told me a story about Garth a few years ago. The trouble is that Jimmy doesn't like people sitting at his table and then running home and writing in the internet about what he said....but I think he'd forgive me this one time, because I think it's a story that needs to be told. I just hope I don't screw it up too badly; I don't want the Crow pissed off at me.

The way I remember it Garth was hired to play some music with a bunch of pretty good musicians. The engineer wanted to record it during a four day period. They were "stacking " the music. At the end of the first day everything was fine except Garth played something entirely different from what was called for. Same thing on the second, third, and fourth day. The engineer was listening to Garth's fourth session and it was something that didn't even make sense. Eppard happened to walk in the control room and he listened to the engineer's whining. Jimmy thought about it and asked, "Have you tried playing all four of Garth's tracks...bringing them up together to see what happens?"

He moved up all four tracks into the mix. It all fit. And it was magic. Apparently Garth had split the music up in his head and only his brain could follow how it all would fit together in the end. It was like he was playing his organ in another dimension. It's hard to tell what Garth is doing at times, but maybe that's because he's considered by many to be a genius.


Entered at Thu Jul 21 19:18:19 CEST 2011 from (24.44.103.67)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Subject: List of 30

I have made a Top 30 list. I've knocking around songs here and there - jotting a few down every now and then. Certainly not definitive as I tried to keep one song/one artist, though I defied that once. Enjoy

My Sweet Lord – George Harrison
Maybe I’m Amazed – Paul McCartny
Close to the Edge – Yes
Amen – Kid Rock
Bad – U2
Sweetheart Like You – Dylan
Thank You – Alanis Morrisette
Bartender – Dave Matthews
You & Me – Dave Matthews
The Living Years - Mike and the Mechanics
The Rain Song – Zeppelin
Cats in the Cradle – Harry Chapin
Shine on You Crazy Diamond – Pink Floyd
Street Corner Symphony – Rob Thomas
Hurricane Season – Trombone Shorty
Lonely Ol Nights – John Mellencamp
Spirit of 76 – The Alarm
Hallelujah – Rufus Wainwright
Texas, Indiana – Vic Dela Pella
Thorn in My Pride – Black Crowes
ThunderStruck – AC/DC
Stranglehold – Ted Nugent
Riverside – Ollabelle
Girl Friend – Matthew Sweet
Folsom Prison Blues – Johnny Cash
Smile – Uncle Kracker
Couldn’t Stand the Weather –Stevie Ray Vaughn
Low Spark of the High Heel Boys - Traffic
Can’t Find My Home – Blind Faith
Forgotten Years – Midnight Oil


Entered at Thu Jul 21 17:33:48 CEST 2011 from (68.164.5.79)

Posted by:

Pat B

Just google "Garth Hudson narcolepsy".


Entered at Thu Jul 21 16:45:09 CEST 2011 from (99.91.225.26)

Posted by:

Dee

Bill M.

Would like to make a bunch of lists but now your post is sending me to the CD player to locate and play my Tom Lehrer collection. (Have the vinyl set too!)


Entered at Thu Jul 21 16:31:56 CEST 2011 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon L

Location: NYC

Subject: Lists

Working on them as time allows, Al. Have some feckin' faith already. :)


Entered at Thu Jul 21 15:58:38 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Every Grain of Salt

As a hired gun, Todd Rundgren's role for "Stage Fright" was that of an engineer, not a producer. It should be noted that, at the time, he was still learning the ropes in working on the other side of the board in the employ of other artists. Is it any wonder that some members of The Band might have viewed him as a young whipper snapper, who should have been seen only with his hands at the faders and not heard.


Entered at Thu Jul 21 15:40:21 CEST 2011 from (59.101.14.222)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Subject: Thought I'd done this...

1) the weight

2) king harvest

3) up on cripple creek

4) shape I'm in

5) jawbone

6) rockin' chair

7) rag mama rag

9) life is a carnival

10) get up Jake

Subject to change and order not permanent


Entered at Thu Jul 21 15:04:44 CEST 2011 from (64.12.116.204)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Cowboy Breakfast

AN OLD COWBOY FROM SOUTH TEXAS COUNSELED HIS GRANDSON THAT IF HE WANTED TO LIVE A LONG LIFE, THE SECRET WAS TO SPRINKLE A PINCH OF GUN POWDER ON HIS OATMEAL EVERY MORNING.

THE GRANDSON DID THIS RELIGIOUSLY TO THE AGE OF 103 WHEN HE DIED. HE LEFT BEHIND 14 CHILDREN, 30 GRANDCHILDREN, 45 GREAT-GRANDCHILDREN, 25 GREAT-GREAT-GRANDCHILDREN, AND A 15-FOOT HOLE WHERE THE CREMATORIUM USED TO BE.


Entered at Thu Jul 21 14:17:50 CEST 2011 from (69.124.123.123)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

I don't know about that comment of Rundgren's about Garth having narcolepsy. People may fall asleep because they are tired....... Put me in a car, if I'm not driving, chances are I fall asleep during the drive. Whe I'm overworked & / or haven't slept enough,, put me in a movie theater or in front of a tv screen, I'm out cold within minutes.... I've spent a few long stretches with Garth, never saw him fall asleep. I have friends who have worked with Garth over yyears, I never heard anyone speak about Garth falling asleep or having narcolepsy.


Entered at Thu Jul 21 13:36:55 CEST 2011 from (41.97.151.209)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Location: error
Web: My link

Wolf 1868


Entered at Thu Jul 21 13:29:51 CEST 2011 from (41.97.151.209)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Adam : great post and link, interesting about "narcolepsy" . is it joke or serious…

btw, I am annoyed these days with persisting afternoon's insomnia

Those cafes in downtown nowadays are uncomfortably crowded with the bad manners which are mass adopted as soon as a [post-colonial / third-world] place becomes excessively crowded, as for instance the quasi-rule to leave your seat once you finish your consumption, and what I dislike the more, the guy who asks you to share your table as an indirect invitation to leave him the place.

I was sitting with a friend who is a journalist, that means somebody supposed to catch the meanings of nuances, drinking and discussing of this and that. Then two of my age or maybe older asked me if they can share the table, I replied firmly that it would disturb us our talk requires discretion, being ready to use any mean if they insist, they received the message and went their way. Less than five minutes later, a group of youngsters in their twenties come and reenact the same demand, and then at the surprise of my friend journalist I rather showed a big smile and invited them to take the seats and the whole table arguing that we have finished the consumption. Soon my journalist friend asked "why did you chance a serious incident for a table that you soon let to different [young] persons"
My reply was already prepared, rather on the tone of enlightenment than justification : "I didn't yield them the table, I yield them the morning". … until today I'm not sure if he truly understood, the journalist, it's all about…

…A TIME ONE PLACE IS OCCUPIED BY A TEMPORARY PERSON, ONLY THOSE WHO MANAGED TO KEEP IT NICE ARE WORTH THE SCREENPLAY

"it" applies indifferently on time or on place or on both…On a completely different chapter, Mr Wolf (I will do some private investigations for his first name) is the man who succeeded the challenge to install the first brewery in the homeland of wine in 1968. He is from Alsace, he moved following the Alsatians exodus around the Franco-Prussian war of 1870. I am posting at 500 yards distance from the historic Wolf brewery)


Entered at Thu Jul 21 12:34:22 CEST 2011 from (95.150.138.170)

Posted by:

Michelle

Location: Ascot

Subject: The Band/ Bob in Bournemouth

That post was great Adam, you are probably younger than most of us here and its great to know that there is a new generation of Band fans, you are right, as a sum lot, the greatest band there has ever been or will be! I have tickets to Bob Dylan at Bournemouth! my son purchased them for my birthday, was supposed to be a surprise but he had to tell me in case I booked some more. Schools break up today, hurrah! no more packed lunches, smelly rugby/football kits to wash and shoes to polish on a Sunday evening. Off to Jamaica for ten days so look forward to catching up when we get back, have a great summer everyone!


Entered at Thu Jul 21 12:17:31 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Just when you thought it was safe...

Right then you fuckin horrible lot.

:-0)

The following have very kindly taken the time and effort to submit both a Top 10 Finest Band list and a top 30 favourite list - PV, Empty, Rob, Kevin, Bob W, Landmark, Bill M, Dunc, Sadavid, Pat B, JQ, Lars, Fred, Michelle, Westie, SM, Joe J, Mike C, Simon, Roger, Al Edge,

The following have very kindly taken the time and effort to submit a Top 30 list but so far no BAND top 10 finest - Bob F, Dlew

The following have very kindly taken the time and effort to submit a Top 10 Finest Band list but so far no Top 30 list - Joan, Todd, BrienSz, Glenn T

David P has very kindly taken the time and effort to be on with both his lists. We await Dave’s lists with genuine baited breath

The following have either not very kindly taken the time and effort to submit a list or have not the slightest fuckin intention of so doing – Serenity, Jeff A, Adam, BEG, Jed, Jerry, Carmen, Janie, Ari, Jon Lyness, John D, Charlie Y, Mike Hay, Peter M, Luke, Dee, NWCoaster, DaveH, Biffalo Bull, Bonk, Tim, Mike &Kim RayG, Jan H

If all those who have so far submitted just a single list could possibly do the list they haven’t so far done, and also assuming DP does both his, it would mean we’d have 28 complete submissions.

Now WOULDN’T IT BE NICE if just two of the miserable feckers who so far haven’t submitted any list could stir their miserable asses do so since then we’d then have a beautiful round even thirty. Wheeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee

So come on yer miserable bastards. Just as if you’ve got fuck all else better to do. Who you trying to feckin kid eh?

Yer can’t kid a kidder.

PS - the reason for the ever so feckin polite prompt is the grandkids are away for a week so whilst I'll miss their gorgeous little hides like crazy I'm finally going to have some time to do the collating.


Entered at Thu Jul 21 11:53:30 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Nice post that Adam

Love a spot of genune passion.


Entered at Thu Jul 21 10:04:28 CEST 2011 from (99.141.24.143)

Posted by:

Adam

Hallelujah, Peter V! In terms of more Band archival releases, I think we can expect "Royal Albert Hall 1971" by 2013 at least. I asked about the release on Robbie's facebook page, and the moderator informed me that fall 2012 would be the earliest release date at this point.

I too am waiting anxiously for the Hawks box set. I believe the last mention of it was in that Clash Magazine interview with Garth a couple years ago. Garth & Maud insisted that it will be released, and that the long delay is due to more material being compiled. That can only be a good thing I suppose. Though the wait is becoming almost unbearable, I must have faith in Garth and trust that he would not spend years on a project only to have it remain unreleased. We'll have to wait, but I have faith we'll see it eventually.


Entered at Thu Jul 21 09:51:05 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Amen, Adam. I hope we’ll see some remastered live material from the original quintet, but I doubt there are many unearthed gems beyond what’s on a Musical History. They must have film of the whole Wembley set. There are some good shows that deserve cleaning up.

That mega-CD Hawks “From Bacon Fat to Judgment Day” project seems to have stalled. Does anyone know anything on that?


Entered at Thu Jul 21 09:06:08 CEST 2011 from (99.141.24.143)

Posted by:

Adam

Subject: Thoughts on The Band

Slow night here in the GB. Well folks, here's what's on my mind.

Many of you listen to lots of other music. I too am interested in many other bands and musicians. They are almost exclusively Band related. I can't really help it. The Band is the greatest band of all time.

They are just an endless source of inspiration and enjoyment for me. I would be happy listening to only The Band for the rest of my life. We all come here to post, and obviously one thing connects all of us: our interest in The Band's music. Other people just don't know. They have casual fans, people that think they're cool, but let's be serious here. The Band was the greatest band of all time.

While I enjoy and even love many of the solo recordings by Band members, there is simply no substitution for the original quintet of The Band. Studio albums, live albums, archival releases, DVD releases. I only hope we can see more unearthed gems in the future. I'm 22 years old. The thought of what may be released by the time I'm 50 or 60 years old makes me unbelievably happy with joy.

It's amazing to think of the standard The Band set for themselves. Thinking their Woodstock 1969 performance was sub-par, for instance. I've listened to that bootleg SBD countless times, and to think that Rick Danko felt his performance was "sub par" that night just boggles the mind. I've found the meaning of life in his high vocal harmony for "Ain't No More Cane On The Brazos".

I'm currently listening to The Last Waltz box set, and again I am left stunned (of course, I'm a couple of beers into it, so that may explain this entire post). I think the whole overdubbing issue is focused on way too much. People forget that this was the 1960s/1970s. Technology wasn't what is is today. Things went wrong, other things had to be fixed a little. I've heard the authentic bootleg, and The Last Waltz box set is the definitive account of what happened that night. The remastered/remixed sound, etc. Of course the jams and other things didn't really need to be edited, but still. When I want to hear The Band play their final concert with their original line-up, I put on the box set. I've seen people refer to the whole event as a "coffee table" type release, not meriting real preservation or containing a performance that really inspires. I disagree. I listen to The Last Waltz, and I hear the passion, inspiration, and genius of five men playing together for the last time. And it's brilliant.

So cheers to The Band. We're all here because we love them. I love them, and I can't get enough. Their music is medicine for the soul, and it gets me through each day knowing that there were once people like myself who think about music like it should be made.


Entered at Wed Jul 20 23:20:40 CEST 2011 from (99.141.24.143)

Posted by:

Adam

Web: My link

Subject: Todd Rundgren on "Stage Fright" sessions

From a recent talk/presentation Rundgren gave on his career:

"Rundgren also opened up about working with Jesse Winchester, whose eponymous album was produced by Robbie Robertson of The Band, and was engineered by Rundgren. He talked about Ronnie Hawkins, and recordiing at the original Woodstock Theater, which at the time was in its original form. Rundgren conceded, "The sessions, to this day, were some of the strangest sessions I've ever done." He noted that it was difficult to get all five of the band's players in the same room. Discussing Garth Hudson, who Rundgren called "a genius," he noted "he has narcolepsy." Rundgren said, "It's no secret." Rundgren recalled, "He would fall asleep right in the middle of a session." Rundgren joked that some musicians, including Levon Helm, "would fall asleep for other reasons." He recalled, "I was making fun of them all, and they hated me." Mused Rundgren, "Troubled artists are my specialty.""


Entered at Wed Jul 20 22:43:38 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Bill M: The punch line would be "Switched-Over Carlos".


Entered at Wed Jul 20 22:18:13 CEST 2011 from (41.97.199.119)

Posted by:

Empty Now

it's a sex reassignment surgery clause

thanks Bill M, now I see the light


Entered at Wed Jul 20 22:09:38 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Walter Carlos, Wendy Carlos, Roberto Carlos. There must be a joke in there somewhere, but I can't think of it. Balls!


Entered at Wed Jul 20 22:05:14 CEST 2011 from (41.97.199.119)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: correction

In my list of Best Rock Instrumentals posted recently, I credited “Roberto Carlos” as the composer of “The Korova Milkbar Theme” from “A Clockwork Orange” movie. Actually as far as I remember I thought this name every time the track was evoked, which is furthermore in my top fifteen list.

Following the smoke rings of my internet links, I just realized that the track was originally written by English classic composer Henry Purcell for the Funeral March of Queen Mary II (Died 28th December 1694), originally scored for 4 trumpets. It was adapted for the synthesizer in "A Clockwork Orange" by Wendy Carlos.

While I started to suspect since a while that the internet can only make a person more clever. I wonder what could be the actual reason for I always thought Roberto Carlos instead of Wendy Carlos, long before the huge Brazilian star footballer of Real Madrid came into fame.

…maybe my subconscient can’t conceive that the virile C major intro pitch can be the brainchild by somebody called Wendy, the Roberto sonority fits the intro pitch as well as the whole chord progression


Entered at Wed Jul 20 21:21:25 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V / David P: I have a test question for the two of you, who seem well versed in the driving habits to truckers. The prospect of meeting which of the following would be most likely to cause trucker Levon to drive 90 mph through a construction site in a blizzard with horn a-blaring and lights a-flashing?

i) Little Bessie
ii) Big Mama
iii) Slick Robbie


Entered at Wed Jul 20 20:35:55 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Right up your arse …

… is what we say about tail draggers in Britain. I was in an "average speed limit" lane through roadworks (construction) in England on the M3 Motorway. It was 50 mph limit and average speed means a camera recording you entering and leaving the system. I allowed the 10% you can argue over accuracy and was doing 54 mph. I had a Spanish-registered truck a few inches from my tail. First he had his lights on full beam. Then he just held down his horn. What do you do? It's a guaranteed speeding ticket in an average speed control area, and this bastard didn't give a shit, knowing they don't bother to chase it up as far as Spain.

The other truck tail draggers I recall are in Holland, in falling heavy snow, doing 90 mph because I had two trucks on my tail flashing me to go faster (not your fault, Norbert!), and Phoenix, where 80 mph was too slow for the trucks behind me. It's terrifying.


Entered at Wed Jul 20 19:47:41 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Georgia Overdrive

One not need be familiar with Newton's second law of motion to realize what can happen with of full trailor load propelling the tractor truck from behind. In the mountains you can often see runaway truck lanes on the side of the road, where some careening truck has plowed up the incline sand barricade. Worse yet, it's a scary thing to look up in your rearview mirror to see a huge truck grill right on your rear bumper. That Mack truck bulldog hood ornament is a frightening beast when it's breathing down the back of your neck.


Entered at Wed Jul 20 18:02:24 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: Working in your favour was the fact that doctors have easy access to better drugs than cabbies do. Reminds me of a Rodney Dangerfield line about his son being at college now.


Entered at Wed Jul 20 17:48:28 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Freewheeling

Coasting downhill in neutral is literally “freewheeling”. I guessed it was a it was a way of saving money by not burning fuel on long downhill runs, but I guess fuel was always so cheap then, and time of the essence. But from what you say, I assume it means going faster because the effect of engine braking is gone. I don’t know if it’s actually illegal here as it’d be impossible to prove, but the Highway Code definitely advises against it. Descending to Yosemite I remember there were signs all over the place saying use gears not brakes to avoid sparks that start bushfires.

Life for truckers here changed dramatically with the “spy in the cab” recorder and time regulations. A few years ago I had to have minor eyelid surgery under a local anaesthetic which was incredibly traumatic because it took 90 minutes and you could see the scalpel and needle for stitches the whole time and the anaesthetic wore off three times. It STARTED at 8 pm in the evening. The surgeon told me he’d started work at 8 a.m. that morning. I said, “Long day”. He said “Yes, especially as I live a 90 minute drive away.” So I had a guy operating on my eye in the 14th and 15th hour of his day. I wondered whether to mention that a truck driver would lose his licence for exceeding 9 hours. But then I remembered he’d be taking the stitches out two weeks later and kept my mouth shut. But it is terrifying that surgeons are allowed to work lengths of time that truckers and taxi-drivers are not.But I guess they have easier access to the little white pills.


Entered at Wed Jul 20 17:29:26 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: milk before whites ...

dlew: This ancient entry from my Aussie hitchiking diary contains a useful health tip for long-distance truckers:

"1 December 1982 - We take trains to Roma Street downtown [Brisbane], then to Ipswich. While we walk to a hitching spot a truck pulls up and offers us a lift. All the way to Dubbo. Go through a sandstorm. Driver coats his stomach for bennies with a quart of milk along the way. Meet Peter at a truck stop. He gives us a lift to the other end of town and puts us up for the night in his auto trim shed, which has a loft above the office area." Funny, I recall the milk but not the sandstorm nor the shed with loft.


Entered at Wed Jul 20 17:13:22 CEST 2011 from (59.101.14.222)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Weed, Whites and Wine

'Whites' in 'willin' is speed... amphetamines being the drug of choice of many long haul drivers... cheap, few side effects, long lasting...


Entered at Wed Jul 20 16:56:42 CEST 2011 from (129.42.208.177)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY
Web: My link

Subject: Gillian Welch and Levon

This essay was on Expecting Rain this morning. The article contains a very cool video of the Gillian Welch song Hard Times and scenes from the film Paper Moon.


Entered at Wed Jul 20 16:14:01 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Got my U.S. regulatory commissions confused. I meant ICC, the Interstate Commerce Commission, not the FCC, which is the Federal Communications Commission. While one overseas loads on roads, the other is concerned with how words are heard. :-)


Entered at Wed Jul 20 15:59:54 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Peter: When I was in college I worked in a warehouse during the summer for several years. We used various trucking lines for shipments. Over the course of time, I got to know some, let's say very colorful characters, who drove big semi rigs. Through them, I learned about a lot of things they did to deliver their loads as fast as possible, including the use of Georgia overdrive. Needless to say, they were always trying to stay one step ahead of the FCC regulations that forbid a lot of things they did.


Entered at Wed Jul 20 15:38:37 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Thanks. I've wondered for years what a "sweet Georgia overdrive" was. Taj Mahal's version has "sweet" and that's the one I listen to.


Entered at Wed Jul 20 15:22:11 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Georgia Overdrive

As memorialized in the classic truck driving song "Six Days On The Road", "Georgia overdrive" is trucker parlance referring to shifting out of gear into neutral when going downhill. And, as the song's lyrics reveal, it's not the only way to pick up speed.

"I got ten forward gears
And a Georgia overdrive
I'm taking little white pills
And my eyes are open wide"


Entered at Wed Jul 20 11:43:24 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: TLW

Yes, have seen it at a local film festival reasonably recently - well worth seeing on a big screen.


Entered at Wed Jul 20 09:05:42 CEST 2011 from (99.141.24.143)

Posted by:

Adam

Very excited to see The Last Waltz on the big screen, Music Box Theater in Chicago next week. Have any of you guys seen it in the theaters?


Entered at Wed Jul 20 05:58:44 CEST 2011 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

Sweet Georgia Brown?

Kansas is near Georgia from what I've been told.


Entered at Wed Jul 20 03:33:20 CEST 2011 from (59.101.14.222)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: There's always great music

Think about it: what were they playing on the radio in 1968? I bet the Band didn't get as much airplay as the Archies... but we remember the Band... (and before David P. corrects me, I know the Archies were crack studio musicians, and the singles were pretty fine examples of pop of the time... ;) )


Entered at Wed Jul 20 01:25:57 CEST 2011 from (68.171.231.81)

Posted by:

Bill M

Kevin J: good catch - Fred Eaglesmith's ""Georgia Overdrive" from "50 Odd Dollars", an album with Richard Bell on keys. Richard may well be on King Biscuit Boy's """georgia Overdrive". I was going to ask David P what the title refers to - perhaps an oldies tour reunion of the survivng members of REM, B-52s and BTO?


Entered at Wed Jul 20 00:38:06 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: John Hiatt

Georgia Rae? Nothing special like some of the others mentioned but always rely on JH for a nice enough boogie.


Entered at Tue Jul 19 23:16:36 CEST 2011 from (174.89.117.65)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Inspired by Bill M’s reference to the PTA , the above is an all-timer of the great Loretta Lynn and proof why she was the original punk performer…….stick with the clip till the end………….Oh my – what she had to put up with – what a lady! ................... and Bill check your fave Fred Eaglesmith for a Georgia reference.......


Entered at Tue Jul 19 22:06:33 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: More from Georgia

Then there's Blind Willie McTell's "Georgia Rag", later covered by King Biscuit Boy on "Gooduns". Of course Blind Willie's most famous song, "Statesboro Blues", incorporates the name of a Georgia town.

Another favorite of mine is the Candymen's "Georgia Pines" from 1967.

The rowdiest version of Billy Joe Shaver's "Georgia On A Fast Train" can be found on "Unshaven: Live at Smith's Olde Bar". Recorded live in Atlanta in 1995 with a hot band featuring Billy Joe's late son Eddy on lead guitar, this version races & smokes like a locomotive on a downhill grade.


Entered at Tue Jul 19 20:47:58 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: time for a Tom Lehrer tribute?

Given Jon L's post, Nick Cave'd be perfect for "The Masochism Tango". "The Periodic Table" would suit any number of rappers. "Vatican Rag" - Barenaked Ladies. "Poisoning Pigeons In The Park" - Tom Waits. "Pollution" - maybe the Dead if Jerry weren't. "Werner Von Braun" - ?


Entered at Tue Jul 19 20:19:15 CEST 2011 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Subject: Re: Cohen tribute

Peter V, I was at that 2003 Leonard Cohen tribute in Brooklyn. I had gone pretty much just to see Linda Thompson--as your review suggests, she unfortunately had something of a secondary role--but was blown away by the other performers, most of whom I had name familiarity with but not much more. Funniest performance was Nick Cave on "Diamonds In The Mine", who appeared to be doing a tango onstage with the lyric sheets clutched prominently in his hand--yet he still managed to bark out each lyric with tremendous conviction, seemingly off the cuff. Great great night of music.


Entered at Tue Jul 19 20:00:35 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Eat A Peach

Lest we not forget "Peach Pickin' Time In Georgia", written by the "North Georgia Wildcat" Clayton McMichen, who made a name for himself playing fiddle with Gid Tanner & Riley Puckett in the Skillet Lickers. When Mr. McMichen later worked with Jimmy Rogers in 1932, the Singing Brakeman recorded his popular adaptation of the song.


Entered at Tue Jul 19 19:24:10 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

This non Tiny-URL one works.


Entered at Tue Jul 19 19:22:38 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: DON'T FOLLOW MY PREVIOUS LINK

This has happened before. I made a TINY URL link and uit got "hi-jacked" onto a commercial site. Last time that happened, it was TINY URL, which I shall now stop using. Somehow something has interjected itself.


Entered at Tue Jul 19 19:20:38 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Martha, my dear

I forgot the Letterman intro by the time I was 30 seconds in (being fixed on her voice) … having Len's old backing duo as on the tribute shows threw me. The DVD was a bit of a mess, but the actual show was great. Link to my review at the time.


Entered at Tue Jul 19 18:57:53 CEST 2011 from (32.177.235.101)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: I've Been To Georgia On A Fast Train

By Billy Joe Shaver -


Entered at Tue Jul 19 18:36:00 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Kevin J: Based on that video, Martha's capable of one helluva version of "Harper Valley PTA".

Sorry I missed the memo with all the Georgia titles. My favourite is, like Dunc's, the Brook Benton, even if the list includes Vicki Lawrence's big hit "The Night The Lights Went Out In Georgia" and (Landmark take note) Bolt Upright's minor hit version of Freddy Weller's "Love You Back To Georgia".


Entered at Tue Jul 19 18:30:10 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

JQ: That version was on the 1994 various artists collaboration "Rhythm, Country and Blues", which also featured the Marty Stuart & Staple Singers cover of "The Weight" and Allen Toussaint & Chet Atkins on "Southern Nights".


Entered at Tue Jul 19 18:02:14 CEST 2011 from (32.177.235.101)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Rainy Night In Georgia

Dunc - I'm with you on this one. Brook Benton's is definitive - what a fine, fine singer he was. There's another version I really like by the duo of Conway Twitty & Sam Moore. I don't recall that LP's name though.


Entered at Tue Jul 19 17:44:09 CEST 2011 from (174.89.117.65)

Posted by:

Kevin J

……..and Van the Man had on purple tights – so what – the clip I linked was from David Letterman - not the tribute show which all around bordered on unwatchable. The Letterman bit was transcendent.


Entered at Tue Jul 19 17:37:26 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Sorry, SIX songs with Georgia in the title. I forgot that. But I prefer Midnight train.

The Rufus and Martha Wainwright Leonard Cohen bits come from the Tribute show. I assume this is the Sydney one from the DVD … the Brighton one I saw had Martha in an unflatteringly short skirt.


Entered at Tue Jul 19 17:21:50 CEST 2011 from (86.162.110.1)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Have to disagree there, Peter.

'Rainy Night in Georgia' is my favourite track with Georgia in the title.


Entered at Tue Jul 19 17:17:24 CEST 2011 from (174.89.117.65)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: "Everybody Knows"

This just in: Northwestcoaster takes the 2 that’s floating around and becomes Rockin Chair 2.

Ari: Are you still in film school? I Don’t recall your comments on the new RR album but perhaps I just missed them……

Leonard Cohen: Above link is to the only Wainwright I can listen to………Martha’s wonderful take on a perfect song. Interestingly her brother’s version of “Chelsea Hotel” might be the only song I have ever seen him do that I enjoyed.


Entered at Tue Jul 19 17:09:54 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

And I forgot that Midnight Train to Georgia (the best song ever with Georgia in the title) is a fifth one for the set, but (a) the lyrics wouldn't have suited them (b) nor would the style.


Entered at Tue Jul 19 17:02:42 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Watermelons On My Mind

Harlan Howard's "Watermelon Time In Georgia" was originally a hit for Lefty Frizzell in 1970, one of his last successful recordings which temporarily revived his career at the time.


Entered at Tue Jul 19 16:13:32 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

And a good south wind sprung up behind;

The Albatross did follow,

And every day, for food or play,

Came to the mariner's hollo!

In mist or cloud, on mast or shroud,

It perched for vespers nine;

Whiles all the night, through fog-smoke white,

Glimmered the white moonshine."

'God save thee, ancient Mariner,

From the fiends that plague thee thus!—

Why look'st thou so?'—"With my crossbow

I shot the Albatross."

You have to watch those albatrosses, Norm. There was something in the British newspapers last week about someone who went to rescue a stuck albatross (or maybe it was a gannet) and it pecked his eye out!


Entered at Tue Jul 19 14:40:52 CEST 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

rockin chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Into the mystic

We were born, before the wind,

Also youger than the sun,

'air the bonnie boat was won,

As we sailed into the mystic.

Well the winds are fair for the next four days, so I guess I'll get myself away........and work the west coast.

Rounding Cape Cook........a really wild and mean looking place that extends out off Vancouver Island at the end of the Brooks Peninsula, stands Solander Island. An island of a few hundred feet across, but about 400 ' high. Now there is supposed to have been seen albatross there. I think it was Buddy my brother who told me........I forget, but I've never seen one............be happy.


Entered at Tue Jul 19 13:53:22 CEST 2011 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

Mike Hayward

Web: My link

Subject: Talented younger artists are out there.

Adam - many of us agree that the old guard has provided so much wonderful music & catalogs w/ depth that many younger artists lack. But there a number of very talented younger artists often introduced to us by Levon, The Band, Dylan, etc.

My wife & I appreciate music a younger generation of musicians, including Bow Thayer, Ollabelle, Martha Scanlan, Jackie Green, Chris Bergson, Jay Collins (Levon's son-in-law), Alexis P Suter & many more. If you scour thru their websites & so on, you may find you'll be introduced to some wonderful music w/ depth.


Entered at Tue Jul 19 12:46:20 CEST 2011 from (129.42.208.177)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY
Web: My link

Subject: New Music

Adam, there is a lot of great music being made today by younger artists. Two of the very best come from your town, Wilco and Michael McDermott. From Texas you have the great Carrie Rodriguez, from Idaho, Josh Ritter and from Woodstock, one of Peter V's favorite bands, The Duke and The King. McDermott and Josh Ritter are easily in my top 10 favorite songwriters and there is no one performing today I'd rather go see then Carrie Rodriguez. McDermott plays in Chicago almost on a weekly basis. Check him out if you get a chance.


Entered at Tue Jul 19 12:19:47 CEST 2011 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: pride in a vessel

Story goes that Captain Jack was having a little trouble with his motor so he sent for the Cummins rep to investigate. The mechanic arrived, boarded the 'Lone Fisher' and prepared to descend into the engine room. It was "Hold on a second there son. You're not going into my engine room wearing those dirty coveralls."



Entered at Tue Jul 19 11:05:11 CEST 2011 from (99.141.24.143)

Posted by:

Adam

I really wanted to like "American Son", Peter. I love Fred Carter and Levon's version of "Blue Moon Of Kentucky" is nice (how is the B-side to that single, Lee Dorsey's "Working In The Coal Mine"?) But as enjoyable as it is, it doesn't strike me as great or even memorable. I'd definitely rather listen to "American Son" than most other new music out today, but the standard set by "Dirt Farmer" makes me forget all about those earlier releases. I just think the songwriting, new-original Nashville based tunes written for the album, are just ho-hum. "Watermelon Time In Georgia" and "Sweet Peach Georgia Wine" open and end the album on a promising note. But in the middle of those, the songs are decent, but don't strike me as memorable.


Entered at Tue Jul 19 10:48:50 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Gonna Send You back to Georgia

I'd agree with you about those two, Adam. I don't agree about American Son. I always thought it his strongest solo work until Dirt Farmer. The songwriting is far more Nashville than his more other outings and benefits from good tunes. The album was done after they'd cut Blue Moon of Kentucky for Coal Miner's Daughter (with Fred Carter & The Cates). Violet Eyes veers into big AoR ballad, but is no worse for that. I just looked at the credit … Levon Helm AND Kenny Buttrey on drums.

Fred Carter jnr plays right through. On China Girl he does the Shootout in Chinatown style intro. The sleeve notes to the CD say The Cate Brothers appear uncredited, but as every song has detailed credits, it's hard to see how they squeezed in. The other interesting thing from the CD notes, is that Levon says they cut twenty tracks and used ten. Now that's a big pile of outtakes. Maybe they ended up on the subsequent (and inferior) album.

What surprises me is that these songs weren't used in the 80s or 90s Band. Like Rick's solo stuff, there was better material on this album than a lot of the stuff they did do. Sweet Peach Georgia Wine would have fitted the 90s Band perfectly, for example. Watermelon Time in Georgia is a more interesting harmonica-intro song than later stuff.They could have had a whole Georgia set with Richard doing Georgia On My Mind, and then adding Timmy Shaw's Gonna Send you Back To Georgia to round it out. I reckon that would have played well in Atlanta, David P!


Entered at Tue Jul 19 10:27:51 CEST 2011 from (99.141.24.143)

Posted by:

Adam

I think I'll drop the "2" from the name. There doesn't seem to be any other Adams here anyway.

Anyway, Raven has reissued the two "Levon Helm" self-titled albums from '78 and '82. I took the opportunity to re-evaluate all of Levon's original solo output. It's all forgettable. I love "The RCO All-Stars" studio album, and the live release "Live At The Palladium". The studio RCO All-Stars is more laid back than you might expect, but it's still worthy. However, I agree with the AllMusic reviews of the rest of Levon's early solo output. The self-titled releases are just forgettable: the musicians are there, the talent is there, but the songs just aren't. "American Son", I agree, is the "best" of those early solo albums, but only in the sense of "Well, this is the best one so far." The Raven two-fer reissues of Levon's early solo output made me think that maybe they have been unfairly judged, and that time may cast them in a different light. But they are forgettable. Levon is probably my favorite singer of all time, and his voice carries those albums. But the songs just aren't there. Those reissues are for completists only.


Entered at Tue Jul 19 09:11:23 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Chelsea Hotel

As Len says in the intro, this guy "Does a wonderful job on (the song)" (from the Leonard Cohen Tribute shows). However, there might be a slight shift in the singer's mental picture of the lyrics.


Entered at Tue Jul 19 05:26:55 CEST 2011 from (74.101.157.90)

Posted by:

Ari

I'm not Adam, Kevin.


Entered at Tue Jul 19 03:05:31 CEST 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

rockin chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Wood & oak barrels

Well there you are Joe. I'm proud a ya. I lean toward the rum oak barrels myself......then of course, I'm a sailor......yo-ho-ho!

A work boat yes, of course, but this grand old lady is class! A lot of people don't understand. When you're sanding cap rails & deck to put the spar varnish to for the luster, it's like caressing a beautiful woman.

Even that old steel tug of mine. Many times over the years, people come shyly by to take pictures. Last year, an elderly gentleman, with a beautiful yacht of his own, came quietly over to me one day. He said, "I was looking at your ship and wondering if you still used it for work, or pleasure, because of it's appearance. Then I saw your winch & towline, and I knew. But she looks more like a yacht." Now that is a special feeling from a man you can see knows his business.

There needs to be class and pride in what we do, otherwise.........what is the point?


Entered at Tue Jul 19 03:04:02 CEST 2011 from (69.124.123.123)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Joe. Sing "I Shall Be Released" three times and go in peace my son.


Entered at Tue Jul 19 01:54:26 CEST 2011 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: glass vs wood

Norm, I went to a higher authority, one Captain Jack, for his opinion. He said you'd be crazy not to fibreglass your work boat in these waters, especially if you have to steam through pack ice. On the other hand, his personal pleasure craft is a hundred percent wood. And yes, it's been a while but I'm very much acquainted with swish barrels.

Thanks Al for the "Peggy Sue..." link. Something else, eh?

I confess I was a bit of a Sheryl Crow fan, own her first three albums. After hearing Dylan do his own version(s) of "Mississippi", I've never been able to go back to Sheryl's.

Heard Levon and band do "Back to Memphis" on CBC this morning. I assume it's from "Live at the Ryman". Got the day started right.


Entered at Tue Jul 19 00:27:01 CEST 2011 from (174.89.117.65)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Above link L. Cohen sings about things that send some GB'ers into a tizzy.................By the way - has anyone ever seen Adam2 and Ari in the same room?


Entered at Mon Jul 18 21:04:38 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: that Sugar Shack ...

Pat B: Suburbs of Chicago? Who'da thunk? Sticking with the Fireballs, the Canuckistani ringer was Stu, not Doug, Mitchell. Despite being a drummer, he was a pretty good songwriter, having written a very good side for another '70 group of Albertans in Clovis, Gainsborough Gallery (with singer Henry Small, who Empty N used to mention here some years ago): "Cold steel buildings tower over me / Cold steel eyes in the faces that I see / I've never felt so all alone / I think I'll catch a bus and go back home".

Also, Kal David played here at the Beaches Jazz Festival yesterday - as Kal David and the Real Deal with Laurie Bono. I'd like to think that he had his old buddy Ed Roth up to guest, but I wasn't there.


Entered at Mon Jul 18 21:01:02 CEST 2011 from (86.162.110.1)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Roger and Michelle:Got my tickets for Dylan in Glasgow. Thanks for early warning, Roger. I got them by phone, Michelle, but no human contact, press this button etc.

Roger:Enjoyed your list, but I had never heard of The Essex. I was too young, but maybe as Peter says a Bournemouth phenomenon. Interestingly, I nearly put Colin Blunstone on my list and I think the Steve Earle/ Del McCoury album is really good.(In addition to the more obvious artists on the list).


Entered at Mon Jul 18 20:59:38 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Bob Dylan Bournemouth gig

Nah, 'fraid not Michelle.

Too busy perfecting my swanneck routine

[Stubs out cigarette and undoes neck brace]

:-0)

Sorry folks, can't seem to stop myself.


Entered at Mon Jul 18 20:54:11 CEST 2011 from (99.254.209.45)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Hy Zaret dies at age 99

A number of years ago, composer Alex North called Hy Zaret and asked him to write lyrics to a melody he had writte for a motion picture. Mr. Zaret said he was busy painting his house; but finally found the time. Zaret wrote the beautiful lyrics to Unchained Melody

Glad he found the time.


Entered at Mon Jul 18 20:37:05 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Al, this reminds me of the ancient joke, "I always fancied myself, but I could never get round to it."


Entered at Mon Jul 18 20:21:09 CEST 2011 from (68.164.4.80)

Posted by:

Pat B

Bill M, I met Jimmy Gilmer in Nashville a couple of years ago. He became quite the publishing giant after his stay in the Fireballs then guided Brad Paisley to success. Paisley rewarded him with a pink slip. I was surprised to find out Gilmer is from the western suburbs of Chicago.


Entered at Mon Jul 18 19:59:50 CEST 2011 from (95.147.180.238)

Posted by:

Michelle

Location: Ascot

Subject: Offending/Bob, Bournemouth etc.

Agree with Joan's sentiments, I have one male partner, three boys and two male cats, it all goes completely over my head! seriously, I am intrigued by the male psyche and enjoy all your comments. Trying to get Bob Dylan tickets for October at Bournemouth but coming up 'currently unavailable', anyone else going?


Entered at Mon Jul 18 19:35:58 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: PV

No time for footy these days Pete. Far to busy perfecting my swanneck routines.

[Lights cigarette and refastens neck brace]

:-0)


Entered at Mon Jul 18 19:13:46 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Swan necked gobble de gook

Bill.

Love it. Your sense of yuma that is. Makes the world go round and adds lustre to my cluster.

[Routinely undoes his neck brace to prepare for evening's entertainment]

:-0)


Entered at Mon Jul 18 19:12:18 CEST 2011 from (108.41.170.6)

Posted by:

Joan

Adam2 don;t worry too much about offending the ladies here. If I've stuck it out this long I think that it must be hard to offend. Don't take Norm too seriously. He just gets that way sometimes. He's a salty tug boat captain. :-)

Peter don't you wish that you could magically watch both concerts sort of like seeing one and DVRing the other to be seen live. Science will have to work on that.


Entered at Mon Jul 18 19:01:47 CEST 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Blushing!

There's no doubt I bring out the worst in you guys. Tomorrow morning I'll slink off back to my tug and let things calm down and that'll be that.

It's great of you to be so helpful to ol' DLEW, Fred.

I don't know that I'll make it over to Gilligan's Island this fall to see you and Lorne, Carl. I'll be there next May for sure tho' So you guys get the still cranked up and get the illixor perfected and in the wooden barrels for the spring.

Hey that reminds me, do any of you guys know what "swish" is?


Entered at Mon Jul 18 18:24:31 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Someone (DP?) mentioned the Fireballs, Norman Petty's post-Buddy houseband in Clovis, with the great and easily identifiable George Tomsco on electric guitar. Their drummer in the late '60s (replacing Doug Roberts, I believe) was Doug Mitchell, who worked with Ronnie Hawkins for a short time in the early '70s. Before being an actual Fireball, Mitchell had done tons and tons of sessions in Clovis as part of Wes Dakus and the Rebels, an Edmonton group who led a long parade of Alberta groups down the road to Clovis. Hugh Brockie, later of Hawkins and then Bearfoot with Terry Danko, had also been in the Rebels.

Gooseneck Al: I agree that the John Doe cover is great - and much more listenable than the original. By the way, your candour is appreciated. Most guys with a record like that would attribute it to a long member, but not you. Might be worth seeing if Philip Roth would ghost-write your memoirs? Imagine what Hollywood could do with "Edge's Complaint". Short-necked Method actors like DeNiro would probably do serious damage to themselves at try-outs, but imagine what a true pencil-neck like Hugh Laurie (the Wooster one, not the House guy) could do with the role: "I say Jeeves, do you know any limericks?" "Indeed I do sir. Ahem. 'There once was a man from Nantucket ..."


Entered at Mon Jul 18 18:07:38 CEST 2011 from (198.228.209.41)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Newscorp

Can you imagine the blessings for planet earth if Murdoch's empire falls out completely? Let's hope -


Entered at Mon Jul 18 17:29:55 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I thought it got worse on Sunday, by the police arresting this Rebekah woman two days before she has to testify to the parliamentary committee, thus allowing her to claim the right not to incriminate herself. Still, with Jude Law hacked in NYC and David Beckham in LA, both cases come under US jurisdiction, so perhaps now they can nail FUX NEWS, and the two bastards at the top of the tree.

Al, I didn't know you'd hacked into my phone. Honestly, I never said that the best three teams in the country are Arsenal, Man U and Chelsea. That was someone imitating my voice. Honest!


Entered at Mon Jul 18 17:12:01 CEST 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The Bloody British

What in hell are you and Al doing over there Peter????? Hacking into peoples phones and causing all manner of uproar.


Entered at Mon Jul 18 17:04:50 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I just added Sheryl's Mississippi to my "Dylan covers" Playlist. And Leaving Las Vegas to my "Female Vocal" playlist.

A song I'm really picky about is First Cut is The Deepest, which I reckon she sings well, and it's going fine until that awful hackneyed splashy electric guitar chord coming in just after the predictable "BIG" drums. But the vocal, strings and acoustic guitar are all excellent. It goes without saying that overall it's not a touch on the P.P. Arnold version. Also a totally play by numbers electric guitar solo … you just know exactly what the next note will be all the way through. But there's nothing wrong with the singing at all, and she has a "signature" voice, which is money in the bank for a singer.


Entered at Mon Jul 18 16:36:53 CEST 2011 from (59.101.14.222)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Fred; you're right...

except I'm in NSW, which means I can blame Rugby league as well...


Entered at Mon Jul 18 15:54:22 CEST 2011 from (68.199.152.229)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Cheryl,Levon,Garth & stuff

Been to a whole bunch of Rambles & Brian Mitchell is a spectacular keys player.As much as I love his work,no one is Garth--he's quintessentially unique in any form or style of music.I'd love to see him @ more Rambles,or in any venue with Levon.Those two are magic! But,tix,imo,won't sell any better. As for Ryman,it's a good show,but I've seen/heard way better from Levon & his band.Cheryl is definitely a selling card for any show--she's popular,but as the man said,popular ain't always good.I do like her voice & went to see her live once.OY VEY!! The worst band I've seen in some time.Of course,her current work with Doyle Bramhall is better musically but her talent is limited.But,her regular band,particularly her gtr. player are awful.


Entered at Mon Jul 18 15:43:31 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Ramble at the Ryman

While Emmylou Harris would have been the natural choice to guest with the Levon Helm Band at the Ryman, she was touring Europe at the time. Sheryl Crow, who lives outside of Nashville and has remained popular for many years, was gracious to lend her talents. Levon's right-hand man Larry Campbell has also recorded with Ms. Crow in the past.


Entered at Mon Jul 18 15:01:41 CEST 2011 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

"Would should"...I just invented that. Someone please notify the Nobel people and the good folks at the Oxford dictionary. ; )


Entered at Mon Jul 18 14:58:42 CEST 2011 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Dlew:that would should be.. strained your shoulder WHILE wrestling a croc AFTER having played Aussie Rules Football. You need to be precise about the nature of the injury. : )


Entered at Mon Jul 18 14:25:00 CEST 2011 from (59.101.14.222)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: I started, I think, theSheryl Crow thread...

I just don't care for her music, or approach to it. I'm deaf to her musical skill... that's all... (for Gawd's sake, don't try and slap westie - he'll slap you back - I at least, will burst into tears, run away, and tell everyone an exaggerated story how I would have shown you what for, but I'd strained my shoulder...)


Entered at Mon Jul 18 13:01:23 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Peggy Sue

She was Jerry Allison's girlfriend who he'd just broken up with temporarily, causing Buddy Holly to stop singing "Cindy Lou … Cindy Lou" and to change it to "Peggy Sue." I know this because I've seen "Buddy-The Musical" twice, not because I wanted to see it twice, but it keeps coming back to Bournemouth for the summer season year after year and the second time we had visitors who wanted to see it.


Entered at Mon Jul 18 12:55:16 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Bob Dylan

Now I'm really annoyed with the mean old sod. He's just announced a tour with Mark Knopfler playing the BIC Bournemouth on 14th October. All standing of course to double the capacity. £68 + "£7.80 per ticket booking charge" from the venue. i.e. we want £7.80 to accept your money.

So then I realized … it's the same night as Eliza Carthy, five miles away in Poole. I bought my Eliza Carthy tickets about ten days ago and got centre of the front row. So even though I'd vowed never to see Bob piss on my memory again, I was going to relent, but now I'm not.

Plus points:

BIC Bournemouth is one of the worst sounding halls in the country. Poole Lighthouse Concert Hall is one of the best.

Poole has some of the most comfortable seats you'll find. Bournemouth is standing.

Eliza can sing in tune and hit all the notes in her songs.

Eliza sticks to recognizable tunes and doesn't make every song sound the same.

I'd rather watch Eliza bobbing up and down than Bob swaying about.

Eliza's latest album, Neptune, is way better than Bob's last … the Christmas album.

MINUS POINTS:

Eliza wasn't selling out that fast … she's just lost 5000 potential local purchasers of tickets.

But it sounds as if Bob is bringing a stunning band … I will miss seeing Mark Knopfler.


Entered at Mon Jul 18 12:51:35 CEST 2011 from (69.124.123.123)

Posted by:

PuEmUp(Friend0

Westie,Adam has a point! Don't you think melissa etheridge would drive through a minefield to eat crow? As futilely misdirected as he is, Adam has a point, you can't ignore the wimmin!



Entered at Mon Jul 18 11:26:43 CEST 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoast rockin chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: A Mel Brooks moment

Awww man! OK! To all the ladies I sincerely apologize. I could just see ol' JQ standing there scratching his head, trying to figure it out.....and..........I had a Mel Brooks moment is all.

Peter, since you're so in to this Peggy Sue thing, do you know who the real Peggy Sue was?

Damn, it's 02:24 hrs here. I woke up, and had to come down, and click on the marine weather forecast for, "West coast Vancouver Island North" to see what weather I'll have for my trip down to Nootka Island. Now I got to see if I can sleep more.

Gawd damn Al is the absolute worst, now I got to try and get to sleep, snickering.


Entered at Mon Jul 18 10:59:29 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Whatever turns your crank

Ha ha

Westie - priceless.

:-0)

As for all the 'giving head' and 'blowing' shite. They always were and always will be utterly shite expressions for pitiful frustrated macho wannagetsome's.

If you want real credibility then use a real man's term - Suckin' the Pud. Take it from the most sucked man alive

[you see, I have this flexible extended neck]

:-0)


Entered at Mon Jul 18 10:10:01 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Buggered if I can find Sheryl Crow's version of "Peggy Sue Got Married", Al. Which album is it on? :-)

Back to the original question. Sheryl has sold 35 million albums and sung with artists from Michael Jackson to The Rolling Stones to Bob Dylan to Don Henley to Eric Clapton. I liked Tuesday Night Music Club, then forgot about her until The Globe Sessions. Dylan gave her Mississippi before he recorded it himself. So, hard as it may seem to accept, she was doing Levon Helm and Jesse Winchester a well-deserved favour by appearing with them. That's not a qualitative judgment, just a reflection of comparative sales and live draw status over the wider market. A Levon link would be her participation in the update tribute album version of Loretta Lynn's "Coal Miner's Daughter."


Entered at Mon Jul 18 09:51:55 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: ????????????

Can't for the life of me work out what the hell all this Sheryl Crowe stuff has got to do with Peggy Sue Got married.

Keep the feckin GB on topic will yer!!!

:-0)


Entered at Mon Jul 18 06:22:09 CEST 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Opinions????

Well, call it what you will, "Adam2". If you want to set yourself up as judge & jury as to waht Levon Helm thinks, or "what the boys would do", I think your in some fantasy world. So your welcome to your opinion......Jeff, as usual trys to turn around what he said, and talk himself out of any corner by changing what he said.

I, on the other hand really don't give a fat rat's ass about your opinion....so you can.........send me to hell, or go and tell, or what ever turns your crank. Lots of the ladies here have said, and heard things that may make your heart flutter.


Entered at Mon Jul 18 06:12:27 CEST 2011 from (99.141.24.143)

Posted by:

Adam2

Levon and the guys in the Band were rough around the edges, but they were still gentlemen. As am I. I'm well aware of Levon's exploits, but the point was just that gentlemen know when to get a little juicer with the jokes, and when to present themselves as gentlemen. It's called class.

Discussing "Ramble At The Ryman" and reasoning that the only reason a female musician (Sheryl Crow) could share a stage with legends like Levon - because she "gives great head" or "people like eating Crow" - shows no class whatsoever.

Now let's no blow this out of proportion. I'm not personally offended or hurt. Why would I be? I just think it shows poor taste.


Entered at Mon Jul 18 05:44:00 CEST 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Sense & Sensability

So your assertion is that we should all consider what Levon would think, or consider appropriate?/ Get your shit together son! When you are talking about Levon Helm & the Band, you are talking about some of the worst red necked, ball breaking characters the rock & roll scene has ever known.

What do you think this is? a tea party? Give your head a shake. Levon Helm is no angel, and in fact one of the worst. Have you read some of the books? What sunday school are you attending? Now all you've done is piss me off with your , "good two shoes attitude". Grow up! And as for you Jeff, I seen what you bin writing on the mens room walls..........you demented little.................:)


Entered at Mon Jul 18 05:31:06 CEST 2011 from (69.124.123.123)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Chivalry is not dead!

Adam, your assertion "We have ladies here too" is correct and I took that into consideration. Hence, I wrote "* Seems people like eating Crow*, would be appropriate." Note "people" as opposed to guys or men. I wouldn't ever ignore the wimmin.


Entered at Mon Jul 18 04:54:25 CEST 2011 from (99.141.24.143)

Posted by:

Adam2

I can take jokes and enjoy a more rough sense of humor. I just meant that it seemed to be in poor taste, and not respectable. We have ladies here too. I just don't think Levon would be proud that comments like that are made about someone he respects and has shared the stage with.


Entered at Mon Jul 18 04:43:24 CEST 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The Naked Gun

Well Adam, it was a joke from a bunch of crude red necks. If that hurts your sensibilities......well......that's something you'll have to live with.

If the host wants to "bar me", that's something I will live with. There is a lot worse crap been slung around this place over the years. It was a "male" joke. Personally, I like Cheryl Crow's music, and I think she's a dish. There fore, Jeff was RIGHT!.......Jeff .....you're such a son of a bitch!

Hey Bonk! I'm real happy your work shop worked out well and enjoyable for you. To answer your question, "Why wood". It would take a long time to answer you.

I like old boats, old cars, and old women. They have Class. The marine surveyor, (a friend of 40 years) was a long time tug boat captain. Now retired, he is a marine surveyor. When Susan said to him.......well....I kind of like fibreglass boats, his answer was. "Yeah, but to us they are kind of imitation."

Thing is, no matter how you insulate them, with sprayed uruthane, or whatever they are noisey with their engines, and on a sea. It can also have problems, wth delamination and other things. Steel & aluminum have their problems............but wood, there is nothing like the warmth, quiet, and the lustre of painted, varnished and cared for wood.

The maintainance free thing of fibreglass, ferro cement, or whatever is fine for a lot of folks. When you see a ship, designed by Ed Monk, and built by McQueen shipyard come slipping by, or into a harbour, kept by someone who loves that wood and keeps it dressed.....nothing compares.


Entered at Mon Jul 18 03:59:13 CEST 2011 from (99.141.24.143)

Posted by:

Adam2

I have to say, you guys can be downright sickening with these comments. I'm no angel, nor a prude, but come on. Sheryl Crow is a person and a decent musician. I'm not a fan, and had many of the same thoughts about her talent when I first saw her listed as the Ramble guest. However, I found her singing on Evangeline to be tasteful, respectful, and showing genuine affection for Levon and his music. I find her respectable if only for the simple fact that Levon Helm chose to have her on stage and sing with him. That's all I need to know.


Entered at Mon Jul 18 03:08:46 CEST 2011 from (24.108.12.129)

Posted by:

BONK

Location: salt Spring Island (by way of cabbagetown)

Subject: FriendO

Here, Here! Norm started it.


Entered at Mon Jul 18 02:46:00 CEST 2011 from (69.124.123.123)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Eating Crow- shoulda been the title of my last post

That first hit of hers was a pretty damn catchy song.Favorite Mistake is an excellent song, there was another, that makes three.

Plus, she is a utiltiy player, plays all sorts of musical instruments..... seems to be quite a musicain actually. Once saw her open for Dylan, some place in midtown Manhattan, back in the early stages of her solo career. Nonmemeorable, but she looked good.


Entered at Mon Jul 18 02:23:27 CEST 2011 from (69.124.123.123)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Re Sheryl, I witheld my commnet, but seeing as how westie didn't show good sense, netiher will I.

JQ's question re Sheryl Crow, brought to mind how a friend, Kingston/woodstock musician with real strong Band connections and credentials.. anytime somene not yet in the big leagues acutally got something REAL accomplished, like REAL AIRPLAY, REAL GIGS, REAL DEALS, he'd say Someone is getting blown.

So in this case, I thought that * Seems people like eating Crow*, would be appropriate.

It's Westie's fault, I swear I wasn't gonna post that....


Entered at Mon Jul 18 01:22:44 CEST 2011 from (24.108.12.129)

Posted by:

BONK

Location: SaltSpring Island/Cabbagetown

Subject: Norm!

Hey buddy how you doing? That comment on Ms. Crow just might get you bitch slapped! HaHa How come wood and not Fibre or Fibre over wood. Lot of the old boys here say stay away from wood. Comments please! Blues workshop was a blast and no assholes. Well, maybe one. But he was more of a piss tank than anything. Talking about Amos Milburn, there was a old time boogie-woogie pounder at the camp by the name of David Vest who just blew me away and he's a huge fan of Milburn. Davids got to be 70 and man could this cat play. And the stories! Jesus H Christ, I was in heaven.


Entered at Mon Jul 18 01:16:33 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Sheryl Crowe

I'll be surprised if you get away with that one, Norm.

I suspect that her sales outstrip many of those she guests with, so she is seen as an assett. Not knowing the words was poor at the Ryman, as surely they could afford teleprompters. I'm neutral on her. Neither like nor dslike.


Entered at Mon Jul 18 00:25:26 CEST 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Moozic

JQ..........Cheryl gives good head....that's why.

Thanks for the note Lars, good to hear from you.

Hey Jaynie, thank you and good to hear you're around. Yeah, it's not the same without Steve around at all. Thank the rest of you guys too. I just came back from doing "sea trials" with the ship. I had her lifted so we could do inspection on her bottom and my marine surveyor could do his work.

Now a wood boat that was built in 1967 can be in some tough shape if she's not looked after, and there is these little bugs called teredos that get in there and do a lot of damage. I had my fingers crossed when we lifted her, but she is in beautiful condition under there. She performs real well.

Peter M, glad you enjoyed that as well. I particularly like Mickey Gee's guitar work, as well as the stuff he did on the "Willie & The Poor Boys" album.

I would have thought some of youze guys would have took a look at the link I put to Amos Milburn. That guy does some of the gawd damnest piano pickin you ever heard. It's from him that a lot of these guys stole licks, same as Chuck Berry's guitar licks.

That boogie woogie stuff, like down the road a piece, chicken shack boogie, and many of them were smokin. Even the Funk Brothers stole from him and his bunch.


Entered at Sun Jul 17 23:28:04 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Peggy Sue Got Married

Hmm. But check this out.


Entered at Sun Jul 17 21:04:29 CEST 2011 from (166.129.157.81)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Rave On

I've been playing it a lot too. And enjoying it, but I think I'm mostly aligned with Peter's view. I can't stand the Macca & Lou Reed ruinous takes on 2 songs that I dearly love. I happy to listen to Nick Lowe, JT Earle, Black Keys, Patty Smith and You're So Square over & over.

DLew919 - Sheryl Crow keeps popping up on tributes and variety shows, Elvis C's Spectacle with Jesse Winchester & other great guests, etc. And she always sucks completely as a singer, plus her original songs mostly blow too - what gives with her popularity amongst other artists?


Entered at Sun Jul 17 16:37:07 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Peggy Sue Got Married

Anyone who thinks I might have been going OTT on this - who, me OTT? - never - :-0) Have a listen to the link. Amazingly someone has put it up on You Tube even though it's only been out 2 weeks or so. Judge for yourselves.


Entered at Sun Jul 17 16:34:27 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Blue Nile/Ricky Lee Jones

Couldn't find that particular one on You Tube Dave. Hearing it for the first time it's beautiful - bleak and haunting as you say. Is there another link


Entered at Sun Jul 17 16:19:22 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: DP's list

Oh this sounds really promising. Licks lips. Salivates

:-0)


Entered at Sun Jul 17 16:09:55 CEST 2011 from (74.82.68.32)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Throwing Hats Up In The Air

Preparing a list of 30 favorite songs is proving to be a daunting task, as I anticipated and initially resisted. Even limiting my choices from my collection of singles is challenging, resulting in a preliminary list of around 100. While I take time to whittle down my selections, here's a preview of one of my more obscure favorites. It's a rare version of The Blue Nile's "Easter Parade" featuring guest vocalist Rickie Lee Jones. This stark, haunting take on the song was released on the B-side of the Linn 12" single of the Bob Clearmountain remix and album version (from "Hats") of "Headlights on the Parade". As far as I know, this rare version of "Easter Parade", apart from this 12" single, can only be found on a Rickie Lee Jones CD compilation.


Entered at Sun Jul 17 15:19:15 CEST 2011 from (59.101.14.222)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Subject: Ramble at the rymsn

Slightly disappointed... Great show, but Sheryl crow? Really? I don't see the appeal... Particulaury when Amy is such a great singer ... Anyway... Good show. 4/5


Entered at Sun Jul 17 15:00:14 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Rave On

I'm delighted you got it Pete. You're clearly very attached to the original Buddy takes. Possibly a fair bit more than myself however much i love them. I guess it's a bit like Westie was with leftie frizzell on Long Black Veil. And when all's said and done Buddy's originals with the amazing Crickets were ...amazing and such pioneering songs.

However, no way could I now have those originals playing back to back repeatedly like I'm doing with this latest tribute.

I think what has really struck me with this batch is the deep respect each of these artists clearly have for the magic of Buddy. And I think it's that more than anything which has really pulled me throught to the other side on this one.

Apart from Paul and Kid rock - who as far as I am now concerned offer a glibness that contrasts with the earnestness of the other artists - the other artists have taken their task really seriously and taken the core of the songs and either attempted to deliver as flawless a re-creation as they can muster or else decided to put an entirely diferent stamp on what Buddy and the Crickets did.

As if it to lend emphasis to this it happens that my two 'obscure' favourites are Not fade Away and That'll be The day which depart most dramatically from the originals. I certainly didn't like them at first but I now see exactly what the artists are doing with them

At the end of the day, however, I think it's the inspired pairing of Peggy Sue and Peggy Sue Got Married that provides the cornerstone of the album.

Now I'm not at all sure if Buddy ever intended them to be quite so dark. But the back to back listening experience on this album takes them into this dark, foreboding territory. And artistically I think it works beautifully. Lou's take does involve some getting used to but after a while it seems to be such an obvious format for a man so desperate.

it all culminates in the even more heightened desperation that John Doe manages to capture so poignantly in his chilling 'band of gold' line climax to Peggy Sue Got Married.

I really do believe that it's a rare coup for a cover to pull off something as magical as this - bringing out the simple yet stunning qualities hitherto concealed in Buddy's 50 year old songwriting.

Got to say [once again :-0) ] in regard to Peggy Sue Got married I think I've only ever heard such a re-invention of what seemed an ordinary song work quite so dramatically once before. That was Shawn Colvin's amazing and equally dark take on Doc Pomus's Viva Las Vegas - which I've acclaimed more than once on here. For me that previously was merely a quirky jaunt by Elvis and others but transformed by Shawn into the true classic it always clearly was.

Anyroad - I do hope a few more plays brings its rewards for you pete. and if not well C'est la vie.

:-0)


Entered at Sun Jul 17 13:37:03 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Rave On

I’ll have to try again. After several glowing reviews I bought it. I thought Paul’s thrashy take on It’s So Easy was dubious until he got to the soul shouting bits and I realized it was deeply, deeply misguided. One of the most abysmal efforts in his career, and I say this as a Paul fan. Cee Lo Green on Baby I Don’t Care sent me running to Elvis. I hated Not Fade Away by Florence + The Machine, and that’s the one The Band and The Crickets covered on the last compilation (Not Fade Away, 1996). Mind you, no one, not even the original, touches The Rolling Stones version. I thought Lou Reed was truly dire on Peggy Sue. I liked the horns, guitar and bass on the Kid Rock version of Well, All Right, but didn't like his voice.

I liked Fiona Apple on Everyday very much indeed, Karen Elson on Crying, Waiting and Hoping (such a great song). Nick Lowe on Changing All Those Changes, My Morning Jacket on True Love Ways, and Patti Smith on Words of Love. So really I liked the renditions that stayed closest to the originals. I didn’t like the ones that tried to do something new or different. I reckon the more conservative “Not Fade Away” set was better, but really I just want to hear Buddy Holly do them.

But I trust Al’s ear … so will try harder and to listen without the prejudice of listening avidly to all those Coral EPs on the youth club record player in the early 60s. I picked up the old 45 of Brown Eyed Handsome Man / Slippin' and Slidin' last week. It's one of those great double-sided records, where Buddy competes with Chuck Berry on the a-side, and to me trounces both Little Richard and The Band on the B-side. I think both had dubbed post production by The Fireballs. They were posthumous releases.


Entered at Sun Jul 17 02:27:52 CEST 2011 from (205.188.116.5)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: This ain't bean counting we're talking about, son.

Bob, I disagree with you. I think Garth being a full fledged participant in a series of Levon/Garth shows would put more asses in seats than The Levon Helm Band does right now at The Beacon. Old fans know, hell any fan should know, that Garth & levon will respond to each other different musically than anyone else would respond to each of them. That in turn effects everything. The entire band has to respond differently. Musical collaboration or cooperation is to a large part a series of simultaneously occurring reactions. I'm sure you recall Steven Bernstein discussing how he learned a new musical language from Levon when he first came on board.. There is one Garth, there is one Levon.

I've seen Brian Mitchell as far back as the 80s. He is an excellent musician. Since you are vocal music fan, I'm surprised you had the knee jerk reaction you had. To me, it is perfectly sane to want to hear & see Garth & levon together. And is not affront to The LH band, or any member. One other point, this is about music, not a head count. Economics is a reality, but I believe Garth & some press, would bring out the troops.

Peter, if this was to occur, and they wanted a male vocalist that could do Band song's true justice, Larry Thurston is the man. As good a singer as walks the planet.If they wanted to stay more local, Lamont Depew, from the other side of the Hudson, is one hell of a singer.

To my way of thinking, yes, the excellent female vocals are abundant and right, and Mavis a great and appropriate idea. She truly loves those guys BTW, i saw Mavis display genuine affection for Garth & Maud up close in Nashville. But a killer male vocalist would also be a good idea.


Entered at Sun Jul 17 01:39:06 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Redemption

I've tried to explain about the money. OK, it's $2000 for 100% guaranteed redemption and forgiveness of sins, but I said I'd pay when I've been redeemed, but I won't know whether I've been redeemed until I'm in a position where I will be unable to access a checking account. Whereupon Mr Hargis said that was why he insisted on money upfront, an issue which is still in dispute. Geoffrey Chaucer had a similar problem with Pardoners.

Tonight they showed classic Top of The Pops appearances 1964-1975. Highlights included This Wheel's On Fire by Julie Driscoll (and the credit box mentioned Rick Danko), A Whiter Shade of Pale (with monks outfit), the classic Maggie May with John Peel miming the mandolin part and Rod, Ronnie & Ronnie playing football, Lola by The Kinks, and T-Rex's Get It On with Elton John on piano. Odd to see how much older Diana Ross looked than her fellow Supremes on "Baby love" … 20 years older, we thought. Stealers Wheel with Stuck in The Middle was great.

What's weird is that year after year, the poor drummer was made to sit in front of the band and at a lower level to mime his part, looking very isolated. It seemed Hot Chocolate were the first band to place the drummer normally.


Entered at Sat Jul 16 23:11:24 CEST 2011 from (79.202.172.239)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: fake, you're a fake, I'm a fake, everything is fake

Mini Clubman ad


Entered at Sat Jul 16 21:58:34 CEST 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Wm. S. Hargis, esq, real estate law & redemption sales

Location: the Salvation Army dumpster

Subject: The USS Essex (CVS-9)

Roger & Peter (the latter of whom owes me money):

My client Lars Pedersen was aboard the USS Essex in Oct of 1968 when they picked up the Apollo 7 astronauts. Seaman (E-3) Pedersen did not actually SEE the operation, as he was tied up below decks, upside down, by a piece of hemp rope, during the recovery time period.

The Essex had one more cruise and then went to Boston, MA to be decommissioned, where seaman apprentice (E-2) Pedersen helped prepare the ship for the mothball fleet. Pedersen left the ship in June 1969 as an E-1 and carried a chip on his shoulder to his next ship, where he had a running feud with his commanding officer (LT Diamond) until his separation from duty (as an E-0) on July 10, 1970.


Entered at Sat Jul 16 21:29:01 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Run, mascara, run

Al, I hate to ask such a personal question,. but did you have a picture of The Ronettes pinned up in your bedroom too? Twinkle. Ahh.The Ronettes link is mascara, as you will know.


Entered at Sat Jul 16 21:26:23 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Roger: I did the Southampton "Essex" tour too! It was a major event. I saw it, and thought, "I like this!". Lars is too young to have been there in 1963, but no doubt the on board records had photos of the Isle of Wight seen from Southampton docks which started his aquisition / invasion idea. I can see them now, browsing the pics of the coloured sand cliffs at Yarmouth, and thinking "One day this can be all ours!'


Entered at Sat Jul 16 21:04:29 CEST 2011 from (98.111.35.96)

Posted by:

Jaynie

Subject: Rockin Westcoaster

Hi Norm!

I'm still here! Still working crazy hours and not getting too much computer time but I do check in once in a while. I've been enjoying the discussions around here lately. Nice to see the renewed harmony.

I love the name "Rockin Chair" for the new ship but I wish you'd stay "Westcoaster." I'm getting too old to be remembering new names. :-)

I'm happy that Mr. Seger and "my song" brought me to mind. Big hugs to you and Susan.

Still missin' Steve lots.


Entered at Sat Jul 16 21:01:23 CEST 2011 from (62.30.51.155)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: UK

Subject: If my memory serves me well...

As a kid in Bournemouth, circa 1962/3 I remember a US aircraft carrier berthing in Southampton for days / weeks? Long enough to run public tours anyways. A friend and I visited - big stuff on our own, a 25 mile train ride and so forth. We toured the ship and were duly impressed by the sailors who showed us round. I remember 'Easier said Than Done' being played on Radio Luxembourg (K-E-Y-N-S-H-A-M - remember folks?) and someone - maybe a DJ relating the story that the group had been formed from those associated with the ship. When the legend becomes the truth, print the legend I say. Lars - were you on the Essex in Southampton?

Sorry Peter I didn't get the boots connection Peter, I was still in love with Honor Blackman.


Entered at Sat Jul 16 20:01:39 CEST 2011 from (91.42.252.28)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: The kitchen, cooking our meal for the day.
Web: My link

Subject: 7

This morning my lovely wife wanted to mow the grass with our new zero turn mower, I couldn’t convince her otherwise so I showed her how the thing worked and went inside, but only to keep a close eye on the whole performance. My basic suspect that mowing grass is men’s work was validated within a minute. She was driving chaotically over the long grass, no system what so ever to discover. In order to address her afterwards convincingly and documented I quickly made a draft of the garden and drew her non pattern in it. After she had finished (and parked the thing back into the garage with a show off wheelie ...), I looked at my garden drawing and discovered that there was a sentence to read ...( ), I was stunned, but it clearly said:

“Whereof one cannot speak, thereof one must pass over in silence”

It was proposition 7 from Ludwig Wittgenstein’s Tractatus ....


Entered at Sat Jul 16 19:52:00 CEST 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: The Essex

Subject: The Essex

Hi Peter- I have no idea if the musicians who comprised "The Essex" were ever actually on my old ship, that was a little before my time. But I remember hearing that they were ex- Marines. Since the early '60's Navy didn't allow female marines to serve on board, I think it's safe to say that not ALL of the group could have served on the ship. I somehow doubt that any of them did, because the marine contingent on the Essex during peace time would have been pretty small. They just needed enough Jarheads to accompany the XO around the ship when he was walking the decks. Just a guess on my part.

We are starting to get a little dry around here, we could use a little rain.

On the subject of Garth, he might show up at the next Bush Brothers appearance at High Falls. He's played at their last two shows, but you never know for sure if he's showing up until the night of the gig. He may have bigger fish to fry next time around. We'll see.....


Entered at Sat Jul 16 19:41:37 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Don't be embarrassed Pete

I, too, had the hots for both but especially Billie. I hated jet harris for dating her. bastard.

:-0)

Thanks btw to Rog for stirring old rogering passions and a fine top 30. Also Dlew- especially for not listing all his Stevie wonder selctions!!

:-0)


Entered at Sat Jul 16 19:19:10 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The Essex were American, on Roulette and all had served on the U.S.S. Essex, I believe. The release here was Columbia. I chose them under "Girl Groups." Interesting that we both chose it because it was a very minor hit here (UK #41). I wonder if it was particularly popular in Bournemouth. That happens. Joey Dee's What Kind of Love Is This wasn't a big deal in Britain, but I know three of my contemporaries who bought it, and Tony Blackburn sang it every week at the Pavilion when supporting Zoot Money.

Twinkle and Billy Davis both wore fetching boots, e.g. on Top of The Pops. I'm now embarrassed that I recall this so clearly.


Entered at Sat Jul 16 18:39:32 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: John Doe

Me neither Joe.

Never even heard of him before. And to be honest I haven't investigated any further because I just kind of know that no matter how good the guy might be I'm not going to find anything to touch this take on Peggy Sue Got Married. I'm sure it's a one in a million exception. A freak if you like. Everything just coming together to make something truly special, certainly something right up there with anything I've ever heard.


Entered at Sat Jul 16 18:30:53 CEST 2011 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Location: the foggy dew

Subject: j doe

Don't know for naught re John Doe except that he does a couple of Dylan covers on the "I'm Not There" soundtrack, one of which, "Pressing On", gets regular play around here. Should investigate further I suppose.


Entered at Sat Jul 16 18:01:44 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: John Doe and Peggy Sue got married

I've had the Rave On album tribute to Buddy for over 2 weeks now.

It hasn't been off - either in the car or in the house. Apart from Sir Paul's take on It's So easy and Kid [you not] Rock's take on Well Alright both of which I initially liked but quickly tired of due to their basic naffness, the remaining 17 tracks are quite exceptional and stand repeated - and I mean repeated - listenings.

One special mention goes to the back to back Lou reed and - most especially - the John Doe tracks. Lou really drives home the point that Buddy probably intended yet never quite pulled off due to his jaunty delivery. That is the real sense of angst and loss of life WITHOUT Peggy Sue.

And then the piece de resistance - John Does delivery of a song I'd hitherto liked but no more than liked which I now find difficult not to listen to at least half a dozen times a day and each time is just so good, so moving, such a triumph of artistry that each time makes me well up. And i don't do that much with any music. But, honest to God, this is a track that is just so good it moves me each time.

When music does that you just know you're hearing something special.

Can't recommend the album highly enough.

As you might have just read

:-0)


Entered at Sat Jul 16 17:17:52 CEST 2011 from (99.254.209.45)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Levon Helm

Levon Helm and the Ramble Band here in Toronto tonight. John Fogerty on the same bill. A perfect summers night; according to the weather.


Entered at Sat Jul 16 16:12:09 CEST 2011 from (72.71.209.213)

Posted by:

PROFESSOR LOUIE & THE CROWMATIX (facebook)

Web: My link

Beautiful live Rick Danko (w/ Garth Hudson & Professor Louie) tune "Twilight" from 09/15/99.


Entered at Sat Jul 16 15:43:19 CEST 2011 from (69.123.3.201)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Garth and Levon at The Beacon would bring in the same audience as The Levon Helm Band. Artists like Emmylou Harris bring in additional paying customers. By the way, Levon's keyboard player Brian Mitchell is tremendous. I'm not comparing him to Garth but the guy can really play.


Entered at Sat Jul 16 15:09:34 CEST 2011 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: All La Glory

Heard a gorgeous gorgeous version of ""All LA Glory" driving home yesterday. By Matthew Barber - from an in-studio taping at CBC Radio it see£ms.


Entered at Sat Jul 16 14:55:43 CEST 2011 from (62.30.51.155)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: UK

Subject: The Essex

Gosh - I didn't know you'd posted The Essex too Peter. In my memory there's a Southampton connection. Mean anything? But they weren't a girl band....

Don't get the Billie Davis - Twinkle connection. Twinkle sang about crashes - and Billie famously had one with jet Harris (in Birmingham I think..)

only other connection I can see is that they were both pin-ups for a generation of pubescent school boys.


Entered at Sat Jul 16 12:26:37 CEST 2011 from (41.97.245.232)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: Gordon Xmas

at the turn of the 20th , John Martin accompanied his father who emigrated from England to Belgium with the intention to extend his activities in the ships market. In 1908, aged 23 years, John created in Antwerp his first brewing company.

in the link above, his grandson reveals in a few words the secret of the British beer, as brewed by Scottish and Newcastle brewers in Edinburgh, how it seduced the beer's connoisseurs in the homeland of beer

in the linked video, the comments become in English at 1:30


Entered at Sat Jul 16 10:59:20 CEST 2011 from (75.34.54.168)

Posted by:

Adam2

Friend0 - You are totally right. Levon and Garth need to play more co-headlining shows together. That would be much more satisfying than just hoping for all 3 surviving Band members to reunite. Could you imagine Garth and Maud co-headlining a Ramble every month or so? Garth plays an opening set, Levon plays his set, and Garth joins him? That would be so amazing. I would take the trip from Chicago again in a second.

By the way, Garth recently responded to a wall post I made on his Facebook page. I don't know if it was literally Garth typing on the computer, as I know Maud runs it, so it was probably her. But such an amazing honor to have the Hudsons recognize my existence!


Entered at Sat Jul 16 08:58:07 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Yes, in a lot of these 'revival' things, female singers are the best bet for replacing male vocals. On the Leonard Cohen tributes and covers, the women come across better. Mary Margaret O'Hara leaps out on Garth's Band tribute, and Out of The Blue is definitely going to be one of my most-played tracks of the year. Robbie uses female vocal to great effect on his solo stuff, as does Levon's shows nowadays with Amy and Teresa. Maud does a beautiful It Makes No Difference. I think when you switch, the nitpicking comparison of stylings drops out of the equation. Yes, you have three superb vocalists very close to home already. If you need four, Mavis Staples!


Entered at Sat Jul 16 04:38:30 CEST 2011 from (69.124.123.123)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Adam, Jon. Peter, Garth, Levon

My hope would be Levon & Garth doing some shows together. I wouldn't like to see it limited to Garth sitting in at more Rambles. Sitting in is great but it is sitting in. I'd love to see Garth as a featured artists both on his own and with levon's band at a series of Rambles, kind of an equal billing thing. Or an equal billing series of shows at some other venue, possibly The Beacon Theatre, or a place along those lines. As great as The Rambles are, Garth & Levon together is another story. Whomever mentioned the need for other singers, well yes, a huge need. The environment already offers three great female candidates, but if this was to happen and anyone asked me to recco some singers, I know who to call.

Funny, I posted on Levon's FB musician page about a week ago about this very thing. If any of you want to bother adding your thoughts about this there, it is easy to find.

Like I said, Rambles are great... but Levon's voice being limited, the uniquesneess of Levon's drums is there. No other drummer will ever sound like that. Garth- keyboard players cop & borrow what they can, but Garth is his own msuical entity. They are both grown men, and don't need us pawing at them, telling em what we want to hear. but son of a gun, I'd love to hear them co-leading a band for a couple of shows together, give me a couple of hours of Garth & levon together, I'll shut the fuck up for awhile.


Entered at Sat Jul 16 02:55:35 CEST 2011 from (24.44.103.67)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Web: My link

Fall Changes - a new album coming out of Levon Helm Studios - some cool funky blues.


Entered at Sat Jul 16 02:50:09 CEST 2011 from (72.71.209.213)

Posted by:

Plochmann Lane

Web: My link

Producer & songwrite Jerry Ragovoy, who penned the Rolling Stones' "Time Is On My Side" & Janis Joplin's "Try (Just A Little Bit Harder" & "Piece of My Heart," recently passed away @ the age of 76 following a July 13th stroke.


Entered at Fri Jul 15 23:57:55 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Roger, name the connection. Billie Davis and Twinkle. Both adolescent favourites.


Entered at Fri Jul 15 23:47:04 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Brahms & Liszts

Love the lists. There can’t be many sites where Easier Said Than Done got mentioned twice in a day. God Only Knows … I nearly put that up instead of Surf’s Up. Probably a better long term bet. A Case of You is one of our continual arguments here. Joni or k.d.’s cover?

Jesse James by Van Morrison was so far out that I had to go and look where it was from … totally fallen off my radar.

Tell Him is Billie Davis (IE). Billy Davis (Y) was the producer of Rescue Me. I can tell you this because I just picked up the 45 of “Three steps From True Love” by the latter, thinking it was a track I didn’t know from the former. “Tell Him” was originally by The Exciters (Do-Wah-Diddy) but I know what you mean about Billie Davis, who dated both Jet Harris and Brian Jones.


Entered at Fri Jul 15 22:55:24 CEST 2011 from (62.30.51.155)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Brum UK

Subject: Now that you called me by name...

Al - lists. Band top 10. Way back in 1979 when we thought cassette tape was hi tech my family and I moved to Nepal. Goods and luxuries were hard to come by out there. We could get things sent out in the diplomatic bag but there were limits so we had to choose carefully how much we took with us when we left the UK. I made a compilation tape of my favourite band tracks. Now I was very proud of this cassette. Compilations took time in those days. Real time in fact had to be used for recording from vinyl. I squeezed about 24 tracks onto the C90 cassette - and I'd purchased expensive tape. Shortly after we'd set up house in Kathmandu we were burgled. We lost things like cameras, hi fi equipment and so forth but I took some comfort because the thieving bastards were clearly not Band fans and left me the tape! There was one favourite track which I'd overlooked including and it's going to be the first one on my list below.

1. All La Glory

2. When I Awake

3. Rockin' Chair

4. The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down

5. Arcadian Driftwood

6. It Makes No Difference

7. King Harvest

8. Whispering Pines

9. When I Paint My Masterpiece

10. The Weight

This list could easily change for maybe 12 / 13 others including 'Too Soon Gone' but c'est la vie with lists.

Now Top 30. My list is a random selection of great pop music and classics in no order. I'm grateful to other listers because I'll score plenty of new material for 'Driving' compilations.

1. Easier Said Than Done - The Essex

2.Atlantis - The Shadows

3. Say You Don't Mind - Colin Blunstone

4. I Could Drink A Case Of You - Joni Mitchell

5. Air - The Incredible String Band

6. If I Fell - The Beatles

7. A Stand Up Guy - Mark Knopfler

8. God Only Knows - The Beach Boys

9. Visions of Johanna - Bob Dylan

10. Sylvia's Mother - Dr Hook

11. Bring It On Home To Me - The Animals

11. Indian Queens - Nick Lowe

12. Did You Ever Have To Make Up Your Mind? - The Lovin' Spoonful

13. Tell Him - Billy Davisn\ 14. Tom Traubert's Blues - Tom Waits

15. The Gypsy's Wife - Leonard Cohen

16. Video Killed The Radio Star - Buggles

17. Still Crazy After All These Years - Paul Simon

18. Walk Away Renee - Four Tops

19. Wild World - Cat Stevens

20. Don't Forget To Dance - The Kinks

21. Jesse james - Van Morrison

22. Let It Bleed - The Rolling Stones

23. Here Comes The Night - Them

24. All Alone Am I - Brenda Lee

25. Never Saw Blue Like That - Shawn Colvin

26. Pilgrim - Steve Earl and the Del McCrory Band

27. Blue Northern Lights - Ollabelle

28. The Day We Caught The Train - Ocean Colour Scene

29. No Surprises - Radiohead

30. Broken Arrow - Robbie Robertson

Damin it - two number 11s - tough.

Tickets go on sale on Monday for Bob Dylan and Mark Knopfler - together. October. Glasgow and Bournemouth on the list.


Entered at Fri Jul 15 22:09:50 CEST 2011 from (95.147.180.93)

Posted by:

Michelle

Location: Ascot

Subject: Woodstock

Have been lucky enough to visit Woodstock a couple of times, dragged my very bemused family around! stayed at a fantastic bed and breakfast, 'Bed by the Stream', was not lucky enough to secure Midnight Ramble tickets on those occasions, but Levon, Garth and Bob?! I would swim the Atlantic!


Entered at Fri Jul 15 21:42:52 CEST 2011 from (63.88.115.195)

Posted by:

carmen

Location: PA

Subject: 3 + 1

How about the 3 plus Dylan doing 1 more


Entered at Fri Jul 15 20:39:03 CEST 2011 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

A more realistic wish might be Garth sitting in on more Rambles. It would be great fun to see Garth and Levon together again, and he'd be such a natural fit for the music they play. He's popped in once or twice, but I'm surprised he doesn't do it more often.


Entered at Fri Jul 15 19:50:33 CEST 2011 from (129.42.208.177)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Levon has a wonderful set up with his band and the Ramble. Everyone who loves The Band should try to get to Woodstock at least once and experience what he has up there. I don't know the man but I seriously doubt he sits around thinking about making music with Robbie. Not only does he have two amazing guitar players, he gets to make music with Amy, his daughter. As a father, I don't think anything could be better then that.


Entered at Fri Jul 15 19:40:35 CEST 2011 from (76.99.245.65)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: by the pond

Subject: Rockin' Welshmen

Hey Norm, it was a treat seeing Dave Edmunds, Pino, Geraint, Henry Spinetti and Andy Fairweather Low (all friends/associates of Townshend, Ian McLagen, Ronnie Lane, Clapton, etc) playing with such spirit. As for "frontman on accordion", to my ears, it sounded a lot like my (highly biased) personal favorite musical style, creole zydeco. All it needed was Ron Wood on scrubboard.


Entered at Fri Jul 15 19:23:46 CEST 2011 from (68.32.141.213)

Posted by:

Luke

Location: PA

Adam & Peter V. It would be great if Levon, RR, and Garth played together, but they would need new material and at least one new singer (Amy?). I think it would be interesting to have the three of them collaborate and write for a female voice. Larry Campbell and Brian Mitchell can sing as well.


Entered at Fri Jul 15 19:15:13 CEST 2011 from (99.102.207.184)

Posted by:

Dee

Location: Wisconsin

Subject: Beery Response to Bill M

Stella is my Gentleman Caller's current favorite "On Tap" and I like it too. We usually order anything that might be good "On Tap". There are many small breweries in Wisconsin now that Milwaukee is no longer the hub of Beerdom and they make fine beers. Don't recall the name of the beer I drank in Paris, it tasted fine as did beer in England and Germany. (Can you tell I spent my formative years in Milwaukee?)

Thanks for the kind words about Wisconsin.


Entered at Fri Jul 15 18:27:03 CEST 2011 from (83.249.106.111)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Subject: Guthrie

DON'T MENTION GUTHRIE, Peter!!! I have played "Do re mi" too much. Now there is a bird outside my open window who wakes me up at 04.13 every morning buy singing "Do re mi". "Turdus Medula" in Latin is his name. No kidding! - It's really nice, actually. The sea is calm.


Entered at Fri Jul 15 18:02:47 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Woody Guthrie

Well, it would have been better yesterday than today given that he was born on Bastille Day. I can't remember when it was but someone posted a "Happy birthday …" to a deceased musician (probably Rick or Richard) a couple of years ago.That Billy Bragg link to "Never Buy The Sun" was a great tribute to Woody Guthrie in spirit, execution and style, I thought.


Entered at Fri Jul 15 18:00:43 CEST 2011 from (83.249.106.111)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Web: My link

Subject: WRONG LINK!!!!!!!!!!

.


Entered at Fri Jul 15 17:58:45 CEST 2011 from (83.249.106.111)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Web: My link

Subject: SAR

...CALLING WESTCOASTER...OVER......CALLING WESTCOASTER...OVER......CALLING WESTCOASTER...OVER......CALLING WESTCOASTER...OVER...


Entered at Fri Jul 15 17:54:31 CEST 2011 from (108.41.170.6)

Posted by:

Joan

Norm congratulations on the new boat. Sail on sailor.

Peter, would it be better if we say Woody Guthrie was born on this day 99 years ago?


Entered at Fri Jul 15 17:47:08 CEST 2011 from (68.164.5.197)

Posted by:

Pat B

I'm sure I've told this story before. I read Shelby Foote's The Civil War trilogy back in 1980. After I finished I wrote him that I was sitting at the Wilder monument on the Chickamauga battlefield with the sun going down reading his account of the action there and listening to TNTDODD. I told him I never felt closer to connecting to the past and I thanked him for it. Within two weeks he wrote to thank me for the kind words, then he wrote "I share with you a high regard for the Band's rendition of "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down." Now that's livin'.


Entered at Fri Jul 15 16:48:54 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I’d love to see them together, Adam, but you have to consider not how they feel about playing with each other, but how they feel about playing 43 year old material with two of the main singers gone. I recall the story of a British band who were offered a great deal of money to reform, but one of them said he’d agree, but only if they did all new material. The promoter wasn’t interested. While it would be great to see Robbie lending his guitar to Dirt Farmer material, or hear Levon’s drums on Robbie’s new stuff, or both of them backing Sea to The North, that’s not what the punters would be lining up to see. We could have Robbie’s guitar intro to The Weight, Garth’s piano and Levon’s drums, but do you think they could make much of a job of the vocal between the three of them now? OK, maybe for one song with Levon, but he seems to have to limit his amount of singing now.

I can’t see them ever doing it unless they thought they could at least pull off a few of the old songs and do them justice. Maybe the one song on some big event is the most to hope for.


Entered at Fri Jul 15 16:29:31 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Rockin' Chair: Congragulations on the retirement, to what ever degree it turns out to be retirement, and the new name.

Dee: Why Stella? Norm's favourite? Anyway, the Belgian for me is Leffe; love the taste and also the fact that it never fails to transport me back to sitting in a warming sliver of sunlight at a sidwalk cafe on Paris's Left Bank early one March afternoon. A Leffe and a 'croque monsieur' - luxury! None of which is to dismiss the undoubted charms of Wisconsin. Not just Racine and Green Bay, but also what in the early was surely '90s the World's Best Airport - it had a very good secondhand book store right inside.

Peter V: Sure, you get delayed for six hours on Crete with a beach nearby! I've gotten delayed like that only in places like Brussels and Gatwick - and at midnight. Where's the justice in that?

Re lists, it struck me some weeks ago that my very favourite song ("Half-Closed Eyes") and my very favourite novel ("The Horse's Mouth") have a very significant intersection. What strikes me as the key line in a thoroughly lovely song and record is "Touch the hands of laughter and be blessed". And in the closing scene of the book, when the 'hero' is being taken to hospital by a Nursing Sister (to die), she says, "It would be better for you to pray [than laugh]", and he replies, in what are the final three words of the book, "Same thing, mother."

Anyway, that got me wondering if others' lists intersected. Like maybe Pat B with TNTDODD and "The Big Book of Civil War Heroes", or Peter V with "Broken English" and "An Instructor's Guide to ESL", or Kalvin with "Dedicated Follower Of Fashion" and "The Scarlett Pimpernel", or RtO with "Drift Away" and "Three Men In A Boat".


Entered at Fri Jul 15 13:38:05 CEST 2011 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

PROFESSOR LOUIE & THE CROWMATIX (facebook)

Web: My link

"Blind Willie McTell" performed w/ The Beards.


Entered at Fri Jul 15 11:38:54 CEST 2011 from (75.34.54.168)

Posted by:

Adam2

Did anyone read on RollingStone.com a few days ago how John Fogerty recently explained that his feelings have changed about a CCR reunion, and that he would possibly be open to one in the future? Makes you wonder if Levon could ever get together with Robbie again, and bring Garth along, for one last collaboration. I don't like the odds of it happening but there will always be a little bit of hope.

I don't mean to sound like a broken record, but I've said it before and I'll say it again - we're living in the golden age of Band solo albums. Such a great thing for a younger fan like myself. Levon, Robbie, and Garth have all released such high-quality releases in the past 10 years. I'm very thankful.


Entered at Fri Jul 15 10:38:03 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Lists … are always momentary and liable to updating. I have a huge number of songs in iTunes on my iMac, which copy over to my in-car iPod, but on there among the playlists is a “Peter Desert Island” playlist that gets copied to my more restricted iPad and iPhone. (Did I ever mention that I used Apple?) That has a tight list of 73 songs (as of today), so selecting is helped by looking at it. But the lists discussion has meant adding several tracks from other’s lists that I’d forgotten about.

Lists are fun. Once on a book promotion tour we had a delayed flight in Crete, because the incoming plane had burst a tyre on landing, and they had to fly in another tyre from the mainland and fit it. We were told to come back in six hours, so the publisher’s rep and I took a taxi to a beach café and whiled away the entire delay sitting in the sun over fresh fish and crisp white wine whittling down our Top 12 desert island songs, arguing over every one, and producing two lists (on the back of a menu) which were not allowed to have the same songs on. Twelve? The number of tracks on a “standard” LP of course. When I got back home I made up two cassettes and sent them. I wish I could find one now, because I bet there were many differences to my last list. I’m sure it had King Harvest on though, because that’s been #1 since I first heard it. It may well have had “Rain” on instead of Baby you’re A Rich Man. I alternate. Note both were B-sides. That’s how good The Beatles were.


Entered at Fri Jul 15 04:42:50 CEST 2011 from (69.124.123.123)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: La La Brooks (lead singer, The Crystals)

Back in the winter of 2010 I caught a Brian Mitchell Band show at the Parkside Lounge. Jimmy Vivino was along that night, the main reason I went. There was a woman with quite captivating looks sitiing at a table against the wall. Jimmy introduced her,La La Brooks she got up, performed the best vocal and animated version of Beast Of Burden probably ever performed. The band burned. The stones woulda been impressed. Actually the band burned all night. Vivno, Mitcehll, Sean Pelton, Freddie Walcott on percussion, Clark Gayton on trombone, & Andy Hess on bass.


Entered at Fri Jul 15 00:20:26 CEST 2011 from (99.102.204.70)

Posted by:

Dee

Location: Wisconsin

Subject: Norm & Lists

"Rocking Chair"

Thinking of having a beer to celebrate your retirement WHEN it happens! Even may have a "Stella" instead of the usual "Spotted Cow" (The latter being a local brew.)

The "lists' submitted amaze me. When I think of the music I have loved over the years, no way could I get it down to 10, 20 or 30. Just a couple of weeks ago, coming home from lunch with gentleman friend, the car hit a bump and the CD player went on....playing Frankie Laine singing "On The Sunny Side Of The Street". We both started singing along. Love the old Frankie Laine stuff. (6 CD player allows for 3 Band CD's and 3 other rotated favorites. Needed to go to the county seat (Waukesha) to get some legal work done. Called friends and offered lunch if they would navigate to lawyers office. Otherwise I'd be like "Charlie on the MTA" and they would have to hand me a sandwich. Reminded me I love the Kingston Trio and played their CD's for while. Band music from the 40's, Louis Armstrong,Ella and on and on. I would play the inherited 78's but no longer have anything but CD players. Love country too..even if it is called Redneck Blues. (I AM a Yankee)


Entered at Fri Jul 15 00:17:24 CEST 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

rockin chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Down the Road a Piece

In the beginning, there was Amos Milburn.........ALL the boogie woogie........chicken shack boogie, etc, etc, etc...


Entered at Thu Jul 14 22:45:14 CEST 2011 from (95.147.180.93)

Posted by:

Michelle

Location: Ascot

Subject: Lists

Oh and Thankyou Peter V, and others, for explaining how to set out lists, simple really, but unless some kind person takes time out to explain...? I really should read instructions more!


Entered at Thu Jul 14 22:32:28 CEST 2011 from (95.147.180.93)

Posted by:

Michelle

Location: Ascot

Subject: Girl Bands

This was really quite difficult! 1.Bond - Explosive

2.Chantels - Maybe

3. Shirelles - Will you still love me tomorrow

4.Dixie Chicks - Not ready to make nice

5.Martha and the Vandellas - Dancing in the street

6.Bond - Fuego

7. The Supremes - Come see about me

8.Bangles - Eternal Flame

9.Kate and Anna McGarrigle - Love Is

10. Ronettes - Baby I Love You

would also liked to have included Staple Singers (sorry Pop!)


Entered at Thu Jul 14 22:15:11 CEST 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

rockin chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Favourite Picks

After I got back out to sea, thinking of and listening to some of my old favourites, I realized what I had forgotten.

When Bill Wyman, Charlie Watts, Chris Rea and all these guys did those "Willie & the Poor Boys" songs on that album from the concerts. Well that boogie woogie to me is some of the best music ever.

Here's Geraint Watkins doing "Squeeze Box". Never see many guys doing the front man playing a piaono accordion.


Entered at Thu Jul 14 22:06:38 CEST 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

rockin chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Bottle of wine

Norbert! it would be one of my greatest pleasures to have you and your lady sitting on that top deck in a quiet bay in the evening sharing a good bottle of wine and sharing stories.

That goes for any of the rest-a-yuz. I'm working my way around to having my time free to enjoy life. Not that I could complain. Living a pretty free life on the water and making a good living after all the struggles, one can't complain.

I was kidding Pat Brennan about that financial situation the other day Norbert. But loosing their triple A status, and the very real situation with national debt is becoming serious. On the news this morning they are talking about not having the money for old age pension commitments, medical care, paying their military people etc.

One of the republican political women, (I forget her name) claims President Obama is on a spending spree. It's not looking good in the USA right now. Hope they weather the storm, and things turn around.

My bills are all due, my children need shoes, and I'm busted..........


Entered at Thu Jul 14 21:32:39 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: He just wants to ride on his motor-cy-cle

And last Sunday was Arlo Guthrie's 64th birthday. :-)


Entered at Thu Jul 14 21:27:57 CEST 2011 from (91.42.226.189)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: National debt tumbles off the triple A

Norm, congrats, I didn’t think to ever come over anymore, but now I do. I’ll take my Els along and we’re going to make a cruise!

Lars & Al thanks.

Debt: Who has the biggest? Just heart the USA is still ahead in national debt at the moment, but Europe is catching up. (link).

Within a decade there will be an American and a European ghetto in the slums of Peking. In the beginning there will be much rivalry amongst them, each hood with their own gang. But only a few decades later you will see American and European entrepreneurs with little shops.

I'll hold on to the Band (from 1920 a group of less then 7 musician).


Entered at Thu Jul 14 21:08:54 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Hey. hey. Woodie Guthrie, I wrote you a song …

While "Woody Guthrie was born 99 years ago today" makes sense to me, marking the "birthday" of someone who's been dead for years (today would have been his 99th birthday) seems bizarre. I've said this before. Sorry. It just goes CLANG! with me.


Entered at Thu Jul 14 20:24:27 CEST 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: not the westcoaster any more

I'm tired........been runnin' my ass off too much. However. Today we have had our offer accepted on a 54' Monk motor yacht. The name of this ship was changed by the most resent owners. Named, "Barolo" which is apparently some Italian wine, (which doesn't do it for me).

Because of my long and lasting friendship with my buddy Lars, the song of the Band, we share, and most resently a comment by a couple of friends of mine. "Well what are you going to do if you retire? sit around in yer rockin chair?" It seemed only fitting to name the ship, "Rockin Chair".

To see some pictures of her, google, Grand Yachts Inc, Vancouver. Click in the blue column to left Yachts for sale. Scroll down to 54' Monk Motor Yacht. There are several pictures. Just below is another 54' Monk Pilot House. I was having trouble making up my mind over the two. Unfortunately, last night the Pilot house one burnt up. There is one sad story about this ship we are getting. The owner, who owned her for 40 years, sadly had to sell her. His wife had become afflicted with alzhiemers disease. He was unable to take her out on the ship any more, as he couldn't run the boat and look after her, and so had to sell.

I haven't quite got my tug & barge sold yet, and retired, but it's getting close. My tug & barge are on the real west coast, of Vancouver Island, in Quatsino Sound. I transported a couple pieces of equipment out there. Now I have to leave next week and bring two barge loads from Nootka Island around to Campbell River. Thankfully so far the weather, (as far as wind goes) is great.

The other day, I rounded Cape Scott, slipped nicely through Scott Channel. As I ran on a beautiful calm sea with only a hint of a ground swell down past Cape Palmerston, and Topknot Point, I laid back with my feet up. Watching the sun sink right into the Pacific Ocean. The lights in the electronics began to glow as twilight came on. I looked back over my shoulder at the navigation lights twinkling at me on my barge. She was right where she should be following along on her leash like a trained pup.

I all of a sudden realized, on the stereo, Bob Seger was wailing at me. "We were young and strong, we were runnin' against the wind." I thought..well that was fitting. I thought of Jaynie for a moment. Wondered where she is, and how she's doing now.

Isn't it strange, how even on this sight people can very briefly come by your life, and then stay there and become a part of it. As well the many relationships that are born here and carry on.

Well I'm older now, and still runnin'...........against the wind.


Entered at Thu Jul 14 19:31:54 CEST 2011 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

THE BAND (facebook)

Web: My link

Today marks what would have been Woody Guthrie's 99th birthday.


Entered at Thu Jul 14 18:36:58 CEST 2011 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: girl groups

Jaynetts, sure. Supremes absolutely - though "Symphony". Ronettes, "Be My Baby" as suggested. Sweet Inspirations (guess which) and "Sugah Woogah" by the Playmates on Savoy.


Entered at Thu Jul 14 16:56:52 CEST 2011 from (59.101.14.222)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Nothrwestcoaster...

Austraian's are generally very proud of Mary... thought you might like to know that...


Entered at Thu Jul 14 16:23:28 CEST 2011 from (69.177.242.99)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Zep

I don't listen to Zeppelin much these days either (they got way overplayed on FM radio during the 80's and 90's).

But, one of my favorites from them has always been 'Good Times Bad Times'. Pretty impressive leadoff track to their first album. Sweet and ominous at the same time. Suitably funky, and nobody's ever hit the kick drum quite like John Bonham. And Page has come up with some pretty iconic riffs over the years. They were a great band to love as a teenager. But somehow I started to lose interest after their second album.


Entered at Thu Jul 14 16:10:02 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Girl Group songs include solo stuff that sounds just like girl group stuff? I reckon. This is a hard list. No particular order either.

1) The He Kissed Me – The Crystals

2) Come See About Me – The Supremes

3) Sally Go Round The Roses – The Jaynetts

4) Past, Present & Future- The Shangri-Las

5) Do-Wah-Diddy – The Exciters

6) Easier Said Than Done – The Essex

7) Be My Baby – The Ronettes

8) Zip-A-Dee-Doo-Dah – Bobby Soxx & The Blue Jeans

9) You keep Me Hanging On – The Supremes

10) Keep Your Hands Off My Baby – Little Eva



Entered at Thu Jul 14 15:11:00 CEST 2011 from (70.28.32.74)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

Okay. I'll bite.

Top 5 Girl Groups Songs (No particular order)

1) Marvelettes: Don't Mess With Bill

2) Spice Girls: Say You'll Be There

3) Jaynetts: Sally Go 'Round The Roses

4) Mary Jane Girls: In My House

5) Martha & The Vandellas: So many Memories



Entered at Thu Jul 14 14:58:47 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Love the Jaynetts song. How about a top girl group singles list?


Entered at Thu Jul 14 14:11:25 CEST 2011 from (70.28.32.74)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal
Web: My link

Obscure? No. Less popular that it flies under the radar? Probably. Here's one that I wish I could have added to my list, which has probably become a Top 100 by now.

Still enjoying all the lists. Keep them coming.


Entered at Thu Jul 14 13:18:09 CEST 2011 from (24.44.103.67)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Not much of a Zep listener these days but the Rain Song is a tremendous song that I have to crank up whenever I hear it on the radio. That would be a Top 30 song.


Entered at Thu Jul 14 11:07:38 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Obscurity? Hardly …

The Marvelettes “When You’re Young and In Love” was the UK hit (#13). Simon's first choice, “The Hunter Gets Captured By The Game” is an iconic Motown track, written by Smokey Robinson, released just before it. In the USA it was a major hit (R&B #2, Pop #13) at the beginning of 1967. While it didn’t actually chart in the UK, it’s a highly-regarded Motown classic here and made it to the highly selective Motown first box set, “Hitsville USA”. The harmonica part is in fact a monophonic synthesizer. I think it really reached the heights of appreciation in the UK later in the 70s, when it became a favoured soul revival track and is among the elite group of reissued Motown singles. I just looked it up in The Complete Motown Singles 1966 (it was issued December 27th), and among the cover versions is one by Massive Attack.


Entered at Thu Jul 14 10:59:32 CEST 2011 from (75.34.54.235)

Posted by:

Adam2

Garth's "Canadian Celebration" CD is still in heavy rotation on my player. I just love it. Garth's playing/arranging skills are as great as ever. I really hope a Vol. 2 is released.


Entered at Thu Jul 14 06:32:04 CEST 2011 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

And the version of Idiot Wind from the NY sessions with Paul Griffin on organ trumps all.


Entered at Thu Jul 14 04:40:21 CEST 2011 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

btw, as per that biography, Plant and Pagey were big Band fans.


Entered at Thu Jul 14 04:25:23 CEST 2011 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

The Rain Song is truly one of the most original songs in the rock canon. Page's use of the alternate tuning is incredibly unique, and I love that mellotron stuff. Now I contend that LZ wasn't much of a live band, at least the few times I saw them, but I've seen plenty of youtube performance and have enjoyed the live DVD thoroughly enough to understand their place in history. Plus, When Gods Walked The Earth is a brilliant biography of the group and must reading for any rock fan. And the author Mick Wall is an amiable chap.


Entered at Thu Jul 14 01:07:10 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Bribery and Corroboration

Bob F: What could possibly ever make you think that Bob?

:=0)

Al E speaks with forked nose

Not being funny Si but I'm hearing Enrique may be on his way - I'm thinking with him, Downing, Adam, a fit SG, the Flanagan/Kelly/Robinson/Spearing emergence and Carroll actually able to move marginally faster than a snail in clogs we might just surprise everyone including ourselves.

You?


Entered at Thu Jul 14 01:05:51 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Norb

Ha ha. Post of the month

:-0)


Entered at Wed Jul 13 22:49:10 CEST 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: the back roads of my memory

Subject: Life report from deep in the woods of NY

Norbert- my advice to you is to either go to bed or start drinking heavily.



Entered at Wed Jul 13 22:47:57 CEST 2011 from (69.123.3.201)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Question for Al

Al, do you owe Simon money?


Entered at Wed Jul 13 22:03:43 CEST 2011 from (89.200.200.49)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: Life report lobby Grand Hotel Bad Boekelo

Lobby Grand Hotel Bad Boekelo, 07-13-2011 10.00pm. After long debate about the real size of the table we’re sitting at my wife is right now measuring the whole thing up with the spring rule out of her purse (260x100x75cm, just as thought). Situated with my back to the wall at the 260cm table; observe the entire entrance of the hotel without drawing any attention. To the right in front of me there is an elderly couple sitting in the easy chairs, she's drinking heavy; red wine, he beer? (can’t see, he looks not happy, was life too hard on him? Does he regret his wife now the end comes near?). They don’t talk, she’s bored, he looks around like me, has noticed me and my laptop already, looked back, he looked away, no danger from that side at the moment. In front to the left, a young man, lying on the couch, also with laptop, headphones; mike attached, sometimes he speaks, Russian or another communist thing (wearing white black striped socks, cheap slippers). Have to watch out. Just ordered another beer and glass of wine, to fit in. Have to pause now.

N


Entered at Wed Jul 13 21:43:04 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Toronto

Simon: Thanks for listening. I like "Fool In The Rain" throughout, but my favourite bit is really the instrumental vamp, which can also be found on "Live Dead" between "Turn On Your Lovelight" and "St Stephen" (I believe). As for the Fairuz, I first got it on an old Parlophone EP that I found in a junkstore in Tenby, Wales maybe 12 years ago. (The other purchase that day was a Springfield LP - on Wing, perhaps.) It was unfindable otherwise until maybe two years ago when copies of a CD that included all four EP cuts plus a bunch of somewhat later but similarly religious songs appeared at a grocery store in Little Arabia on the other side of town. We've been there since, but that particular CD is no longer there, unfortunately. Will keep eyes peeled, though. Or, Al, is it pealed?


Entered at Wed Jul 13 21:20:08 CEST 2011 from (86.167.241.200)

Posted by:

Simon

Al - I'll have to tread carefully because I haven't seen Breaking Bad yet but I read most of that piece. BB is one I'm looking forward to immensely. Someone was telling me about an early scene - probably the first episode - where the main protagonist is telling the kids about the natural world and the beauty and relevance of his chosen subject, chemistry. And the kids just don't give a shit. He said that scene was almost heartbreaking.

If you're interested there will be a Small Faces boxset coming out soon. Supposed to have great sound and extra goodies and all the rest of it. More importantly it'll be the first time they and their families and estates will get a decent wedge out of it. Not before time.

Bill - I've just listened to Zep's "Fool In The Rain" and it is a great track but I can't help thinking Plant's voice sounds a bit flat. He's struggling to hit those notes when previously he'd have managed with no sweat. It's a phenomenal piece of music though. As for "The Rain Song" I think the original working title for it was "Slush". It could've just as easily been Syrup. Again, I'm a sucker for that kind of overdone romantic stuff. Pat picked it as one of his tracks too.

I won't dwell too much other than to say those Motown tracks were hits and not deep cuts. They might not have been the label's top smashes but I'm pretty sure they all charted. I was very much taken with the Fairuz (sp?) track you posted. I know it was on your list but you posted a YouTube link too. Is that from an available cd? It was really lovely.

David - Looking forward to your selections.


Entered at Wed Jul 13 21:09:36 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: With apologies to the Bard...

I haven't been able to purchase a copy of the Betty Everette single from the merchants of Venice or elsewhere. However, "with bated breath and whispering humbleness" I say this:

My list, although limited to selections from my 45 singles collection, will contain some of the usual suspects, as well as a surprise or two.


Entered at Wed Jul 13 20:56:48 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Vinyl ash trays

Bill - you retrieved that Small faces ash tray yet?

:-0)


Entered at Wed Jul 13 20:54:36 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: ..abated breath

:-0)

On this same 'greatest' tack - though switching it to the telly - I've linked a really interesting piece on the best telly of the past 10 years.

Anyone who hasn't yet been hooked by Breaking Bad - and hasn't got to the end of Series 3 - had best not read the final 3 paragraphs. Which kind of defeats the premise of reading the feckin piece in the first place I guess - but still.

:-0)


Entered at Wed Jul 13 20:26:39 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

David P: That was a commendably sly reference to Shoop Shoop, by the way. Cam we expect to see it - whether the original Betty or the Linda cover - on your top 30?


Entered at Wed Jul 13 20:09:19 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Adam2: It's true that I have little idea, but it can't have been more than 39 years.

Al E: Yes, a champeen suck-hole for sure. Can I ask if you bait your breath with minnows, worms or those fancy plastic things that champeen fly-fishermen like Amos Garrett (he says, gratuitously inserting a Bobby Charles link) use?


Entered at Wed Jul 13 19:46:56 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: DP's link re "I am the Greatest" :-0)

Thanks DP.

Very interesting piece Dave but I just wish the guy would have explored the whole concept a bit more thoroughly. I mean he makes a great point about Beethoven yet doesn't make any reference to my own definitive top 30 song selection. How superficial is that!!!

:-0)

Seriously, I find the subject fascinating in the context of these lists I've been attempting to elicit from everyone.

I think it's as near nailed on as you can get that any group of people who have gravitated towards having The Band as their - poetic license - favourite popular music combo are bound to have some slightly more innate sense of the perceived quality of their own popular musical taste than most - no matter that time served Bay City Roller fans might wish to contest the quality of the Band fan offerings!!

:-0)

As far as I'm concerned the selections we've had so far are tending to support that view [Not that of the Bay City Roller fanbase]. Moreover, I happen to think the selections reached their zenith with Simon's list and it gave me a real buzz to read it. I thought it was a selection which displayed the sort of devotion to music listening and appreciation that you simply don't find that often and that can only ever be yielded by a real deep love for fine popular music and untold hours down the years searching such stuff out and mentally processing it all.

It simply doesn't just materialise out of thin air and a quick trawl through a few music lists.

As I see it, if Simon's, shall we say, more obscure selections had been motivated by any pretentiousness in any way - which I think is along the lines of what may have [I think] mistakenly upset dear SM [incidentally SM please do stick with us - your humour really does offset some of the rather more serious posting] - then I know I for one would not have embraced it as I did. 'Cos I fuckin hate that.

However, on the contrary, what shone through Simon's list for me - and was underpinned as I played each track on You Tube - was his clear genuine devotion to what I personally felt to be real quality much of which I either scarcely knew, had forgotten or never knew at all.

Clearly Bill to name just one doesn't quite see it the way I do - and that's fair comment - as I also loved Bill's list too and he also so clearly has a corresponding deep appreciation of good stuff [am I mister suck hole or what!!!!].

But hell's bells, whatever anyone's take, Si's list sure as hell made my day. So much so I repeated the You Tube trawl again last night.

And now I await Dave P's list with baited breath. And there's still a few more I'm desperate to see too - real music lovers like jeff and roger and JD. And others too.

I'll fuck off now

:-0)


Entered at Wed Jul 13 19:35:54 CEST 2011 from (75.34.54.235)

Posted by:

Adam2

Subject: Bobby Charles deluxe reissue

Holy shit! Thank God in heaven. You guys have no idea how long I've been waiting for a deluxe edition of Bobby Charles' 1972 Bearsville album. News of this possible release was mentioned about a year and a half ago, and never materialized. Then Bobby passed away, and it looked like it was shelved permanently. I emailed Rhino Handmade repeatedly begging them to release this thing. I'm so excited this is being released. Already got mine pre-ordered with the bonus vinyl 7".


Entered at Wed Jul 13 19:30:46 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Bobby Charles

A mid-priced CD reissue of Bobby Charles' Bearsville album was released by Warner/Rhino UK a few years ago and I believe it's still available.


Entered at Wed Jul 13 19:02:37 CEST 2011 from (83.249.107.19)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Australia and dlew

Don't worry about Rupert the rat, dlew. Her Royal Highness The Crown Princess Of Denmark comes from Australia and she is professional, competent and good-looking!


Entered at Wed Jul 13 18:58:58 CEST 2011 from (108.41.170.6)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Bobby Charles

Jonathan, thanks for the heads up on Bobby Charles. One of my favorites. Glad to see its being reissued. Years ago I had to get my copy from Japan. Its too good to be unavailable.


Entered at Wed Jul 13 18:48:51 CEST 2011 from (83.249.107.19)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: NorthWestCoaster

Subject: "Dylan" Dylan

"Dylan" album is not only great - it is superb! Musically it has many pearls: "Bojangles" has the spirit. The LP cover is so touching that I have had it in front of old beer bottle caskets which I use to keep my old LP's in. It shows also that this business is full of RATS... just like Murdoch press.


Entered at Wed Jul 13 18:33:51 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Simon: Thanks. I now know Massive Attack's "Unfinished Sympathy" - in two versions yet. Very good, but I prefer "We Don't Need Another Hero", which it resembles. Gotta like the ticka-ticka rhythm on the Glastonbury version - borrowed from "Magic Bus", I'd say.


Entered at Wed Jul 13 18:20:54 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Oh no, you need to see, it's in his list...

As it relates to the always popular, especially of late, topic of favorite music lists, I thought I'd mention an interesting editorial in the July edition of STEREOPHILE magazine. In his "As We See It" column, under the heading "My music is better than your music!", John Marks raises some thought-provoking issues on the subject. Perhaps foremost, he points out that although "...we all like to see our prejudices validated" when comparing lists, on the other hand, "More important, when such lists differ from our own, we can profit from the encounter by revisiting music, books, or whatever that we should reconsider, or by reading or listening to something new to us."

See link to complete text of this timely piece.


Entered at Wed Jul 13 18:13:32 CEST 2011 from (86.167.241.200)

Posted by:

Simon

Bill - That's fair enough and I did come across a bit strong. I hope S.M. doesn't stay away on my account. On the other hand I thought his/her comment was a bit snippy. Maybe I overreacted. As for the Americana stuff ... maybe I should've held that back for when we get those occasional odd - very odd - statements about British musicians and singers being 'inauthentic'. Maybe what I posted was inappropriate. It's all that stuff about authenticity and rootsiness that I find irritating. If something moves you then the goosebumps don't really make those distinctions. It's all just music to me. But I am quite willing to admit liking a bit of schmaltz now and again. And I naturally assumed that everyone would be familiar with Unfinished Sympathy by Massive Attack. It's one of the most acclaimed songs of the last twenty years or so.

Dunc - I'm not sure who it was - perhaps some old bluesguy - but there's the line about "all songs are folk songs ... I ain't heard no horses sing 'em." I always took the word to mean people, which is the same as pop/popular. I know what you mean about labels.


Entered at Wed Jul 13 17:59:49 CEST 2011 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Subject: Re: Bobby Charles

Jonathan Katz, thanks for the heads-up on the Bobby Charles rerelease. I really love that album.


Entered at Wed Jul 13 17:43:20 CEST 2011 from (69.177.242.99)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: His Story

Ahhh Bill M., Good attention to detail....musical history. (Is there any other kind?). Point taken, but I thought it would be a good resource to look up info re: the 'Who Do You Love' 17 or 20 years old saga (furious guitar chops for any age IMHO).

Look on the bright side. At least it didn't show up on the Watkins Glen release. That coulda taken some explaining.


Entered at Wed Jul 13 17:22:40 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

dlew: True - a book could be used as either a drum or a drumstick. On the other hand, a debate has raged for decades over the musicality of the drum. As in the assertion that "A drummer is a guy who hangs around with musicians." By the way, have you heard of Oka, from Australia's Sunshine Coast? They played a two-day streetfest this past weekend; we liked them so much on Saturday that we went back for Sunday. Forty five minutes away, so not just across the street either. We are now proud possessors of all five of their CDs. Going in, if we'd given them any thought at all we would have assumed them to be a Mohawk groups singing political songs, the town of Oka in SW Quebec having been the site of a protracted stand-off between Mohawk activists and the provincial police.


Entered at Wed Jul 13 16:58:09 CEST 2011 from (59.101.14.222)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Bill M...

A john cage, or a member of the fluxus movement might indeed see a book as a musical instrument! ;)


Entered at Wed Jul 13 16:40:26 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: dancing about architecture, etc.

Todd: While it's always nice to see you taking Robbie's word for something, he wasn't saying that the AMH booklet presented the 'definitive history'; he was saying that AMH project presented the 'definitive musical history' - with 'musical' underlined. A musician, Elvis Costello for example, is unlikely to see a book as a musical anything.

Dunc: I do like the BARK CD very much, but generally because of BARK rather than the guests.

Simon: Yes, you were being cranky, and I think unfair to S.M. in particular regarding obscurity and to most of the rest of us regarding 'Americana'. Until I checked out a handful of your songs, I hadn't heard (or perhaps know but not by title) 1, 4, 5, 7, 8, 11, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 20, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, though in almost all cases I do know other songs by the artists. (The exceptions are 11,17,21,28 and 30.) I checked out the Sill (awful), the ABBA (awful) and the Zep (disappointing as I was hoping against hope that it was going to be "Fool In The Rain". But Al's pleased with your choices, and he deserves to be given the energy he's put into this little poll. And for that reason I'll keep you in mind should I ever decide to chuck a butcher cover LP.

Re 'Americana", it's not a term that's used here all that much that I've noticed. There were a couple of instances a week or so ago, but that was only because Robbie had used the term, though perhaps not in the sense that has become common of late. I find it an appalling term, not because it seems so broad but because it seems to be so narrow that it (likely deliberately) looks like musical apartheid. Perhaps the more liberal fans would allow Taj Mahal into the tent, but otherwise a large and tremendously potent stream of American musicianship is simply not American(a) enough. The very good news for us is that the GB is a much broader and more welcoming tent that seems pretty open to discussing / learning about all types.


Entered at Wed Jul 13 15:30:44 CEST 2011 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

PROFESSOR LOUIE & THE CROWMATIX (facebook)

Web: My link

Beautiful live rendition of Richard Manuel's "Whispering Pines."


Entered at Wed Jul 13 15:16:46 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Garth's in the basement mixin' up the music...

According to one source, when Garth later recorded the Bengali Bauls in the basement at Big Pink he used an Ampex 400 tape recorder, two Altec Lansing 1567A mixers and Norelco D-24 microphones (see link).


Entered at Wed Jul 13 13:33:19 CEST 2011 from (68.50.244.13)

Posted by:

Jonathan Katz

Location: Columbia, MD
Web: My link

Subject: Bobby Charles

Rhino Handmade has announced an upcoming release of a three-disc edition of the great Bearsville Bobby Charles album. The new release includes the original album remastered, unreleased recordings, and a 1972 interview. For those unfamiliar with the album it includes work with Mac “Dr. John” Rebennack, pedal steel ace Ben Keith, guitarist Amos Garrett, saxophonist David Sanborn, as well as Levon Helm, Rick Danko, Richard Manuel, and Garth Hudson. Details can be found at the above link. Only $50! Maybe I can re-mortgage the house and also pony up for Robbie’s new deluxe release!


Entered at Wed Jul 13 11:58:29 CEST 2011 from (62.30.51.155)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Once upon a time in the south

Subject: Name names Peter...

I went on a similar theatre trip a couple of years later Peter. We saw the Olivier - Maggie Smith Othello - now a classic, in spite of the Black and White Minstrels connotations. There was a fair amount of under age drinking going on (I know, I was that soldier) but I didn't see any teachers in the nearby pub...

Better email me to avoid libel legislation. If it happened now all our mobiles would have been hacked but back then life was different.


Entered at Wed Jul 13 11:48:36 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The tunnel of Folk

Irish singers get the tunnel of folk treatment too, probably less so since U2. If Alex Harvey had been called Alex MacDonald, I bet he’d be in the folk section. Categorising is a bugbear of mine. I get annoyed at finding Chuck Berry and Little Richard in “easy listening” (explanation: people your age buy them). Then you get the case of Sugarland, who have long ceased to be “country” but are invariably in country because she has a Southern accent. k.d. lang stayed in C&W for years, though what’s C&W about Ingenue or the Tony Bennett collaboration, I have no idea.

I will repeat my old Bonnie Raitt story, which is so old it goes back to Tower Records days, and this will be it’s 3rd or 4th repeat. I was looking for a Bonnie Raitt album in Tower, naturally in blues. Not there. I asked and was directed to country. I mentioned her blues collaborators and was told “She had pedal steel on one record. No one who’s ever used pedal steel goes in my blues section.”


Entered at Wed Jul 13 11:39:48 CEST 2011 from (41.97.129.99)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

link above : brief overview of the Festival one month ago -- too different of what I meant with "the ambiance of the Jazz Festival" in I my yesterday post, things evolve


Entered at Wed Jul 13 11:39:02 CEST 2011 from (41.97.129.99)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: Jazz Festival of Constantine

from "show more" in the link above

"a story forged in pain and hope

In the beginning there was the association Limma, full of ideas and will. Since the first act, called Majazz, [note by poster : this is a pun which has a meaning in Arabic and can be translated as "force the passage"] many things have changed, starting with the name of the event, which became Dimajazz [other pun which can be translated as "always jazz"]. The Artistic bill has also been most pleasant developments, as the reputation acquired over the years is now attracting illustrious names among the jazz world elite.

At the bases of Limma association, there was also the concern to provide more music education, rather deficient in Constantine. That which motivated the integration of Master Classes in all the editions of the festival. .

Along the way, two founding members of the association and the festival died [in a car accident, and in the context of the activities of the festival] leaving a boundless void... Aziz Djemam and Adel Merrouch, irreplaceable sacrificed their lives for what they deeply believed in : jazz, action, the city of Constantine, that which was representing for them life, as opposed to the obscurantism and defeatism of the era.

The path of Dimajazz is a model of perseverance and an illustrative case of emergence of a cultural dynamic. Over the years, the editions follow and do the same. they didn't fail once to the principle of slow and secure, strengthening the bond of trust with the public, the first partner of the festival. .

And the men who are behind, continue to cultivate this garden and to laboriously write its pages of history, with love and with respect for the jazz, for the jazzmen, and for the public of Constantine."

soundtrack of the clip : Joe Satriani - "I believe"


Entered at Wed Jul 13 11:22:31 CEST 2011 from (86.162.110.1)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Various

Bill M:I see what you mean about the BARK duets, but I enjoy the album. I've only played it three times so far. I don't know many of the female singers. I think what you get from BARK is great musicianship. I played 'Kings of Love' last night and I think it's great how they enhance tracks. Amongst many songs, I really enjoy 'The Lucky Ones', 'As Lonely As You' and 'Don't Want To Know'.(Perhaps I think this is better than the original).

Adam 2:If you get the chance to see Sid Griffin deliver his talk on the Basement Tapes take the opportunity. It's very good. He and Rod Clements ex Lindisfarne played songs and parts of songs to make points. He was careful when I asked him about the Band song writing controversay. (I had just recently read Levon's book).

Simon:Thanks. I play 12 of your list regularly, play about another 10 of the artists regularly, but I don't play these particular songs, so I might seek them out. I actually at times get out 'Waiting on a Friend' and play it on its own. There are a few artists I don't know, but I know that I'm not the most comprehensive of listeners and I never got into Led Zep or Abba.

'Americana' is a terrible description and there have always been problems with descriptions. But probably one of the poorest descriptions is 'folk'. Over the years I have heard Scottish singer songwriters complain about being 'put' into the tunnel of 'folk' because they're Scottish.

I saw a really good show at the Glasgow Jazz festival. A big band tribute to Tamla motown. About twenty musicians on stage, good singers and the songs were well done.

'London Calling' often appears in the top ten of album lists punctuating the Beatles, Dylan, Stones and Beach Boys albums from a different era.


Entered at Wed Jul 13 10:12:43 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Also on Sid Griffin (great book, I agree), The Long Ryders album is re-released in a remastered version this month.


Entered at Wed Jul 13 08:46:12 CEST 2011 from (75.34.54.235)

Posted by:

Adam2

I can't reproduce all the info in Syd Griffin's "Million Dollar Bash" book, but I highly recommend it to everyone here. It has loads of information on The Band and the Basement Tapes in general, and quite a lot of info about the recording equipment used for the BT. As I recall, it basically lists all the most likely equipment Garth used for the sessions (mics/mixers/machines/etc.) and gives an educated guess on where it all came from (Peter Paul and Mary). An extremely worthwhile read.


Entered at Wed Jul 13 06:55:19 CEST 2011 from (59.101.14.222)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Robbie's strings...

I used to play 008's through to .41s... maybe that's what Robbie plays. (but then, maybe it's 0.12 on through... ) It's actaully interesting, because Robbie bends (plays everything) beautifully. A friend of mine has 013s, and he can bend his strings futher than i can bend my 009s (I upgraded...)

30 favourite non-band songs... ah, gee...

No order, subject to change...

River Deep Mountain High, Celine Dion. (nah, actually Ike and Tina)

We Used to know, Jethro Tull

Bohemian Rhapsody, Queen

Okie From Muskogee, Merle Haggard

Smoke on the Water, Deep purple

Black magic Woman, Santana

Seven Nation Army, White Stripes

Diamond Dogs, David Bowie

Won't Get Fooled Again, The Who (I could probably do this all of Who Songs)

Tiny Dancer, Elton John

The Message, GrandMaster Flash and the furious five

Livin' for the City, Stevie Wonder (and there's another 30 songs...)

Duchess, The Stranglers

Oliver's Army, Elvis Costello

California Dreamin', The Mamas and the Papas

Heard it through the grapevine, Marvin Gaye

I want you Back, Jackson Five

Sittin' on the Dock of hte Bay, Otis Redding

Hot for Teacher, Van Halen

A Beatles song

Stuck insdie of Mobile, Bob Dylan Burnin' Love, Elvis Presley

Jailhouse Rock, Elvis Presley

Tutti Frutti, Little Richard

Johnny B. Goode, Chuck Berry

One Week, Bare Naked Ladies

Hey Hey My My, Neil Young

(to be continued)


Entered at Wed Jul 13 06:03:32 CEST 2011 from (69.177.242.99)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: BT Gear

Thanks for the additional details Pat. Just saw this on Wikipedia before I read your post. It seems to reinforce the Peter Paul & Mary connection. I also read that they were one of the first groups to have a hit with a Basement Tapes song, so the loan of equipment worked out pretty well for them.

"Hudson set up a recording unit, using two stereo mixers and a tape recorder borrowed from Grossman, as well as a set of microphones on loan from folk trio Peter, Paul and Mary."

I haven't read the Griffin book yet either. Adam 2, any specific info about the gear they used that you'd like to share?

Or maybe Jeff could slip a question or two about it into conversation the next time he runs into the Hudsons. But maybe not. My impression is that Garth seems like a guy very much living in the present rather than rehashing the past....Speaking of the Hudsons, where the heck is Dave Z??


Entered at Wed Jul 13 05:38:50 CEST 2011 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

I had some old notes on the BT and this is what I had gleaned (quite a while ago, btw). The mixers were probably two Altec 1567A's, which are actually rack mount pieces with pots for faders. Each was a mono output and had 4 mic inputs. I figure two of them because the original BT are stereo. I assume Garth hooked as many as four mics into each one and sent each's output into one of the two stereo tracks on the tape recorder. These were tube technology which explains the warmth of the recordings. They are said to have been owned by Albert Grossman and may or may not have been used on the 65-66 Dylan tour.

I have yet to see a description of the tape recorder.

The mics, all Neumann's, are said to have been loaned to the project by Peter Paul and Mary. They were also Grossman's clients so it is probably impossible to say they weren't Grossman's too, but the PP&M connection is mentioned quite often.

Undoubtedly, Garth set up the system and ran it. You can hear Dylan ask Garth how much tape is left, turn the recorder off, etc. However, I have never heard how they monitored the tape machine--no mention of playback, speakers, amps, etc. I haven't read the Griffin book so there is probably more info out there.


Entered at Wed Jul 13 04:37:19 CEST 2011 from (75.34.54.235)

Posted by:

Adam2

Subject: Basement Tapes recording equipment

I believe the most in-depth information on the Basement Tapes recording equipment, and where it probably came from, can be found in Syd Griffin's "Million Dollar Bash" Basement Tapes book.


Entered at Wed Jul 13 04:11:40 CEST 2011 from (69.177.242.99)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Things & Strings

Bill M, I was referring to the book/box set 'A Musical History' from 2005.

"OK... here it is, I can really sign off on this; the definitive musical history of The Band" -- Robbie Robertson, Ice magazine, August 2005

Pat B, Regarding the recording setup at Big Pink, you may be right about the Peter, Paul & Mary connection, but I saw the following quote which sounded familiar to me, that mentions the equipment coming from the 1966 Dylan tour. Of course the quote could be incorrect.

"in the mid-1980s the original tapes—recorded by Band organist Garth Hudson using quality equipment left over from the 1966 world tour (half a dozen Neumann mics, 2 Altec tube mixers)--slipped into the hands of collectors and spawned a 5-CD bootleg series as well as a great 2-CD “best of....”

No mention of the recorder, but my guess would be some sort of 2 track reel to reel...maybe 1/2 inch?

Kevin J. & David P., I don't know what gauge Robbie used, but I know that he's mentioned using banjo strings on his Tele in the early days. Good chance that he still favors light gauge strings. Probably something like .009 up to .042, but it would be interesting to know if he changed to something heavier over the years.


Entered at Wed Jul 13 01:22:36 CEST 2011 from (86.167.241.200)

Posted by:

Simon

The missing one is the back of Highway 61 Revisited, although I think it is different from the original US one. I do love those style of illustrations. We've got an old set of books from the 50's or so (card games, domestic efficiency, keeping the kids entertained etc) and they all have the same style of drawings.


Entered at Wed Jul 13 01:16:23 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: I know it should really be something from the Clash days....

...but this is my own Joe fave


Entered at Wed Jul 13 01:13:08 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Sorry, the LPs are Please, Please Me, Rolling Stones No 1, Elvis No 1, Never Mind The Bollocks, The Clash plus the back of one that I can’t work out.


Entered at Wed Jul 13 01:08:36 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Correction

Sorry, the BACK of London Calling copies the HMV "dancing sleeve" while the FRONT of London Calling copies the Columbia "dancing sleeve" (both EMI).


Entered at Wed Jul 13 01:05:46 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: London Calling

There's a major thing on deliberately retro sleeves..

London Calling is an exact copy of the red HMV "dancing" sleeve which ran from the beginning of 1958 to the end of 1959.

That's Entertainment sleeve by The Jam (and the Sound Affects LP) is based on the BBC sound effects LP series.

The last three Paul Weller singles use 1960s Island designs (but one shifts the pink to pale green).

The recent 2011 Matt Berry single on Acid Jazz copies the early 70s Harvest design. They're all doing it!


Entered at Wed Jul 13 00:33:51 CEST 2011 from (86.167.241.200)

Posted by:

Simon

Web: My link

Peter - The London Calling 45 sleeve (link) is really nice and possibly inspired by those old Columbia singles sleeves you posted about a while back. See if you can name all the other LPs in the pic.


Entered at Wed Jul 13 00:06:39 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Art School Dance Goes On Forever

A couple of years ago I saw the stage play "Meeting Joe Strummer", which was a bit too much historical narration, but nevertheless entertaining. The Clash were major label punk, CBS in England. What Joe Strummer had in common with so many British rock & rollers was that art school education. If you look at The Clash LP and single covers, they extracted great designs from a major label, and (for the UK) unusually one-off designs too.

The other guy from the same era and genre that's true for is Paul Weller. Great designs through The Jam, The Style Council, his own Respond Records label, right up to his recent V2 and Island singles.


Entered at Tue Jul 12 23:54:15 CEST 2011 from (68.164.5.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Peter, I agree with you 100%. I've just found that many former punks considered PH far beyond the mainstream of what punk was supposedly rebelling against. Plus, those PH roadies could probably handle themselves pretty well after moving pianos and Hammond organs around the world.


Entered at Tue Jul 12 23:31:22 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Joe Strummer was a musician though. Sid Vicious wasn't.


Entered at Tue Jul 12 23:04:58 CEST 2011 from (68.164.5.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Jon Langford, who has punk credentials galore, is a big fan of Procol Harum. I believe Joe Strummer was also in that fan club.


Entered at Tue Jul 12 22:05:34 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Robbie's Gear

Kevin: Apart from the brand, it would be interesting to know what gauge strings Robbie prefers for his electric & acoustic guitars.


Entered at Tue Jul 12 21:31:35 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Whispering Bob

Bob Harris told a lovely story this month. In 1977, seen as the host of Old Grey Whistle Test, and therefore as a champion of "the bizness", he was assaulted and severely beaten by a psychopath (Sid Vicious). In the midst of the beating he was rescued … by Procul Harum's roadies. That fact defines the divide before and after punk. (I vote for Procul Harum, obviously)


Entered at Tue Jul 12 21:20:58 CEST 2011 from (216.121.194.179)

Posted by:

S.M.

Subject: I surrender

Bye, bye


Entered at Tue Jul 12 21:18:21 CEST 2011 from (86.167.241.200)

Posted by:

Simon

Thanks for the comments folks. The only thing I'd want to clarify is in response to S.M. saying he/she didn't know obscurity was a prerequisite. Have to say I'd be shocked to find that people think the majority of that list obscure. Six, seven or eight maybe. I dunno. Reminds of an interview with Mr Weller (I've got it somewhere on some bonus disc) where he's asked about chart positions and he replies with a sense of tiresome wonder: "You love music, right. How many great fackin songs never even made the charts? Fackinknowworramean?"

I thought the reasoning behind the two lists was different. The Band list was not necessarily favourites but those you objectively consider the best. Now of course there can be a lot of overlap there. I was very hard not to see Whispering Pines in there - and it would be bubbling under at 11 - but I couldn't objectively not have The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down in there even though (gasp!) it might just be outside my top 10 favourites.

If the criteria for the top 30 were the same then it would undoubtedly be Dock of the Bay, Like a Rolling Stone, Satisfaction, Born to Run and so on. Magnificent songs all undoubtedly loved my myself. But that exercise would be a bit boring and besides, there's that Dave Marsh tome if you need some kind of reference.

So that's why I'd like to champion some people like Evie Sands and Barbara Acklin. Always the bridesmaid and never the bride. Well not in my world. I'll admit too that I'm a bit cynical about the preeminence accorded to so-called 'Americana' within these pages. I mean nobody can actually definitively say what the fuck it is for one thing. There's just this assumption that it's better than everything else. Well to me it was a marketing term coined in the mid-to-late eighties and has bugger all to do with the original Band. I sense a slight ingrained suspicion of 'pop' also ... as if denim-clad troubadours with acoustic guitars and songs with loads of stanzas are de facto the gold standard for songwriting and that's there's a galactic gulf between them and the great unwashed. Might be an interesting area for potential discussion: "The Coffeehouse tradition versus the fey limey Art School hotbeds."

Hopefully this doesn't sound too cranky.
--------------------------------------
Al - Thanks for the kind words. I'm having a blast going through everyone else's picks and will certainly post a 'props due' list. Loved your Dominic Chianese. Matter of fact it would be easy to pick quite a few solely from hearing them on the Sopranos.

Kevin - I think the alternate "Tangled ..." just has that certain something. Ditto with the "You're a Big Girl Now" on Biograph. To me it's perverse why Bob would select one and reject the other but then that's why his back pages are so interesting. For me the officially released versions of those two tracks border on hectoring. They're still great, though.

Bill - The live version of Tin Soldier is great. Hadn't heard it in a while and it packs a punch. Take this in the spirit of jest but along with Al I couldn't help notice that you do sometimes jettison some quality items. I was thinking about that Canadian mono Blonde on Blonde. If you do come across an original Beatles butcher sleeve then let me know before put it thru the shredder [wink].


Entered at Tue Jul 12 21:02:02 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: DP on the singles prowl

Yippee!!

Honestly cannot wait. I can see You Tube will be getting a real hammering.

:-0)

Empty - Apache's my all time fave too. :-0)


Entered at Tue Jul 12 20:39:05 CEST 2011 from (174.89.117.65)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: From Acoustic Guitar mag - new edition

ROBBIE ROBERTSON’S GUITARS AND GEAR •

ACOUSTIC GUITARS: “I’ve got some dandies,” Robertson says, before rattling off a stunning partial account of the Martin guitars in his collection: 1901 00-42: “It’s just a little honey, and it looks almost new.” 1919 00-45K (koa): “I have the only original that exists in the world. Martin has made some different new versions of it for me—and they’re making a 00-45 signature series and a 00-42 signature series.” 1927 000-45 (strung with nylon). 1951 D-28: “I have a couple of those.” OM-42 “Workhorse Show Dog”: “Martin made a beautiful all-around great-sounding, great-playing guitar for me, with a hidden pickup.”

Robertson also owns a Martin ukulele, an Eric Clapton signature Martin, and a Gibson Style 0 “with that mandolin curlicue on the body. It’s a weird-sounding guitar, but of course it looks fantastic.” •

ELECTRIC GUITARS: “I got stuck on Fender at an early age because we had to play long hours in clubs, and the Les Pauls were heavy on the shoulder after a couple of hours.” Robertson says. “I play hot-rodded custom signature Stratocasters, with two pickups in the rear, so they have a thick humbucking sound, and one front pickup. I also have a 1951 Broadcaster, which is a great plug-it-in-and-it-sounds-good guitar, and a bunch of Les Pauls, which for me are great for rhythm parts.” •

AMPLIFICATION: “Only the ‘Workhorse Show Dog’ [OM-42] has a pickup [a Fishman Martin Gold+Plus Natural 1].” •

STRINGS: “I don’t know which ones are better.” •

PICKS: “Dunlops, because they don’t slip. But I fingerpick, too.” •

CAPOS: “I don’t use one very often.” ________________________________________


Entered at Tue Jul 12 20:33:27 CEST 2011 from (41.97.227.45)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: The Sun / Rock Instrumental Tracks

About ten years ago I sympathized with an Englishman in the ambiance of the Jazz Festival of Constantine. Sympathy is the world, the guy was awesomely sympathetic, I rarely knew in my life such kind person, without affecting kindness the guy was naturally nice. I believe my unconditional admiration of the English people has been built on the individuals I met coincidentally, The Band GB included. Anyway, the major fact was that at a certain moment a smart moujere walked near us and the man exclaimed "wow! she's a page three girl !", next he had to bear the uneasy job to enlighten me on the meaning and the source of the phrase, and to discuss it too.
I remember the importance I showed for the topic, given my innate interest for popular linguistics. I remember clearly how I then found it regrettable the fact that a tabloid can influence so that a mass as far as in their habits of languages, I knew that it is not an isolated situation at the international scale, maybe I was wrong, but I assumed inherently that it (the influence) could be not limited to the habits of languages only

Here is my list of favorite Rock Instrumental Tracks (in chronological order)

The Shadows – Apache
The Shadows - Guitar Tango
Ennio Morricone – The God The Bad And The Ugly
The Band - The Genetic Method
Hot Butter - Pop Corn
Roberto Carlos – The Korova Milk Bar theme (Clockwork Orange)
Mike Oldfield - Tubular Bells
Jean Michel Jarre - Oxygene
The Band - Islands
Santana - Moonflower
Alan Parson's Project - Sirius
Raina Rai - Hamama (link)
Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan Peter Gabriel - Passion
Gipsy King - Faena
Hans Zimmer - Rain Man theme

Thanks Al for having first offered the opportunity. A lot of movie themes, but I remember I bought them at a Rock Instrumental Tracks store


Entered at Tue Jul 12 19:37:09 CEST 2011 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

THE BAND (facebook)

Web: My link

Heinrich Klaffs b & w pics of THE BAND @ the Musikhalle in Hamburg, Germany.


Entered at Tue Jul 12 19:31:50 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Two Tickets To Paradise

Attending the same football game twice reminds me of the old Justin Wilson comedy bit. Justin runs into one of his buddies, a true ragin' Cajun LSU football fan, who tells him he has two tickets to go see the Tigers play at Notre Dame. When asked who the second ticket was for, his friend replies that he needs it to get back into the stadium after he gets thrown out for getting too drunk & rowdy during the first half of the game.


Entered at Tue Jul 12 19:12:37 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: Remiss, I guess - but I never liked the guy anyway.


Entered at Tue Jul 12 18:42:58 CEST 2011 from (109.254.59.98)

Posted by:

netscro

Location: ukraine
Web: My link

Subject: smith

Great web site! It looks very professional! Keep up the good work!


Entered at Tue Jul 12 18:39:41 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Gay & Clinch

Bill, perhaps some of the fans attended twice. That would swell the numbers. Also, if it was one of your classmates who got shot, I think it remiss of you not to have noticed till the school reunion.

We do hear things years on. When we were sixteen, we were all taken to see "The Merchant of Venice" in London on the train. I was sitting three rows forward from the back, but a pal was in the back row next to our English teacher. As soon as the play started the teacher slipped out only to return five minutes from the end reeking of gin. I never knew that until thirty years later. The Old Vic theatre is very close to Waterloo station, and the Long Bar there was one of the few legal places where you could drink during the day in those days. There were a lot of illegal places in that area anyway. As the story gets retold now, details get added (lipstick on the collar, reeking of cheap perfume and gin), but I suspect the gin was about the beginning and end of it.


Entered at Tue Jul 12 18:26:44 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

David P: Thanks for the correction and additional info. The only time I've ever been near the US south was a class trip to Knoxville (and the TVA) in '75. It struck me that the footfall stadium held more fans than the city had people. That field trip came up at a recent class reunion. I had no idea until then that the reason we checked out of the Hotel Farragut (at the corner of Gay and Clinch - I'm not making this up) after a single night was that somebody got shot.


Entered at Tue Jul 12 18:07:41 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The Two Religions

Bill M: Some say that, beginning in the fall of the year, Southerners heed the tenets of two religions -- Christianity and football (American style).

Bobby Bare had a country hit with Paul Craft's "Dropkick Me, Jesus (Through the Goalposts of Life)" and then we have Martin Mull's "Jesus Christ Football Star". Going back further to the '50s, we have Andy Griffith's classic comedy bit "What It Was, Was Football", which featured his unique interpretation of "Romeo and Juliet" on the flip side.


Entered at Tue Jul 12 17:37:15 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

country songs … and don't forget your old dog comes back to life.

I'm a "fucking humdinger of a list" school of thought.

A good list would be "Best Dylan Covers."


Entered at Tue Jul 12 17:34:44 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: drop kick me Jesus through the goalposts of life

Kevin J: The first C&W song that came to mind was Martin Mull's, which, goaded on by our poetic chum S.M., I've laboured to render in reverse in haiku:

The season - football
Returning with a flying tackle
Jesus Christ!


Entered at Tue Jul 12 17:23:45 CEST 2011 from (174.89.117.65)

Posted by:

Kevin J

David P: Reminds me of that joke…….what happens when you play a country song backwards? Answer: You get your marriage back along with the house , kids, money and truck!

Simon: Excellent list as noted - only quibble is with Tangled Up in Blue as I think version on Blood on the Tracks is perfect.


Entered at Tue Jul 12 16:39:56 CEST 2011 from (68.164.5.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Regarding the recording situation in Big Pink, I thought that the PA equipment came through Grossman from Peter, Paul, and Mary--mixer, mics, and I assume some playback system. The recorder? I don't know. Garth is the one who figured it out, but it would have been a pretty simple system with no post recording mixing. RR supposedly became interested in the intricacies of recording after watching John Simon do BP.


Entered at Tue Jul 12 16:23:52 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The Dolphins

It's hard to beat Fred Neil's eponymous 1966 album, which includes both "The Dolphins" and his original version of "Everybody's Talkin'". A little bit of liner note trivia, a favorite pastime of mine, reveals that Billy Mundi played drums on that record. Of course most people are more familiar with Harry Nilsson's cover of "Everybody's Talkin'", just as many know Tim Buckley's cover of "The Dolphins".

Al Edge: Alright, I'll compile a singles list, but it may take some time. My twist will be that I'll choose selections from my collection of 45 singles.


Entered at Tue Jul 12 16:18:56 CEST 2011 from (216.121.194.179)

Posted by:

S.M.

Subject: Cooking 101: Reduction

Reduce a book (fiction or nonfiction)to a Haiku.

My first submission Sophie's Choice :

Winter's cruelty

births Spring's dilemma

and Summer's death


Entered at Tue Jul 12 15:52:15 CEST 2011 from (216.121.194.179)

Posted by:

S.M.

Subject: Hmmm...

Did not know obscurity was a prerequisite- must now rethink my list...


Entered at Tue Jul 12 15:41:32 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Ha ha [again]

Bill M: "Er you got that Small Faces Tin Soldier 45 I lent you in '76?"

Bill M's mate: "Yeah, sure, here you go. Shaped like an ash tray but still plays like a dream."


Thanks Bill. You got me in bulk with that one. Ha ha.

:-0)


Entered at Tue Jul 12 15:32:37 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: a modern sound in C&W

Kevin J: And be sure to do your best to sound like Richard Manuel when you're singing.


Entered at Tue Jul 12 15:28:41 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Ha ha - Vive la difference

Al E: - That is one fuckin humdinger of a list

DP: - That's quite a nice list

Priceless

:-0)

Hmmph - er lists David? Pretty please.

:-0)


Entered at Tue Jul 12 15:20:04 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Simon: That's quite a nice song list. The dedicated mono version of Axis has been reissued on vinyl by Classic Records. I imagine that the YouTube version was sourced from the LP.

Kevin: Take three chords, D, A & G, add an A7, maybe use what country pickers call a cheater (a capo), and sing the following Harlan Howard song:

"The bills are all due and the baby needs shoes and I'm busted
Cotton is down to a quarter a pound but I'm busted
Got a cow that's gone dry and a hen that won't lay
A big stack of bills that gets bigger each day
The county's gonna haul my belongings away, cause I'm busted"


Entered at Tue Jul 12 15:09:32 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Todd: Jan '63 sounds right. What is the 'definitive history' that you referred to? Also, don't be so quick to blame your fawlty memory: Garth was indeed the recording engineer, though of course that doesn't mean that the studio was his idea.

Heard the BARK / Amy Helm track from "Kings and Queens" on CBC radion this morning. The whole song sounds sooo much like "Ophelia".

Simon: the one on your list that I'd certainly have had on mine if it'd come to mind at the right time was Fred Neil's "The Dolphins". Re "Tin Soldier", have you heard the live version that was appeared on an Immediate 45 of the day? Better than the studio version, I remember thinking to myself before I gave it away to a big Small Faces fan friend of mine 35 years ago. Must ask if he still has it.


Entered at Tue Jul 12 14:18:50 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: The Holy Grail

When I asked everyone if they'd be kind enough to post their top 30 favourites the list that Simon has just posted was the sort of perfect ideal I had in mind.

No disrespect to anybody else [myself included] but that is one fuckin humdinger of a list.

Since seeing it this morning and drooling over some of the choices - only two of which were in mine and very few in anybody else's - I've been copying and pasting each one into You Tube and purring over the quality, range and balance that Simon has somehow managed to incorporate into his 30.

To say I'm envious is an understatement. For all my love of music I simply couldn't get near such quality married with such relative obscurity.

Never having heard a fair few of Si's choices I kept expecting to find a track that underwhelmed me. In fact, the opposite kept happening and each play either unlocked a long forgotten memory of a long forgotten track I once loved or else finding a new treasure to cherish.

Cheers Simon. If ever the naysayers as to the delights of compiling lists such as these due to their being "too much like hard work" have had their miserabilist feelings shoved right down their throats then your thirty wonderful - and earnestly considered - delights have been the ones to do it.

:-0)

Final word to anybody who hasn't done their lists beacause they're too "busy" or just can't be fuckin arsed - look and marvel at just how wondrous a collection such intense love for great music can occasionally summon up.

But don't be put off. Very few will come near to compiling a list like Simon's. He's set the bar very very high. Impossibly high In my humble opinion. But please still do yours because I for one will deeply appreciate and enjoy it.

Also bear in mind that when I come to do the totting up it may well be the case that one of your choices just might just make the difference between a song's success and failure in the all time definitive doozy GB top 30.

Wheeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee!!

:-0)


Entered at Tue Jul 12 13:37:38 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Empty Now brought up the criterion of how many times you’ve played a song, which I agree with. It gets skewed though. Two of my choices should have been Mercy, Mercy, Mercy by Cannonball Adderley (written by Joe Zawinul) and Trouble by Little Feat. Both were on a CD compilation I’d made, and it was the mid-90s when my mother was terminal with a long illness, and everything on that CD had a melancholy air. Those two tracks were side by side and they seemed to sum up the mood, especially Trouble. The day she died I played them coming back from the hospital, and basically that finished both for me. If I hear them I feel the sadness welling up. When Little Feat did the live new version of Trouble with the female vocalist, I found I could listen to that again. But I really can’t listen to Lowell George singing it, even now, sixteen years on. With Mercy, Mercy, Mercy, I have lots of other versions which I can play, but there’s something about Zawinul’s piano in the original. When I saw him play a few years ago, I was actually relieved he didn’t play it.


Entered at Tue Jul 12 12:33:31 CEST 2011 from (86.138.228.217)

Posted by:

Simon

Web: My link

Thanks, Peter. To be honest I could've easily included half a dozen Small Faces songs including All or Nothing and Autumn Stone (Ian MacLagan's favourite, apparently). The Marlena Shaw track is one that used to be what you might call rare groove but is now part of the mainstream almost. I first hunted it down about twenty years ago. It was one of those you could play to friends and watch their reactions. I love the way she almost fluffs the vocal once or twice but just laughs and carries on. The guitar solo on Sunday Morning is played by Lou Reed. Sterling Morrison plays the bass. The vocals were added to a slightly slowed down track which is why Lou sounds a bit younger on the final product. Also the Hendrix track and "Axis" album is on YouTube in mono ... the whole thing slams in mono, especially if you like drums. They should release it on CD. Finally here's a link to the full Abba track. Did I mention the legs?


Entered at Tue Jul 12 11:11:41 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Great list, Simon. It immediately sends me off finding stuff to replay.

Marlena Shaw. I was tempted by Mercy, Mercy for my list, and hovered between Cannonball Adderley and Marlena Shaw's version. Evie Sands is a great one. I approve of Abba finally getting a place. Our lists only coincide on Rescue Me and Waterloo Sunset, but I'd be happy with most of yours. The Small Faces one for me would be All or Nothing. Even now you can slip it on a Motown / Atlantic 60s playlist and it fits seamlessly.

I haven't played Sunday Morning for years … that's coming now. Pale Blue Eyes was tempting for me.

That whole run of Temptations singles is … a temptation. It's Growing would just edge Since I Lost My Baby for me, but it's tight.


Entered at Tue Jul 12 11:09:45 CEST 2011 from (41.97.162.143)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Wayne Carson Thompson


Entered at Tue Jul 12 11:08:39 CEST 2011 from (41.97.162.143)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

really great fun with lists, spacially the best 30 non The Band songs

Repeat - I relied as main criterion on the number of times I played a song; what by mind I estimate as the number of times. will always remain a taste of imperfection

Link above : "The Letter" - 1967, by The Box Tops, written by Wayne Carson



Entered at Tue Jul 12 06:50:19 CEST 2011 from (86.138.228.217)

Posted by:

Simon

Subject: Top 30

1) The Hunter Gets Captured by the Game - The Marvelettes
2) Rescue Me - Fontella Bass
3) Tin Soldier - The Small Faces (mono)
4) Bold As Love - The Jimi Hendrix Experience (mono)
5) My Baby Loves Me - Martha & the Vandellas
6) Penny Lane - The Beatles (mono)
7) Since I Lost My Baby - The Temptations
8) Sunday Morning - The Velvet Underground (preferably mono)
9) Waterloo Sunset - The Kinks
10) Hot Fun in the Summertime - Sly and the Family Stone
11) California Soul - Marlena Shaw
12) Love Hurts - Gram Parsons & Emmylou Harris (possibly giving the edge to the alternate version)
13) Am I The Same Girl - Barbara Acklin
14) Southern Nights - Allen Toussaint/Glen Campbell (various live versions)
15) The Rain Song - Led Zeppelin
16) Circles (Ready Steady Who EP version) - The Who
17) I Can't Let Go - Evie Sands
18) Tangled Up In Blue (Bootleg Series 1-3 version) - Bob Dylan
19) Doctor Wu - Steely Dan
20) Glad Tidings - Van Morrison
21) The Paris Match - The Style Council (Tracey Thorn version)
22) September in the Rain - Dinah Washington
23) Waiting on a Friend - The Rolling Stones
24) Help Me - Joni Mitchell
25) The Dolphins - Fred Neil
26) #9 Dream - John Lennon
27) We Must Be In Love - The Impressions
28) The Kiss - Judee Sill
29) The Name of the Game (full original unedited five minute version) - Abba
30) Unfinished Sympathy - Massive Attack

Alan - a most difficult assignment. For the upper half or so I wrote my selections on bits of paper, put them in a bowl and drew them that way. With two or three changes I was happy to let it stand that way. In football commentator parlance there really is only the width of a cigarette paper in it. I've stressed mono versions in some cases because of the night-and-day superiority of those mixes. Some of the Motown and soul selections might be mono-only in any case. No Ray Charles, Aretha, Beach Boys, Four Tops and I feel bad about that ... and I took it as read that I could omit the Band due to them having their own list.

There are some what you might call sad songs but I'd have to agree with Robbie that it's nice to listen to a funny song every once in a while but a sad song really hits the spot. I'm that way inclined and always have been. On reflection though most of these are 'up' songs that lift the spirits. For anyone interested in the Abba selection (i.e. nobody) I'd direct them to the Japanese TV version on YouTube which is the only way to hear this uniquely structured track in full as it's not even available on cd. You may scoff but my response would be one word: "Legs". If I could be so modest as to have a Great Songs You Might Never Have Heard Before section in these notes I'd direct you to the Evie Sands (Although you might've heard the Hollies' version ... and thanks PatB, great minds think alike), Judee Sill (real saaaaad) and Style Council/Tracey Thorn selections.

Thanks to everyone else for their lists. It's been fun discovering and rediscovering some great songs.


Entered at Tue Jul 12 03:24:24 CEST 2011 from (69.177.242.99)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Who Do You Love

Bill M., According to the definitive history, 'Who Do You Love' was recorded in January 1963 at Bell Sound Studio in NYC with Henry Glover producing. It's possible Robbie was referring to a time when he first started playing live versions of the song with Ronnie & the Hawks when he may have been 17.

The story he told about Bo Diddley coming to see Robbie in his room and making up an ominous song on the spot about what he was going to do the girl who was visiting Robbie after he got rid of Robbie was pretty intense. Quite an entrance by Bo. Guess we now know why he wasn't invited to TLW.

Interesting that Robbie cited 'Drown in my Own Tears', by Ray Charles as one of his favorites. Levon has also mentioned that tune as one of his favorites as well. The two of them must have been pretty simpatico in those early days.

Also interesting that Robbie talks about how he set up the studio in the basement of Big Pink. I had always thought that Eric Garth Hudson was the one who was instrumental in setting up the basement recording situation. I thought that I'd even seen Garth listed as engineer somewhere, but that could be my faulty memory kicking in.

The reason that Brown is the superior album is that it's the result of a very strong ensemble. Many of Dylan's albums are also amazing, but it's always been Dylan as singer songwriter backed by a variety of backing musicians. Powerful in it's own way, but will never approach the cohesiveness of the tight unit The Band was in 1969.


Entered at Tue Jul 12 02:10:05 CEST 2011 from (75.34.54.235)

Posted by:

Adam2

The definitive Walk On Guilded Splinters has to be from Dr. John's performance at Bonnaroo 2006. Post-Hurricane Katrina, the bootleg recording features Dr. John's first "Night Tripper" set in about 30 years or something. That was the first time he got on stage with the feathers, gris gris clothing, etc. It's a historic bootleg, and the version of Guilded Splinters that opens the set is spooky as hell.

Dr. John's appearance at this year's Bonnaroo, from June 2011 with the Meters/Allen Toussaint/horns & backing singers, also surfaced recently as a fine bootleg audience recording. They play the whole Desitively Bonnaroo album, which the festival was named after.


Entered at Tue Jul 12 00:53:15 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: 3614 Jackson Highway

Dr John's "I Walk On Gilded Splinters" has to be the definitive one … listen to "Mama Roux" then go back to it. Cher did a pretty decent much shorter cover on Atlantic (or Atco in North America) that got a lot of airplay, and was probably where I first heard it. It was from the 3614 Jackson Highway (the address of Muscle Shoals studios) album that also has her take on For What It's Worth.Rhino's attention to detail is very poor ; it's spelled "Guilded Splinters" on the CD. The 1969 single has "Gilded".

The 2008 CD is pretty poor generally … no liner notes and no bonus tracks. A bit of Googling reveals a 2000 issue with lots of bonus tracks. Wikipedia fills in the gaps, which explains why this collection of covers is so good:

(QUOTE) The cover is a photograph of Cher with the musicians who played on the album. They are: front row, left to right: guitarist Eddie Hinton, bassist David Hood, Sonny Bono, Cher, producer Jerry Wexler, background vocalist Jeannie Greene, background vocalist Donna Thatcher and producer Tom Dowd. Back row, left to right: lead guitarist Jimmy Johnson, producer Arif Mardin, drummer Roger Hawkins and keyboardist Barry Beckett.


Entered at Mon Jul 11 23:13:56 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: all ego and no arithmetic

If Robbie was born in '43, he turned 17 in '60. "Who Do You Love" was released in '63. I think I saw it listed as having been recorded early that year, though I sometimes wonder if it hadn't been recorded in '61 as part of the R&B-heavy sessions with Henry Glover and then just tarted up a bit for release more than a year later. Most of the material from the '61 Glover sessions sat in the can until '64 or '65, when Roulette issued the Best of Hawkins LP (only in Canada: pity). Robbie's most frightening guitar work is on rare live tapes of the Hawks - truly chilling at times; somewhat 'easier' to find is Ronnie Hawkins' 1965 cover of "Diddley Diddley Daddy" on which Bobby Starr plays Robbie's style in a way that still catches me off-guard whenever I hear it.


Entered at Mon Jul 11 22:58:47 CEST 2011 from (68.164.5.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

There is an outtake from BoB where one of the Nashville cats says after a take, "Robbie, you're gonna get laid playing like that" (or something to that effect).


Entered at Mon Jul 11 22:47:49 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M again

Web: My link

I forgot the Checkmates thing from over the weekend. Probably every decent-sized city in the Anglosphere has had a group called the Checkmates. Toronto had Jon and Lee and the Checkmates, whose one and only record came out as by the Jon-Lee Group, presumably because their US label wanted to rule out confusion. There was a somewhat earlier group of Checkmates whose "Percolator" 45 I almost purchased because I saw that it was written by a Fontana, which I confused with Fonfara. There was also the Checkmates Ltd, as mentioned by Peter V, whose name was changed to Sonny Charles and the Checkmates by the time they released the phenomenal "Black Pearl" with Phil Spector back when he was apparently limiting his output to just one brilliant 45 per year.


Entered at Mon Jul 11 22:40:26 CEST 2011 from (174.89.117.65)

Posted by:

Kevin J

……and what a quote that is David …”Three chords and the truth”………love it! The “new country” guys would have taken an hour to explain what country music was….

Bill M: Thank you for that clip…..It is interesting how Robbie has these vivid memories about little details that make such a difference in sounds and songs….…….also had to chuckle at the stories he’s telling and how our Steve would have blown a fuse at the “Nashville session guys all rushing out to shake Robbie’s hand” or how his Dinah Washington/Max Richter creation “just tore Marty’s heart out”…..all true no doubt but it does take a certain ego to re- tell these stories……….and finally dig the confidence in Robbie’s playing at just 17 – astounding really.


Entered at Mon Jul 11 22:35:42 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Ken Pearson on organ

RtO: Thought I'd stress the strong work of organist Ken Pearson on most of the new BARK tracks, notably "Brave". I suspect that he's known (if at all) as a member of Janis Joplin's Full Tilt Boogie Band, but he also did some very fine work with Jesse Winchester both before and after Janis, and with Kate and Anna McGarrigle. It's nice that the BARK guys unearthed him and let loose.


Entered at Mon Jul 11 21:46:19 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Kevin: The prolific songwriter Harlan Howard once described country music as "three chords and the truth".

Keith Richards once said that all you need to play his trademark style of riffs in open tuning is "five strings, two notes, two fingers and one a**hole.


Entered at Mon Jul 11 21:44:30 CEST 2011 from (41.97.173.212)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: P J Wright

to be discovered


Entered at Mon Jul 11 21:43:27 CEST 2011 from (41.97.173.212)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: Lily Of Barbary

…God only knows, God makes his plan, the information's unavailable to the mortal man
======== ===============

LILY OF BARBARY – PJ Wright a song of Pete Scrowther

Just a cabin boy on a Whitby trader Mediterranean Sea,
Bound for Malta’s strand
The 15th day of June 1680,
The day my second life began
We were caught and boarded by a Moorish galley,
The battle short, the outcome clear
My shipmates died in pain, only I was spared
And sold in a market in Algiers

[Chorus]
They say the fates of men are written on the wind
No-one knows where they may blow
I was taken in chains by a Barbary corsair
It was in Barbary I found my Lily fair.

But luck was with me, I found a kindly master
Learned to serve him and I served him well
And with my new name, clothes and language,
I thought little of my homeland, truth to tell
And when my master died his testament did free me,
With a gift of gold besides
I became a merchant, a man of consequence,
With everything a rich man’s life provides

Then one day in the slaver’s market, wide-eyed and trembling,
There among the goods on show
A frightened Cornish girl, snatched from hearth and home,
And pity in my heart did overflow
So I sent for gold and I bought her freedom,
Gave her shelter in my home
And in a few short weeks, love between us grew,
From each other’s side we swore we’d never roam

But she missed her home, she missed her family,
Missed the deep green hills of England’s shore
So I knew I must leave my home of twenty years
For I couldn’t live without her anymore
Now before the wind, bound for northern waters,
Watching Barbary’s coast subside
Though no man may know just what the future holds,
I’ll sail with Lily by my side


Entered at Mon Jul 11 20:54:30 CEST 2011 from (174.89.117.65)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: Paul Simon on Charlie Rose

Take a few chords and make some magic......seems easy enough but it isn't - unless you are Paul Simom and a select few others....


Entered at Mon Jul 11 20:52:41 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

GregD: Thanks. I agree - great stuff. I don't think Ronnie cleared things up any by saying that the kotex (that Levon used to dampen his drum sound) is known in England as durex.

Kevin J: That Dinah Washington/Max Richter track is magnificent. I'm sure Robbie recalls playing with the great Dianne Brooks (in the studio and on the Blue Note stage in the early '60s), whose voice and sense of drama were sometimes likened to Dinah. (Be patient: she doesn't come in until 0:24 of the clip.)

Listening to Dr John's "Gilded Splinters", I realised that I've never heard it before - just Johnny Jenkins cover, which was something of an FM staple aroudn the time I started listening, and which I still very much prefer.

Are there tapes of Dylan and the full Hawks doing "Obviously 5 Believers" before he took just Robbie to Nashville? Sounds so much like "Good Morning Little Schoolgirl" and so much like something Dylan'd've hacked around on with the Hawks.

Dunc: I picked up the BARK duets CD. Mostly I think it've been just as good without the Queens along, but Cassandra Wilson is phenomenal on her bit, as is Serena Ryder. "Brave" is a brilliant song that I thought must be a Willie P one like "Step Away" until I checked the credits. Do you know Colin James, mostly known as a guitarist hotshot, who wrote that song with Tom Wilson? If not, you might rummage around the internet for his "Far Away Like A Radio", which sounds to me like the Atlanta Rhythm Section meets the Band.


Entered at Mon Jul 11 20:24:23 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: There Goes Rhymin' Simon (Changing Labels Again)

A shrewd veteran of the music business, the never simple Mr. Simon is playing all the angles when it comes to the slices of the pie men. Following his back catalog deal with Sony, his new album was recently released by the growing independent Concord/Hear Music label. Years ago, his first several albums were released by Columbia. He then signed with Warner in the '80s and now his back catalog, including his Warner recordings, has gone back to Columbia/Legacy. I guess the big question for Simon fans is whether the forthcoming reissues will include bonus material.


Entered at Mon Jul 11 20:09:41 CEST 2011 from (81.156.61.169)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Thanks David P and Dave H. I'll wait.

I'm going to make an effort and try for 'completion' in a few artists. I didn't realise I was so near.


Entered at Mon Jul 11 19:51:41 CEST 2011 from (174.89.117.65)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Thanks to Greg D for that Ronnie Wood interview with RR ….An excellent link well worth checking out….loved the song selection and the stories!


Entered at Mon Jul 11 19:50:49 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

On Paul Simon, I got my refund today on his "no-show". To my pleased amazement they also refunded the booking fee. I guess the venue didn't do too badly though, as they let 800-1000 cars park without telling them the show was cancelled. They're Pay & Display (in Advance) car parks, so most people will have chosen the four hours option.Fortunately, a kind soul tapped on my window at just the point where I could turn without going into the car park. I console myself that the rude buggers who banged their horns and gave me the finger in their haste to get into the car park (as I was reversing a little and turning) wasted their four hour parking fee.


Entered at Mon Jul 11 19:44:37 CEST 2011 from (136.167.102.118)

Posted by:

Dave H

The "Dylan" album was released on MP3 a couple years ago, but only in a "complete works of Dylan" deal through iTunes. Other than that it's currently unavailable, as far as I know. Paul Simon's solo catalog is in the middle of being re-released by Columbia Records, his original label, after having been on Warner Bros. for years. As a result, some of his albums are temporarily out of print, but they're all supposed to be back on the market by the end of the year.


Entered at Mon Jul 11 19:33:38 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Paul Simon

Dunc: Paul Simon signed a deal with Sony late last year involving is solo back catalog. Those albums were previously on Warner and I think those reissues are now out-of-print. Sony/Columbia/Legacy will soon be reissuing his solo albums, so you might want to hold off and wait for those new versions.


Entered at Mon Jul 11 18:59:34 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

As far as I know, the "Dylan" album was only released on LP & cassette here in the U.S. Copies of those are still available second-hand. I'm guessing that it may be available as a digital down-load, but not sure if it's officially legal in that format.


Entered at Mon Jul 11 18:16:28 CEST 2011 from (81.156.61.169)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland
Web: My link

Subject: Visions of Johanna

Thanks David P, Peter, Kevin and Greg D.

Will keep looking for Paul Simon albums. I have tracks from them on a compilation.

That's a pity I won't be able to get Dylan.

Kevin, I remember when our poet laureate wrote this of Visions of Johanna. See link.

I feel a freshness when I play certain Dylan songs, even though I've played them many times.

My disappointment about lists is that the Brown album is never in the top ten - you get a handful of Dylan and Beatles albums and Pet Sounds and one Stones album and another album for the younger generation.

Thanks Greg D. Enjoyed show.

The other thing that sometimes is maybe not talked about as much as the lyrics is that you need a good tune.


Entered at Mon Jul 11 17:19:24 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Inside the museum, infinity goes on trial

Dunno. Anything by Robbie Robertson or Paul Simon is going to be better-crafted than Dylan, because Dylan always throws craftmanship to the winds in favour of inspiration. Both Robbie and Paul Simon show detailed craftsmanship throughout. I'd agree that Dixie is better crafted than Visions of Johanna, but Visions of Johanna rides on a tide of unrivalled inspiration. I can't think of a song with more lines that stick in the head (though what they mean is another issue altogether). I don't think one is "better" than the other, but they do represent rival styles of songwriting and producing. And Robbie's guitar on Visions of Johanna is one of his finest moments.

Actually, picking up Blonde on Blonde, I just realized I always skip Pledging My Time.


Entered at Mon Jul 11 16:58:57 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Dylan

My copy of the CD is 1991, and Columbia, not CBS. 1991 is the year they switched names. It's all in English and says in tiny print "Not available in some territories" and "Made in Austria"). The spine is the uniform early 90s black on white. American copies from around then I have are printed red on white. So they never released it in the USA on CD?


Entered at Mon Jul 11 16:55:45 CEST 2011 from (174.89.117.65)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Blonde on Blonde vs The Band

Double albums just do not stand the test of time ……….Can anyone listen to “Rainy Day Women #12 & 35” anymore?……Quite honestly I never could along with at least 5 or 6 other songs on Blonde on Blonde……….I love Bob Dylan and Dunc’s description of his standing in the music world was spot on………however, as to a single album to album comparison - Blonde on Blonde vs The Band, in my opinion, The Band album is by far the greater album. …….and on 10 different levels including outstanding song. Really - does anything on Blonde on Blonde come close to “The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down”? Yeah. we all love “Visions of Johanna” but it is not as well crafted a song as Dixie is and the Brown album has no filler – none at all whereas…….Blond on Blonde has 20 minutes of it.

Al Edge: Great post on the Sun and the corrupting strategy of Robert Murdoch. Bravo to the people of Liverpool for standing on principal.....more and more I am pleased with my decision on choice of football team to follow!

Surprises from the “Lists” continue……The inclusion of “Sleeping” on so many lists is one that I did not see coming


Entered at Mon Jul 11 16:38:55 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Dylan (the album)

"Dylan" was released by Columbia in 1973 without Bob Dylan's authorization after he jumped ship & signed with Asylum. By that time Dylan had also parted ways with Albert Grossman. The album was made up of out-takes from the "Self Portrait" and "New Morning" sessions, many of which were just basically impromtu covers.

The album was reissued on CD in Japan and Europe at one point I believe, but is now out-of-print. As Dylan's current contract with Sony/Columbia gives him tight control over his back catalog, it's unlikely that "Dylan" will be reissued again any time soon.


Entered at Mon Jul 11 16:20:25 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Hearts & Bones

Rags & Bones was a Bandian-slip. I rate Hearts & Bones as the best album after Graceland, with ease. Some days it's just his best album. One trick Pony is less strong on songs, but strong on groove, and Douglas Adams thanks Paul Simon in one book, which was written to One Trick Pony on replay. When I first started writing full-time on my own (without a partner) I also spent a month writing only to One trick Pony.

Neither are on amazon.co.uk. Funny, I saw the 9 album box set (which has both) the other day in a s/h shop for £30, but it went while I was there. Neither should be hard to pick up though.


Entered at Mon Jul 11 15:02:42 CEST 2011 from (81.156.61.169)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Peter, Help

Thanks. That explains why I've not been able to find this Dylan album in various shops(what shops there are) on the East and West of Scotland. Like you, I quite enjoy Self Portrait. Does the red 3 album 'Dylan' have any new tracks?

I've noticed your love for Blonde on Blonde over the years and wondered how you would answer. It's a great album.

I think this site has made me a better listener. The Brown album is really a tremendous album.

I thought of trying to go complete on Paul Simon and try and get Rags and Bones and One Trick Pony. They are expensive. Are they deleted too?


Entered at Mon Jul 11 13:04:57 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Dunc, I’m so old I remember Aberdeen’s spell as Scotland’s best team. I thought to myself, that manager might go far …

Q1: DYLAN v THE CHRISTMAS ALBUM

Isn’t the “Dylan” album deleted? The LP was called “Dylan”. The CD was called “Bob Dylan (A Fool Such As I)”. It’s playing as I type. It’s “Self-Portrait” rejects, but I like Self-Portrait anyway. When I got the LP. I loved “The Ballad of Ira Hayes” but that was because I hadn’t heard the Johnny Cash version. It’s still worth hearing. I like his croaky “Can’t Help Falling in Love” but that may be because it’s an intrinsically good song. “Lily of The West” is pretty good. Same for “Mr Bojangles” and he intones it interestingly too. “A Fool Such As I” is quite a production with girlie chorus, as is “Sarah Jane”. On the downside, Big Yellow Taxi is dire.

I’d say it’s better than “Saved” or “Dylan and The Dead.” The Christmas Album is one I’d only ever play at Christmas, for the production, but his voice is so far shot away it’s painful.

Q2: Is the Brown album better than any Dylan album?

Heylin comes across as something of an arsehole in print, in spite of erudition. The bits of himself he lets on the page are the problem. So to the question.

Not in terms of songs. Blonde on Blonde is my favourite Dylan album and is hard to touch. The Times They Are-A Changing is also non-stop great material, though minimal as production. The Brown Album is more carefully crafted and sequenced than any Dylan album, and more carefully arranged too. But Blonde on Blonde, through serendipity, is just as powerful. Even with Blonde on Blonde though, Sides 1 and 2 (of the old double album) get played way more than Side 3 here, which gets played more than Side 4 (Sad eyed Lady of The Lowlands). I often play Blonde on Blonde in the car, and I can’t usually be bothered to wade through Sad Eyed Lady of The Lowlands. I’m beginning to persuade myself than as an integrated album, the Brown album IS better. You could assemble an album equally as good from Blonde on Blonde, but Sad eyed Lady and Temporary Like Achilles and Obviously Five Believers would need to go. The Times They Are A-Changing and Freewheeling are genius in the raw, so on a different playing field altogether. I think I’ll go for the Brown album being better than any Dylan album AS AN ALBUM.


Entered at Mon Jul 11 12:30:18 CEST 2011 from (81.156.61.169)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

I was reading 'Behind the Shades' by Heylin, who can sometimes anger me. He is very complimentary, as he should be, of the Brown album. 'Robbie Robertson relocated to Malibu that summer. Robertson was suffering an even greater creative drought than his former master. After four albums in as many years - the second of which, 1969's The Band, was a work of such stature that Dylan himself must have wondered whether his pupil might yet outstrip his own efforts - there had been two and a half years of silence from Robertson and Co., punctuated by a stopgap live double album and a collection of rock and roll covers.'

Here's the exam question. Discuss.

Although everybody here recognises the brilliance of Dylan's body of work, which can't be matched by any other artist, the Band's Brown album is better than any Dylan album and for that piece of work the so called pupil did indeed eclipse the so called master.


Entered at Mon Jul 11 12:10:15 CEST 2011 from (81.156.61.169)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

The Sun is big up here because of one reason - football coverage. Because of money, they can cover the small clubs well and fans buy because of this. I bought the Sun on a Monday because of my son's part time professional football career. I felt guilty buying it, but I wanted to read match reports.

I've not bought any Murdoch paper for about 9 years. I feel the deleting of the Milly Dowler texts was the most despicable act I've ever heard of in journalism. Think of her parents thinking she was alive. Horrific. There is no way Murdoch should get total control of BSkyB.

All prime ministers courted Murdoch,who has always supported the winning party in a British election since 1979. Are the electorate that unclever? So I hope this is a break.

Up here, I'm disillusioned with football. Older GBers will remember that every so often, a club other than Rangers and Celtic won the league, but because of money that is not going to happen. Other clubs would take points off them, but that does not happen so often now. The result is that there is too much tension around the Rangers v Celtic games. Let's be honest, who wins them wins the league. People from all over Scotland support these clubs instead of supporting their local team. I don't know the way forward for the rest of us.

Peter, Jimmy McGregor is 80 now. I was googling last week - really looking at the role of London in the British folk boom(which was huge) and several sites commented how pure the voice of Robin Hall was. Drink took its toll on him. Drug of choice up here was always alcohol.

I have bought the half dozen albums of Dylan I need to get complete and only have about two to go - Dylan and the Christmas album. I'll maybe get help here, Peter.

I actually enjoyed the two folk Dylan albums, reviews of which are often dodgie.


Entered at Mon Jul 11 11:30:35 CEST 2011 from (120.16.38.36)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Subject: Murdoch

Not an Australian citizen, but was born here. His newspapers are trash. Until the right went insane, about 5 years ago, the Australian was the best paper in this country. Not that the standard of aus journalism is very high. We don't have journalists of the quality of gill, or even the loathsome clarkson, who can at least write well. The sway that Murdoch has here is amazing, though we tend to vote against him...


Entered at Mon Jul 11 09:38:57 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Billy Bragg

Brilliant. Genuine topical folk music written right on the week. Woody Guthrie would be proud of him. He should release it as a single.

Al and Dunc may remember that "Tonight" the BBC early evening news magazine in the 60s had a topical song every night. There was Robin Hall & Jimmy McGregor, Leon Rosselson, and the one I remember best, Cy Grant. Cy Grant had it easier because he did a daily topical political calypso (so didn't have to think too hard for a tune). When I first heard "while calypso singers laugh at him" I thought Bob might be referencing Cy Grant … he'd spent time in England. I once met Cy Grant at a party circa 1970.

Then David Frost took up the idea on "That Was The Week That Was" with Millicent Martin singing a topical jazzy song weekly. It's a tradition that's got lost, but goes back to Shakesperean England where topical ballads could get you arrested.


Entered at Mon Jul 11 04:15:55 CEST 2011 from (99.250.10.113)

Posted by:

GregD

Web: My link

Subject: on the radio

Don't know if this has been posted before, but the above is a link to the show featuring Robbie's appearance on Ronnie Wood's radio show, taped when he was in England promoting HTBC. Some interesting banter and song selections from the two.


Entered at Mon Jul 11 04:06:56 CEST 2011 from (74.118.207.166)

Posted by:

glenn t

Subject: top 10 band

if it's not too late to add my 10 bits (in no particular order):

king harvest

unfaithful servant

we can talk

all la glory

stage fright

rocking chair

when you awake

it makes no difference

the weight

the rumor

covers: don't do it, mystery train


Entered at Mon Jul 11 01:14:22 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Don't Buy The S**

Looks like Billy Bragg's just been reading the GB.

Well in Billy lad. He just gets it.

:-0)


Entered at Sun Jul 10 21:39:37 CEST 2011 from (86.149.108.160)

Posted by:

Simon

Subject: My top ten Band songs

1) Unfaithful Servant
2) King Harvest
3) We Can Talk
4) The Rumor
5) All La Glory
6) Caledonia Mission
7) Tears of Rage
8) Rockin' Chair
9) The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down
10) Sleeping

I know there are some serious omissions here but that only reflects well on the music. Rest assured The Weight, Acadian Driftwood, When You Awake, Rag Mama Rag and many more are not far behind. Really tough to put these in some kind of order but this was the best I could do.


Entered at Sun Jul 10 21:14:31 CEST 2011 from (86.149.108.160)

Posted by:

Simon

Al - the time frame all sort of blends together ... buying all the papers, making phone calls ... of course they printed that several days later so it was midweek. I know that on the Saturday I was traveling back from London and got in the house around 2.45pm. To be honest I was mainly a home games attender - with maybe about a dozen aways under my belt at that time (didn't have the money). Despite the lies about ticketless hoardes it's funny how tickets were freely available from the Anfield office late Friday evening (as confirmed by my mates who bought them). Sobering also to look back at footage from the 1981 Wolves/Spurs semi and see just how close disaster was there. My mates were all in the upper tier near the front and managed to pull a few people out. I honestly think it'll take some sort of deathbed confession for the air to be cleared and the full truth to come out. It's long overdue.

As for the lists, Al, I've been giving them a lot of thought. The Top 30 songs is proving difficult, especially having to grade them in some sort of order. I dunno about that one. The Band list I'll post as soon as.


Entered at Sun Jul 10 21:00:22 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Simon

On a lighter not Si, don't forget your top 10 FINEST Band songs and top 30 FAVOURITE songs btw Simon. Really love to read yours

:-0)


Entered at Sun Jul 10 20:58:19 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: PV

The thing is pete it may well have simply been ignorance with that Hunt guy. On one level it's unforgivable and intolerable yet on another - well it happens. People glean their interpretations from so many sources. And it is in this area of disinformation that publications like The S** are just so pernicious and and wicked. Hillsborough is just one case of so so many. It's arguably the worst in the sense that there are still huge swathes that believe the lies and distortions that The S** - and others let's not forget - published.

The BBC is far from blameless in all this too. Just one recent example is its pandering to kelvin Mckenzie - yet another evil unprincipled bastard - who was editor of the S** at the time of Hillsborough.


Entered at Sun Jul 10 20:50:25 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Si

I can imagine that old fella's distress Si. I was beside myself with outrage having been in the very pens not 3 or 4 days earlier. Took me many years of furious writing to correct anyone - and I mean anyone - who took up that evil tack that I finally managed to exorcise the outrage from my system sufficiently to lead a "normal" existence.

How the hell the likes of Anne Williams and Phil and Hilda hammond have dealt with it all god only knows. the deaths were monstrous but the cover ups, lies and injustices by the authorities are the things which really make it all so unbearable.


Entered at Sun Jul 10 20:46:01 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Interesting, "Culture" secretary Jeremy Hunt is the most recent politician to put his foot in his mouth over Hillsborough, AND is the guy with the job of sorting out Murdoch's bid for 100% of subscription TV. However, according to The Observer, he declined to party with Murdoch and News International two weeks ago, an offer both "Call me Dave" Cameron and The Ed Miller Band accepted.


Entered at Sun Jul 10 20:36:01 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Football on Sky

We kept Sky for a while for football, but then you found one week a game was on Sports 1, the next week on Sports 2, the next week on Sports 3, so you had to subscribe to the lot. That pissed me off and I cancelled and stick to FreeView. If I want to watch an HBO series, it's easier to wait and buy the DVD. One of the many disgraces of British football is putting national team matches on subscription channels. I'd pass a law saying they alternate between BBC and ITV terrestrial channels, as they used to. But in Britain, all officialdom has its arse in the air to Murdoch.

BTW, I'm very proud of my granddaughter. She said she wanted Tangled soundtrack at home. I said I'd copy ours (wrongly) and she said, 'You can't do that. That's being a pirate.' Superb, and absolutely right. I'll buy her a legitimate one tomorrow.


Entered at Sun Jul 10 20:28:24 CEST 2011 from (86.149.108.160)

Posted by:

Simon

Well said, Al. I still have a very clear memory of going to the local shop on the Sunday morning and seeing a pensioner start wheezing and collapsing after looking at the front page. He just sort of crumpled to the floor in slow motion. An ambulance was called and we found out a few days later that he was going to be okay. During my teen years my granddad lived with us and he did used to buy it once or twice a week but my uncle talked him out of it because of the horrendous coverage of the miner's strike. That alone should've been reason enough for people. Excuses would be "Yeah but it's just for the racing pages." Or the tits. As for the small number who do continue to buy it, well, we do have a sizeable student population and I think that may be a factor.


Entered at Sun Jul 10 19:56:57 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Don't Buy The Sun

Not sure if the other GBer's realise but Liverpudlians en masse boycotted Britain's largest selling tabloid [and best selling by some distance] immediately after those sick bastards published heinous lies about the Hillsborough tragedy.

From a little acorn of outrage grew almost overnight within the city's population a huge movement of contempt for and proactive boycotting of the truly contemptible newspaper and its proprietor.

Don't Buy The S** is now in its third decade in Liverpool and has never remotely waned. Liverpudlians don't even mention its title. I've only printed its name in the heading above for those unaware of the revulsion in which it is held in Liverpool.

The newspaper has never recovered its readership in the city though elsewhere throughout the UK its readership remains strong and seemingly loyal - especially in the South East of the country near to the capital.

Coming scarcely a few years after the evil ogre that was Margaret Thatcher had tried to destroy the city's economy [which she did] and spirit [which she never came within a trillion miles of doing], this popularity of The S** amongst rank and file Brits contrasting so starkly with the vilification for it amongst rank and file Liverpudlians became another reason why the modern Liverpudlian felt increasingly apart from his fellow Brit.

Back to the boycott, I think even now some 22 years after its disgraceful editorials regarding the Hillsborough tragedy, it still only sells something like 12,000 daily within the city which for a major British city is miniscule. Most of those sales are likely non-native scousers and only a small percentage of its original daily sales. I'd also assume most of those sales are likely non-native scousers

So the overriding point I'm making is that these boycotts can certainly work provided the depth of feeling is felt deeply and strongly enough.

As a downside, however, if I'm being realistic, whilst his newspapers are clearly a profitable enterprise for Murdoch, I think the Sun itself acts for Murdoch far more significantly as his tool for blackmailing politicians into toeing his line with the veiled threat that he would make their lives very uncomfortable with their undoubted cupboard skeltons if they didn't toe his line.

Added to the individual blackmail threat is the unpalatable that The S** has prove on several glaring occasions that it has the power with its influence over its readership to win elections or lose them as the case may be.

Financially, I'd guess the only place to really hurt Murdoch - in the UK at least - would be by mass boycotting of his subscription television and I really can't see that happening without a credible alternative television football franchise emerging.


Entered at Sun Jul 10 18:52:06 CEST 2011 from (166.187.182.140)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: FOX & Limbaugh

FOX is very loyal to the GOP, all around. But Rush is more selective and more similar to how Peter described the subordination-to-Murdoch required in England. I think that is Rush's role in the formula: that moderate GOP members (RINO class) and their views are thoroughly disabused by him, at times even more powerfully than his attacks on liberals. That gives FOX a bit of an out in regard to the perception of their extremity.

I sure miss Steve on stuff like this -


Entered at Sun Jul 10 18:27:08 CEST 2011 from (83.249.104.6)

Posted by:

Ilkka Jauramo

Location: Nordic Countries

Don't buy Murdoch newspapers.


Entered at Sun Jul 10 18:14:39 CEST 2011 from (108.41.170.6)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Murdoch

Here in the US we have Murdoch's Fox "News" . The media outlet for the extreme right wing of the Republican Party. Their motto is "Fair an Balanced" of which they are neither. He also Owns 2 Newspapers, The Post and The Wall Street Journal. Fox "News" is the outlet for Sarah Palin Mike Huckabee and until recently Glen Beck.


Entered at Sun Jul 10 14:53:13 CEST 2011 from (41.97.236.38)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Subject: missing verse

please insert:

…Forgetting my sickness I began describing them
I began by Marie, pure, virtuous, and combed with musk, I managed to separate gold dust from bigotry;
For God's sake, Oh blamer stop blaming…

confirmation, it's not an easy job, but so exciting


Entered at Sun Jul 10 14:32:37 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Well, entertaining journalists in Clarkson's case. But A.A. Gill's reports from his third world travels are serious stuff, his TV reviews are perceptive and his restaurant reviews are funny. Liddle has been excellent on the crap and corruption in sport.


Entered at Sun Jul 10 13:58:10 CEST 2011 from (99.254.209.45)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Checkmates Toronto

Actually Peter V, I think the other Checkmates that the other Peter was talking about; because he thought they were from Toronto was Jon & Lee and The Checkmates. The best R&B band that ever came out of this city. Just ask Bill M. Jon later helped form Rhinoceros on the Elektra label.


Entered at Sun Jul 10 13:07:28 CEST 2011 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Surely, you jest

A.A. Gill, Jeremy Clarkson, Rod Liddle...great journalists?!? The bar's been set pretty low then, hasn't it. ; )


Entered at Sun Jul 10 13:04:27 CEST 2011 from (41.97.236.38)

Posted by:

Empty Now

"Pavillon of Peace" ?==? Janah Salem ? Salé


Entered at Sun Jul 10 12:52:23 CEST 2011 from (41.97.236.38)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: Corsan Ighenem (Corsair in Conquest) - Revisited

Remain some uncertainties concerning this song I posted lengthily about, I thought about the text as a pure Algersian affair, on the ground that Algiers was the traditional nest of corsairs. though Algiers hadn’t the monopoly of pirates.
At the light of new insights, particularly exploiting some youtube comments when they seem relevant, there are chances that the song is of Morrocan concern and authorship. Specially due to the toponymy used in the song
In reality the poets of the era are traditionally Morrocan, though Morroco hadn’t the monopoly of poets too. It’s truly puzzling, adding to the practice of authorship being mainly archived through riddles in the body of the song. many times, confusion was introduced just by a bad spelling from a given performer (intentional or not)

My most recent update seems leading to two authors Abdul Rahman Majdub El Jadidi and Sidi Humaimid Al Haw, both from Marrakech. The song is dated 1814. The factual historic content of the song is beyond my capacities

Here is my newest English translation. not easy, most of the text is in Sabir. Nonetheless, I believe many people over the internet eagerly need it. Feel free to put it anywhere, provided you add the mention “Reproduced courtesy of The Band GB”

Corsan Ighenem (Corsair get Spoils)

[intro]
In all my life I possessed one Carat, and I ordered my words in quatrains
How many men to whom God gave wealth, have said “I have the strength of my arms”

Corsair get spoils, Brought private virgins from the strait of Malta, All beautiful pure as pearls
Corsair has skills, All over the Admiral vessel, Made of noble wood, Finn wood, and teak
Perfect elegant, Three masts robust on the wave, Sixteen of cruisers with weaving sails
Riding the wave, From Tarifa took-off and people were active, Whatever heavy were their walls the ships slipped away

Corsair skillful, Sextant right in hand, compass and maps, from the heart of the cabin he scheduled operations
As he enjoys, Two thousand marines to him faithful, On the Doomsday of the Great-Siege
Cannons spoke, Trembled the towns, mountains and plains, Destroyed the city of Malta, by the oppression humiliated

The Ajamis surrendered, Girls came falling as gift against safety, Accepting the defeat they withdraw, And we took the young girls
He became dreamer, Captain of the marines, and people were active, By Algeciras he discharged the ships to rest
At the “Pavilion of Peace”, Walked the cape toward the quay of Marina, The “Tower of Conquest” was so described in the verses
Landed the virgins, Each one walking her own charm, Forgetting my sickness I began describing them

[here starts the authorship section]

For sake of God, Oh blamer stop blaming and open your heart to the mercy of purity, Tell these verses as others told them before you
On your nights numbered, If you understand the Corsair without fault, Ask everybody in the homeland of “The Joyful City”
My name is starchy, H and two M and D and no controversy, Two L and M waved with W if you do understand the verses
Representing the Seal of the Prophet , I honored the uniform with scented clothes, And patterns that stunned men of referrals

Footnote “Pavilion of Peace” is likely a toponyme of a place to be found
“Tower of Conquest” == Ribat Al Fath, then Rabat, city in Morroco
“The Joyful City” == Al Bahdja, this is a modern nickname of Algiers, it’s very recent


Entered at Sun Jul 10 12:50:30 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Current affairs!

I know we’ve not been talking current affairs, but then this week we haven’t been talking much. These News International stories grow. Murdoch had Blair, Brown and Cameron in his pocket. Blair phoned Murdoch three times to “get approval” to invade Iraq. Hugh Grant stood up to them last week on BBCs Question Time and pointed out that not a single politician dare do so. If they do, within weeks, some past issue will emerge: that spliff at university, that one night stand, that gay pal, that speeding ticket, that financial irregularity. No politician is peachy-clean enough to risk Murdoch’s wrath. Immediately, the ex-Murdoch editor brought in Grant’s LA arrest in 1995. Grant just said, I admitted it. I do stuff, but I don’t have secrets. So you have no power.

Then Shirley Williams (Lib Dem) who should have been Prime Minister years ago, said that when she was a journalist in the fifties, slipping policemen £5 was regular practice. She said she’d never done it. We can also add that in the early 50s, a £5 bribe was half a week’s wages, so not inconsiderable. British police taking bribes is no surprise to me anyway. When I was seventeen, I witnessed a road accident. One driver was (a) a doctor (b) rolling, staggering drunk. He pressed £10 into each policeman’s hand. Then, £10 was 50% the national average wage. He was not tested. I reported it. I got threatened for my trouble.

The more you hear the worse it gets, and we’re arresting anyone whose name is NOT Murdoch. Unaccountably, they remain immune. So today, for the first time in many years, I did not buy the Sunday Times. I did not renew The Times App on my iPad either. I’ll miss the great journalists … A.A. Gill, Jeremy Clarkson, Rod Liddle … but hopefully they’ll move to less polluted waters. This is the only weapon the public have. Don’t buy Murdoch newspapers. They’ve been caught out in the UK. Their influence in the USA and Australia is the same.


Entered at Sat Jul 9 21:31:12 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Yes, Checkmates Ltd were an American band on Phil Spector International Records. The other Checkmates were Emile Ford and The Checkmates. Emile Ford was the first British black artist to sell a million.


Entered at Sat Jul 9 21:17:41 CEST 2011 from (99.254.209.45)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Checkmates Ltd

Not the same group from Toronto Peter. I believe they were an American band.


Entered at Sat Jul 9 16:14:31 CEST 2011 from (66.66.215.42)

Posted by:

Pepote Rouge

Location: NY

Subject: HAWKS

Hey all....Looking for someone who could trade some flacs or a cd copy of The Hawks OK 1965 circulating recording.Mine no longer plays.Thanks for you time...... homelesslew@yahoo.com


Entered at Sat Jul 9 15:51:55 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I see the "Byrds Tribute Band" release has been cancelled by Floating World.


Entered at Sat Jul 9 15:24:15 CEST 2011 from (69.124.123.123)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Web: My link

Subject: G Bear's link, G bear

Please keep us informed about this project of Sebastian's & Robbie's. Most likely there will be a limited edition version, and maybe, if the kids are lucky, a Robbie Robertson action hero playtype thing. Various guitar models might be optional purchases, as well the Last Waltz scarf.`



Entered at Sat Jul 9 13:44:50 CEST 2011 from (99.141.29.198)

Posted by:

Adam2

Web: My link

Here's a great photo of Garth from the concert at BB King's that I attended about a week ago. I keep thinking about it. Garth is so amazing.


Entered at Sat Jul 9 12:08:58 CEST 2011 from (41.97.217.222)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: Om Kalthoum - Enta Omri

link qbove to the originql version - Phenomenal voice, she has to stay one yard far from the micro to avoid breaking it, and the sound is such of a limpidity


Entered at Sat Jul 9 12:07:25 CEST 2011 from (41.97.217.222)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: the perfect post for a Saturday GB

a young musician once explained me why today's generation underrates the mythical Om Kalthoum. The main reason is likely chronologic, with his own words, here is the typical physiognomy of a recording
- 5 minutes applauses
- 15 minutes instrumental, individual, in sequential order : harp, flute, oud, violin.
- "aaaaaaaahhhhhhh"
- 1 minute very loud cheers - 10 minutes instrumental, orchestral
- "ahibak"
- 5 minutes cheers and applauses together
- the body of the song, it lasts one hour and a half in average (how long is a hit-parade ?)

While this timing visibly suited well the Nasserian era generation, who visibly did take the time to enjoy the nice things, it doesn’t suit well the new generations of the Age Of Hastiness


Entered at Sat Jul 9 10:26:21 CEST 2011 from (99.141.29.198)

Posted by:

Adam2

I've always loved the Woodstock performance, and I'm so thankful we have the SBD of that. It is a little ragged and loose, but that's a good thing. There are now 6 audience recordings from 1969 in circulation. Such a great treasure chest of bootlegs. Band shows are very difficult to come by, but as you find them here and there, they do add up to a great collection.


Entered at Sat Jul 9 08:15:36 CEST 2011 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Par B

Adam2, I have everything but the Felt Forum, the May and July shows I have on vinyl, the others on cassette. Woodstock is the best quality but the performance is no where near this new one. Heck of a songlist. I'd say this the best recorded performance of 1969. I saw then in the late fall around Thanksgiving and Christmas in 69. The Opera House on Wacker. Saw the Rascals and Hendrix there too.


Entered at Sat Jul 9 06:05:45 CEST 2011 from (99.141.29.198)

Posted by:

Adam2

Pat - It's quite amazing. I think any existing recordings from 1969 are essential. What does your collection look like Pat? As far as I know, these are all of the existing recordings from that year:

04/19/69

05/09/69

07/00/69 (Pasadena)

08/31/69

10/26/69 (this new recording)

12/26/69 (Felt Forum, mislabeled as 1970)

The final jewel in the collection from 1969 is the Woodstock SBD. Pat, when was the Chicago show you saw in relation to this new 10/26/69 gig?


Entered at Sat Jul 9 03:11:36 CEST 2011 from (72.71.209.213)

Posted by:

Gbear

Web: My link

New children's book being written about Robbie Robertson by his son Sebastian.


Entered at Sat Jul 9 02:42:27 CEST 2011 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

Easily the most important Band boot from this century. Just amazing to hear them in 1969. By far the best of the early boots.


Entered at Sat Jul 9 01:41:57 CEST 2011 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

Adam2, amazing.


Entered at Sat Jul 9 01:00:54 CEST 2011 from (99.141.29.198)

Posted by:

Adam2

New Band recording surfaced today on a torrent site. Philadelphia Academy Of Music, 10/26/69. It's a beauty.


Entered at Fri Jul 8 21:36:53 CEST 2011 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

Professor Louie & The Crowmatix

Web: My link

Please checkout our "facebook" page.


Entered at Fri Jul 8 20:56:36 CEST 2011 from (81.156.61.169)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Various

Thanks again Bill M. By coincidence today I played Jericho by the reformed Band and thought what a good song it is.

I played MFBP, the Brown album, Stage Fright and NLSC. Here is my list, but there is so much great material I've left out.

Many Scots of my age will have been introduced to the Band through 'Rag Mama Rag' and I love 'I Shall Be Released' but it's a Dylan song.

I could take any ten songs from the Brown album, which is my favourite album of all time.

Here is list AL in no particular order.

The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down.

Whispering Pines.

Rocking Chair.

The Weight.

Acadian Driftwood.

Sleeping

Across the Great Divide.

It Makes No Difference.

When You Awake.

Up on Cripple Creek

I'm hurting at the Omissions.


Entered at Fri Jul 8 20:17:57 CEST 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Kevin, thanks. Great link.

Jesse Winchester is a true artist. That was a beautiful performance of a great, great song.


Entered at Fri Jul 8 20:01:46 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Dunc: BARK's best-of does have some non-CD material. One is "Folsom Prison Blues" from a Johnny Cash tribute. Another is their version of Richard Bell's "Jericho". The notes for both songs are well worth a read by Band fans. the notes also do a good job of how the group got together (for a tribute CD, as you know). More recently I read Fearing mentioning that he first met Linden when he was chosen as opening act for a Bruce Cockburn tour (for the "Nothing but a Burning Light" album); Cockburn's band at the time subsequently became Linden's band, who then became the BARK band - Linden, Richard Bell, Gary Craig and John Dymond. By the way, the 'Hank' in "Lean On Your Peers" is actually 'Frank', as in Frankie Venom (really Frank Kerr), one of the world's great frontmen when he headed Hamilton's Teenage Head. "Something's On My Mind" on Frolic2 was one of Teenage Head's big songs back in the day - late '70s.


Entered at Fri Jul 8 19:32:12 CEST 2011 from (174.89.117.65)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Above link to the great Jesse Winchester....sad to hear the news...but hope all will work out..


Entered at Fri Jul 8 16:56:55 CEST 2011 from (205.188.116.5)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friendo

Subject: lung cancer

Billy Costello, 140 lb world boxing champ in his category, from Kingston, NY, with ties to woodstock NY, died from lung cancer at 55 very recently.. Never smoked a cigarette...


Entered at Fri Jul 8 15:36:14 CEST 2011 from (71.62.70.35)

Posted by:

Charlie Y.

Location: Down in Old Virginny

Subject: Jesse Winchester

Bob: I'm very sorry to hear my fellow Virginian Jesse Winchester is now fighting cancer. Thanks for letting us know.


Entered at Fri Jul 8 14:26:02 CEST 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Saw this morning that Jesse Winchester has been diagnosed with esophageal cancer. Wishing him all the best with his treatment and recovery.


Entered at Fri Jul 8 12:11:28 CEST 2011 from (41.97.154.225)

Posted by:

Empty Now

translated from the link in my yesterday's post Entered at Thu Jul 7 11:14:14

"Nothing that is done is ever fully completed as long as everything that started is not fully finished"

what a phrase! with something Lastwaltzian for The Band Connection


Entered at Fri Jul 8 11:45:48 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Union Song

Do check out "Rock & Roll Joe" by Chip Taylor. It's a concept album dedicated to the unsung heroes of rock and roll, and as I said a couple of days ago, a central hero is Richard Bell, and "The Union Song (We Just Got Screwed and It Keeps Getting Better)" is for and about Richard Bell, with appropriate piano playing too.


Entered at Fri Jul 8 11:34:32 CEST 2011 from (41.97.154.225)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: just keep joking

Coluche taught that what makes a joke a good joke or a bad joke is not totally inherent to its content, but depends on three factors (if its content has the minimum required)
1 – who tells the joke
2 – who listens to the joke
3 – the moment chosen to tell the joke

Another anthological tip in the link : The story of a dude who knew in his life one joke only, but he used to perform it with perfection, the punch-line entirely built on the fact that it is spelled with a nasal voice.
At the peak of its success, he was asked to tell it to his boss, whose wife reveals her natural nasal voice. There’s only one exit : arrange things such that it is the listener who will perform the punch-line

“an elephant comes to drink at the edge of the river, he put one foot in the water, he put a second foot in the water, he put his trunk in the water, a crocodile arrives and eat its trunk”
the elephant rises-up and replies [nasal voice] “and you do find this funny?” and Coluche emphasizes “even in Belgium it makes people laugh” for the Band Connection


Entered at Fri Jul 8 11:21:28 CEST 2011 from (81.156.61.169)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Bill M

Thanks, again. On the 'Best of Bark' are there tracks which are not on other albums? May not be completist if I don't have that.

I think 'Let's Frolic Again' is a masterpiece. The track with Garth and Richard Bell (which I recommended to Adam 2) playing solos is brilliant.

Still working on the Bruce Cockburn. Quite a Canadian collection coming along. When I saw Ramblin' Jack a few years ago he said all the best singers come from Canada!


Entered at Fri Jul 8 08:32:10 CEST 2011 from (76.99.245.65)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: by the turtle pond, Drexel Hill, Pa.

Subject: The Checkmates

I saw a mention of the Canadian band, The Checkmates, here. My father's family is originally from Newfoundland, and I was raised in the Philadelphia suburbs. In 1966 or '67, when I was 13, I saw my first concert. It was The Supremes (no "Diana Ross and", at that time) at Villanova. Three bands on the bill. Opening was an outfit listed as The Checkmates Ltd, and I believe they were described as being from Canada. Could this be the same guys? The Supremes were fantastic, at the peak of their popularity, with a many costume and wig changes, an unbelievable thrill to see and hear. The second band really intrigued me though. They were The Parliaments, and their routine was very Motown, in a Four Tops/Temptations fashion: step, clap, spin choreography, wearing matching three piece suits. The frontman was a little edgier, itchier, a little wilder than the rest. It was George Clinton, just at the point in his career before the funk fully burst out. You could almost see the funkplosion as it was starting to happen.


Entered at Fri Jul 8 00:04:08 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Dunc: Here's a link to where you can, I think, still order the Lightfoot tribute. Quite a cast.

As for Willie P, he was always more of a cult figure than hugely popular with the public beyond the folk-fest crowd. And his core cultists were surely people who, even if they could out-sing him (and most could better his bray) couldn't come close to the biting beauty of so many of his songs. Jeez, even the wordless instrumental, "Andrew's Waltz", which is on BARK's best-of, is lovely. I'd be quite pleased with myself if I'd written "Wino wakes up on the street, counts his feet, sees there's two, counts himself a lucky one". Anyway, I saw him just once - in a pub in Banff, Alberta in '78 or '80.


Entered at Thu Jul 7 23:21:28 CEST 2011 from (81.156.61.169)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Bill M, Kevin

I don't have that cover, but I regularly still play Gordon's greatest hits.

'The Lucky Ones' is a great song.

Did you guys see Willie P Bennet? Why is he considered so special by BARK? Just the great songs?


Entered at Thu Jul 7 23:17:32 CEST 2011 from (69.124.123.123)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

A woman's husband had been in a coma for a few days. Upon awakening, he motioned her to come near. He whispered, "You have been with me all through the bad times. When I got fired, when my business failed, when I got shot,…by my side. When we lost the house, when my health started failing, you were there.... You know what?""What dear?" she asked gently."I think you're bad luck. Get the fuck away from me."


Entered at Thu Jul 7 22:48:20 CEST 2011 from (174.89.117.65)

Posted by:

Kevin J

...and Dunc...."Summer Side of Life" happens to be my favorite Lightfoot song.


Entered at Thu Jul 7 22:45:23 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: BARK completicism

Dunc: Good man re BARK. Do you have "Beautiful: A Tribute to Gordon Lightfoot", on which BARK performs "Summer Side Of Life"? Anyway, you're way ahead of me, as I still lack both the first and the latest. Don't even know why I don't have the first, as it contains so many of Willie P Bennett's classics, notably "White Line". It's a credit to Willie's work that songs of his that BARK covered on later albums, like the heart-wrenching "Lucky Ones" and "Willie's Diamond Joe" didn't make the initial cut. (Note to Al E: Add "Lucky Ones" to my list!) The clip's a biggish song from Tom Wilson's previous group, Junkhouse.


Entered at Thu Jul 7 22:22:46 CEST 2011 from (174.89.117.65)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: I Believe in You

Proof that a great singer does not always improve a Bob Dylan song..........


Entered at Thu Jul 7 21:48:10 CEST 2011 from (174.89.117.65)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Bill M: Funny….last night I stopped by the LCBO ( that’s the liquor store for those outside of Ontario ) and just as I was walking in “The Weight” came over the sound system……that is what prompted the last post…..as to real “diners” – hard to find a good one these days as many are being converted to upscale-who-knows-whats by the good for nothing kids of the old Greek owners who seem embarrassed to sell no-name coffee and sit on ripped stools………Mars on Yonge was still a great diner last time in…won’t swear on hearing The Band but did have a good meal……..


Entered at Thu Jul 7 21:21:00 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Kevin: The diner part is indeed a mystery, so much so that I suspect you're making it up. In my experience, "The Weight" comes on in department stores (as you say), large grocery stores and IKEA. In other words, places I only go under duress and where I welcome "The Weight" as the universe's acknowledgement of my plight.


Entered at Thu Jul 7 21:09:08 CEST 2011 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

THE BAND (facebook)

Web: My link

Which 1970 multi-gig music festival that not only starred THE BAND, but also Janis Joplin, The Dead, Richie Havens & many more, was stopped by a court injunction @ the 11th-hr? It did still prompt the 10-15K fan attended "People's Party." There's video footage out there somewhere.


Entered at Thu Jul 7 20:46:00 CEST 2011 from (174.89.117.65)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Mysteries of Life

A couple of things that never fail to amaze me…..1.) How when tossing a salad - 10 seconds in – and I always realize that what initially seemed to be too little dressing was actually too much, and 2.) No matter where I am – walking through a department store or at some diner in the middle of nowhere – hearing “The Weight” come over the speakers is always a great pleasure and one that never seems to diminish.


Entered at Thu Jul 7 18:18:02 CEST 2011 from (129.42.208.177)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY
Web: My link

Subject: PSB Article on Bob Dylan shows from 1981

PSB, I was also at these shows. I wish we could go back and see them again! As always you hit it right on the nail! Great job.


Entered at Thu Jul 7 18:02:32 CEST 2011 from (69.124.123.123)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

David, I'm hoping that if Tuna pressed vinyl, they also recorded on tape. Levon's studio offers tape, albeit, last time I looked, a MCI 2". Just wouldn't make sense to record digitally, then press vinyl.


Entered at Thu Jul 7 16:28:29 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Vinyl Siding: Hot Tuna

I've been enjoying the new Hot Tuna album "Steady As She Goes", opting for the wonderful sounding half-speed mastered LP version, which also includes the CD. It was recorded at Levon's studio and produced by Larry Campbell. Jorma & Jack have never sounded better, aided by Barry Mitterhoff on mandolin and Skoota Warner on drums. Larry plays his usual vast array of instruments and, along with his wife Teresa Williams, adds background vocals.


Entered at Thu Jul 7 14:02:26 CEST 2011 from (155.82.249.253)

Posted by:

Leslie Davenport

Location: Savannah Georgia

I am a 48 year old college student and had to do a power point presentation for my American Music class. We had to pick a performer from woodstock to do our project on. I of course pick "The Band". Thank you so much for the great site.I have always loved the music by The Band but now can appreciate the lives behind the music as well.Even though I did do further research on the web, this by far was the most well put together, easy to manuver and informative site of them all. I want to thank the guys for the music and the memories. It has been my honor to have done this small tribute to them even if it was only school work. Sincerely Leslie


Entered at Thu Jul 7 11:14:14 CEST 2011 from (41.97.136.82)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: Schmilblick 2/2

The genuine Schmilblick (from Yiddishb Schlemiel = idiot and Billik = cheap) was invented by Pierre Dac in 1950, despite himself credits the brothers Jules and Raphaël Fauderche for its invention, as it can be attested by this testimony.

"The Schmilblick of brothers Fauderche is, it should be pointed out, rigorously integral, that is it can both serve as an interior Schmilblick, thanks to the reduced size of its gorgomosches and as a mobile Schmilblick thanks to its mostoblaze and its two glotosifres which enable the group to urnapull the istioplocks, even at the lowest temperatures, and whatever is the nature of the land. It is absolutely useless, and can therefore be used for anything"


Entered at Thu Jul 7 11:13:12 CEST 2011 from (41.97.136.82)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: Schmilblick 1/2

The Schmilblick was a French TV Show animated during the early 70s by Guy Lux. The game consists to guess the name of an object given some of its characteristics following a trial and error process

In the link above, Coluche parodies, with Guy Lux as exclusive spectator, 1975. it became a cult show
Judge by yourself. Rarely humour reached such summits, now that the GB talks versatile. Coluche never used laughter's injection. My fave candidate is at 2:30
"I don't have any question, I just would ask Zezette to go directly at René because I lost the keys of the lorry; it's a shit…. "
the internet before the word


Entered at Thu Jul 7 10:50:28 CEST 2011 from (81.156.61.169)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Jeff, Adam

Thanks for the post, Jeff. Really interesting. Garth's commmitment to continual improvement.

Adam B. Should be Willy Clay Band. Having senior citizen moments.

Incidentally, the only time I heard 'The Weight' live was when it was done by 'The Willy Clay Band'.

Peter. I never said. My good lady and I took your advice and went to Pioneer Creek. We had a great day. There were presentations by First Nation peoples and an exhibition and workshops related to the Metis. I forgot about that day and never thanked you. But, it shows how long I have been on this GB.

Has anyone heard how Knocking Lost John is getting on?


Entered at Thu Jul 7 02:47:27 CEST 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Adam2, you could download one of the countless free programs that enable you to create MP3's from YouTube videos and create a very nice collection of Garth Hudson solos and various supporting performances. There is a plenty to choose from there.


Entered at Thu Jul 7 01:53:18 CEST 2011 from (69.124.123.123)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: 15, 16 card polka

Dunc, One night, several years back, Garth and I were having dinner in a diner in Kingston. Sitting in the rear corner booth, talking away. He pulls a handwritten index card history of polka accordion players out of his pocket. Think it was his jacket breast pocket they were traveling in, anyway, it was a hefty stack of index cards, not the smallest variety either..... Garth got polka .... I recall he talked about individual players, and he held some of these gyus in extremely high regard.


Entered at Thu Jul 7 00:09:23 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Black Creek Pioneer Village? Mrs V was almost persuaded. We went there twice with our kids in different years and she always thought it was a magical place. I remember the video about clearing tree stumps off the land year after year and why pioneers hated trees. Certainly a place to air songs from "Dirt Farmer".


Entered at Wed Jul 6 23:18:22 CEST 2011 from (174.89.117.65)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Black Creek

Regretfully not me as I spend just about every week-end on the road to Montreal…….not complaining but it leaves almost no time for seeing live music which is a regret……playing guitar on my couch is about as exciting as music gets for me these days …….As Band fans – who could have ever imagined that we would be enjoying this mini/late stages – golden period of Garth concerts, Levon concerts and Robbie new original music and TV appearances. Long may it last……


Entered at Wed Jul 6 22:31:56 CEST 2011 from (99.254.209.45)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Levon / Black Creek

Anyone going up to see Levon at Black Creek on the 16th? Great double bill with John Fogerty. Hope it don't rain.


Entered at Wed Jul 6 22:27:43 CEST 2011 from (81.156.61.169)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Adam B

Sorry ...the track is 'Stand Amazed', the album, 'Heaven and Earth'.


Entered at Wed Jul 6 22:14:57 CEST 2011 from (81.156.61.169)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Adam 2, Garth on accordian

Garth is great on accordian on 'Old Hotel' on Let's Frolic Again by Blackie and the Rodeo Kings. This beautiful track also features a Richard Bell solo.

(Bill M - just got my BARK duets album. Remaining a Bark completist).

He also plays great accordian on 'Stand Amazed' the posthumous John Martyn album. Garth got a couple of honourable mentions for his playing on this track in recent British reviews.

Garth goes traditional on 'Poor Folk Polka' on Long Roads by Four Men and a Dog. I remember reading a few years ago that Garth was listening to polkas.

Garth plays beautifully on the Swedish band Willy and the Clayboy's 'If You Leave Me Now' from Rebeca Drive...another beautiful track.

These would be worthwhile downloads... and in true Band style, Garth's playing is relevant to the song. Definitely worth a download, Adam. What a talented and versatile musician Garth is.


Entered at Wed Jul 6 20:43:35 CEST 2011 from (174.89.117.65)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: The Weight

Bill M: Yes we had tossed this one around some years back on the other GB…..and I recall getting some flack from BEG I believe for noting how Blue Rodeo stepped all over themselves that night…….No harm really as they were a bit nervous but really the performance would have been better without them……Like you, I also enjoyed the interchanges between Rick and Robbie…….also I recall Colin Linden telling the story of how at rehearsal just about every TO guitarist of note was in the room and when Robbie walked in and said – “anyone go a pick?” 50 guys went for the quick reach……..wish I had been at the Horseshoe later that night when Rick and Robbie also played……


Entered at Wed Jul 6 19:44:02 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Kevin J: Thanks for the clip, which I hadn't seen before. Rick was excellent, as you said. And Robbie was deservedly pleased with having sung a creditable rendition in Levon's place. I liked Robbie's little smile at 1:32, which I'm sure was his reaction to Cuddy (?) having coming in with a verse-early "freeee" at 1:27. And Robbie smiling at Rick's turned head at 4:49, and Rick turning and smiling back at Robbie's turned head four seconds later. (Such telepathy after all those years together!) And Robbie signalling, by looking skyward at 5:10, that it was time for the special growl to be unleashed. And David Foster deciding at 5:59 that he should stand too.


Entered at Wed Jul 6 19:16:56 CEST 2011 from (174.89.117.65)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

To JQ's point.....it will never happen but I would love to see Garth and Jeff Beck collaborate on something with some of the singers Beck has been using lately......Would be fun.

Above clip just because I love seeing Rick Danko sing and wish we had had 20 more years of him......No one in Rock n roll I miss more..................imagine stumbling into a Yonge street bar mid 1960's and seeing Richard at his peak and Rick who was almost always at his peak and Robbie playing wicked guitar.....


Entered at Wed Jul 6 18:47:24 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Garth odds & ends

More recently there's the all too brief "Genetic Method (Anew)" from the Canadian Celebration of The Band.


Entered at Wed Jul 6 18:41:06 CEST 2011 from (166.205.142.109)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: The Water Is Wide

Pat B - that was grand, although I thought the guitar was too out front, it was especially annoying during the solo. That song & Feed The Birds just seem right for his most emotive playing.

I like to see Garth take on a full record of holy/church music - can you imagine what he would bring to a classic funeral dirge; the most mournful stuff, eh? Maybe just a great singer and Garth doing the Latin high mass.


Entered at Wed Jul 6 17:18:16 CEST 2011 from (87.53.7.76)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Subject: Garth odds & ends

See link above


Entered at Wed Jul 6 16:55:31 CEST 2011 from (174.89.117.65)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Bill M: I did not see it as I was occupied watching a great series called “Justified”……………starring Tim Olyphant and based around an Elmore Leonard story………..highly recommended to anyone who cares for quality drama……………..As to the Yonge Street series….I am anxious to purchase it when released and watch it again………………………I also watched Charlie Rose interview David McCullough about a book he has written on Americans in Paris in the 19th century……also very interesting………..most of those folks as expats in Paris were busy thinking of ways to bring modern medicine back home to the USA along with various other scientific and cultural delights……….imagine their horror if they could have fast forwarded to 2011 and realized that an entire journalistic community in their country would be obsessed with a verdict in a whacky teenage murder case! Truly mind blowing!


Entered at Wed Jul 6 16:14:31 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Pat B: First, thanks for responding re First Lady. Second, a much bigger thanks for the link to the Karla Bonoff number - which I hadn't even heard of before. Phenomenal. Caused me to pull out Bobby Charles' "Tennessee Blues" - another great Garth contribution. Adam2 take note.

Kevin J: Did you see Bravo played part 2 of Yonge Street again last night? Every time I pick up on new bits. Was that Freddy McNulty getting onstage with Hawkins and Hawks in that home-movie quality clip?

RtO: You may have appreciated seeing Robbie, then Ronnie talk about how great John Finley (later of Rhinoceros) was, and then seeing Finley talk about the Hawks asking him to join as their new frontman post-Hawkins, then seeing some footage / hearing some song clips of Finley and Fonfara in John and Lee and the Checkmates. Maybe they'll be showing part 3 tonight, when the outro segment is a 2011 John Finley finally supplying his lead vocals to the instrumental tracks to "Please Please Please" that our guys had recorded in '64.


Entered at Wed Jul 6 15:50:59 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Odds & Ends

How about "Two Piano Song" from The Band's "A Musical History" box set?


Entered at Wed Jul 6 13:18:31 CEST 2011 from (41.97.165.152)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: Correction : Mohammed Abdel Wahab

link above to the referential Biography suggested by different links on the net, funny but not surprising, it's the site where The Band is

the CD I previously mentionned as having been released in 1992 was actually released in 1988. in fact 1992 is when I first heard about

"In 1988, at the age of 81, he made a surprise return to the studio, singing a new composition, and despite lyrics that seemed unacceptably iconoclastic to some radicals, the disk sold two million copies. "


Entered at Wed Jul 6 11:29:43 CEST 2011 from (41.97.165.152)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: One joke for Al Edge, signed Coluche

Two friends are talking
- “I wont go to Brazil next summer, I dislike Brazil, there are only whores and footballers”
- “Eh dis donc! you should know that my wife is Brazilian”
- “Really? with what team does she plays ?”

(not figuring in the link above which is just a facet of the awesome French humorist)


Entered at Wed Jul 6 10:20:46 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Many thanks, Pat. I'd long forgotten that one. I just put it on my iTunes in the "Peter's Desert Island" playlist.


Entered at Wed Jul 6 00:00:04 CEST 2011 from (68.164.6.24)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

adam2, although not strictly fulfilling your requirements, I think this might be Garth's greatest moment.


Entered at Tue Jul 5 23:58:22 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Dozens of Garth sessions listed on the site. The major one, assuming you have Our Lady Queen of Angels & Sea To The North is:

Feed The Birds from “Stay Awake” Hal Wilner Disney album



Entered at Tue Jul 5 23:53:48 CEST 2011 from (68.164.6.24)

Posted by:

Pat B

I know it predates the Civil War and that's about it. I also believe it is not a strictly US thing as many world leaders' wives are now referred to as First Lady. Of course, now there is a First Lady of practically everything.


Entered at Tue Jul 5 23:48:40 CEST 2011 from (75.34.41.26)

Posted by:

Adam2

Subject: Garth odds & ends

I will take advantage of the GB's considerable list/compiling skills, and ask you guys for a comprehensive "Garth odds & ends" list. I'm talking about stuff like Garth's Largo and French Girls - Garth solo pieces/instrumentals that are scattered across various releases, that would sound good compiled together. I'm not sure if there are even very many, but I figured I'd ask before looking into it myself. Are Garth's Largo and French Girls the only ones?


Entered at Tue Jul 5 23:22:59 CEST 2011 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Thanks for the link Bill; I hadn't heard that tune in many a year.


Entered at Tue Jul 5 21:48:27 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: Rockin' Chair Ride

Kevin J: For some reason you reminded me of Christopher Kearney's lovely "Rockin' Chair Ride". Here's a link to his second stab at it, in 1971. I prefer the one he did a year before, but that may be just because it's the first one I heard. I take it that that photos that go with the song are of Newfoundland outports. Last I saw of Kearney was at the ElMo in the early '80s when was in something of a local 'supergroup', China (aka King Kearney and McBride) with former Kozmic Blues Band keyboardist Bill King and future Chris DeBurgh guitarist Danny McBride.


Entered at Tue Jul 5 21:26:43 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: "Send 'em Home Sweatin'"

Pat B: So, where'd the title "First Lady" come from? (We've been awaiting your return.)

Peter V and other UKists of a certain age: A recent literary purchase was "Send 'em Home Sweatin': The Showbands' Story" by Vincent Power. All about the showbands (fully horned lounge bands) of Ireland of the '50s and '60s. I haven't waded in yet except to read the third-last chapter on Rory Gallagher and his days as a young showband guitarist and the second-last chapter on Van Morrison and HIS early days as a showband saxist.


Entered at Tue Jul 5 21:20:42 CEST 2011 from (41.97.194.174)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: Mohamed Abdelwahab - Revisited

Al Watan Al Akbar (The Greatest Nation)

Masterpiece of Mohamed Abdelwahab, 1956, under the form of Operette featuring one huge star singer from every Republic from the Arabian world. By-order musical masterpiece whose text glorifies major Arab countries, qualified Popular.

Very close to perfection on the musical level, the demagogic text of this composition which cannot be more than hollow slogans at the time of its intention, by a twist of history owned concreteness on the ground of 2011. intriguing text also for its time (sample) :

Oppression has called its own end
Gone from the world its time and its reign
Neither in Algiers nor in Oman
Unrest prevailed over tyranny
This is the triumph of the Arab people

One word on Mohamed Abdelwahab

Singer-songwriter whose career spanned all technologies. First disk recorded in 1917. More than adulated in Egypt. It is said about his last 1992 CD, a concept album based on poems of Elia Abu Madi, that the all one million CDs stock were sold prior to the rehearsals for the recording. This is the only case I ever heard of such formula.
On the same way, he spanned several political regimes, though he is presented as a major figure of King Farouk era.

An acceptable quality video in the link above, where one gets a close view of the Maestro


Entered at Tue Jul 5 20:50:14 CEST 2011 from (174.89.117.65)

Posted by:

Kevin J

I have not checked but seems to me that” Rockin Chair” has made every list…….It won’t finish no. 1 but just might be the most consistently favoured Band song by the cognoscenti……..a re-do for me on the Band list is “Out of the Blue”….lovely song that I never tire of……..


Entered at Tue Jul 5 20:36:44 CEST 2011 from (68.164.6.24)

Posted by:

Pat B

Subject: Adam2, Avert your sensitive eyes

1. Dixie

2. Look Out Cleveland

3. Unfaithful Servant

4. We Can Talk

5. Acadian Driftwood

6. I Shall Be Released

7. The Rumor

8. Caledonia Mission

9. The Weight

10. Rockin' Chair

Bonus: The Covers

1. Share Your Love

2. Don't Do It

3. Georgia


Entered at Tue Jul 5 20:03:59 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Gillian Welch

I don't know whether the Harrow breaks any new ground for the Harvest, but I was underwhelmed by Ms. Welch's performance of one of the new songs on Conan O'Brien's show last week. Her lackluster vocal didn't hit any emotional chord for me and, to make matters worse, the sound was mixed so that Mr. Rawlings' dazzling fretwork drowned out Ms. Welch's vocal throughout the song.


Entered at Tue Jul 5 19:48:32 CEST 2011 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

THE BAND (facebook)

Web: My link

Happy birthday, Robbie Robertson!


Entered at Tue Jul 5 19:02:46 CEST 2011 from (129.42.208.177)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY
Web: My link

Subject: John Platania

Peter V, In addition to his great guitar work on the fine new Chip Taylor release, John Platania recently produced and played guitar on a very good Dylan covers record. The artist is Nick Rael and the record is called Winter 61. Also, I love the new Stevie Nicks. Dave Stewart did a great job with the production. There are at least 6 very strong songs. On one called Italian Summer she hit's a couple of notes at the end of the song that really surprised me.


Entered at Tue Jul 5 18:49:47 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Richard Bell

BTW, the Band member quoted in "We Just Got Screwed and it keeps getting better" is Richard Bell … the song is all about Richard Bell. The other one that's fun is The Van Song, about how John Platania always drops Chip's band when Van phones.


Entered at Tue Jul 5 18:25:38 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Vancouver psych / Ronnie Hawkins / the Doors
Web: My link

If any of you clicked on the Vancouver psych music link I posted yesterday you would have seen a group called Mock Duck performing their song "Do Re Mi". It occurred to me this morning that the keyboardist even has a Ronnie Hawkins connection, in that he seems to have been in the original version of Hawkins' early '70s back-up band, the Travelling Medicine Show with David Foster, BJ Cook Foster, Dwayne Ford, Brian Hilton, Steve Pugsley and Hugh Brockie. Most soon flew back west to form Skylark (leaving Ford, Brockie and initially Hilton to regroup with Jim Atkinson and Terry Danko - still with Hawkins and then as Bearfoot), but not before recording Barrett's "Madeleine", which was released on Hawkins' Hawk label. The dweebish vocal may well have been Foster's first. Anyway, I scouted out Ross Barrett's current website (see link), which indicates that his second CD has John Densmore himself on drums!


Entered at Tue Jul 5 18:14:21 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Gillian Welch

I played it through once and thought the first couple dullish, but then it got better. I was going to play it again, but the Chip Taylor arrived in the post and has been on replay ever since. Every Band fan, I think, will love it. Try "Monica" on iTunes or whatever. John Platania was asked for a riff for "Domino" by Van, and presented him with a choice of two. Van made his choice and that's Domino. But "Monica" is based on the other one.


Entered at Tue Jul 5 18:00:36 CEST 2011 from (166.205.142.109)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Gillian Welch

Peter V - Any take yet on her new one?


Entered at Tue Jul 5 17:47:00 CEST 2011 from (41.97.194.174)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Subject: Bill M / Just to test if language-specific jokes export well to English

Bill M: thanks for the link

And here’s the testing joke:

Two friends, Jan from Flanders and Johan from Holland are traveling the savannah inside a jeep, when suddenly Johan shouted “oh! Look at the smart Giraffe at the left”
Jan turned left, then corrected knowledgedly “Nee, that is not one Giraffe, that is one Tankh Errawuss” [ “kh” is spelled as Spanish J]
Johan grinned, assuming it’s a local appellation, and continued driving. Half an hour later he exclaimed “Look Jan, an elephant on the right”
Jan : “Nee, that is not one Elephant, that is one Tankh Errawuss”
Here Johan, began rather to be upset, while accepting fair-play the correction, even beginning to doubt of his long time knowledge. Half an hour later, “and this one Jan, you’re not gonna tell that it is not called a Lion ?”
Jan: unperturbed, “Nee, that is not one Lion, that is one Tankh Errawuss”
Then Johan entered a loud anger, “where the hell did you learned this appellation ? I demand an explanation!”
Jan always unperturbed, “It was at the entrance of the reservation, written on a big panel “Attention! Oll The Animals Are Tankh Errawuss” “


Entered at Tue Jul 5 16:38:24 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Hey Porter

Peter V: Gillian Welch & Dave Rawlings previously recorded the album "Time (The Revelator)" at RCA Studio B, which no doubt influenced the obession with trying to recreate the magic. When RCA first built the studio, however, there were problems with its acoustics. The legendary engineer Bill Porter took some inexpensive acoustical tiles, formed into pyramids, and strategically suspended them from the ceiling.

Kevin J: Jody Maphis, the son of Joe & Rose Lee, is also a talented multi-instrumentist. Back in the '70s I saw him many times playing drums with the Earl Scruggs Revue. As part of their stage act, Jody would stand behind guitarist Randy Scruggs and reach in with his left hand to fret the the guitar as Randy picked an uptempo tune with his right hand.


Entered at Tue Jul 5 15:37:09 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: CBC radio concerts: 1) Colin James with Tom Wilson; 2) last Little Feat show with Ritchie Hayward

Upcoming concert broadcasts on CBC Radio 2:

Thursday, July 7, 2011
concert 1: Colin James
recorded at the Studio in Hamilton Place, Hamilton, ON
Tonight on Canada Live, an acoustic performance by Colin James that was recorded in the intimate setting of the Studio in Hamilton Place. As well as some of his hit songs, you'll hear Colin perform some classic blues tunes. Special guest Tom Wilson (from Blackie and the Rodeo Kings) joins Colin on stage for a couple of songs. [This is repeated next day on Radio 1, 2:05 pm.]

Friday, July 8, 2011
concert 1: Little Feat
recorded on the Main Stage at the 2010 Vancouver Island MusicFest, Courtenay, B.C.
Little Feat have a sound that is infused with nearly every style of popular music: Rock, blues, funk, country, Cajun, jazz, and rhythm & blues. With guitarists Paul Barerre and Fred Tackett, Bill Payne playing keyboards, Kenny Gradney on bass, and Ritchie Hayward on drums, Little Feat have continued to create their unique blend of eclectic and infectious music for thrilled live audiences for more than 40 years! The Sunday night festival crowd buzzed with anticipation, as the late evening sun dipped behind the trees. The audience knew they were living history, as Ritchie Hayward set that unmistakable groove behind Little Feat in what was his last concert. Ritchie Hayward passed away August 12th, 2010.


Entered at Tue Jul 5 15:16:48 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Fat arses

PV

Ha ha.


Entered at Tue Jul 5 15:13:55 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Calvin

Must admit I'd love to read your lists mate.


Entered at Tue Jul 5 15:11:50 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Is that Robbie playing a bit of "Amazing Grace" in "Straight Down The Line"? I wonder why? (As noted last week, a bit of "Pinball Wizard" turns up much later on the album.)

Empty N: Your song at least led me to Boris Vian's "Le Deserteur", which for some reason my class learned to sing in school - must've been late '60s. Presumably Northern Boy did too.


Entered at Tue Jul 5 14:58:31 CEST 2011 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

Mike & Kim Hayward

Web: My link

Happy b'day, Robbie Robertson!


Entered at Tue Jul 5 14:51:13 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Before the ban … the new Chip Taylor "Rock & Roll Joe: A Tribute" just arrived, with Band connections … Ron Eoff plays bass, and Tony Leone, Bill Frisell get quoted, and also John Platania plays guitar. I read a review and ordered it (and can't find the review) but "The Union Song" is subtitled (We Just Got Screwed and It Keeps Getting Better) and is based on, I believe, a quote from a Band member.


Entered at Tue Jul 5 14:42:54 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I foolishly repeated that joke to Mrs V on the grounds that she laughed at the monkey one. Now I've been banned the internet for a week.


Entered at Tue Jul 5 13:59:24 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Hmmph...

After the wife had a shower last night she then stood naked in front of the mirror and asked me if her breasts were too small.

I told her that if she wanted them to get really enormous she should try rubbing some toilet paper between them for a few seconds each night.

She asked how long it would take doing that for them to get huge.

I said it could take quite a few years.

She said she didn't believe me.

I told her it seemed to have worked for her arse.

That's when the the fight started.

:-0)


Entered at Tue Jul 5 11:24:39 CEST 2011 from (41.97.194.174)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

This joke looks like this one which is generally told under is under the form of a riddle (quiz)

1 - A Sultan tired of receiving an increasing number of his daughter’s pretenders (who was already promised to the King of Trebizonde), set an impossible challenge to keep them away : “the Prince who will make my elephant laugh wins the hand of the Princess”
All the pretenders tried everyone his trick to make the elephant laugh. Nothing happened. Elephants should never laugh. Came Nasreddin and he said something at the elephant’s ear. Spontaneously, the elephant started laughing and never stopped anymore

2 – The Sultan tired of the elephant laughs called for a second challenge, the Prince who will make the elephant stop laughing wins the hand of his younger daughter. All the princes tried their tricks without result, then came Nasreddin. The elephant started crying and never stopped anymore

Quiz
1 – How did Nass earn the hand of the Sultan’s elder daughter ?
2 – How did him earn the hand of the Sultan’s younger daughter ?

Answer:
1 – Nass said to the elephant “my penis is bigger than yours”
2 – Nass showed his penis to the elephant


Entered at Tue Jul 5 10:57:35 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Hospital rule Numero Uno...Nurses should never laugh...

Nurses aren't supposed to laugh...

"Of course I won't laugh," said the nurse. "I'm a professional. In over thirty years I've never so much as laughed on one single occasion at a patient. It would be morally and professionally irresponsible of me to do so"

"Okay then," said Bob. And he proceeded to drop his trousers, revealing by far the smallest male part the nurse had ever seen. It's length and width was almost identical to an AAA battery.

Trying as hard as she could but unable to control herself a giggle just came out.

Then as her giggles got the better of her she started laughing ever more at the fact that she was giggling.

Poor Bob stood there, not knowing which way to turn, his face turning ever more scarlet, his tiny part shrinking even more.

After a minute or so and by now feeling utterly ashamed that she had laughed at Bob's tiny part, the nurse finally composed herself as well as she could.

"Oh I'm so sorry," she said. "Really sorry". "I don't know what came over me. On my honour as a nurse and a lady, I promise that won't happen again. Now, tell me, what seems to be the problem?"

"Well, the last week or so it's begun to swell up," Bob replied.

The nurse collapsed in a heap on the floor.


Entered at Tue Jul 5 10:29:31 CEST 2011 from (41.97.194.174)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: Les Loups Sont Entrés Dans Paris - (Wolves Came In Paris)

Serge Reggiani - "Les Loups Sont Entrés Dans Paris" , text of Boris Vian

And if it was a night, as we didn’t have since one hundred thousand nights

A night of iron, a night of blood, a night, a dog is howling,
”Take a look people of Nanterre !, take a look at it,
Under his coat of green bronze the lion, the lion trembles"

The men have lost interest to live, and fucked it all
Their mothers, brothers, girlfriends, for them all was cinema
The sky became wild again, the concrete was eating the landscape, …then

Wolves, Wolves were far from Paris,
in Croatia, in Germany, the wolves were far from Paris
I loved your laughter, charming Elvire, the wolves were far from Paris

But it did fifty leagues, in one night and in a single file
When they sniff a feast of deaths, on the battlefield
When fear haunts the streets, the wolves come by night ... so

Wolves, Wolves looked at Paris,
from Croatia, from Germany, the wolves looked at Paris
You can smile, charming Elvire, the wolves are looking at Paris

it was by a harsh winter, a hundred congestions in miscellaneous news
Shuttered inside, we rattled teeth, even in the best districts
And no one dared the evening to face the snow of the boulevards.... then

Two Wolves, Two Wolves came in Paris
One from Issy, the other from Ivry, two wolves came in Paris
Oh you can laugh, charming Elvire, Two came in entered Paris.

The first one had only one eye, it was an old male from Krivoy
He set up his ten females, in the lean square of Grenelle
And it feeds its two hundred children with the children of Passy.... then

One hundred wolves, One hundred wolves came in Paris
either from Issy or from Ivry, one hundred wolves came in Paris
Stop laughing, charming Elvire, one hundred wolves came Paris.

The second was only three feet, it was a gray from the Carpathians, called “Lent-Taking”
He did grace to its children, and offered them six ministries
And all the guardians of pounds ... so

Wolves, Wolves invaded Paris
either from Issy or from Ivry, the wolves invaded Paris
Stop laughing, charming Elvire, the wolves invaded Paris.

Attracted by the smell of blood, came hundreds and thousands wolves
To do carousel, jubilation, and feasting, in this fucking country of France
Up until the men have recycled love and brotherhood .... then

Wolves, Wolves came out of Paris
either by Issy or by Ivry, the wolves came out of Paris
You can smile, charming Elvire, the wolves came out of Paris

I love your laugh, charming Elvire, the wolves came out of Paris.


Entered at Tue Jul 5 10:10:33 CEST 2011 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: H & H

The Harrow and Harvest is a pretty good album. Not too much different than some of her earlier releases but maybe a little more up tempo. I was hoping she would ask OCMS along to liven up a few tracks like Dave did but alas it didn;t happen.


Entered at Tue Jul 5 10:00:46 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Harrow & The Harvest

The five star critics’ favourite this month is “The Harrow & The Harvest” by Gillian Welch, which they say is actually the name of the duo of Gillian Welch and David Rawlings, not just of her. I spent five minutes in HMV pondering whether to buy it or the new Stevie Nicks, and opted for the folkie one.

Gillian is interviewed at length in “Uncut” about the album. She says they’ve spent the last eight years obsessively transforming their Nashville studio into an exact replica of RCA Studio B, down to the same linoleum, wall tiles, Hammond B3 and xylophone in exactly the same places against the wall. To me it sounds like the people who buy a Robbie Robertson signature guitar, believing that their own shop-bought Martin’s different detail is all that is preventing them from playing like Robbie.

Anyway, she then goes into a tale we’ve discussed here before. She’s had a lot of irritating criticism because of her LA upbringing / Berklee College of Music education in Boston. She was adopted and says her birth mother was an Appalachian girl in New York City. She adds that she likes to believe her father was a musician passing through NYC … Levon Helm or Bill Monroe. As she was born in October 67, that places Levon down in the gulf and not playing at all in January, so he’s off the hook. Bill Monroe was fifty-seven at the time, which indicates a pretty wide-ranging taste in men. Not that fifty-seven’s past it, I hasten to add. My grandfather was born in 1889 to a seventy-five year old father.


Entered at Tue Jul 5 08:11:45 CEST 2011 from (59.101.14.222)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: I shouldn't enter into this...

A chap suspects his wife is cheating on him, so he organises to go to work late so as to spring her. He sneaks out the front door, waits 20 minutes and sneaks back in - springs her in the bedroom: she's obviously been with someone, but she's alone - he races to teh window, where he sees a man running away from his house in barefeet. In a jealous rage, he races downstairs, rips the refrigerator from the wall, races back upstairs, throws teh refrigerator, and hits the man in the back of the head with it. The strain is so much our hero has a heart attack and dies on the spot.

At the pearly gates, St Peter calls out: 'Next. How did you die?'

'In a jealous rage, I threw a refrigerator at a man I suspected was sleeping with my wife. The strain gave me a heart attack.'

'Bless you my son: in you go.. Next'

'I overslept, and was running late for work. As I ran towards the bus stop, in bare feet, a refrigerator came out of nowhere and hit me.'

'Bless you, my son: in you go. Next'

'There I was, cold, naked and frightened, hiding in a refrigerator ...'



Entered at Tue Jul 5 03:09:06 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: While dodgy jokes are being applauded...

Chap comes home from work to find his wife sitting at the table with a jug of coffee made, and with her head in her hands. He puts his briefcase down, puts an arm round her and as she looks up he raises an eyebrow in concern and curiosity.

"That son of yours!" she says "GOD knows what we'll do about him now!"

"Oh dear. Is it that bad? It generally is when all of a sudden he is MY son, sweetie" he says, sitting down and helping himself to a coffee

"I was tidying his room and found magazines..." she begins

"Come on, babe" he chuckles "He's fifteen....you have to expect that sort..."

"These are very specific!" she cuts in, adding "Whips, chains, punishment..you know? Honey, WHAT are we going to do?"

"Well, then" begins hubby before taking a slurp of coffee "I see the difficulty...

...I mean, it's not as if we can give him a slap, then, is it?"


Entered at Tue Jul 5 02:56:17 CEST 2011 from (205.188.116.5)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Fucking hysterical, Al :-)


Entered at Mon Jul 4 21:54:46 CEST 2011 from (99.235.255.183)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: Happy 4th of July to all Americans...

Wishing all US a Happy 4th of July. Have a great day...

Our Independence Day

by Roger J. Robicheau

With our first fourth on that seventh month began A declaration of how we would forge our life In signature, John Hancock did lead by action The beginning of a nation which has firmly stood

As we stop to embrace our Independence Day We should reflect back from this sixth millennium year Looking to the many trials we have faced as a country Most vividly, to that infamous September morn

We have never, and never will succumb to threat Our rigid foundation is of, by, and for the people We heed the message of President John F. Kennedy It is what we do for our country that stands us tall

As good citizens we put our trust in God, and each other Under one flag we stand, united for all the world to see Our Stars and Stripes form the Old Glory we so revere And how gallant are those who march with our colors

As Americans, we hold freedom as a certainty Our bravest have given their all to this end If not for their willingness, we would not be The cost of liberty demands this commitment

So many have endured the precious loss of loved ones We must stay aware of the tragedy they live with For they, more than any, feel the total cost of sacrifice Praise their fallen heroes, they left freedom for us

My Dear Americans, as we take time to celebrate This independence held so deep in our hearts I hope that the following thoughts of America

Bring forth emotion, for the USA that we love We shall always be ‘the land of the free' We shall always be ‘the home of the brave’ We shall always hear ‘God Bless America’ We shall always love ‘Mom and Apple Pie’

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Americans in Strength

by Roger Robicheau

Americans in strength unite This union born in freedom’s light United States, how sure we are We’ll pull together, near and far

The world can see of what we’re made Each state is of the highest grade Determination, filled with pride Our people’s will won’t be denied

Our founding fathers set to stay The road we’ve traveled to this day A quest for right cannot be wrong With help from God, we will stay strong

Support our troops ranks number one For the job they do is never done When forced they put it on the line True patriots, when called they shine Let’s raise Old Glory with a cheer

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxoxoxo


Entered at Mon Jul 4 20:49:39 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: It Is A Good Day To die

Ah, check the sleeve notes. This was the music to a detailed six part TV series, "The Native Americans." He knew the history. Though why he thought the "soldiers," presumably Custer's men, would have understood Lakota and wondered about the meaning, I don't know.


Entered at Mon Jul 4 20:46:09 CEST 2011 from (72.71.209.213)

Posted by:

THE BAND (facebook)

Web: My link

Happy 4th of July!


Entered at Mon Jul 4 20:45:22 CEST 2011 from (108.41.170.6)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Foul language

There is nothing more profane than a woman's dormitory. I'm old so things might be different now,, my reference being the 60's.If you lock up 200 women every night at 10:00 you are bound to incubate profanity. There were things said tha would embarrass a sailor (sorry Norm). I went off to school pretty much like a lady, but after 4 years I had a truly foul mouth. It took me a while to get back to "Lady" status. My point being, if you use bad words enough they become meaningless. You get inured. You don't even think you are doing something bad till you see the look on people's faces.

Al Great joke! Started off my day laughing.


Entered at Mon Jul 4 20:43:00 CEST 2011 from (174.89.117.65)

Posted by:

Kevin J

David P: Great nod to Joe Maphis………I enjoyed seeing some of the clips on youtube……humbling actually.

Westcoaster: Good luck at Sea.


Entered at Mon Jul 4 20:12:29 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Peter V: You may well be right, Robbie being an intellectual and all. Still, I think it more likely that he took his new bride to the hit movie than got Levon to take him to the liberry again - especially one big enought to have microfiche.

Dan George had a pretty decent ride back home in Vancouver on the back of his LBM success. Even did an album with a local rock band called Fireweed, a member or two of which our chum Westcoaster has played with. Fireweed evolved from Hydro-Electric Streetcar, known as Vancouver's loudest band of the psychedelic era. Group leader John Mills-Cockell, a misplaced Torontonian synthesizer pioneer who'd previously been in Kensington Market, returned ca '71 to lead his new trio, Syninx into the charts and the memory banks of radio fans like Landmark (with "Tillicum", especially).

RtO: You might like to know that the very final drummer of Rhinoceros, an Englishman named Malcolm Tomlinson (who'd played early Band songs in a group with Martin Barre), was also the drummer in the last version of Syrinx.

The link above is to a benefit compilation that includes the only Hydro-Electric Streetcar recording. Westcoaster will appreciate many of the records listed down the right margin. Following a particular string of those follow-on links got me to our guys' "Leave Me Alone", which led to several tracks from the limited release of the "Port Dover '64" tape.


Entered at Mon Jul 4 19:27:00 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Kevin J: As soon as Pat B's back from his July 4 fun - I'm guessing either a game of horseshoes or a re-enactment of the Battle of Something Something - I'm sure he'll tell us where that gag-inducing "First Lady" tag came from. It's especially gag inducing when applied, as it has been, to Laureen Harper.


Entered at Mon Jul 4 19:07:34 CEST 2011 from (174.89.117.65)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

For clarity, it was Michaelle Jean - above link - that I meant as being impossibly beautiful - not her husbamd.....


Entered at Mon Jul 4 19:00:03 CEST 2011 from (174.89.117.65)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Bill M: Veering toward Stevonian territory…..but I will say just this……..having Royals does prevent the absurd practise of elevating the wife or husband of our elected Prime Ministers into that nutty media invented position of “First Lady”………at least the Royals have been properly trained for the most part………………..Can anyone ever forget the wife of Byron Muldoon getting to the Great Wall of China and exclaiming “ Oh, it’s so small “……..........having said all that I do remember back in the days of the other Guestbook having to explain to our friends in the US ( Happy July 4 to all by the way! ) how the husband of our Governor General - the impossibly lovely seal heart eating Michaelle Jean was really our First Lady even if he was a balding older man and a separatist to boot…….only in Canada!

Northwestcoaster: Apart from song selection - did he sound ok? What about the age of the crowd?


Entered at Mon Jul 4 18:43:22 CEST 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Subject: cue ball

Excellent, Al. I needed a good laugh.


Entered at Mon Jul 4 18:42:50 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Pardon? That old? I can't remember.


Entered at Mon Jul 4 18:41:25 CEST 2011 from (83.249.104.152)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Subject: Leavenworth Weekly Times, Thursday, August 18, 1881

With all respect, Peter.... but are you really THAT old?


Entered at Mon Jul 4 18:33:41 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Chief Dan George

Bill M: "Low Dog's Story of the Battle: A Hunkpapa Sioux's account of the Battle of the Little Bighorn" in the Leavenworth Weekly Times, Thursday, August 18, 1881. Low Dog is quoted as saying 'I called to my men, "This is a good day to die: follow me."'

I found that on Wiki, so it's probably wrong (I hear from The Sunday Times that the Republican party are changing Wiki entries madly so as to obscure their candidates' gaffes). I knew it was Sioux, but I thought it was either Crazy Horse or Sitting Bull who'd said it before I looked it up. I always find Chief Dan George's portrayal of Old Lodge Skins wonderful. I assume Robbie was quoting the original stories, not the film. Thomas Berger's novel was well-researched, and until that point I don't know how many people saw Custer as a genocidal lunatic.


Entered at Mon Jul 4 18:15:40 CEST 2011 from (41.97.194.174)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: Al_Edge_dly Yours

Al Edge,

As I completely dissociated my 30 best non-The Band songs from my best albums list, to render my job easier, allow me to introduce the following precision :

what made me Naturally decide of my best albums list are songs in the so called albums, So to make things conformal to the spirit of what was generically asked for, and after deep ponder, I decide of my own initiative to list two songs from every album figuring in my favorite albums list. Two being the lowest number to justify the selection of the album instead of the single. (In reality, songs from a given album of my list added to other albums of the same artist alone surpass 30 songs.)

from best album #1 : Nobody’s Home, Dust In The Wind
from best album #2 : Everybody Need Somebady, Minnie The Moocher (Cab Calloway)
from best album #3 : Duncan, The Boxer
from best album #4 : Ohio, Southern Man
from best album #5 : The Load Out, Stay

Al : you’ll surely find the best move to do to preserve the spirit of the game, as to adjust these titles on my 30 songs list in the way it suits the best, or use them to decide between ex-aequos, I rely on your wisdom

Bill M: thanks for the link, as the other Fairuz fan from Band world, I was eager to keep trace of what you consider the best Fairuz song;

For the Band Connection, though there is a Wagnerian feel in “Flower of the Cities”, just as TNTDODD, it is actually a song about a next_day_of_defeat. I have reasons to believe that next_day_of_defeats songs are great songs, while I not ready to post the list of my best next_day_of_defeat songs


Entered at Mon Jul 4 18:15:22 CEST 2011 from (83.249.104.152)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: 1.) Dylan in Sweden 2.) Ukulele in Guinness World Records!!!!

1.) Dylan ended his mini-tour in Europe in Sweden. He totally missed the obvious circumstance that the place was Sweden's "Iron Range" like that one in Minnesota. He didn't play anything Band related except "Forever Young". I was disappointed.

2.) I am going to take part in Guinness World Record Event in UKULELE playing. We need to be nearly nine hundred people playing simultaneously the same song at the same beach in August. Now I really need to practice those three chords on ukulele... OUCH!!! My fingers... It is more difficult you can think.


Entered at Mon Jul 4 18:10:53 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Robbie's mug's been on a Canadian stamp; will William's be?

Kevin J: With any luck, and a national outbreak of rational thought, William'll never be our head of state, though I wish him every success as the UK's. (And thanks again, Peter V, Al E, Roger, RtO, et many al for your part in paying for the upkeep of these people.)


Entered at Mon Jul 4 18:01:37 CEST 2011 from (174.89.117.65)

Posted by:

Kevin J

The visit of the Royals……..Typical of Toronto media to blow up what was a few nuts in Quebec that show up and protest all such events…. ….as strongly as these protesters believe – it amazes me that they never do grasp the reality that it only reflects poorly on them and hurts their cause when they give the finger to guests invited to visit their home………anyhow………The reception in Quebec with its military connections was well handled all around and fitting given Quebec’s disproportionally high number of men and women lost to battle representing Canada in Afghanistan over the last 10 years………….. At a time when most cretins in the media were just focussed on what Kate was wearing I was pleased to see her husband accurately and properly pay homage to Canada’s and Quebec’s often overlooked but quite glorious contributions to world military battles past and present….........Yes….I am a leftie but nice to see future heads of state that have some educations in matters other than celebrity bull sh*t………………Now back to the lists!


Entered at Mon Jul 4 17:51:03 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Al E: Not so many jokes make me laugh out loud anymore, but yours did, thank you very much!

Speaking of laughing out loud, I heard Big & Rich's "Save A Horse Ride A Cowboy" - at a Canada Day event at the nearest Legion. (We got there too late to catch the band, Magnum with steel great Bob Lucier, recently praised by one-time protege Daniel Lanois in Lanois's autobiography and in the Yonge Street documentary.) Liked it so much that I'm considering it for my revampted top 30 (sorry Adam2: this is Al's gift that's gonna keep on giving), since it meets my only criterion - that it has moved me to either laugh, cry or get the chills.

Since Empty N posted a Fairuz song, I thought I'd repost another, the most moving of a very moving EP of her performances of Easter songs from the early '60s. This one was already on my top 30, and will stay there.

I might also add "Sea Of Heartbreak", an indestructible tear-jerker that Joe J commendably credited to Don Gibson. Re the Pogues record, I prefer Fred Eaglesmith's similarly themed "The Light Brigade".

Westcoaster: Re children swearing, I love sometime-Hawk Eugene Smith's line, "Have you ever seen eight little kids playing in the sand, calling each other names that they can't even understand?"

Peter V: Re "Little Big Man", I trust you made the link between Dan George's big line and one of Robbie's later songs: "Today is a good day to die."

Peter V again: Good of you to nod in the direction of Althea and Donna's great one hit, "Uptown Top Ranking".

Landmark: Thanks for the Canada list. Good job on yours too, dlew - deserving of a special medal given the geographical challenges!

Al E: Your Manfred link at least took me to what was their final (pre Earth Band) hitlet, "My Name Is Jack". I still have to wonder if Jack is Rick's dog, the one that appears in "The Weight"? (I know his real name was Hamlet, but imagine how well that would have gone over in the schoolyard: something like "Nigel" would have in my day.)


Entered at Mon Jul 4 16:19:00 CEST 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: y'kin do anything when yer mad

Didn't have to Al.......he said he was sorry so I let him out. When I went back inside tho', I realized how I'd wrecked my skates. (Notice I didn't say I fucked them up).

Lots of teenage boys, don't yet get the consequences of calling older men such names. I'm not unique. I know a lot of guys you don't call names like that, or you suffer for it.

In conclusion, I have been guilty of bad language in front of the ladies, some times in not realizing they were about. No man should be above apologizing (and meaning it) for indicrections.


Entered at Mon Jul 4 15:59:28 CEST 2011 from (69.123.3.201)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Laughing!

Al, that's funny! You crack me up!


Entered at Mon Jul 4 15:49:39 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Vulgar joke for my penance Norm...

A guy walks into a bar with his pet monkey. He orders a drink, and while he's drinking, the monkey starts jumping all around the place.

The monkey grabs some black olives off the bar and eats them, then grabs some sliced limes and eats them, then jumps onto the pool table, grabs one of the billiard balls, Sticks it in his mouth, and to everyone's amazement, somehow swallows it. Whole.

The bartender screams at the guy, "Did you see what your monkey just did?"

The guy says "No, what?"

"He just ate the cue ball off my pool table! He swallowed it whole!"

"Yeah, that doesn't surprise me," replied the guy, "He eats everything in sight, the greedy little bastard. Sorry. I'll pay for the cue ball and stuff."

He finishes his drink, pays his bill, pays for the stuff the monkey ate, then leaves.

Two weeks later he's in the bar again, and has his monkey with him.

He orders a drink and the monkey starts running around the bar again.

While the man is finishing his drink, the monkey finds a maraschino cherry on the bar. He grabs it, sticks it up his ass, pulls it out, and eats it.

Then the monkey finds a peanut, and again sticks it up his ass, pulls it out, and eats it.

The bartender is disgusted. "Did you see what your monkey just did now?" He asks.

"No, what?" replies the guy.

"Well, he stuck a maraschino cherry and a peanut up his ass, pulled them out, and ate em!" said the bartender.

"Yeah, that doesn't surprise me," replied the guy. "He still eats everything in sight, but ever since he had to shit out that cue ball, he measures everything first." !!!

:-0)


Entered at Mon Jul 4 15:43:32 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Got to say I'm mega impressed Norm...

...I mean how the feck did you manage to drive the truck with them ice skates on?

sorry.

Couldn't resist

:-0)


Entered at Mon Jul 4 14:39:47 CEST 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Just f----- off to work

I'm in agreement with you Peter & you to Al. Fred.....well he's just a shit disturber, he loves it:)

However, the baker incident, I would of calmly gone over to the boys, grabbed 'em by the hair in each hand and banged their heads together a couple times. I don't believe some of these youngsters do this unknowingly. I think they some how think they are impressing everyone..

A lot of years ago at the hockey rink in Sechelt where I lived, another fellow and I had to take over the job of "rink rats" at public skating. There was a gang of about 10 teen age boys who were terrorizing the place and pretty well every body was afraid of them. The language coming from these guys was unbearable to all the women and their toddlers.

One evening one of these guys skating backwards, (which is a no-no at public skating), he knocked an elderly lady right off her feet. I grabbed him and said that's enough you're out of here. I was immediately surrounded by his gang. I knew just about all these boys fathers. They said, "think you can take us all?" I said probably not but some of you are really going to be hurting. This boy I had hold of, Cory Motishaw, his dad had the auto body shop in town, I had known him for years. Well Cory said "Get your hands off me you C---". I dragged him out to my truck still with our skates on and threw him in it. I got in and started it up. He says what're you doing. I said I'm taking you home and tell yer dad what you just called me and he can watch me smack you silly. Then I'm going to smack him silly. He begged me not to take him home. I impressed on him that is not some thing you call a man.

Now my own explanation, which is a feeble excuse, with sports on tv, I get wrapped up in it, and these expletives come bubbling out without thought. You look around, and there she is hands on hips with a wet dish towel giving you this look! So you realize it's safer to be some where else. There is a difference between this, and what we may say here, and what Peter has just described. I'm talking about in my own home. The public displays are not acceptable at any time.

In the late '80's while visiting Edmonton, at the West Edmonton mall, there is a rink in center court where the Edmonton Oilers would come for an afternoon skate & practise and sign autographs. The language those hockey players used on that public ice in front of all their little fans, I thought was particularly disgusting.


Entered at Mon Jul 4 14:24:08 CEST 2011 from (70.28.32.74)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

A safe and happy 4th of July to all our American posters.


Entered at Mon Jul 4 13:31:26 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Ha ha - Fred, the scouse canadian

:-0)


Entered at Mon Jul 4 12:47:09 CEST 2011 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

fuckin' spot on, Alan. : )


Entered at Mon Jul 4 10:10:30 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: One more relevant thing on the 'f' word

Let's all be honest here.

In its right context there is no adjective yet invented that can more colourfully emphasise the point being made than the term 'fuckin' nor is there an expletive that comes near to a long drawn out exaggerated 'f-u-c-k-i-n-e-l-l' to convey shock or surprise at something happening.

Certainly not in the scouse idiom anyroad.

:-0)


Entered at Mon Jul 4 09:58:33 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Fowl language

It's a crazy conflicting area of life.

I was raised devout RC. So swearing was always a sin. I've been lapsed twice as long as I was devout but I still find myself cringing like PV when I hear the 'F' word and especially the 'C' word being openly used without any awareness for those around by young boys and girls.

And yet here's me on these forums openly using fuck and twat and shit for all and sundry to read. The sheer hypocrisy of it all. Don't do as I do do as I say huh.

Even in everyday talk just like westie I find myself using the same language.

There is a big but though - and perhaps it still smacks of hypocrisy - but I would never use the same language in front of kids or in front of anybody who I feel would find it offensive [yeah i know some on here might do - i've no answer to that one except that when I type it no fucker is sitting next to me]

I remember as teenagers lying on a crowded beach at blackpool with a gang of mates and a few of them were swearing loudly like troopers in earshot of families. I said to a few of them to tone it down and they looked at me like I had just landed from Mars. The two biggest culprits worked on the buildings and they both said that was just the way it was.

I think it's the same with those kids pete. i think it's just the way it has gradually become over the years until the 'f' and 'c' words are simply such a fundamental part of these kids everyday vocabulary without any consciousness as to who might be listening or if the person listening might be offended.

The likes of yourself and yes even myself [mister fuck this and fuck that] is still mortified to hear such vulgar language in open public usage but that's by the individual standards criteria we have been conditioned to by our own upbringings and how we have brought up our own children.

These kids are conditioned by entirely different standards.

Yours sincerely

Al 'don't do as I do, do as I say' Swearinger

Actually, PV, if Deadwood was actually intended as an authentic representation of life in mid 19 century western America then I'd say even those kids in the supermarket would have been mortified by the vulgarity of the language back then!!

:-0)


Entered at Mon Jul 4 09:06:25 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Norm, there was some memo last week that the UK police can no longer arrest people for calling them the c- word to their faces, as it is said that courts will no longer accept that the word caused deep offence. To a degree that's true, but the one time I got offended recently was buying bread in the supermarket and the two youths putting out bread were having a loud conversation sprinkled with f- this and he was a right c-. It was ten in the morning and there were women with little kids and elderly people buying bread and they were deeply offended. What's worse the manager was standing three feet away having a conversation with another worker, and was totally oblivious to it. The store was Tesco. My main objection was that if these people (and the manager) were too dumb to realize it was inappropriate in the situation, then they were way too dumb to wash their hands after the toilet or sneezing or whatever, and they were handling food. And the manager was too stupid to enforce the rules anyway. Largely, I've taken my business elsewhere.


Entered at Mon Jul 4 05:33:36 CEST 2011 from (74.190.125.13)

Posted by:

MIke C

Subject: Goddam Impossible Way of List

1. Waterloo Sunset - Kinks

2. Dust My Broom - Elmore James

3. Fisherman's Blues - Waterboys

4. Stay With Me Baby - Lorraine Ellison

5. Lake Marie - John Prine

6. Smokestack Lightnin' - Howlin' Wolf

7. Johnny Strikes Up the Band - Warren Zevon

8. Rosalita - Bruce Springsteen

9. Take Me to the River - Al Green

10. Things Have Changed - Robert Zimmerman

11. The Angels Wanna Wear My Red Shoes - Elvis Costello

12. I Can't Turn You Loose - Otis Redding

13. Right Place Wrong Time - Dr. John

14. Brass in Pocket - Pretenders

15. A Whiter Shade of Pale - Procol Harum

16. Hummingbird - Leon Russell

17. Diamonds on the Soles of Her Shoes - Paul Simon

18. Mystic Eyes - Them

19. She Loves You - Fab Four

20. Jack the Ripper - Link Wray

21. When Something is Wrong With My Baby - Sam & Dave

22. Loan Me a Dime - Boz Scaggs

23. Gimme Shelter - Strollin' Bones

24. Doctor My Eyes - Jackson Browne

25. Wheels - Flying Burrito Brothers

26. Right in Time - Lucinda Williams

27. I Think It's Gonna Work Out Fine - Ry Cooder

28. Crossroads - Cream

29. Hurt - Johnny Cash

30. You Never Can Tell - Chuck Berry


Entered at Mon Jul 4 04:17:17 CEST 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The F--- Word

Lars! Good to hear from you old son. I miss your witt and your humour. Hope things are sliding along ok, and the garden is coming along fine.

I remember the big ta-do about the first "lady" using the f word in the movies. Barbara Streisand in "The Owl & The Pussycat with........aww damn his name is escaping me at the moment. Anyway, I suppose most of yuh have seen the movie. She's a hooker, he's a writer. She gets him kicked out of his apartment. They form a ver odd aliegance.

They're walking down the street, she's trying to impress him with "expanding her vocabulary."

Three guys in a convertible come along, hitting on her and trying to steal her away. "Hey baby! get rid of the four eyed freak and we'll show you a good time." She calmly walks over to their car, and says, "Listen guys I'm trying to have a really nice conversation here. Now would you please just fuck off. To which the guys give chase to them and after ditching them in a few blocks she says. "Jesus people are touchy now, y'can't say a word to them."

So the door was open. It isn't right or ,ok, maybe, or correct to use these words. Th people who find it so offensive, just don't do it. For some reason in these movies, it has become, "the norm". For myself, it became a bad habit, living in bunkhouses, and on ships with no women any where around.......just a bad habit. I have no explanation as to why. I do repect the ladies, and when I was young, we wouldn't even think of talking that way around them. Now it's just too common place, and that don't make it right.

His name is George sumpthin'............damn I forget.


Entered at Mon Jul 4 03:35:18 CEST 2011 from (208.57.247.136)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland Tx

Subject: other places, other pasts

Apart from talking about some new artists I've never heard of every three pages or so, the ambition of Jeanette Leech's "Seasons They Change" is it's contention that "Acid Folk" never faded just because the tiny record companies went away, and She views the music as a social rather than political movement that continues to this day. In this counter history of our Pop Music The Incredible String Band are roughly The Beatles, Fairport the Stones, Dr. Strangely Strange The Who, Donavan Dylan and Tim Buckley Donavan. One non hit wonder is a kind of badge of honor and tender hearted groups form, quickly break up and never really get over it. The Ren Fair never ends! It's a fascinating book.


Entered at Mon Jul 4 02:48:30 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: Kate's Dad's Canadian war heritage

That balances things out nicely. There's probably a few distant Saxe-Coburgs who were in the SS!


Entered at Mon Jul 4 02:39:30 CEST 2011 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: cussin

My old man spent his life on the water and he could cuss with the best of them. Don't think I ever heard him use the f word though, or any sexual or scatological language for that matter. He could, however, give a couple hundred variations on the "Dying Jesus". First time I ever heard such language in commercial music was almost certainly "Goddamn the pusher man" by Steppenwolf though I'm sure some GB regulars can top that. Then there was the SFA on the 'Young Man Blues' fadeout. Folk and blues music a whole other thing of course.


Entered at Sun Jul 3 23:54:54 CEST 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: A vulgar question

Subject: vulgar language

Westie-

Being an ex-sailor myself, I sometimes find myself in a fucken tight spot if I'm not careful. The word is "hump," isn't it?

Be careful out there in the waves, Nature is an awesome force.


Entered at Sun Jul 3 23:15:23 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Little Big Man / John Hammond

Just watched Little Big Man. First time for five or six years. The soundtrack is by John Hammond. Sounds like a Ry Cooder one too.


Entered at Sun Jul 3 23:10:24 CEST 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Paying the Piper

Y'got to be careful tho' Al. Especially around this house. That 4 letter word is the one thing Susan WILL NOT TOLERATE. I have myself in trouble here a lot of the time.

I had to buy a bigger TV for watching the hockey games. I had kind of a small one in the family room. The big one is in her sitting room upstairs.....well.....about the beginning of May I got myself kicked out up there.

Any movies that come on with too much of the "this film contains coarse language" I'm booted out. Consider "Eddy Murphy" in anything but Shrek, he is never allowed on that TV up there. It's a hell of a life I lead. When I been at sea too long, I get my mouth scrubbed out with Tobasco sauce.......so.........be careful.


Entered at Sun Jul 3 22:11:16 CEST 2011 from (99.254.209.45)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Kate

Yes Peter. She's looking forward to going out to Alberta to see where he trained back in the day.


Entered at Sun Jul 3 21:37:13 CEST 2011 from (74.82.68.19)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Joe Maphis

westcoaster: I do remember that amazing album and couldn't help but use the word fire in describing Joe Maphis' fretwork. He could really burn up the strings, sporting a flashy double-neck custom Mosrite. He was one of the pioneers in transcribing fast fiddle tunes to the guitar and was adept on the banjo as well. Inspired by playing honky tonks in Bakersfield, Mr. Maphis and his wife Rose wrote the country classic "Dim Lights (Thick Smoke and Loud, Loud Music)". And as we all know, where there's smoke, there's fire!


Entered at Sun Jul 3 20:33:42 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Thanks, John. It was BBC News that thought lumberjacks apposite, not the couple, of course. They seem very pleasant indeed … Kate's dad trained pilots in Canada in the war.


Entered at Sun Jul 3 20:22:00 CEST 2011 from (64.12.116.204)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: NYC july 15 Felix Cabrera/Arthur Neilson P & G Bar

Music lovers in the areea, this is amust see. Felix is a great entertainer, and a good guy. Band will be killer, Tim Tindall is a finebassist, edd Bishai,the best Egyptian keyboard player I ever heard, drummer BillY schroeder' blues lineage goes back to leaving texas for NYC with Lousiana red.

On my advice, Joan caught Felix at the Port washington library this past spring, and I believe she was rather ecstatic about the show. Vivino was with him then, and I will say, that Arthur is right here in league with Vivino. Can't pay a higher compliment to any guitarist, and to top it off, arthur is a true gentleman and a good human being.

8- 10 PM P & G Bar 78 th & columbus


Entered at Sun Jul 3 20:20:21 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Cussing cousins

Jeez Westie - and I haven't even got the excuse of being a sailor. But fuck it, I'm with you. Cussin's the bestest thing ever.

And that Serge can get to fuck too... ;-0)

Hmmm - might just do a fave swear words list - anyone up for it?

:-0)


Entered at Sun Jul 3 19:52:31 CEST 2011 from (108.41.170.6)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Independence Day

Happy fourth to all. It's not a;ways perfect, but Democracy is pretty darned good. Have a great day!


Entered at Sun Jul 3 19:42:51 CEST 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Independence Day

First off.....Al....I'm a sailor. Swearing is expected of us. I'm sure you've heard the expression, "Swears like a sailor"......so there you have it.

I'm in agreement with you John Donaby. That young Royal couple are a delight. I've always thought highly of young William, and his humanitarian accomplishment. He shows his mothers compassion for people. His humility is a joy to watch, and his choice of a bride was excellent. I think that in the tradition of a Monarch people can be proud of, young William is a standout choice.

I'm away to sea tomorrow, so alla youze gawd damn yankee..........souls, enjoy your Independence Day, don't start any fires and look after one another.


Entered at Sun Jul 3 19:15:52 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Goddam it all Jeffrey Brooklyn Alexander

I'm blowed if this don't sound like the clearest case of goddam prevarication I've ever come across

:-0)


Entered at Sun Jul 3 18:57:45 CEST 2011 from (69.124.123.123)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Location: The Edge of All Lists

Subject: The Edge of All Lists

Al, if, as I suspect, we are all party to your plea bargain, and participants in your rehabilitation, it would only be fair for you to confess your crime :-)


Entered at Sun Jul 3 18:39:35 CEST 2011 from (69.124.123.123)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Al, I can't quite suss out this recent bout of peculiar behavior of yours. Not very far on the heels of your return here. I'm thinking that it's quite possible, in fact very likely, that you were convicted of some sort of crime, you had the right attorney, and the judge only sentenced you to community service, but allowed you to choose your medicine. Hence......


Entered at Sun Jul 3 18:35:25 CEST 2011 from (99.254.209.45)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: For Peter V/observations on Royal visit

Well Peter and his fellow Brits. One thing is for certain. Canada has fallen in love with William and Kate. Kate immediately had crowds chanting, "KATE, KATE, KATE, KATE." As media are reporting here, "If the monarchy is to survive it will be through these two." It was pointed out that when Charles and Camilla were here two years ago, "they couldn't draw flys." Both William and Kate truly know how to engage people and they are attracting thousands. I know it's their first visit outside Britain; but if they keep this up, many feel he should be the next King. I don't believe Charles could do that? Peter will know. Anyway they are in Quebec now and there are protests. Don't take it personally; because there are those who aren't crazy about us living right next door. Let me clarify. "Some feel that way...not all." It will be nice when they get down to Prince Edward Island and Kate can see the area where "Anne of Green Gables" originated. A book she cherished as a little girl. I am very, very impressed by both of them. I'm sure her Majesty is watching this tour very carefully.

Now back to our regular scheduled program.


Entered at Sun Jul 3 18:18:53 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Gawd damn it all Westie

Doncha have a goddam handle on these goddam rules yet!!!!!

Everyone has 30 votes. Except sailors from British Columbia who get an extra vote fer sounding like Deputy Dawg!!

Dem's the rules. And goddam it all if we're not sticking to 'em!!

:-0)

oh I forgot - folks from Brooklyn only get 29 votes for leaving their Goddam windows open. Goddam it all.


Entered at Sun Jul 3 18:17:42 CEST 2011 from (216.121.194.179)

Posted by:

S.M.

Subject: A rose by any other...

If by "mermaid" you mean sea cow- yes, that's pretty close!


Entered at Sun Jul 3 18:02:57 CEST 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Fire on the Strings

David do you recall Joe Maphis album by that name? I had it too many years ago to remember.


Entered at Sun Jul 3 17:24:49 CEST 2011 from (74.82.68.32)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Vinyl Siding: Urban Rockabilly from Hollywood

So many great tunes, so little time to sit down and compile a list. Instead I'll continue my posts on wonderful vinyl grooves. My latest record acquisition is Ricky Nelson's 1958 single STOOD UP / WAITIN' IN SCHOOL, complete with the Imperial record "Ricky Nelson" picture sleeve portrait of Mr. Nelson blue-eyed and Brillcremed. This recording session marked James Burton's debut with Nelson, although he played rhythm guitar, with Joe Maphis adding his fire on lead. Later that year Mr. Burton would take over on lead guitar, beginning with his snarling licks on BELIEVE WHAT YOU SAY. While many, rightfully, are aware of James Burton's prowess as a guitarist, it's a shame that many more aren't familiar with Joe Maphis. I've long been fascinated with his tasty licks on WAITIN' IN SCHOOL, written by Johnny and Dorsey Burnette. As a sidenote, Joe Walsh later recyled one of the song's licks on his song ALL NIGHT LONG, which was featured on the hit URBAN COWBOY soundtrack. Another example of chicken pickin' hick licks, so slick that they weather the test of time, preserved in dusty vinyl grooves.


Entered at Sun Jul 3 16:47:51 CEST 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Slippin thru the cracks

Al!....gawd damn it! You forgot Northern Buoy. Does he get a bye? This just ain't fair........I'm tellin yuh.

What are the rules? Do I get to change some of mine after further consideration? Kevin even tried to put up a # 31, but I caught him at it.

Now this is serious business, and Peter keeps fuckin it up! :)


Entered at Sun Jul 3 14:05:27 CEST 2011 from (86.183.202.22)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: PV re label compilations/Pye and Dawn

I've noticed that too with CD label comps. Funny that the original vinyl sets from Island (YCAJI, NETE, Bumpers & El Pea), UA (Gutbuckets, All Good Clean Fun), CBS (Rock Machines, Underground, Fill YHWR, Rock Buster) Harvest (Bag, Picnic) and Vertigo (Annual and the other one!) never had the disjointed feel problem of the current CD sets. Maybe they just thought them through better, or given the less diverse vintage of the material (always a current album so all artists output was within 12 months of each other) there may have been more of an even keel than CD comps that span (say) 1968-73. Only 5-6 years but very much an era where studio technology, equipment standards and engineering disciplines were advancing almost daily, so a 68 recording against a 73 can be like Leadbelly vs Jean Michelle Jarre.

Pye launched Dawn to try and offset the general public perception that they were too Tony Hatch and not remotely Jimi Hendrix. Man's Deke Leonard has told the tale that the creation of Dawn didn't help much; same disinterested and severely staid promo department and most artists couldn't wait to escape from Pye. The Man band, his tale concludes, went and lived in Germany while sending rumour round Pye that they had split. It worked; they signed to Liberty/UA immediately and nobody at Pye ever followed it up!


Entered at Sun Jul 3 13:42:27 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Comus

BTW, when I was listening to iTunes on Comus, it jogged my memory. The complete "Song to Comus" is on the "Cave of Clear Light" 3 CD set of Pye & Dawn underground material, 1967-75. I knew I'd heard it in the last couple of years. The CD set is too diverse to be relaxing listening in fact, a problem with some of these label compilations.


Entered at Sun Jul 3 13:34:10 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Family

Link is to the later 1971 lineup live on "Spanish Tide."

I saw Family Mk1 at least four times, and Family Mk 2 the same. They were truly a band no one could follow onstage because Roger Chapman gave it so much. At Hull, Joe Cocker was the support band to Family. They only had one possible spot on the bill. Jenny Fabian's early rock novel "Groupie" is based on Family.

It's perplexing that Family never became a mega band. Warner-Reprise thought they would in 1968 with Music From A Doll's House, then again in 1971 … Family got flat out wonderful album cover designs for Fearless and Bandstand, and in Europe got their own "company sleeve" design (as opposed to picture sleeve) for singles. They did an American tour but just didn't take off as expected.There are oddities in rock. Why Cream but not Spooky Tooth is another conundrum. Or as Jeff has implied, why The Eagles but not Poco?


Entered at Sun Jul 3 12:35:11 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: ROG

I hope it was the original.....

fingers crossed

Mind you he is a bugger for digging up old artifacts isn't he

:-0)


Entered at Sun Jul 3 12:21:43 CEST 2011 from (62.30.51.155)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: UK

Blimey, Tony Robinson's just chosed The `Night They Drove Old Dixie Down' on Desert Island Discs. First sighting on this programme....


Entered at Sun Jul 3 12:20:28 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Norb

Sorry?

Whatever for mate?

I loved your joke - like all your nutty posts!!

:-0)

was kind of hoping you'd like my Manfred man one too [link]

:-0)


Entered at Sun Jul 3 12:15:03 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Todd - Deadlines

Good stuff Todd - I know you like doing this sort of stuff but I know what you mean in that you do need thinking time. I have to say I drop off to sleep each night trying to search the memory banks for hidden treasures.

I was kind of allowing 2 or 3 weeks for folks on holiday and the likes of Simon and Roger who tend to pop in only now and again. I know they like this sort of thing. I'm sure there will be a few others who'd be more than willing to give it a go.

Have to say it does baffle me why some find it such a chore to delve into their musical memories and find once cherished delights tucked away and I certainly cannot for the life of me comprehend how some seem to think such a thing is beneath them. - I mean I know I'm one sad bastard but I'll be honest I got a real thrill when reading the GB a few minutes ago and saw PV mentioning Family. My fondest thoughts immediately leaped to NO MULE's FOOL - - I just absolutely fuckin love nothing better than finding something long forgotten joy like that - or for that matter an entirely new joy like that amazing new John Doe take on Peggy Sue Got Married on the Rave On Buddy Holly tribute - which incidentally arrived in the post yesterday and has scarcely been off since.

...But hey we're all different sorts of weirdos - some more so than others. Who - me????

Anyroad, for the record the following haven't posted a BAND FINEST TOP 10

PAT B - arguably the most insightful Band top 10 of all of us along with JD, PSB and DP seeing as they go right back to the start. Hmm, talking of which - I wonder what dear old Serge's top 10 would be and Paul Godfrey's - God bless him.

:-0)

The following either haven't got around to posting anything or haven't got the slightest inclination to do so. It's entirely up to them like - all's I'll say is I'd be delighted if they would since it would give the lists more credibility in reflecting the tastes of folks on this GB. JH, DLEW, JED, BEG, DEB, DAVID P, ROGER, JD, SIMON, JON LYNESS, SERENITY, JEFF, JERRY, MIKE&KIM, RAYG, NWESTCOATER, MIKEC, ADAM, ARI, NORB, GREG D, BIFFALO BULL, TIM, BONK


Entered at Sun Jul 3 11:45:16 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Wow Pete - thanks a zillion for nod to one of my all time faves

UNBEFUCKINLIEVABLE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

How the hell did my memory ever lapse on this???!!!!!!

Straight into my top 10 let alone top 30!!!

This will now be on repeat play all morning while I'm working. So fuckin good. So good, so rare, so off the wall. So many fond memories. Ok so mainly they're of being stuck inside the ale house listening to this on repeat play - but still. You know what I mean.

:-0)


Entered at Sun Jul 3 11:30:00 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Comus

I had a few 30 seconds on iTunes, Ben. The book I look up on this stuff is "The Tapestry of Delights" which is ecstatic about "First utterance." I would have thought they'd release the original, not a compilation. It was on the Dawn label, which was Pye's "prog" rival to Vertigo, Deram and Harvest. All Pye stuff is a bit dubious, the catalogue having been through many hands since the label stopped. Reading the bits and listening to the clips, I'd have thought a reissue would tie in with the interest in psych-folk. I'm sure I did see them, because they sound a bit like Family (as reviews note), with the quavering voice and violin, but much less muscular than Family. Think I'll have a listen to Music From A Doll's House today. It's been a while.


Entered at Sun Jul 3 11:24:55 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: I'm a lumberjack and I'm OK

Yes, Todd, I reckon those War of Independence scars are just beginning to start to heal after such a short time. We're forgiving people. We've even forgiven the Norwegians for sacking York in the 10th century. As Jan can testify, it's barely mentioned in the pub nowadays. As I always say, it was Hessian mercenaries in America, not us.

I don’t know what Canadians would have made of the BBC News last night though. They showed William & Kate planting a tree, and said something about ‘a nation of lumberjacks knowing all about tree-planting.’ I don’t see many of you guys at the top of a lofty pine, but the BBC does. And was I the only one who thought, 'hang on, lumberjacks FELL trees, not plant them.'


Entered at Sun Jul 3 10:56:07 CEST 2011 from (41.97.182.163)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: Fairuz : Jerusalem Flower Among The Cities

This song was released short after the 1967 Israelo-Arab war, commonly called the Six Days war, and what it provoked as instant feelings for Fairuz’s, rendering it as a passive actor from one camp of the conflict..

I searched through the whole internet, from top to bottom, I haven’t found a sole video without added pictures, that not only harshly disrupt the spirit of this heartfelt masterpiece, and in the worst indecent tendentious way, recuperate it to an instrument of propaganda. Most of the pictures are contextual and picked from tangent events of which Fairuz even never thought.

The linked above video has the merit to provide English subtitles, easily readable, and very faithful of the lyrics. If you try to read them without seeing the pictures, you get a chance to retrieve what it is exactly about.

The original TV-clip showed just one picture, Fairuz in black and white, wearing a headscarf, standing in front of a uniform black background, solemnly performing in a grave attitude.

Anyway, things seem proving that what was intended to be a snapshot 67 war is earning youth at over the years, and bound to survive the turmoil of the region. It is the lot of the masterpieces.

And never forget, my job in The Band GB is to inform only, eventually to learn worthy tips from the elite of the GB, and casually to get fun


Entered at Sun Jul 3 04:29:01 CEST 2011 from (69.177.242.99)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Top 30 List

Al Edge, Don't know if there's a deadline, but don't count me out yet. Got busy this week with life and work, and will jump back into the list next week. The cool thing about it is I've revisited a lot of stuff that I hadn't listened to in a while. Still have some serious culling to do.

Getting ready to celebrate Independence Day here in America. Heading to Boston to soak up some history, and maybe an Ale or two. Hard to believe that we were at war some 235 years ago and now we're gathered here peacefully swapping lists....the healing power of music eh? As Ringo would say, Peace and Love, Peace and Love.


Entered at Sun Jul 3 00:43:25 CEST 2011 from (75.34.41.26)

Posted by:

Adam2

Thanks Jon. Garth's portion of the show was amazing, and I was so happy to see him. Being so close to him while he was performing, and seeing his mind and hands work in a way that was just pure, in-the-moment creation, was amazing. I hope I can see Garth again any time there is a possibility to in the future.

I also traveled around the New York countryside and visited the Bethel Woods museum, and the area was STUNNINGLY beautiful. I think I have to live there someday. Seeing the site where The Band played at Woodstock, in the beautiful rolling hills and forests of Bethel, with creeks and rivers and the beautiful nature all around, it was just beautiful beyond words. Truly God's country.

I also finally saw William Scheele's photo exhibit in the Bethel Woods museum. It was amazing too! Great photos of The Band at Watkins Glen, Roosevelt Stadium, and '74 tour.


Entered at Sat Jul 2 23:37:15 CEST 2011 from (64.134.236.94)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland Tx

Subject: stuff

I think my favorite one hit wonder is "Western Union" by the Five Americans, best Bryds copy ever!! PV, there is on Comus song on an anthology on ITunes. Have you seen the "Seasons They Change" book?


Entered at Sat Jul 2 23:02:31 CEST 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Mizzone Brothers

Yeah!!...and I bet you look just like a beautiful mermaid.

Now HEY! has anyone, (specially you David P) ever seen or heard the Mizzone brothers?? 12 year old guitar picker, 10 year old fiddler and 8 year old banjo picker. Bluegrass

Foggy Mountain breakdown..........take one.....YIKES!

Gawd damn thing won't work again. Put Mizzone brothers in the search on youtube. Damnest pickin' you ever heard by kids....(if you like bluegrass)


Entered at Sat Jul 2 22:40:24 CEST 2011 from (216.121.194.179)

Posted by:

S.M.

Subject: sea born

Tho I cannot swim

I was sea born

bound by tides

freed by winds


Entered at Sat Jul 2 21:16:11 CEST 2011 from (41.97.166.71)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: this is a web site in honour of The Band and their music

nobody will ever believe that my Songs of Resistance list is ideology-free and set on a pure musical perspective. In fact I’m still trying to convince myself of it. Who remembers the days of The GB when for much lesser reasons, spark unending political arguments melted amid personal attacks or four-letter words, posts deleted, GBers banned, GBers’ threat to leave forever, GBers’ loud anger followed by refusal to eat the dessert, and so on…

The truth is that everybody’s getting too old here. TNTDODD and maybe AD, and I forget the rest, are songs of resistance in a way, this is a web site in honour of The Band and their music. Specially their music.


Entered at Sat Jul 2 21:13:26 CEST 2011 from (91.42.235.113)

Posted by:

Norbert

Sorry Al :-(


Entered at Sat Jul 2 20:12:59 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Norb's List

Trying to get me head round your list Norb

Let's see if I've got this right.

So I take it that's six votes for Manfred Mann's 5 4 3 2 1

Boring choice if you ask me [stifles yawn]

Now what about your other 24?

:-0)


Entered at Sat Jul 2 20:06:29 CEST 2011 from (216.121.194.179)

Posted by:

S.M.

Subject: Sea born

I can see you and Susan on the 54'Monk Mcqueen motor yacht.

Maybe I'll bid on the Ruby Red when my ship comes in...


Entered at Sat Jul 2 19:59:32 CEST 2011 from (79.202.172.81)

Posted by:

Norbert

Adam, don’t tell me the list time is over already.

Anyway I want to contribute my magic list today. It may look like an empty nothing list, but that’s only for the inattentive observer. For the eager observant this "simple" list is magic, a revelation of the social interaction, the synaesthetic perception, of music, perceived in the aware state of mind over a period of 5 (five) years. I have listed here 5 Band songs, on order of penetration ratio (personal favorite #1, second Fav.=#2 etc.) .

2001

1

2

3

4

5

2002 this year nothing has happened

1

2

3

4

5

2003 but now watch what happens

1

2

3

5

4

2004 and the change goes on

1

2

5

4

3

2005 just look at the list

1

5

4

3

2

2006 the change is complete

5

4

3

2

1

This “simple” list tells us about the stunning evolution of Band song in the human mind at the specified time interval. I still can’t believe that all of this happened in such a short time period. Tomorrow we will take a look the top ten lists over a period of 33 years and see what happened to TLW Song ranking.

I’ll hope this list is of any help, every regisered Band fan is free to use it for his or her own purpose, it may be copied without my permission, but please do mention my name. Don’t thank me, thank Al, thanks Al.


Entered at Sat Jul 2 19:10:15 CEST 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The missing D

Your right. I'm glad you didn't think I was leaving out the ladies.

Well I'm not buying that Ruby Red boat. It is a 50 footer. If you google Grand Yacht Sales Inc, click on yachts for sale.....there is 2 - 54 footers the first one, longer boat than the Ruby, same owner for 40 years, kept in a boat house, less money, and waaaay more beautiful. I'm pretty sure I'm going to make an offer on her.

I been all over this coast looking at boats lately, right up to Juneau , Alaska. Stood right in front of the Mendenhall glacier the other day, and took pictures of it. Y'know it's gawd damn cold in front of that thing! I think y'kin google that too to look at it. It's really sumpin.


Entered at Sat Jul 2 18:47:05 CEST 2011 from (216.121.194.179)

Posted by:

S.M.

Subject: Bucket List

Bucket List?

No way!

Much too revealing!

P.S.: There is a "d" missing-right?


Entered at Sat Jul 2 17:39:15 CEST 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Heavy List to Port!

Yer damn right Peter. Every one has gone list crazy here. I'm blaming that gawd damn Al. You guys better take him in hand over there.

I want to know every boy's "bucket list".


Entered at Sat Jul 2 15:12:05 CEST 2011 from (24.193.158.70)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC
Web: My link

Subject: Re: Garth in NYC

Adam, thanks for the Garth show review! I really wanted to be there, but wasn't able to make it. Very cool that you got to hear "Garth's Largo" live, as well as the solo keyboard numbers and the Band songs with Maude. Garth concerts are certainly unpredictable, but there are always many moments of beauty and whimsy, and his unique personality shines through... and even if all else fails, you're still watching the genius who was an essential part of [insert your personal Band top ten list here], a treat in itself. Above is a link to my own review of a Garth concert from some years back -- hope you enjoy.


Entered at Sat Jul 2 14:23:50 CEST 2011 from (41.97.166.71)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

5. Asimbonanga -- Johnny Clegg & Savuka, for that i wont forget the day i will be asked to list my favorite Songs of Resistance, awesome video, ggez! this text gives me the chills too (without i understand a word)


Entered at Sat Jul 2 14:21:24 CEST 2011 from (41.97.166.71)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: 2 more songs

link above : rare recording of Miriam Makeba singing ancient Algerian songs for independance, geez, the text gives me the chills too, and Miriam Makeba had a better Arabic diction than I


Entered at Sat Jul 2 12:23:05 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

That was a list to port, wasn't it, Norm?


Entered at Sat Jul 2 12:02:48 CEST 2011 from (75.34.41.26)

Posted by:

Adam2

Haha! Al Edge, that seriously made me crack up. Thanks for the good natured laugh!


Entered at Sat Jul 2 11:50:48 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: My all time favourite bestest ever list ...

...that not even poor old plum tuckered out Adam could surely ever tire of


Entered at Sat Jul 2 11:06:36 CEST 2011 from (41.97.166.71)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: E Io Ero Sandokan - Revised

If one verifies these kinds of “best of” lists the we GBers publish in The Band GB(s) over the years , one should surely notice that my lists don’t change, or just are almost the same, even if the list thread starts sporadically following some intempestive effect. Eh oui, I am faithful by birth.

The reason is also I find some reason to give these lists their due level of seriousness, .they are my memory, they are me

see everytime a “best movies lists” was asked to post in The GBs, you’ll find exactly the same list with #1 “The Blues Brothers”, #10 “The Goddess” (Satjatit Raj). I didn’t undergo the Lord of The Rings bludgeoning. C’eravamo Tanto Amati ranked #8 just because it is not an originally English spoken movie. So I must revise my movie list following new highlight

C’eravamo Tanto Amati : director Ettore Scola, 1973, starring Vittorio Gasman, Nino Manfredi, Stephania Sandrelli, Music : Armando Trovaioli

This Movie deserves a better rank in my list for the following reasons :
1 – it is actually the best movie ever made
2 – I posted a lengthened thread about the movie theme “E Io Ero Sandokan” as if it were an authentic Italian Song of Resistance sung during WWII. ERROR

E Io Ero Sandokan [link above] : Though it’s till today the most evocative and most moving song of resistance I ever heard, all wars of resistance in history and all causes in the world reunited. It turned out that “E Io Ero Sandokan” is a fictive song of resistance composed for the occasion of the movie in 1973. Text of Ettore Scola, Music of Armando Trovaioli.

The text is simply too strong, the music matches the text. For sure, it’s easier to get inspiration far in time behind, a fortiori for a resistance which succeeded 100 percent.

I am not the only one who went wrong, many people believe (even in Italian) that the song dates from WWII. I posted by the past a draft translation; this one is picked from the internet

E io ero Sandokan – (And my name was Sandokan)

We marched soul in the shoulder, beneath the darkness above
But the fight for our freedom will enlighten us along the way
I did not know your real name, nor even mine should I say)

CHORUS: I just knew your nom de guerre Pinin, and my name was Sandokan

We were all ready to die, but we never talking of death
We talked about the future, if fate split us away
The memory of those days will always keep us together

I remember when rose the dawn, and something suddenly changed
Tomorrow will be a new day, and the night was forever passed
In the sky was shining a new sun born in freedom

Footnote: an undreamed opportunity to call the GBers for a list of “Best Songs of War/Resistance”, but a very hazardous thread given that where the separation between the musicality of the song and the cause it advocates is unclear. I will not post my fave Songs of Resistance list, first because I Respect that this is a web site in honour of The Band and their music, second because some sensitive souls would be scandalized to find in my list something like 2.“Hasta Siempre Commandante Che Guevara” (Mocedades version), 3.”Partisan” (Leonard Cohen version), 4.”Jerusalem Flower of The Cities” (Fairuz) – thus I prefer to not chance the risk to break gratuitously his serene ideological neutrality to this GB, en plus none of these songs is in English

Geez! just reading those titles gives me chill, en tous cas my favorite Song of Resistance is not a Song of Resistance (and so is my One Hit Wonder list)



Entered at Sat Jul 2 10:53:46 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: A List of Favourite Lists

1) My ten singles for a desert island

2) My 30 songs that I have to play again and again

3) My ten favourite Band songs

4) My ten favourite Beatles songs

5) Today's shopping list for the supermarket

6) My ten favourite "guilty pleasure" songs

7) Franz Liszt

8) The five tracks I want played at my funeral

9) My ten favourite Bob Dylan songs

10) My ten most disliked singers

WORST LIST

Chores to do today


Entered at Sat Jul 2 10:12:11 CEST 2011 from (81.159.35.83)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: Landmark

I can believe that the Passion Play tour was something to behold (and yes - it was Hare not Rabbit, I remember now - the short film was included on a JT compilation video I had!). But the album sucked!!!

The real stinker in the "prog rock gone bad" cannon is of course ELP "Love Beach" but my stipulation was to own or have owned each LP named and shamed - and thankfully I don't possess a copy of that!

Likewise with JT - "A" is arguably the low point but I never bought that, either.


Entered at Sat Jul 2 06:05:51 CEST 2011 from (75.34.41.26)

Posted by:

Adam2

Ugh, please guys. I know it's all in fun, but these lists are tiring.


Entered at Sat Jul 2 03:25:08 CEST 2011 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: final assignment

1. Blue Moon of Kentucky; Elvis
2. I’m So Lonesome I Could Cry; Hank, Margo
3. Sea of Heartbreak; Don Gibson
4. I Still Miss Someone; Cash
5. Pancho and Lefty; Townes, Willie & Merle
6. Who Knows Where the Time Goes; Sandy Denny, others
7. The Band Played Waltzing Matilda; Pogues
8. Me and Bobby McGee; Lightfoot, Janis, you & I
9. The Boxer
10. Duncan
11. Hey Jude; Beatles, Wilson Pickett, others
12. I’ve Just Seen a Face
13. Into the Mystic
14. And It Stoned Me
15. Gimme Some Lovin; Spencer Davis
16. Baby I Need Your Lovin
17. Spanish Harlem
18. Stand By Me
19. Respect; Otis, Aretha
20. No Woman No Cry; live
21. Driftin Away; DFA
22. Mississippi; track 1 Tell Tale Signs
23. Tears of Rage; Dylan, Clark
24. Every Picture Tells A Story
25. Loan Me Dime; Boz Scaggs
26. It Ain’t Me Babe; Dylan, Cash
27. When The Levee Breaks
28. High Water (for Charlie Patton)
29. Don’t Worry Baby; Los Lobos
30. Can’t You See; Marshall Tucker & a whole lot of bar bands


Entered at Sat Jul 2 01:59:10 CEST 2011 from (173.178.214.140)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

I did not really care for "Passion Play" however it was one of the best live shows I did see. For one thing, when you entered the arena (Montreal Forum), there was a white dot that kept flashing onto a giant screen behind the stage. It kept flashing and was slowly getting larger during the opening act's (Brewer & Shipley's) set, as well as through the change-over. By the time Tull came on stage, the dot had become a picture of the ballerina pictured on the album cover. Slowly, her fingers moved one by one. She slowly rose, did a pirouette and leaped through a mirror. The sound of crashing glass and then Tull was playing the piece in its entirety.

Aside from that, I still rank as one of the best rock shows I've seen. Aside from "The Hare That Lost Its Spectacles", they also did a "comedy bit" where in the middle of a screaming guitar solo, they would stop playing and walk over to the frot of the stage to look at a phone, resting on a stool. They did this a couple of times and after the last encores, the phone rang.



Entered at Sat Jul 2 01:10:49 CEST 2011 from (75.34.41.26)

Posted by:

Adam2

Subject: Garth in NYC

Just got back to Chicago from seeing Garth in NYC. It was amazing seeing him live. He did come on last and didn't play as long as the earlier, younger keyboard players that were also on the bill. But he did play around 45 minutes or so, and seeing him up close more than made up for it. We were sitting five feet from his keyboard station, and a camera showed a better view of his hands. Garth and Maud were both great. Will Lee, Anton Fig and Oz Noy were good, but overall they didn't impress me too much with their backing. The three younger keyboard players on the bill were entertaining at times, but I really wasn't into them that much. Jon Batiste was nice with a few songs, but Robert Walter and Marco Benevento's portions of the show were really long, drawn-out, and super heavy-aggressive on the soloing/improv jams. Garth was a breath of fresh air. The backing band's attitude visibly changed when Garth came on stage - they all toned down, and followed Garth (including his instructions on who/when to solo). It seemed like Anton Fig's drumming wasn't quite meshing with Garth at times. Garth would play something and Fig would try to play along, but wasn't really locked in and would take awhile to find the groove. Oz Noy was a good guitarist but his style didn't impress me too much either. These are minor observations though, as all I cared about was Garth and he was in great form.

I remember him playing Don't Want No Anchovies On My Pizza, In The Dark (Johnny Otis), and a handful of keyboard-based instrumentals. Maud sang Don't Do It (great version indeed) and Tears Of Rage very well. Someone in the crowd shouted for Garth's Largo, and they played it. It was a definite highlight. The show ended with Garth alone at the keyboards, playing a small solo piece. It was so amazing to see him, and I loved his portion of the show. The backing band was talented and professional of course, and though I wasn't terribly impressed by their individual styles, they did an acceptable job. It was amazing to see Garth!


Entered at Sat Jul 2 01:08:49 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Prison- Mike Nesmith

The theory was that you read the story while listening to the music. Someone else did it with a crime thriller packaged with a cassette. That didn't work either.But there IS mileage in the concept, I think, if the music was used to set the era rather than originals.


Entered at Sat Jul 2 01:05:31 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Comus

Just looked in "Rare Record Guide". First Utterance by Comus goes for £400 mint in gatefold sleeve.


Entered at Sat Jul 2 00:21:04 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RtO

Apologies for the typos in previous list. Was keeping an eye on a vintage guitar on eBay, which I won!!!

Rotten as a pear, indeed. And ahve meant to be "have" not some awful Leicestershire version of "I've".


Entered at Sat Jul 2 00:16:07 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: Ten shameful psych/prog/concept albums you own that seemed like a good idea at the time...

1. Quintessence - "In Blissful Company"

2. Quintessence - "Quintessence"

Ah, the Ladbroke Grove atmosphere, the smell of ganja and incense, the horrible hippy-dippy quasi-Indian vibes. "Gunga Mai! Gunga Mai! The river of ho-o-o-ly wa-ter, hear me cry!". Mitigation: i) I was collecting "pink label" Island LPs anyway; ii)the lead guitarist wasn't bad; and iii) the album jackets were BEAUTIFUL.

3. Procol Harum - "Grand Hotel"

Everything we told our mates that prog rock would never become but kind of knew it all along. Overbearing, turgid rubbish from a once fantastic group. The dinner jackets and theme tell the truth about prog rock - it was always a bit too clever to be anything but "establishment".

4. Pink Floyd - "Wish You Were Here"

The line in the sand that saw the Floyd turn from probably the most important post-psych UK act with an improvisational bent into that naff concern in suits that played note perfect renditions of their albums at Princes Trust (or similar) toff-fests. A sad end.

5. Caravan - "Blind Dog at St Dunstans".

Oh dear. Now f*ck off back to Canterbury and make another "Grey & Pink". Next!

6. Jethro Tull - "A Passion Play"

Rotten as a pair! They were doing so well with the first three LPs, many people like their fourth best of all and the fifth one (though a little convoluted for my liking) did at least ahve that great fake newspaper cover with the "shopping boots" advert and "non-rabbits" article. Then this! Tour behind the album eschewed a support group in favour of a short film by bassist Jeffrey Hammond-Hammond entitled "The Rabbit That Lost His Spectacles". Piss off, the lot of you!

7. Mike Nesmith - "The Prison"

Hmm. Mike, I love you dearly but this isn't half hard going, mate...

8. Chicago - Chicago IV

A three LP live box set from the parpsome band who've already made their first three albums doubles? No, I don't know why I bothered buying it either as if truth be told I only ever play "South California Purples" off their debut...

9. John Mayall - "Bare Wires"

Take one of the best blues bands of the UK, known for their refreshingly authentic take on Freddie King style workouts and...have them record a limp, jazzy concept LP. Frank Zappa "Bare Wires isn't dead, it just smells funny"

10. Camel - "Music inspired by the Snow Goose"

Oh, GROW UP. A great LP to own and play if you want to pointedly avoid mixing with girls and having sex.


Entered at Fri Jul 1 23:35:18 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: Comus "First Utterance"

Despite being highly collectable, my old man managed to find a copy in £1 chuck-out bin in a second hand store a few years back. In terms of street value he was on to a good thing. On the basis of the music, he was diddled.

As a rough idea, the Third Ear Band sound like Paul Revere and the Raiders next to this lot!

Right, I must go. I fancy listening to Fruup and Gryphon before bed time...


Entered at Fri Jul 1 20:23:46 CEST 2011 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

THE BAND (facebook)

Web: My link

Happy Canada day!


Entered at Fri Jul 1 20:18:41 CEST 2011 from (41.97.244.54)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: One Hit Wonder - continued

Let’s tolerate a little freedom in the definition of “One Hit Wonder”, in the limit I construe a song as a one hit wonder when it’s the only hit of a short career group, in any way the only thing we can agree on is that the song is a Hit at least.

Here are 3 songs to add to my previous list to fulfill a separate list (of 10 all-English spoken songs)

The Zombies – She’s Not There, 1964
Wallace Collection – Daydream, 1968
Survivor – The Eye Of The Tiger, 1983


Entered at Fri Jul 1 19:20:24 CEST 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

swestcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Yer Good!

Damn .....yer good Pat. Well as it stands, in 2010 Warren Buffet lost 25 billion, while Bill Gates only lost 18 billion. Now.......hell that can't be that bad can it??

I just hope people will start looking after their bucks a little better. In an Alaskan paper I picked up there was now 9 pages of foreclosure sales on homes. I hope it gets better.

My joke about the Chinese was motivated by events here at home. In Port Alice, where I still own my house, (I've had it leased out since I moved here to Powell River). I put it up for sale, but now have to wait a little. An old friend there, an ex Cop, now property manager told me yesterday, the Chinese have now bought the pulp mill.

They are moving in 900 more employees to renovate and upgrade the mill. There is, I think 800 people there, at it's peak I think the town was 1800. Now many people from Alberta and the states own homes there for summer homes. I guess my place is jumping about $50,000. You got to be patient, but I don't think I'm going to catch up to Warren Buffet.


Entered at Fri Jul 1 19:13:41 CEST 2011 from (108.41.170.6)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: One hit wonders

One if my favorites is The Madisons "What Do All The People Know."


Entered at Fri Jul 1 18:56:56 CEST 2011 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

Mike & Kim Hayward

Web: My link

The "Other Watkins Glen."


Entered at Fri Jul 1 18:49:20 CEST 2011 from (68.164.6.24)

Posted by:

Pat B

My mudder was from a dairy farm near Clyde, Wisconsin. I not only speak cow dung stink, I kin write it. And if ya borrow me your shovel, I'll bang your head wit it. I'm sure the fine Georgian David P kin do da same to ya.


Entered at Fri Jul 1 18:25:30 CEST 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The jig is up!

I think all youze Pat Brennan & David Powell better start learnin to speak cow dung stink. The Chinese are gonna foreclose on yuh pretty quick. Your just gonna be a bunch of share croppers. Yer dollar ain't worth a yen!


Entered at Fri Jul 1 17:57:10 CEST 2011 from (68.164.6.24)

Posted by:

Pat B

I believe "In A Big Country" by Big Country is the greatest one hit wonder, followed by "99 Luftballons" by Nena. "98.6" (ironically) by Keith is third. I'd have to think about the rest.


Entered at Fri Jul 1 17:27:56 CEST 2011 from (216.121.194.179)

Posted by:

S.M.

Subject: Lap of luxury

That was some boat!

What if I recant?


Entered at Fri Jul 1 17:20:06 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: One Hit Wonders

From my 45 single collection, another one hit wonder comes to mind: Jody Reynolds "Endless Sleep".


Entered at Fri Jul 1 16:45:36 CEST 2011 from (41.97.244.54)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: Methodology - One Hit Wonder

1/ open youtub

e 2/ search with the name of the band only (or the name of singer only)

3/ if all the result list shows the one same song repeated, it's a One Hit Wonder


Entered at Fri Jul 1 16:33:28 CEST 2011 from (41.97.244.54)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Subject: Landmark - PS

indeed, my 30 Non The Band best songs list, posted before, includes many one hit wonders as Sniff 'n The Tears "Driver's Seat" (1979), that i dont reproduce here


Entered at Fri Jul 1 16:28:53 CEST 2011 from (41.97.244.54)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: always volunteer for a list - the one hit wonder

Precision : My list of Duets means casual duets, ie duets who are not naturally duets [as Shuky & Aviva] performing a song where the artistc result is bigger than the sum of the parts

**********************

In chronologic order

The Barkays – Soul Finger, 1967
Free – All Right Now, 1970
Pop Tops – Mammy Blue, 1971
Jeanette – Porque Te Vas, 1974
Black Blood (then a Zaïrian band) – A.I.E (A Mwana), 1975
Shuky & Aviva (Israeli duet [link above]) – Je t’Aime Un Peu Trop, 1975
The Motors – Airport, 1978
The Buggles – Video Killed The Radio Stars, 1979
The Korgis – Everybody's Got to Learn Sometime, 1981
Alphaville – Forever Young, 1984


Entered at Fri Jul 1 16:28:57 CEST 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Oh Yeah.....Redneck??

Ok! S&M......(that's pretty perverted by the way). I leave my gawd damn Christmas lights up all year! Takin' them down is just a stupid waste of time. You end up doing things like Chevy Chase.

Putting a new roof on my house last week. Susan told me I had to take my lights down....BULLSHIT!.....she called me a red neck........I've had it with you wimmin. I'm not taking you on that new boat now.......no way......


Entered at Fri Jul 1 16:22:20 CEST 2011 from (216.121.194.179)

Posted by:

S.M.

Subject: Silver Bells

Hey! Christmas! What's not to love?

Christmas makes me all soft and gooshy!

I can even ALMOST forgive people who leave their Christmas lights up all year!

ALMOST.

But not quite.


Entered at Fri Jul 1 16:11:38 CEST 2011 from (59.101.14.222)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: One hit wonders...

In a course I teach, I define three types of one hit wonders: careers gone awry; fad-followers, and god knows why... there are all kinds of wrinkles, of course. And then there are people like gainsbourg, or zappa...

so 1 hit ownders...

valley girl, frank zappa
convoy...
hooters? all you zombies (though And she danced was a hit...


Entered at Fri Jul 1 15:54:26 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Duke & The King

I'm sorely tempted, Bob. We have 'rare as hen's teeth' tickets for Kevin Spacey in Richard III the day after, and friends are coming over to stay from Germany for the event. There is then a secret pub gig featuring two-fifths of a well-known band who haven't played together for 40 years on the Sunday. (Rob, I'll let you know about this one).


Entered at Fri Jul 1 15:28:40 CEST 2011 from (69.123.3.201)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: The Duke and The King

Peter V, The Duke and The King are playing The Byrdcliffe Barn on August 5. A mid summer night with The Duke and The King in the hills of Woodstock. Come on over!


Entered at Fri Jul 1 15:28:20 CEST 2011 from (173.178.214.140)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

Subject: Putting My Money Where My Mouth Is

1)Brandy - Looking Glass

2)The Rapper - The Jaggerz

3)Tighter and Tighter - Alive and Kicking

4)When I Die - Motherlode (Of course!)

5)Journey To The Center Of Your Mind - Amboy Dukes

6)Ride Captain Ride - Blues Image

7)98.6 - Keith

8)Sea Cruise - Frankie Ford

9)In The Summertime - Mungo Jerry

10)Green Tambourine - Lemonpipers



Entered at Fri Jul 1 15:19:10 CEST 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Fred Flintstone

I'm gonna throw a rock Fred.......I bet I can hit yuh right from here!

C'mon now listen, greatest Canadian songs.....really

Whether y' like him or not, Bryan Adams, "Straight From The Heart"

Powder Blues......Doin it Right on the Wrong Side of Town, now of course Bill or Kevin will chastise me and say, "Those guys aren't all Canadian"

There is a couple of songs of Chillywak that are right up there.

Skylark's "Wild Flower".........I could go on, but those guys just can't see past their back yard fence.


Entered at Fri Jul 1 15:17:10 CEST 2011 from (173.178.214.140)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

You're right, it is hard to define. I would not consider the Archies who had a couple of minor Top 40 hits as well (Jingle-Jangle and Bang Shang a Lang) but Norman Greenbaum should qualify in spite of cult-fave "Canned Ham". Thus, I figure it is anyone who had 1 and only 1 hit that made the Top 40.


Entered at Fri Jul 1 15:03:16 CEST 2011 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Happy Dominion Day

Nag, nag, nag...that's all people from western Canada are good at. : )


Entered at Fri Jul 1 15:03:07 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: SM

Wow, you've really got the bug now

Great top 30 list btw but couldn't quite reconcile Silver bells. Is there a story there?

:-0)


Entered at Fri Jul 1 14:56:19 CEST 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Change!

It's too gawd damn late to change now!

Landmark! you meat ball! I see all yer Canucky hits are from east of the Ontario border. Are you gonna be out there with the lily pad leapers protesting the visit of young Will and his new bride? Can't have any monarchy people in Quebec! It just never gets any better.

I'm pissed off at every body. Spending a week in Alaska, our dollar is worth more than the Yankee buck, but they still will charge us 5% for our money, and they have a "screw you" attitude because their dollar has become puny, and they act like it is our fault!


Entered at Fri Jul 1 14:56:06 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Good list Pete

And if you're going to San Francisco you might find another

:-0)


Entered at Fri Jul 1 14:55:57 CEST 2011 from (59.101.14.222)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Top Canada...

1) Fly By Night - Rush

2) Sea to the North - Garth Hudson

3) Java Blues - Rick Danko

4) One Week - Barenaked ladies

5) Heart of Gold - Neil Young

6) Suzanne - Leonard Cohen

7) Big Yellow Taxi - Joni Mitchell

8) How to Be Clairvoyant - Robbie Robertson

9) Helpless - K D Lang (written by Neil Young)

10) Gimme Some Lovin' (Blues Brothers, feat. Dan Aykroyd)

Al: you can ignore this one - it just seemed intersting to see how quickly I could do it... too quickly, I think...


Entered at Fri Jul 1 14:49:42 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Define "One Hit wonder"

I had a google. The Guinness Book of records allegedly defines a one hit wonder as a record that gets to no 1, with the artist having no other chart hit. I used to think it was just the one hit, but it's hard to draw a line? Top Ten? Top Twenty? Anymore and the field is too wide. Then we have the "where?" question. See link for UK "No 1 one hit wonders.' Selecting from that list, I'd say:

1) Je t'aime - Jane Birkin & Serge Gainsbourg

2) Jerry Keller - Here Comes Summer

3) Phyllis Nelson "Move Closer"

4) B. Bumble & The Stingers 'Nut rocker'

5) The Archies "Sugar Sugar" 6) Matthews Southern Comfort "Woodstock."

7) Norman Greenbaum "Spirit In The Sky."

8) The Floaters "Float On"

9) Althea & Donna "Up Town Top Ranking"

10) Crazy World of Arthur Brown "Fire"

It was hard to find ten. I'd be happy with just six or seven, really.


Entered at Fri Jul 1 14:23:30 CEST 2011 from (216.121.194.179)

Posted by:

S.M.

Subject: Oh! Canada?

PullMe Through - Jim Cuddy

Song For A Winter's Night - Sarah Maclachlan

Thousand Kisses Deep - Leonard Cohen

Helpless - Neil Young

Both Sides Now - Joni Mitchell

I'm Scared - Burton Cummings

What About Now - Robbie Robertson

Rock Me Gently - Andy Kim

Ballad Of Lucy Jordan - Barra Macneils

Big Yellow Taxi - Joni Mitchell


Entered at Fri Jul 1 14:20:47 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Whizzo - ha ha ha

Westie - you crack me up. Please don't ever change.

:-0)


Entered at Fri Jul 1 13:57:18 CEST 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Wishing our neighbors to the north a wonderful Canada Day. Hope you are having great weather like we are enjoying here today.


Entered at Fri Jul 1 13:42:55 CEST 2011 from (173.178.214.140)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

Subject: Lists

Here's a list no one thought about, how about we make a list, limited to no more than ten, of our favourite one hit wonders? Ponder that one and I personally, would love to see what people come up with.


Entered at Fri Jul 1 13:37:55 CEST 2011 from (173.178.214.140)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

Subject: Happy Canuckistani Day!

Good morning all. With all the lists recently, it is time that I post a Canickistani top ten list, which was once a Thursday staple in here. Alors...

1) Spirit Of Radio -Rush

2) Downtown - Neil Young W/ Pearl Jam

3) Running Back To Saskatoon - Guess Who

4) New Girl Now - Honeymoon Suite

5) One Fine Morning - Lighthouse

6) Music At Work - Tragically Hip

7) Jemima Surrender - The Band

8) Julianna - Five Man Electrical Band

9) When I Die - Motherlode

10)Bust the TV - The Pumps

Please note the omission of classics such as "Four Strong Winds". Since it is a warm, suny day outside, I chose to make a more rocking list.


Entered at Fri Jul 1 13:30:22 CEST 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Whizzo?????

What in hell is whizzo? What in hell is Al puttin' in his coffee??.......well it's probably tea.

Al!....Susan said she's gonna show me how to paste!


Entered at Fri Jul 1 10:34:40 CEST 2011 from (41.97.226.179)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: Jimmy Oihid

wishes you "GOOD MORNING !" [link above]

this singer spent third of his life in a hospital


Entered at Fri Jul 1 10:32:10 CEST 2011 from (41.97.226.179)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: fave duet #11 == morning translation exercise

Denia - Manu Chao & Jimmy Oihid , 199?

the song title is a word with several meanings : world, life, terestrian life, etc...

rough translation:

• Poor Algeria, world filled of dismay
• Poor Algeria, world filled of my eyes
• Poor Algeria, world filled of lies
• Poor Algeria, my heart aches to watch you
• Poor Algeria, world filled of evil
• Poor Algeria, world filled of hunger
• Poor Algeria, world filled of mothers’ tears
• Poor Algeria, world filled of police
• Poor Algeria, world filled of silliness
• Poor Algeria (x10)



Entered at Fri Jul 1 10:31:22 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: My Family & Other Animals

We have cassette set with a "word for word" reading of Gerald Durrell's book, and it was our kids' favourite for long journeys, so I heard it through three times. The oft repeated punchline from the Greek guy who looks after them is 'Honest to God, Mrs Durrells' and it comes up when Al says it!


Entered at Fri Jul 1 10:29:00 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Ben : Comus. I never heard the album, but I have a feeling I saw the band live and Comus rings a bell as "really fecking weird". I think University of East Anglia, on a bill with Chris Spedding's band, but couldn't swear to it. Not anywhere near as weird as Principal Edward's Magic Theatre, but somewhat in that direction.


Entered at Fri Jul 1 09:45:21 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Er...these fuckin lists

Can I just clarify guys

It's a bit of fun

Okay so I happen to love reflecting on the great music legacy all these artists have left us and perhaps find some hidden or long lost treasures.

However, at the end of the day it's essentially a bit of fun.

Now in a few weeks time I'll total up all the scores of every GBer's submitted lists - The Band top 10 will score 10 points for first place down to 1 point for tenth place and the top 30 Non-band will be 30 points for top place down to 1 point for bottom place.

That will take me about 5 or 6 solid hours compilation so I'll need a slack time - the grandkids are away on hols in a few weeks so that'll probably be ideal - but for this particular music nut it'll be a labour of love so i'm really looking forward to seeing how it all pans out.

I'll have You Tube handy so each song choice that takes my fancy I can just click on and reflect 'Wow, what a choice!!' or think 'What the fuck is this guy/gal thinking about!!!!'....

:-0)

By the end of the complilation we'll actually have the definitive prevailing selection of what the fine folks on this GB consider to be their top 10 finest Band songs and their top 30 favourite non-band songs.

Now won't that just be fuckin whizzo.

:-0)

So the more folks that bother to contribute the more reflective the final result will be.

But anyone who can't be fuckin arsed to make the effort - well just go and fuck yerselves - in the nicest possible way, of course.

:-0)

Joke. Honest ter god.


Entered at Fri Jul 1 09:44:53 CEST 2011 from (75.34.41.26)

Posted by:

Adam2

Subject: Garth in NYC

Just got back to Chicago from seeing Garth in NYC. It was amazing seeing him live. He did come on last and didn't play as long as the earlier, younger keyboard players that were also on the bill. But he did play around 45 minutes or so, and seeing him up close more than made up for it. We were sitting five feet from his keyboard station, and a camera showed a better view of his hands. Garth and Maud were both great. Will Lee, Anton Fig and Oz Noy were good, but overall they didn't impress me too much with their backing. The three younger keyboard players on the bill were entertaining at times, but I really wasn't into them that much. Jon Batiste was nice with a few songs, but Robert Walter and Marco Benevento's portions of the show were really long, drawn-out, and super heavy-aggressive on the soloing/improv jams. Garth was a breath of fresh air. The backing band's attitude visibly changed when Garth came on stage - they all toned down, and followed Garth (including his instructions on who/when to solo). It seemed like Anton Fig's drumming wasn't quite meshing with Garth at times. Garth would play something and Fig would try to play along, but wasn't really locked in and would take awhile to find the groove. Oz Noy was a good guitarist but his style didn't impress me too much either. These are minor observations though, as all I cared about was Garth and he was in great form.

I remember him playing Don't Want No Anchovies On My Pizza, In The Dark (Johnny Otis), and a handful of keyboard-based instrumentals. Maud sang Don't Do It (great version indeed) and Tears Of Rage very well. Someone in the crowd shouted for Garth's Largo, and they played it. It was a definite highlight. The show ended with Garth alone at the keyboards, playing a small solo piece. It was so amazing to see him, and I loved his portion of the show. The backing band was talented and professional of course, and though I wasn't terribly impressed by their individual styles, they did an acceptable job. It was amazing to see Garth!


Entered at Fri Jul 1 08:38:16 CEST 2011 from (59.101.14.222)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Top 10 Elvis? Top Ten Springsteen? What are we up to?

Top 30, ok...

Subject to change, probably just after hitting submit...

The Band; The Weight

The Band; The Night they Drove Old Dixie Down

The Band: King Harvest

The Band: Rockin' Chair

the Band; Jawbone

Unfaithful Servant

Stage Fright

Shape I'm in

Rag Mama Rag

Elvis

Jailhouse Rock

Hunk of burnin' love

Return to Sender

Mystery Train

Hard headed Woman

Blue Suede Shoes

Joshua fit the Battle

I John

American Trilogy

Blue Moon of Kentucky

Favourite songs not already mentioned

Jethro Tull- We used to Know, Skating away (on the thin ice of a new day), Wind Up, Too Old to Rock and Roll, Life's a long song

Queen - Brighton Rock, Long Away, It's late, Hammer to fall, You and I, Breakthru

Various: The Stranglers, "Duchess", Dylan ... erm (put in 20 dylan songs here: Stuck inside of Mobile, the Mighty quinn and Maggie's Farm will do for now

Oh, gosh, now it's hard... erm... Fleetwood Mac can get five or so (The Chain springs to mind), The Who can have Baba O'Reilly, or somethign else from Who's next.

Oh, jeez... erm... ah, I can't do this...



Entered at Fri Jul 1 07:33:31 CEST 2011 from (70.71.169.48)

Posted by:

Evelyn Fontaine

Location: Vancouver - British Columbia

Subject: The Band's music

I listened to your music on Knowledge network tonight and it brought back good times and memories for me. Your guest stars looked so young. I especially enjoyed seeing Neil Young, Eric Clapton and Joni Mitchell in their youth again. Thanks


Entered at Fri Jul 1 06:12:06 CEST 2011 from (120.16.53.182)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Subject: Best duet...

Ok, not the best but a good one is stop dragging my heart around by Tom petty and Stevie nicks


Entered at Fri Jul 1 03:17:52 CEST 2011 from (64.134.236.94)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland Tx

Subject: weird obscure british music

PV....do you remember "First Utterance" by Comus? another mention in the "Seasons They Change" book....


Entered at Fri Jul 1 02:35:37 CEST 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: Past 55

Subject: Such a sad link, Joe.

That last link is not new to me, but I find it strange how it becomes more terrible as time goes by.


Entered at Fri Jul 1 02:06:01 CEST 2011 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

JOE J

Web: My link

Subject: Top 30

Sorry Al but I can't come through on this one. Honest to Christ I've been spending too much time on it and I've been loving everybody else's lists but it started to get painful. This whittlin down. I'd just excised Roger Miller and Johnny Rivers. Another slash and Smokey Robinson's gone. John Lennon and Stevie Wonder were on the cutting board and I can't go on.

Anyway tomorrow's Remembrance Day in this nation. I'm sure I've told the story of Great-uncle Joe before. Survived Suvla Bay and Beaumont Hamel but died of influenza a year after the war. I wish Steve were around. He knew a whole lot more about the Battle of the Somme than I ever will.

Link is to the Pogues' 'Waltzing Matilda', a song that would have made my top 30 for sure. Along with 'Hey Jude', 'No Woman, No Cry', 'I Still Miss Someone', 'Driftin Away' and a few others.


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