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The Band: Live at the Academy of Music 1971

Levon Helm: Ramble at the Ryman

The Band: Three of a Kind

Robbie Robertson: How to Become Clairvoyant

Garth Hudson Presents a Canadian Celebration of The Band

Levon Helm: Electric Dirt

Garth and Maud Hudson: Live at the Wolf

Pulse

Dirt Farmer

Elliot Landy's Woodstock Vision

The Band Guestbook, March 2011


Entered at Thu Mar 31 23:54:14 CEST 2011 from (76.66.27.210)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Robbie Robertson at Toronto's Indigo Bookstore Meet and Greet

We stiood in a long line up this time to meet Robbie Robertson again. It was soooo hot in Indigo Bookstore! While waiting in line I met someone who told me that they know J D and Bill M. He had a lot of stories to tell about the days of The Hawks and The Band and others who represented the Toronto Sound. Wow! Sharing stories made it easier to wait in line at the end of a day where I already felt totally exhausted.

While we were waiting in line I hear Robbie's voice!....He just arrived wearing a long black coat. He said hello to someone waiting in line and then I saw him. I think he's about 5' 11''. My older brother (very similar to Robbie in style and demeanor) met him at a restaurant in Yorkville and told me that they're about the same height. I'm mentioning this as the height of The Band members has come up on this site. Robbie definitely has an "IT" factor. It's the way he represents himself, his style, his confidence......

Heather Reisman (Jerry T knows her. I'm sure he would have been there to meet Robbie again if he was in town.).....is President and CEO of Indigo Bookstore. She asked Robbie a few questions and then had Robbie's music turned up while we were waiting in line to meet Robbie. I have to admit that when I heard "When The Night Was Young"....I was swaying and singing along...not too loudly....as when I looked around....no one else knew the words yet...lol

imagezulu must have really rushed to meet me at the store. He knew it was important to me. I didn't know at the time that Indigo Bookstore now has staff that will take your picture with whoever is showcased. Anyway, he took my camera as he sold all his Hasselblad cameras and took some photos of Robbie's fans. I forgot that you can always bring another The Band/Robbie item for him to sign. Some brought their guitars, records, CDS. I should have brought Redboy as that's my favourite Robbie solo CD. Now that I've been listening to his latest.....I would say they're both my favourite...but very different. Redboy is Robbie the rebel. He's also sharing his heritage with us. HTBC is Robbie letting us into his personal world. You can hear remorse and sadness in some songs. I think this is as close as we're all going to get to Robbie.

I could see from a distance that Robbie seemed to be smiling more this time. I can see how hard it must be to be pleasant and chatty with fans when you're signing your CD. At first I heard Robbie ask someone how they're doing and by the time I reached him his head was down writing "To Angelina Robbie Robertson". I did tell him a few things....He thanked me with a smiling face. I'm glad I have a few photos of that moment.

Anyway, I'm really enjoying his latest CD. There's maybe only one song I tend to skip....I just adore Angela McCluskey's voice so much on back up vocals. When Robbie's "This Is Where I Get Off" comes on....Who did him wrong???? Is he referring to the reformed Band using The Band name? Is he referring to Levon's book? Someone else?

Kevin J....You weren't able to make it? I knew Bill M wouldn't be interested....but if Robbie was there with The Hawks.....Check out the photo I've linked.....as Robbie's got a thing for striped shirts these days. ;-D Btw, the poster of the young Robbie that someone posted the other day....The picture is in the CD as well.


Entered at Thu Mar 31 22:15:54 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Lap-Steel of Luxury

Kevin: Thanks for the Musician magazine post, as that's where I remember reading that story. I think I still have a copy of that issue which featured Robbie on the cover with his Strat. Ry Cooder also discovered the advantages of old lap-steel pickups years ago. He's been known to use a vintage Strat with an Oahu/Supro lap-steel pickup mounted at the bridge position for his slide work.


Entered at Thu Mar 31 21:19:19 CEST 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: JRR on the circuit

Just a reminder for our Canuckistanian readers that JRR visits the Geo. Stroumboulopoulis set tonite. After my bedtime, but I imagine it will be archived . . . Strombo gives pretty good interview, so it should be worth a look . . . .


Entered at Thu Mar 31 20:55:48 CEST 2011 from (74.198.87.116)

Posted by:

Kevin J

a bit more detail on guitars from the same article:

"I have an old Broadcaster that I use quite a bit," Robbie Robertson says. "It was made around 1948. With a lot of new guitars you plug 'em in, adjust 'em for an hour and maybe they sound pretty good. This you plug in and it sounds good. I've had this souped-up old Stratocaster quite a while. It has 'Number 254' on the back. You can tell it's old 'cause the neck's a little thick. Before I used it in Last Waltz I had it bronzed, like baby shoes. That gave it a very thick, sturdy sound. A Stratocaster has three pickups; I had the one in the middle moved to the back with the other and tied them together. They have a different sound when they're tied together, and I don't like having a pick-up in the middle, where you pick. I've got a Washburn whammy bar on that guitar. I have a 1959 Les Paul with flat-wound strings on it that I use if I want a thicker, fatter sound. Those flat-wound strings are nice for slide playing.

"On the wall in the studio I have four amps: a little 30-watt Vox, a very old Bassman, a Roland Jazz Chorus and a Fender Reverb with a souped-up tremolo. I have a switch so I can use any or all of those amps, and I use a slow gear pedal a lot. I also use these tiny old Fender Princeton and Harvard amps on some things.

"And I have an old Rickenbacker lap steel - I like the way it looks more than anything about it. These things were made in the late 30s and there's a pickup on it that wastes any pickup anybody has on any instrument now. Amps start weeping at the very sound of the power this pickup puts out! I talked to Seymour Duncan on the phone a few months ago - I wanted him to come down and help me suss out this pickup. He said he'd come down and I never heard from him again. Maybe he was afraid I was gonna tell him this story... "


Entered at Thu Mar 31 20:48:53 CEST 2011 from (74.198.87.116)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Re: David's post about S Duncan

From Musician magazine 1987 - Bill Flanagan article - a great article by the way:

"Uh-oh - if you readers have gotten this far in this box hold on to your hats - 'cause Robbie just might be persuaded to tell us the previously unrevealed Seymour Duncan Story. Waiter, a couple more cocktails! "I met Seymour Duncan a long time ago," Robbie begins. "I didn't really remember the circumstances. One day I'm reading a magazine and he's telling how he got into pickups. It says that he met me in this place near Atlantic City where we were both playing, and we stayed up all night and played and he said, 'Geez - the sound of this guitar of yours - what have you got in it?"'

Robbie turns conspiratorial: "Now this was a style of playing I had learned traveling around the country with Ronnie Hawkins. People asked me about it a lot and I got bored so I used to make up stories. I'd say, 'I soak my guitar strings in hair oil,' or 'I cut swastikas in the speakers with razor blades.' So Seymour Duncan says to me, 'What have you done to your guitar to make it sound like that?' And not being able to think of anything better I said, 'I've got more windings in the pickups.'

"So anyway, I'm reading this article years later and Seymour Duncan says, 'Robbie Robertson told me about more windings, so I've put more windings in my pickups and I've gone on to make The Seymour Duncan Pickup!"' Robertson lets out a laugh. "And this whole business is based on a big lie! It never existed! I couldn't think of anything else to say!" Robbie takes a drink and smiles. "I never told this story before. I wonder what he's gonna think. " So do our ad guys, Robbie.


Entered at Thu Mar 31 20:36:32 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

The late Seth Lover joined Fender in 1967. In later years before his death he worked with Seymour Duncan. Mr. Duncan first crossed paths with Robbie when his band was playing at Tony Marts in Somers Point, NJ with Levon & The Hawks. There's a famous story, which I can't recall all the details, about Robbie b.s.ing Mr. Duncan back then that the secret to his Tele sound had to do with increased windings in his pickups


Entered at Thu Mar 31 20:10:14 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Pickups

David, I think it is a regular Gibson-style humbucker. I seem to remember the Lover unit not being released until 1972, so the chances of getting one as a part would have been remote. Fender have a reputation for not giving a new part until you send the broken one back as proof that you have reason to get another!


Entered at Thu Mar 31 20:04:52 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Country Boy

I was just reading about A&M and the article said their first British release was "I'm Just A Country Boy" by George McCurn, the only A&M record released via London-American. A quick Google search, and yes, it is the Richard Manuel song from Jericho. I think we discussed Sam Cooke doing it in 1964 and Don Williams in 1977, but we never to my memory noted it as a 1963 release by George McCurn (a member of the Ink Spots).


Entered at Thu Mar 31 19:54:35 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Link to Dylan playing that same Tele at the Rock of Ages concert.


Entered at Thu Mar 31 19:38:43 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Wound Up

RTO: It's hard to tell if Robbie was using Fender Wide Range humbuckers designed by Seth Lover around that time. Mr. Lover had earlier worked for Gibson, where he designed the legendary P.A.F. humbucking pickup in the mid-'50s. His Fender design sounded brighter & rawer.


Entered at Thu Mar 31 19:26:24 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Emmerdale and Telecasters

PV: Amos & Mr Wilks are for me the only thing I cherish about UK soaps in my childhood. These days all manner of rumour would be spread about two batchelors sharing a residence, eh? Then it was no big deal; Morecambe and Wise even shared a bed. Amazing that as same-sex partnerships get less and less of a taboo and we arrive at the age of civil ceremonies, that innocent depicted scenarios seem to get safer and safer!

David P - If you look at Festival Express, I think it may be that Tele (still with the single coils then) that was modified for the RoA era.


Entered at Thu Mar 31 19:00:10 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Robbie's 1971 Tele

RTO: You may be right about that Tele with the humbuckings. Robbie could have had it customized himself, but it looks like a new guitar with a wood-grain finish, rather than one of his older Teles (see link). There's a better color photo of it inside the gate-fold covers of "Rock of Ages".


Entered at Thu Mar 31 18:53:33 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I only saw Emmerdale once (because someone I knew was in it), but if you Google it (as I did to see what part she played), it's really funny reading the year by year very terse summary of what happened (as it would be for any long running soap)


Entered at Thu Mar 31 18:47:50 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Web: My link

Subject: NorthWestCoaster

Let us remember the great eccentric combination of Amos Brierly & Mr Wilkes that ran the Woolpack pub in Emmerdale. Growing up in a family home with my maternal grandmother a permanent resident, there was little scope for escaping Emmerdale Farm as it was known then. These two almost made it bearable.


Entered at Thu Mar 31 18:35:49 CEST 2011 from (90.239.127.168)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Just Another Whistle Stop

Thanks RTO. It makes sense.

Peter, about alcohol. I use to watch "Emmerdale" every day before my afternoon nap. Drinking has definitely more golden halo in Emmerdale than in this gb.


Entered at Thu Mar 31 18:31:00 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Web: My link

Subject: David P

David, are you sure Robbie didn't just slap a humbucker in the neck of his old butterscotch regular Tele? I thought the Tele Custom was the deliberate model by Fender that had the bigger pickguard with four rotary controls instead of the usual two and the pickup selector moved to the top bout? (see linked pic)

If I am wrong and RR did play a Custom for a while, would love to see a pic.

Fender introduced this model as a response to the fact that many players such as Albert Lee, Harvey Mandel, Keef (later on, of course Andy Summers) had done exactly the procedure I described above. They also made a two humbucker Tele called the Deluxe which had a Strat neck. But neither ever really caught on until very recently when younger guitarists (the guys from Franz Ferdinand are generally considered the most notable exponents) started picking them up as good solid guitars for Indie rock. Like Costello and Tom Verlaine did in the late seventies did with the Jazzmaster, they rightly saw market unpopularity as a means of getting a well-built, good playing vintage Fender for little more money than a brand new Korean imported instrument. All now command sums better suited to their all-American vintage Fender status.


Entered at Thu Mar 31 18:19:35 CEST 2011 from (69.177.230.78)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Strawberry Wine is fine but Daniel holds up over time

Yikes! Is it possible to like ‘Strawberry Wine’ AND ‘Daniel and the Sacred Harp’? I think so.

As an aside, RTO your bawdy take on the suggestiveness of ‘Strawberry Wine’ gave me a chuckle, but I actually think the song was written with actual Strawberry Wine (the libation) in mind. Later on in Levon’s solo career, on American Son, he did ‘Sweet Peach Georgia Wine’ which was definitely delivered with a wink and a nod……Hey, how was he supposed to know she was the sheriff’s daughter? And that she was only sweet 16, but she looked a lot older? (Note to self - Gonna keep that character away from my daughter!)

But back to the Stage Fright album……I enjoy Strawberry Wine, but it wouldn’t necessarily be on my top ten list of favorite Band songs. It’s got swagger and energy to be sure, but there’s more to The Band than that. (And I actually prefer the live version to the studio cut). There could be some deeper meaning, but I’m with Peter in thinking that whether the song is about someone choosing alcohol OR heroin as something they can’t live without, and putting human relationships second, is pretty tragic no matter what the specific drug of choice is. Also I wonder how much of the speculation on heroin as a muse, was influenced by Rob Bowman’s speculation in the liner notes of the remasters that he could hear it in Levon’s voice.

But songs aren’t always what they seem. Perhaps ‘Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds’ was really influenced by a picture that young Julian Lennon drew, ‘Helter Skelter’ is based on an amusement park ride, and ‘Martha My Dear’ was inspired by Paul’s dog. But we’re not talking about the Beatles, so back on topic.

Maybe the issue I have is that I don’t view ‘Daniel and the Sacred Harp’ as an “experiment”, failed or otherwise. It’s really just another folk tale set to music, like so many great Band songs. I mean you’ve got a guy making a deal with the devil, and he loses in the end! That’s classic stuff. But what makes it really special is the performance. It’s got so much of what makes The Band great and unique. The song literally dances. It’s anchored by Levon’s country funk drumming locked in with Rick’s loping bass as only he could play it. We get both Richard and Levon swapping lead vocals, and on the chorus we get the amazing vocal blend that is the hallmark of so many great Band performances. The guitar properly serves the song rather than the other way around. Drizzled on top of all that we get some accordion and fiddle to keep things honest, and I think even a little bit of harpsichord sprinkled in here and there for flavor. I may even detect some Hawaiian style slide guitar possibly played by Richard?

Call it what you want, but I call it good gumbo!


Entered at Thu Mar 31 17:57:29 CEST 2011 from (74.198.87.116)

Posted by:

Kevin J

David P: A good reminder - I do hope that Carol was able to Snag RR for one of her Band Bites.......The release of Claivoyant sure has generated interest in The Band.....I don't recall there being this much discussion of Band music at this site in years............


Entered at Thu Mar 31 17:37:47 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Fret Not

Adam: According to Carol Caffin's blog regarding Rick's gear, the Ampeg fretless was part of the equipment that Ampeg gave the group after the release of MFBP. As I recall, it was an Ampeg AUB-1 model that Rick modified with a better bridge and Fender P-Bass pickups.

In 1971 Robbie began using a Fender Telecaster Deluxe model that featured humbucking pickups instead of Fender's standard single-coils.


Entered at Thu Mar 31 16:19:43 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Acoustic + Deep, meaningful and pretty? We've drifted back onto The Unthanks again. Anyway, Rob, I found a 1964 NME today with a whole page Futurama advert, including a picture of the excellent Futurama Bassist amp, extremely powerful at 15 watts.


Entered at Thu Mar 31 16:13:34 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Shape I'm In - opening side 1 of SF

Oh, I agree with that, Peter, don't get me wrong. I just prefer Strawberry Wine to Daniel & the Sacred Wotsit - given the less warm and inviting atmosphere of the third album, a bit of plodding blues rock goes a long way, and swapped with TSII would go even further as a midway relief from the intensity of some of the darker, "closed" songs. But as you say, stick the superior "stomper" on the first side to open up. For me, the excellence of All La Glory renders D&TSH redundant as the "chill out" cut and (ALG) seems so much more effortless, whereas D&TSH to my ears tries too hard to be deep, meaningful and pretty and thus I find it a little hackneyed.


Entered at Thu Mar 31 15:46:36 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Paul McCartney, as I've often pointed out, was one of the few who refused to flee his country for tax reasons. That's probably why he's "Sir" and why long-time foreign residents Messrs Jagger and John really shouldn't be.


Entered at Thu Mar 31 15:44:21 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Taxman

Thank goodness there are two of us with taste, Brien. I still believe The Shape I'm In should have started side one. Interesting that both side starters have a similar theme and style though. Strawberry Wine sounds too much like a song on Levon's four solo albums (though better played), well, maybe not as good as the ones on American Son.

Tax rates. I can recall 85% as a figure that was active. George Harrison talked about 95% due to some stuff on "unearned income" which was treated differently. I was teaching English as a Foreign Language, and two of us, teaching and living together, in the early 70s could only afford to rent a damp flat over a shop. We were paid state tertiary education rates (e.g. junior college), did lots of well-paid lectures as overtime and the sketch shows we did were paid too, and we ended up paying over 50% tax while living in near poverty. When we went abroad, the limit in money in those pre-credit card days was absurd. I think we could take £30 each. Everyone had money hidden in their shoes. We got a free trip to Paris in 1973, testing out a new route for the school to use for students weekend excursions. We planned to stay seven days, ran out of money (though we had money we couldn't get at in the bank) and had to come home after four.

Mind you, my companion blames some of that on the wide availability of wonderful Chess LPs on the French Vogue label. Vogue kept stuff like "The Rocking Chair Album" by Howling Wolf in print for years when it was hard to get in the UK or US, and later put all that stuff on CD first. People joke about French pop music, but Paris was a dream city for jazz and blues fans.

We arrived in the UK with a bus ticket home and not enough money for a cup of tea. Pre cash-machine days too! I still think of anyone in the government in those days as utter bastards. But I think that of anyone in government ever. Especially this month.


Entered at Thu Mar 31 15:16:05 CEST 2011 from (196.30.40.22)

Posted by:

NUx Schwartz

Location: Durban South Africa

Subject: Syd Kitchen

Syd Kitchen: Afro-Saxon singer and songwriter Mar 26, 2011 11:42 PM | By Chris Barron Syd Kitchen, who has died in Durban at the age of 60, was an iconic South African singer, songwriter and guitarist who was scarcely known in his own country and whose music was seldom if ever heard on radio. NOT FOR SISSIES: Syd Kitchen You'd visit his flat and notice an item of furniture was missing; he'd had to sell it to pay for his latest record or CD The title of his 2001 album, Africa's Not for Sissies, became one of the most popular one-liners in the country. A clothing retailer cashed in on its popularity by running off a batch of T-shirts carrying the phrase, but never spoke to him about it, let alone offered him any royalties. When he politely raised the matter they pulled their remaining stock and paid him not a cent. Kitchen, who started off as a duo called The Kitchen Brothers with his brother Pete in their home town of Umbilo in the late 1960s, was more widely appreciated in New York, where a documentary about his life, Fool in a Bubble, premiered a couple of years ago. Many of Kitchen's muso friends from South African emigrated to New York and encouraged him to do so as well. He would have sold more music there, played more gigs and made a lot more money, but although he performed widely in Europe, the UK and the US, the man who described himself as "Afro-Saxon" was never going to leave the country, or the town, of his birth. Africa's Not for Sissies was his humorous riposte to white South Africans who did take the gap. In spite of his marvellous guitar playing and witty, thought-provoking lyrics, Kitchen was ignored by the local music industry. Radio stations didn't play his music and the big retail outlets didn't sell it. In part this was due to his refusal to schmooze station managers and disc jockeys or accept any of the compromises that come with joining a label, and in part it was because his music couldn't easily be pigeonholed. He was not a blues, jazz, rock 'n' roll or country singer, although he played blues, jazz, rock 'n' roll and country brilliantly. His music embraced a whole range of genres and store owners never knew where to put him. Waiting for the Heave in 1987 was a landmark album, but none of the labels were interested. He released it independently as he did all his music at great cost to himself, and it was sold at 12 stores around the country to which he sent 10 copies at a time. He couldn't afford to make more until those 10 copies had been sold. If a small radio station in Canada requested some of his music, he'd be at the post office the next day, sending off a CD. You'd visit his flat and notice an item of furniture was missing; he'd had to sell it to pay for his latest record or CD. He arranged all of his own gigs - staying at friends' houses and sometimes not even being paid - and sold his music from the back of his car before and afterwards. With his floppy hats and eccentric, usually second-hand, clothes, Kitchen's image was that of a hippy, but his approach to his music couldn't have been more serious. That's why he went to the University of KwaZulu-Natal at the age of 50 to study it. He obtained a BA (Hons) in music, cum laude. Another source of income for him was teaching guitar but, here too, he refused to compromise his standards and was very picky about who he accepted. He produced 10 albums, starting with S'No Good and Reason Why soon after he began his solo career in 1979, and one volume of poetry, Scars That Shine. His bands included Equinox, Harry Was A Snake, Syd Kitchen and the Utensils, The Flying Sombreros and Aquarian Quartet. Kitchen, who died of lung cancer, is survived by his second wife, Germaine, and two daughters.


Entered at Thu Mar 31 14:51:55 CEST 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Subject: British taxes in the 70's

Peter V or anyone who might know this. IN the 70's, most of the Stones as well as other British artists fled England because of the crushing tax rate they faced - do you know what that tax rate was?

By the way I prefer Daniel and the Sacred Heart over Strawberry Wine.


Entered at Thu Mar 31 12:16:38 CEST 2011 from (99.141.31.86)

Posted by:

Adam2

There's some other photos from the same show on that site if you look around. Robbie's telecaster also must have been stripped by Jan. 1970.


Entered at Thu Mar 31 12:09:52 CEST 2011 from (99.141.31.86)

Posted by:

Adam2

Web: My link

Check out this great photo of the Band from Queens College, Jan. 1970. They're playing Caledonia Mission, with Garth on piano, Levon on acoustic guitar, and Richard on drums. This also answers a question I had - Rick had the Ampeg fretless as early as Jan. 1970.


Entered at Thu Mar 31 11:29:12 CEST 2011 from (41.97.192.20)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

add "non-incentive" very important

"banatage" that Blond-Blond sings in Juan les Pins, [4:07 in the link] are Tunisian Meatballs made of chopped beef, bread crumbs, parsley, dash of nutmeg, onions in powder, and one egg slightly beaten
The meatballs are in a Sauce made of chopped onions and tomatoes, dash of parsley and saffron, cinnamon and pepper, tomato juice


Entered at Thu Mar 31 10:57:59 CEST 2011 from (66.8.140.145)

Posted by:

Nick

Subject: Strawberry Wine

Is a kick ass tune! Especially the live version on AMH! One of my favorites.

"Yeah, You caught me when I's down a-sleepin' in the park, Climbin' up the walls and laughin' in the dark."

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KvPYj0Ny-jU http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KvPYj0Ny-jU levons vocals are incredible! Just a total blast of a song


Entered at Thu Mar 31 08:33:46 CEST 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Nor have you lost your faculties, Al ;-). Apparently I'm losing mine.


Entered at Thu Mar 31 07:23:01 CEST 2011 from (12.51.52.166)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Web: My link

Muddy's great 70s band. Pinetop, Portnoy, Johnson, Margolin, Big Eyes, Jones.


Entered at Thu Mar 31 06:47:29 CEST 2011 from (12.51.52.166)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Scouser, I'm glad to see that ye haven't lost your facilities. One mere observation, and you return to form. :-)


Entered at Thu Mar 31 04:34:08 CEST 2011 from (68.50.244.13)

Posted by:

Jonathan Katz

Location: Columbia MD
Web: My link

Subject: NPR

Don't know if this has been posted yet.


Entered at Thu Mar 31 04:25:52 CEST 2011 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Al Edge: Like I said. Only me more succinctly. So you never got around to MFBP or what?

Been a long fucking day. Got 'The Trinity Sessions' for the ride home. If I'm not suicidal after a date with Margot then I'll be OK for the duration.



Entered at Thu Mar 31 01:10:54 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Adam2

Strawberry Wine IS stronger IMHO than Daniel & The Sacred Harp, Adam, quite agree. The former is blighted by a somewhat "pub blues" delivery and the latter unfairly elevated by sophisticated and purer instrumentation. There is a deep-rooted problem in music generally that the more acoustic instruments a tune features, the more seriously it is taken. Utter rubbish.


Entered at Wed Mar 30 23:03:44 CEST 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: from the New Age Reading Room

One for BEG . . . .


Entered at Wed Mar 30 22:49:50 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Connection

Kevin: "Java Blues" from Rick's 1977 solo album was co-written with Emmett Grogan, who died of a heroin overdose on a New York City subway train a year later at the age of 35.

"Strawberry Wine" is the one song that Robbie concedes was initiated by Levon and that he helped him finish it.


Entered at Wed Mar 30 22:32:53 CEST 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: wet your whistle stop

RTO: I think "Just Another Whistle Stop" is a reworking / extension of Mayfield's metaphor from "People Get Ready" -- it's not very far between "there's a train a-comin; all you need is faith" and "the locomotive will arrive . . . bringing souls . . . bound for higher ground . . . " Recall also "yes that train is a-comin'" from "The Unfaithful Servant." And of course a whistle stop is indistinguishable from a one-horse town . . . .

Re: "Strawberry Wine," I hear a nice bit of word play around "I know that you are sweet, and more than double fine . . . " -- "fine," of course, means good-lookin' (see also J. Hendrix, The Chiffons, etc.), so "double fine" is extra good-lookin' -- and _more_ than double is the superlative. But I think "double-fine" is also a shorthand form of "double-refined," as in extra-sweet white sugar as opposed to once-refined brown or Demarara. Where this leaves your cat-eat-mouse theory (esp. in re: Jagger / Richards "Brown Sugar"), I'm not sure . . . but I know my wise old Gran always used the white kind for making raspberry wine . . . .

Kevin J: thanks for the "Java Blues" . . . love that song . . . .


Entered at Wed Mar 30 22:03:44 CEST 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Nazareth doing a Rick Danko fav about coffee…and sometimes coffee is just coffee or is it?….very unrocksnobby….but to anyone who cares this is where Axl Rose got his voice……………


Entered at Wed Mar 30 21:47:15 CEST 2011 from (99.141.31.86)

Posted by:

Adam2

I'll say that I think "Strawberry Wine" is stronger than "Daniel & The Sacred Harp". My reasoning being this: "Strawberry Wine" does what it sets out to do, and it does it perfectly. "Daniel & The Sacred Harp" on the other hand is much more ambitious, lyrically and musically. But it doesn't pull it off. A song must be judged on it's own merit. I would never rate "Daniel" higher, simply because "Daniel" tries and fails. It is an ambitious experiment, but it doesn't make it. "Strawberry Wine", however trivial or uninteresting the blues form may seem, tries and succeeds in every way it sets out to.


Entered at Wed Mar 30 21:35:42 CEST 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

.....BB King laying the foundation.........not much confusion here - just beautiful guitar.......the advert is short - the guitar is worth the wait....

Postage stamps: I have some Joni's, a Lightfoot and a few Montreal Canadiens left......licked them all.........I would draw the line at Rush and if some of those awfull 80's bands are ever so honoured I might be forced to swtch to courier.....


Entered at Wed Mar 30 21:21:48 CEST 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: Strawberry Wine

The first-person protagonist is an alcoholic; the song is "about" his point of view (roughly, "pass the bottle and fuck off.") By exhibiting one alcoholic's point of view, the song is by extension "about" alcoholics and alcoholism more generally. By being "about" alcoholism, the song is by extension also "about" all other addictions.

It's pretty amazing that JRR put these words (and those of "Forbidden Fruit") in Levon's mouth -- in other world-views, I guess Levon put them in his own mouth -- but in Richard Manuel's words, "we can talk about it now."


Entered at Wed Mar 30 21:25:11 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: PV

Alcohol and tobacco are the hardest to kick?

Oh, shit...


Entered at Wed Mar 30 21:20:50 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Al again - SF vs Pink & Brown - Sex and Genocide?

Interesting to re-read your conclusion. My father always maintains that "the brown one is the gem, but Big Pink and Stage Fright are pretty close". He doesn't see Pink as half of a mighty pairing at all, rather that - like you say - the second album is an entity all of its own class. The old boy (once again, like Bill M and I have come to agree with him over RoA) might have the right idea...

STRAWBERRY WINE: I've always thought another interpretation aside from heroin could be from the old "Jelly Roll" tradition of (sorry to be crude ladies, but...) a chap yearning for the taste of a lover's stimulated intimate parts. See also Jemima Surrender as evidence that Levon is never squeamish about graphic details of the oldest pleasure, and indeed why should he be- historically the blues and rock & roll (in itself, I believe a negro slang for sex) is riddled with it. The Dead had not long before put out Dupree's Diamond Blues, another "Jelly" song - Dupree gets no "jelly" until he provides a diamond ring, holds up the jewellers, even the old judge admits that the "sweet. sweet, jelly's so good" before passing death sentence.

JUST ANOTHER WH/STOP: I can't remember who, but I DON'T think it was Brinsley, or Dad (Dad likes what he likes but isn't analytical like that) wondered if Just Another Whistle Stop might have been about the WW2 transit trains to concentration camps; most notably the legendarily grim week-long journeys to Auschwitz. "...all concerned, dead or alive, the locomotive will arrive" fits the historical evidence that many of the unfortunate souls rounded up for such transits didn't even survive the journey, let alone whatever fate awaited them in the camp. "Higher ground..." could refer to the afterlife; UK ITV's award winning "World at War" series featured a Czech jew who had held a "trustee" job down at Auschwitz and recalled that small children were told, upon arrival, that the trustees were called the Heaven Commando to sweeten the grim reality up for young ears. Given JRR has Jewish roots, it isn't an unlikely metaphor.


Entered at Wed Mar 30 21:19:26 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Strawberry Wine

I think there’s a misconception running here that alcohol is a minor problem. It’s not. While people have to go out of their way to find hard-drugs, alcohol is all around us, all the time. Richard’s demons were mainly from Grand Marnier, but we put a pleasant halo around booze. Allegedly, from stuff written by addiction clinics, heroin is easier to kick than alcohol, and alcohol is easier to kick than tobacco.

In the end, "Strawberry Wine" is way the weakest track on Stage Fright. Though it would have shone as brilliant in the 90s Band repertoire.


Entered at Wed Mar 30 21:14:55 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Al again - SF vs Pink & Brown - Sex and Genocide?

Interesting to re-read your conclusion. My father always maintains that "the brown one is the gem, but Big Pink and Stage Fright are pretty close". He doesn't see Pink as half of a mighty pairing at all, rather that - like you say - the second album is an entity all of its own class. The old boy (once again, like Bill M and I have come to agree with him over RoA) might have the right idea...

STRAWBERRY WINE: I've always thought another interpretation aside from heroin could be from the old "Jelly Roll" tradition of (sorry to be crude ladies, but...) a chap yearning for the taste of a lover's stimulated intimate parts. See also Jemima Surrender as evidence that Levon is never squeamish about graphic details of the oldest pleasure. and indeed why should he be- historically the blues and rock & roll (in itself, I believe a negro slang for sex) is riddled with it. The Dead had not long before put out Dupree's Diamond Blues, another "Jelly" song - Dupree gets no "jelly" until he provides a diamond ring, holds up the jewellers, even the old judge admits that the "sweet. sweet, jelly's so good" before passing death sentence.

JUST ANOTHER WH/STOP: I can't remember who, but I DON'T think it was Brinsley, or Dad (Dad likes what he likes but isn't analytical like that) wondered if Just Another Whistle Stop might have been about the WW2 transit trains to concentration camps. most notably the legendarily grim week-long journeys to Auschwitz. "...all concerned, dead or alive, the locomotive will arrive" fits the historical evidence that many of the unfortunate souls rounded up for such transits didn't even survive the journey, let alone whatever fate awaited them in the camp. "Higher ground..." could refer to the afterlife; UK ITV's award winning "World at War" series featured a Czech jew who had held a "trustee" job down at Auschwitz and recalled that small children were told, upon arrival, that the trustees were called the Heaven Commando to sweeten the grim reality up for young ears. Given JRR has Jewish roots, it isn't an unlikely metaphor.


Entered at Wed Mar 30 21:00:26 CEST 2011 from (99.141.31.86)

Posted by:

Adam2

David P - Exactly what I was thinking! The great Jesse Ed Davis covered "Strawberry Wine", many years before losing to heroin as you said. That's pretty convincing just by itself. He could've picked any Band song to cover. But the one he did cover was "Strawberry Wine", probably recognizing it as a great stomper, but also knowing full well what the song is about. "Forbidden Fruit" is another pretty close example too, like David said.


Entered at Wed Mar 30 20:44:17 CEST 2011 from (86.146.143.11)

Posted by:

Simon

I think a strong case could be made for Strawberry Wine being about hair-o-wan. I've always thought Sleeping was about depression and a disengagement from the world. I also never took the second album as being set uniformly in the past ... Peter mentioned Up On Cripple Creek ... there are also references elsewhere to the telephone and a Fender guitar. That doesn't mean those songs are set in the present either but they can't be in the same time frame as certain other songs. But I never really assumed they were. I also think there are quite a few contemporary references (and forward-looking sound textures that belie the apparent rootsiness) on MFBP - hexagram is one that comes to mind. That seems very '1968' to me, although I'm aware the I Ching is an ancient text. 'Did you trip' is another, perhaps. Or maybe not, I dunno. Certainly worth mulling over (and thanks to Al for the post).


Entered at Wed Mar 30 20:43:12 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Re; Al (Stage Fright)

Al, great work, a good read!

I see why Brins took the opinion he did; both of the first two albums became, rightly, considered almost 100% comprised of rock benchmark standards and thus 'over familiar'. He also reckons that the third LP is nowhere near as instant but if anything more rewarding a listen if you get to where the songs are etched in your mind rather than new and unfamiliar.

My take on this is that I personally consider it equal to the first two but - can easily see why others may not agree with this. My wife swears blind also that whatever I feel about the individual merits of the three releases she would bet money on the fact that Stage Fright is a head and shoulders above the other two in terms of how frequently I put it on to listen to. Favourite and most often played are NOT the same thing.


Entered at Wed Mar 30 20:43:02 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Forbidden Fruit

Adam: Robbie would revisit that theme in the opening song on "Northern Lights / Southern Cross". Sadly, the only person to cover "Strawberry Wine", Jesse Ed Davis, lost his own battle with addiction.


Entered at Wed Mar 30 20:33:41 CEST 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: "Clairvoyant" posters

I like the one with the freaky hand . . . .


Entered at Wed Mar 30 20:31:08 CEST 2011 from (99.141.31.86)

Posted by:

Adam2

I didn't mean to sound too strong in my last post, but having gone through the addictions a young man might go through, and reading the lyrics written out on the paper, it's pretty clear to me. They would not start off Stage Fright with simply a throwaway with no deeper meaning (however subtle or buried it is), and then go right to "Sleeping", one of their deepest, saddest songs, as if to say "Just kidding! Here's Track 2, where the album REALLY starts!" Like I said, finding no other meaning beneath the surface of "Strawberry Wine" is like doing the same thing for "Sleeping". Or actually believing that "Jemima Surrender" is about maple syrup and pancakes.


Entered at Wed Mar 30 20:25:36 CEST 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: if you can't join 'em, lick 'em . . . .

Tim: thanks for the _Macleans_ link. See [My link] for a look at the JRR postage stamp design mentioned in the article.


Entered at Wed Mar 30 19:57:02 CEST 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Strawberry Wine

I can't remember where I read it, but I think Levon said the song was about his heroin use. His voice was so "stoned" on the record. After this he went back home to Arkansas to"detox"


Entered at Wed Mar 30 19:53:29 CEST 2011 from (134.174.21.2)

Posted by:

Tim

Location: Boston
Web: My link

Subject: Robbie article

interesting title.


Entered at Wed Mar 30 19:49:13 CEST 2011 from (99.141.31.86)

Posted by:

Adam2

It's hard to believe I'm the only one who sees strong references to drug addiction under the surface in "Strawberry Wine". The first song on the album, the album where the Band starts to remove the curtain and comment on their own changing group dynamics, and you're telling me it's completely without any suggestions of darkness and is simply about loving strawberry wine? Listeners who feel that way aren't listening close enough. The lyrics are "childishly defiant" or whatever because that's exactly what a drug addict is - immature, selfish. I've experienced severe addiciton, and those lyrics are exactly how I would describe it - you'd do absolutely anything to get it, and when you do, the darkness that is so obviously lingering under the surface gives way to the misguided happiness of being in possession of it once again. And by that point, you sound like Levon does when he's singing the song. Of course the song sounds like it's just to be taken at face value - that's the whole point. On the surface, it's just a rollicking stomper about the joys of getting drunk, fitting in with the "good time rock 'n roll" smokescreen that the album has. But when you think about the lyrics, the "strawberry wine", doing anything just to get more of it, feeling good all the time, CLIMBING UP THE WALLS AND LAUGHING IN THE DARK. It's supposed to be more subtle. It's SUPPOSED to be just a song about getting drunk on the surface. But when you think about it logically, and put it in the context of the whole rest of the album (which deals with similar themes) and the group dynamic - there's no doubt. And it's haunting, and that's the whole point of the album. "Strawberry Wine" is NOT a throwaway warm-up song for Levon. Misinterpreting this song is like insisting "Sleeping" is just a song Richard wrote about getting up late, and there's nothing more to the lyrics.


Entered at Wed Mar 30 19:42:08 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: King George, Mel & John's Speech

I've always wondered if John Hammond Jr.'s singing affectation was developed, in part, as a forceful way to overcome stuttering. I understand it something he suffered from, like King George VI and Mel Tillis.

Thanks Joan for the Record Store Day link.


Entered at Wed Mar 30 19:25:12 CEST 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Web: My link

Subject: Vinyl

For all the vinylphiles, from Vanguard Records newsletter.


Entered at Wed Mar 30 18:21:35 CEST 2011 from (72.78.32.29)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love
Web: My link

Subject: So Many Roads

David, that was my introduction to the Hawks as well, and a few months later after seeing Dylan at Forest Hills and finding out after the show who the players were, my reaction was, okay, the guys on the Hammond album. That album more than anything led my brother and me to Muddy, Wolf, Bo Diddley, Jimmy Reed and all the other great Chicago blues guys. While the official Dylan and Band myth has always been Mary Martin led him to them, I've always suspected he knew about them from Hammond and wouldn't be surprised if he attended the sessions. Hammond attended the Bringing It All Back Home sessions. Yeah the vocals are over the top, but Hammond (who I've interviewed and is a really nice guy) refined his style over the years and as far as I'm concerned is the real deal. There's a few more from the album up on youtube. I'd been checking periodically and found this stuff last night. And yeah David, I too have the mono and stereo vinyl and the CD. When I got into the Chicago guys, I put that album away for awhile and then eventually went back to it. And as legend has it, when Bloomfield went to the sessions and heard Robbie play, he said, "I'll play piano." The real injustice of The Last Waltz is that John Hammond wasn't included.


Entered at Wed Mar 30 17:39:29 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: John Hammond

Nice to listen to these again. The playing is extraordinary. A shame about the vocals. Unfortunately, for once (and this is rare) I agree with Greil Marcus, who said:

"Anyone with the stamina to sit through Hammond’s ludicrous blackface vocals can hear what Robbie considers some of his best blues playing; all rough edges, jagged bits of metal ripping through the spare rhythm section."


Entered at Wed Mar 30 17:34:45 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: So Many Roads

Thank you Peter Stone Brown for posting those clips. When that album was first released, it was my introduction to The Hawks, and I'm still in awe of their performance. I have original Vanguard pressings of both the mono & stereo versions, as well as the CD reissue. Several years ago, Cisco Records put out a fine vinyl reissue (cut by Kevin Gray), which is sadly out-of-print.


Entered at Wed Mar 30 17:23:58 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Off Broadway

That would be on stage at the Woodstock Playhouse.


Entered at Wed Mar 30 17:20:36 CEST 2011 from (72.78.32.29)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love
Web: My link

Subject: You can hear Garth on this one

Garth's wild organ is audible on this one. Vanguard Records had never recorded anything like this before, didn't know what they were doing and no one has ever remastered this.


Entered at Wed Mar 30 17:19:55 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: All the world's a frightening stage...

While "Stage Fright" may pale in comparison with burnish of The Brown Album, I believe, on its own, it's a strong work from start to finish. Applying the William S. Burroughs / Brion Gysin cut-up method, here's another angle of examination:

"I would try my finger and I would try my hand at any fool game in this man's land.

For the life we chose, in the evening we rose, just long enough to be lovers again.

When my day's work is done we can take in a jamboree, but I just wanna sit by the fire with my love right here beside me.

To all concerned, dead or alive, the locomotive will arrive; bringing souls from all around, they'll be bound for higher ground.

It's time for you to dream away, for what a big day you've been through.

Out of nine lives, I spent seven, now how in the world do you get to heaven?

They'll be saints and sinners, you'll see losers and winners, all kinds of people you might want to know.

Are you one of the chosen few who will march in the procession?

Now deep in the heart of a lonely kid, who suffered so much for what he did.

Maybe it's a lie, even if it's a sin, they'll repeat the rumor again."

And in the end, presented on stage, we have a life of innocence lost, sin, redemption and salvation.


Entered at Wed Mar 30 17:13:11 CEST 2011 from (72.78.32.29)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love
Web: My link

Subject: The Forgotten "Who Do You Love?"

I knew this would show up on youtube eventually by the man who by all rights should have been at The Last Waltz. Jaime Robbie Robertson: guitar; Mark Levon Helm: drums; Eric Garth Hudson: organ; Mike Bloomfield: piano; CD Musselwhite: harp; Jimmy Lewis: bass.


Entered at Wed Mar 30 16:52:38 CEST 2011 from (67.163.118.32)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Subject: Thanks Al!

I have to agree with your take on Stagefright and The Band's Brown Album. To be completely sacrilegious, I find Big Pink to be virtually unlistenable. Yes, it has The Weight, Tears of Rage and I Shall Be Released, but I only listen to the rest if forced to or out of a sense of obligation. MFBP is like the Bible: either the most important or among the most important of its' kind. Well, I have read the bible front to back and have no desire to ever do so again either. The Band's Brown Album is a perfect universe unto itself musically and thematically that wears well and always has some previously unknown nuance ready to reveal itself. Stagefright, while having some lesser material, is cohesive, artistically confidant and shows The Band at that fleeting moment of being both at the peak of their powers and a cohesive, functional unit.Listening to it leaves you a feeling of regret knowing they will be very good again in the future, but never this GREAT again. I feel obligated to like and praise MFBP, but I have never felt genuinely inspired to do so. It is a start with some brilliant moments, but it just never takes off for me.


Entered at Wed Mar 30 16:31:18 CEST 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Al Edge

A post for the ages and archives to be sure……….However…..the only judge is really the songs……….didn’t Mick Jagger sum it up well when his record company stirred up all the unwashed and assorted 2nd rate talk show hosts last year to celebrate the re-release of “Exile on Main Street”…………when he said something to the effect that it had everything EXCEPT a bunch of great songs! The Brown album contains at least 5 great songs – possibly 7…….Stage Freight had one……………..Really no contest at all.


Entered at Wed Mar 30 14:46:51 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Jan should add that last post to the library as an article. Thanks for the thoughts. In the end, I guess what we're saying is the amp goes up to "ten" and the Rolling Stone / Mojo reviews go up to "five stars", and Stage Fright achieves both markers with ease. The thing about the Brown Album is you need an eleven or a six. What interests me is that Al, like me, sees it set almost entirely in the past. The modern truck driver was a shock in Cripple Creek the first time I heard that was what it was, in spite of Spike Jones on the box. But going back one, The Weight never felt like Nazareth, PA in 1968 to me either. I saw the town they had on screen in True Grit (bTW, was the town CGI in True Grit? I thought probably).


Entered at Wed Mar 30 14:40:35 CEST 2011 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

Mike & Kim Hayward

Web: My link

Subject: Robbie Robertson's new web store.

Sebastian has helped his dad launch a new web store from Robbie's website w/ a cool limited edition signed cd.


Entered at Wed Mar 30 14:22:13 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: A bone to chew on

Sometimes you just get an itch you simply have to scratch. If anyone's to blame then it's Jeff for giving me the challenge.

:-0)

THE SUM OF THE PARTS

Have to admit Rob’s mention of his mate – the one and only Brinsley Schwarz no less – opting for Stagefright over the first two albums and Rob’s own inclination not to disagree with that view has had me feverishly playing all three albums and reassessing my own Band yardsticks this past week or so.

Now I’ve always had a fixed mindset on this – namely the precedence of the first two albums – but I know Pete Viney to name but one highly respected time-served GBer has often maintained Stagefright as the equal of the other two. So I felt this latest judgement of such a legendary Band aficionado as Brinsley more or less coinciding with PV’s view surely demanded at the very least some considered reflection on my own take.

Having had quite a lengthy hiatus from any Band listening whatsoever – possibly extending [cue entirely justified disparaging grimaces all round] for more than a year – I was quietly enthralled at the task in hand and pleased to think I’d be able to approach it with real objectivity. I opted to begin my contemplation in reverse order with back-to-back plays of the Stagefright album before proceeding in the same reverse order with the Brown album and Big Pink. I felt that way I could avoid any possible clouded judgement of Stagefright arising from saturation with the first two albums.

Possibly due to not having listened to it for so long – and ironically in spite of my long love affair with it – I was caught entirely off guard by the awesome quality of Stagefright. The opening bars of Levon’s Strawberry Wine were a real adrenaline rush. Boy did it sound good. Mindful of Adam’s recently espoused ‘heroin’ take I even determined to listen more intently to its lyrics than ever before. Such intent lasted all of 20 seconds. So implanted in my brain is the child-like defiance of those opening Strawberry lyrics that any notion of the song not being a drunkard’s rejection of attempts to deny him his precious barley wine swiftly dissipated. Perhaps there is an altogether more sinister slant on it but for now I’m lumbered with the plain-as-the-nose-on-your-face plonkie interpretation.

And so, as Side One played on and the Strawberry Wine revelry melted first into Richard’s exquisite yearning for tranquil escape, then into his and Rick’s paean to domestic bliss, then Richard’s frantic railing at life per se before drifting into the sweetest lullaby since Brahms, so wonderful did it all seem that it was hard to resist the inclination that perhaps this was the time to re-adjust my long held stance as to where this wonderful record stands in The Band’s pantheon – and for that matter the pantheon of popular music per se.

And, of course, as we all know Side Two is simply so good it was only ever going to reaffirm such an inclination, to the extent that by the time Rick in that amazing backwoods drawl of his was telling me he’d “rather die happy than not die at all” [cue moistened eyes] I was sold. Mind made up. This was music that simply could not be bettered. And the quality of the three final cuts only served to seal the deal. “Open up your arms and feel the good…it’s a coming a brand new day”. Richard’s clincher, the album’s climax invoking more eye moistening this time of pure joy lending testimony to the sheer magnificence on offer.

Next stop, The Band.

To quote John Winston, I should have known better.

Across the Great Divide isn’t so much a song as a time machine to an era five or six generations distant. If the song’s title alone isn’t enough to stir latent 19th century pioneering instincts then its opening refrains are akin to Charlie Worcester’s chuck wagon rolling up outside your front door and Ward Bond motioning you to go and calm the stand-off between the gun-toting Molly and her frantic misunderstood spouse so the trek west can begin.

And once, Rags, the 4-19 iron horse is scratching your back at the side of the railroad track with dear old Charlie and WB jigging wildly to its infectious swing in the distance you are no longer in the seedy comfort of your own armchair enjoying a fine musical listening experience. No sir. For something rather special is taking place. The creators of this particular audio spectacular had something in mind a little bit different from the norm. This deal demands you to be there with them down in that special tract of America termed ‘the south’. Well virtually any rate. A bit like Arnie Schwarzeneger’s virtual vacation on Mars, minus the little green men.

So by the time Vergil Cain has laid down his particular weary tune at your feet, you find yourself surveying a smouldering Virginian landscape. It’s 1865. You’re in the early stages of a journey that will take in as many aspects of rustic bygone America – the charms, joys and pain of it and its denizens – as even Charlie Worcester cares to imagine. Rolling mud and tolling bells ominously announcing the South’s demise, the reassuring wisdom of Holie and a loving grandpa coupled with the rather more earthy comforts of dear Bessie. The heart rending emptiness of a mist shrouded house . Foghorns calling out to sea for the return of lost love. The images are endless. A chancer’s insistent craving for a night of joyous passion with the luscious Jemima. Old sailors pining for their Virginny homes and rockin chair comforts, thieves and vagabonds, twisters both human and meteorological; disgraced servants from a country home. The journey culminates in the bleak rural desperation of failed crops, magnolia trees, worn out shoes and an old horse, the aptly named Jethro, going loco.

All told it represents an enthralling listening experience. Probably a unique one. Viewed in the context of its ultimate success in realizing the magical tapestry it sets out to weave, the album has to be seen as music unsurpassed. And, somewhat perversely I guess, it is via a reassessment of Stagefright itself, the same artists’ ensuing album, which provides us with the requisite testimony to support the legitimacy of a claim of such boldness.

The thing is, in terms of much of its core essence Stagefright may well be said to emulate its predecessor. Wonderful songs with ensemble singing, playing and arrangements transcending even the highest standards to attain levels few, if any, before and since have achieved. Four Canadians and an Arkansian somehow aspiring –and managing – to fuse into a single seamless entity. So tight, so fluid, so intricate, so complementary, so in touch with their roots and yet at the same time so able to take the heritage plucked from those roots to a new high water mark of musical accomplishment.

Yet the stakes of judgement are also at their highest here. They have to be if that judgement is to be worthy of the subject matter it is judging. And so, in this regard, we do have to ask ourselves the question – most especially those of us who hold The Band so dear –as to where Stagefright as an entity actually takes the listener?

Sure, it is manifestly cut from the same cloth as the Brown album and many of its individual tracks certainly conjure up similar powerful imagery of their own. As an entire piece, however, Stagefright simply does not work on or at the same level as the Brown album. Whilst its majesty is unquestionable, that majesty lies in other areas. In contrast, what can only be termed the high art of the Brown album is that not only does it provide songs of supreme quality, arranged, played and sung with matching quality and not only is that standard maintained across every track on the album but each of those tracks also gloriously complement each other to provide a cohesive entity equating to that of the singers/musicians performing it. And all of it wrapped for the most part in a 150 years old southern USA landscape that is as tangible as any such vicarious experience can ever be.

Moreover, so real and so convincing is it that there can be no question of it not having been the intended objective of all parties involved in the project to aspire to creating it. It didn’t simply happen like that. It was planned. Crafted. A unique amalgam of inspiration, perspiration and incredible innate ability saw to that. And all done in such a subtle fashion that the listener is left with the impression that they are simply eavesdropping upon a group of musicians from the era itself just there to play for themselves or, more likely perhaps, for kith and kinfolk. Crucially those musicians also seem part of what they are singing about.

Stagefright, in contrast, is without question the work of a band reacquainted with and re-attuned to the modern era flexing its considerable collective muscle to show just how damnwell fine and accomplished it is. And whilst its members manage to demonstrate that more than capably, never do we get the sense they are still part of any of the things about which they are singing. Rather the songs provide us with what amount to their own personal commentaries about what is happening to them and their ways of dealing in many instances with the very disconnection they have experienced or are still experiencing.

One simple analysis illustrates this disconnection and some of those subtle distinctions between the respective albums. Taking what most regard as Stagefright’s cornerstone song – The Rumor, we find a truly mighty track by any criterion. Within its majesty we find its protagonists the butt of the rumour mongering about which they sing. Initially disconsolate, then philosophical, they ultimately become defiant and fired with the conviction of a brand new dawn awaiting them.

On the one hand, it is wonderful life-affirming music, its vocal performances interchanged between Rick, Levon and Rick particularly stunning. And yet on reflection the song itself has little if any connection with anything preceding it on the album. It speaks, isolated, only for those singing it or for those few of like experience. That is not to detract from the undeniable top quality of the song in itself. It is merely to make the observation that the limited degree of its interface with and connection to the rest of the album tracks – and theirs with it and each other – inevitably results in an album whose overall quality is forced to depend upon the quality of its individual parts rather than any cohesive amalgam. In the ultimate analysis the ensuing whole is only equal to the sum of the parts. Such disconnection is a world away from how the music of the Brown album was envisaged, forged and linked so seamlessly making its whole nigh immeasurable in quality.

Sticking with Stagefright’s party piece, there is a further closely associated distinction worth noting here. If we were to speculate as to how a song dealing with the concept of rumours would have featured on the Brown album or even more so on Big Pink with its more emphatic underpinning sense of community, it would seem fairly evident how with hindsight it might have turned out. The singers as part of the community wherein the rumours germinated would more than likely have been part of the rumour mongering rather than the targets for it. However unsavoury or unpalatable it might have seemed – being as most people would like to think that they would view rumour mongers as the bad guys – it would simply have been the way such things work. The brutal reality is most folk love a bit of gossip. Art imitating life, as it were.

So, taken in the splendour of their own isolation, The Rumor and its fellow Stagefright tracks may all work magnificently, yet together they fail to emulate the Brown album’s seamless artistic integrity and completeness. That meshing together so pivotal in creating the wonder of the Brown album is absent. As such Stagefright – albeit fairly typical in its ‘unmeshed’ sense to most albums – has to be viewed as having fallen somewhat short of the high water mark of its forerunner.

Some may regard the need to apply such fastidious criteria as I have done as nitpicking. And perhaps in one sense it may well be. Yet the piece I’ve written speaks for itself in this regard. It has not been formulated to decry Stagefright in any way. Rather to help ensure the Brown album remains elevated – even if only within the stronghold of The Band’s own community – at the unique niche its uniqueness merits.

In the final analysis, whilst many of the points made are certainly fine and marginal ones, if they can provide even a modicum of insight as to why my own instincts arrived at the conclusion that one album is simply a wonderful one whilst the other has entered artistic territory trodden by few, then as far as I am concerned the effort will have been more than worthwhile. Individual musical tastes can lead each of us down different paths, yet I do still believe there are occasionally certain absolutes that call for us to defy charges of mere favouritism and attempt to provide a rationale. Surely, it is especially encumbent upon diehards such as those of us who inhabit the GB to explore any such subtle distinctions and fine margins when evaluating the music we love. Hopefully, my own little soul search has gone some way to doing just that.


Entered at Wed Mar 30 13:54:19 CEST 2011 from (41.97.212.89)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

next, see how our media reported it, how could you believe the media


Entered at Wed Mar 30 13:52:58 CEST 2011 from (41.97.212.89)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

add "non tendencious" very important

my second presumption of political incorrectness of the day -- this one is for Ilkka only -- see the link above for the facts as they trully are


Entered at Wed Mar 30 11:47:06 CEST 2011 from (41.97.147.193)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: on harmonious conviviality and dogs

I Imposed myself, more than to be politically correct in The Band GB to show all respect to any culture, a rule of honor to never write a post which may give right to any reader to interpret it as offending toward any culture.

Please recall that for similar threads my posts want to be purely informative non-speculative non-interpretative non-propagandative. I heard about such anecdotes, but when it's France24 news it gains credibility and reduces political incorrectness

The Band Connection is at [2:13 – 2:30] in the link above


Entered at Wed Mar 30 08:54:03 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Jess Roden

There's that Butts Band outtake where Krieger says to Densmore, "F*ck me! This guy's twenty times better than our old singer!"

And rightly. I saw Jess Roden several times with The Alan Bown and I saw Rod Stewart with The Soul Agents and Steampacket. They were both loaded with charisma and had powerful voices that could dry everything on a washing line at twenty yards.I wouldn't say one was any better than the other. But look what happened to Rod. I reckon the difference was simple. They were much of a muchness while covering soul standards, but when it came to picking new material (and writing a bit), Rod had a much, much better ear for selecting good songs.


Entered at Wed Mar 30 08:32:28 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: The Big Three At The Cavern

A track from the EP is on YouTube, see link. The great sleeve is there too.I'm fascinated by live recordings this early. Joey Dee and The Starliters are a classic example. The Big Three at The Cavern is allegedly live.

RTO and the other guitar and amp afficiandos will enjoy the sleeve anyway. The comment below says it's a Hofner Colorama.


Entered at Wed Mar 30 05:13:09 CEST 2011 from (99.235.255.183)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: ROBBIE

TIM: Thanx for the info. George Stroumb. Tonight will be shown on CBC #5 Canadian, at 11:05 PM Thursday.

March 31, 2011

Robbie Robertson

Robbie Robertson never set out to reinvent rock & roll - but as the main songwriter and guitarist in The Band, he helped create a natural, rustic sound that had never quite been heard before. The Band backed Bob Dylan and were the first North American rock group to appear on the cover of Time magazine. And when they called it quits in 1976, the all-star concert that bade them farewell was a testament to the influence they'd had on music. In 1987, Robbie made his solo debut with an album that went Gold, was nominated for a Grammy and swept The Junos. Now he has a new solo album: 'How To Become Clairvoyant' deals with everything from the early days of rock & roll to his historic departure from The Band.

CYA soon xoxoxo


Entered at Wed Mar 30 02:57:00 CEST 2011 from (24.218.200.216)

Posted by:

Tim

Location: Boston
Web: My link

Subject: Robbie TV interview Thursday

"You can see Robertson talking with George Stroumboulopoulos on George Stroumboulopoulos Tonight on Thursday." apparently a show in Canada.


Entered at Wed Mar 30 02:05:53 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Bill & Peter

Jess Roden - funnily enough, dug out Bronco's "Country Home" LP the other day and quite enjoyed it. Best thing about the Butts Band is the lovely old brown Fender Concert amp on the cover!!!

Did I mention i don't have much time for dogs as pets, at all?


Entered at Wed Mar 30 02:04:21 CEST 2011 from (99.235.255.183)

Posted by:

Serenity

Web: My link

Subject: All your wonderful posts

My link is an anniversary page from Rolling Stone Mag.

BEG: Thanx heaps for ALL the links to ROBBIE,etc. And especially the Bravo shows. I missed #3, so was glad to be able to see it. Also for the news on the Blues Fest here in Kitchener. It draws a lot of people, but not sure if I can make it.

TIM, DAVID P, ADAM2,etc. Thanx guys for the RS interview, new music. I love the songs I've listened to so far. Hope ROBBIE does well with this album/CD.

All posts were very interesting and good reading. They certainly made my day. Thanx to all.

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxoxo


Entered at Wed Mar 30 00:46:26 CEST 2011 from (86.219.10.7)

Posted by:

Lafay Serge

Location: France

wonderful work for a wonderful band


Entered at Wed Mar 30 00:16:55 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I guess Jess went through a period in the early 70s when he couldn't afford decent sidemen.


Entered at Tue Mar 29 22:03:10 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Right now I'm listening to Daniel Lanois playing some fabulous and out-there steel guitar while talking about his days on Yonge Street. The thought occurred to me that Lanois and his steel could do a dandy remake of Garth's magnificent "Music for Our Lady Queen of the Angels" CD.


Entered at Tue Mar 29 21:38:43 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Jess Roden

Peter V is such an even-handed kinda guy that he doesn't even hold it against Alan Bown singer Jess Roden (ie, before Robert Palmer) that Roden later found himself fronting TWO former Doors (Krieger and Densmore) in the Butts Band.


Entered at Tue Mar 29 21:24:16 CEST 2011 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: yonge st

Link works just fine for me and for that I give thanks. Spent last night watching part two when I should have been in bed. Great to be able to put faces to some of these legends like John & Lee and Jackie Shane.


Entered at Tue Mar 29 21:21:16 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Big Three

I scrabbled through the boxes and pulled out The Big Three At The Cavern, and also the singles Some Other Guy and I'm With You. I've decided they were better than Cream. (But I think a LOT of 60s bands were better than Cream).

I'm reading the biography of The Alan Bown Set at the moment. Alan Bown led the John Barry Seven for two years after John Barry decided he couldn't be arsed to tour. Then he formed the Alan Bown Set, with praise on the back cover of his book from Elton John, Rod Stewart and francis Rossi. They were indeed one if the best late 60s UK bands. But the memory is shot. He's fond of doing surprised mentions of support bands who did well. He recalls touring as the John Barry Seven with Marty Wilde in 1964 and "remembers" the support band was the Pink Floyd. Um, no. That's why the "I know. I was there" line is so often dubious.


Entered at Tue Mar 29 21:05:00 CEST 2011 from (134.174.21.2)

Posted by:

Tim

Location: Boston
Web: My link

Subject: Robbie on youtube rolling stone mag video


Entered at Tue Mar 29 20:42:52 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Revenge Not So Sweet

RTO: Sounds like you've been watching that infamous scene of Jim Carrey in "Me, Myself and Irene".


Entered at Tue Mar 29 20:33:49 CEST 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Thanks Al…….I enjoyed reading that series of posts.


Entered at Tue Mar 29 20:11:30 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Dogs again

Joan, the puerile and offensive periodical "Viz" over here refers to sh*t as "dog's EGGS"! You had more patience with your neighbour than I would have done, though. It would have gone through the letterbox....we had an incident where a neighbour's dog took a shine (yes shiNe!!!) to our driveway and the wife went mad at me for putting up a notice saying "Dog Owners - If this driveway starts to become fouled, I shall start leaving poisoned sausages outside". Fair warning, I thought.

Glad to see that my stance as the Dog Nazi is not without support though.


Entered at Tue Mar 29 20:08:24 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Timbos Goals

Subject: 8 views a week

ha ha.


Entered at Tue Mar 29 20:06:24 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Al E / Peter V: I guess we now know who "21st Century Schizoid Man" was written about - Eric Clapton.

Joan: You got me worried, as I'd sent the URL off to a couple friends. Luckily, I'm listening to it now. So maybe it won't work outside Canuckistan as you feared. Too bad as you're missing not just some great stories and insights from Robbie but some performance clips of Robbie and Levon and Levon and the Hawks that just about nobody can have seen before.


Entered at Tue Mar 29 19:55:43 CEST 2011 from (217.44.154.146)

Posted by:

Simon

Subject: Al

Al, I've long suspected there might be a bear living near me. I say that because of the sheer size of what was left on the pavement a few days ago... honestly it was like three pound of spuds just sitting there. It actually cast a shadow. In all honesty though it is disgusting and I witnessed a kerfuffle outside the local supermarket when a guy just let his dog crap outside the entrance. I could hear one of the staff yelling that somebody had to clean it up and how would they like it and so on. The guy with the dog just made a 'what you gonna do about it' gesture. Pretty dispiriting all in all.

Great MFBP story too. I saw that on RAWK at the weekend. I'm glad that thread has more than 8 views to date!


Entered at Tue Mar 29 19:51:10 CEST 2011 from (41.97.153.212)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Subject: Al Edge / NorthWestCoaster

Al: thanks for the video

NorthWestCoaster : thanks for the precisions

Before powering up the computer for my afternoon session, I had two thoughts in head : George Best and “Ain’t no more CAN”
Though according to Ilkka's marks, my best posts are those where I report my daylife line of thought, it’s not always an easy exercise ..and in English

Translation in brief

George Best was one of the next on my bookmarks list of youtubes (after Puscas; Banks, etc… all is recorded in The Band GB) thanks Al for the anticipation, I suppose that the one you linked dispenses me of long and awkward searshes.

“Ain’t no more CAN” – the Continentatl Nations Cup, CAN for Coupe d'Afrique des Nations – today all the African football national teams without exception, sometimes all the team, are composed of Players from the European First Leagues teams. it’s a total denaturation of the competition, and disrespectuous for the local leagues (i wonder why they stil exist at all)


Entered at Tue Mar 29 19:47:24 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Merseys / Merseybeats

They weren't bad. Johnny Gustafson the bass player from the Big Three was in the second or third version. "The Big Three At The Cavern" was a seminal British R&B EP. They did Zip-A-Dee-Doo-Dah. For some reason "The Merseybeats On Stage" is a sought-after 60s EP..

In a piece of pub quiz winning trivia, there's a connection your mate will know of. Jack Bruce played the sawed bass intro to "Sorrow."


Entered at Tue Mar 29 19:47:00 CEST 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Yonge St Doc

Has anyone else had trouble accessing it? I get the commercial and then a message there is an error. Could it be that It won't play in the US? I know sometimes that happens.


Entered at Tue Mar 29 19:40:01 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Joan

Bloodyhell Joan. 3 days. That must have been one hell of a turd.

:-0)


Entered at Tue Mar 29 19:33:29 CEST 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Doggie doo

Some years back I lived in Manhattan. At that time there were no "pick up after your dog"laws. Walking down E 86th St. was like doing the Cha cha stepping around and over piles of s#%t. And in the summer the smell was gagging. They passed a "pick up" law and enforced it. Nowadays you can pretty safely walk without stepping in it. I love seeing people walk down the street with their little plastic bags of dog s@#t.

I had a neighbor out here that used to put his dog out every morning and it would walk right over to my lawn and s@#t. I talked to my neighbor about it to no avail so I solved the problem my way. I would pick it up with 2 plastic shovels and deposit in front of his car door. He got the message It took exactly 3 days and I never had a problem again.


Entered at Tue Mar 29 19:25:06 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Snippets

Final one

""Prior to Cream I had been the Tour Manager of a very successful ' Major Pop Band' - [Al E interjection - I found out they were The Merseys - SORROW etc ] but I have always detested "pop" music intensely, and the bullshit which surrounds it sickens me.

They were connected to Epstein's NEMS Enterprises and led to my getting the Cream gig and this was a breath of fresh air.

Cream was an education musically for me. Not only listening to them play every show, but being exposed to their influences was enlightening. Eventually we had a portable record player installed in the car which we used for travelling to gigs in England, and Clapton would feed his collection of blues singles into it at the rate of one every 3 minutes. So I got a very rapid education into blues music that way.

Jack Bruce was more a jazz freak, and through him I came to love the music of Miles Davis, Coltrane, (and many others.) Ginger on the other hand never seemed to listen to any music at all and the only drummers I ever heard him praise were Phil Seaman and Buddy Rich.

The long tours of America which Cream did, playing 5 different cities a week for 6 months at a time, provided some memorable concerts, with legendary bands on the same bill as us.

Steppenwolf, Janis Joplin, Buffalo Springfield, Zappa, The Doors, Grateful Dead, Canned Heat, jeez I've forgotten most of 'em, at legendary gigs like the Fillmores in NY and SFO, and The Grande in Detroit.

Amongst all that exposure to the top bands of the day, I still say when I heard The Band's Big Pink album for the first time it stood out like a beacon with it's brilliance. It was as if I'd been waiting all my life to hear this album and it had a tremendous effect on my taste in music from that moment on.

Clearly, it had a similar effect on EC who later confided that his biggest disappointment was that he hadn't become successful with a group which he had known and grown up with since he was a kid. The Band's music seemed to come from a bunch of very good friends who liked and understood each other and that most certainly was not the case with Cream.

Since Cream split, most of the bands I have worked with have been hard rock because that has always been the most successful genre commercially (festivals, tours, etc.) and that was the area which I operated in and knew best, but if musical tastes were taken into account, I would have preferred The Berlin Philharmonic anyday !

Hope that answers your question.

Bob A


Entered at Tue Mar 29 19:18:55 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Snippets

Here's the next

""When I got back to London at the end of that US tour, I stayed at The Madison for a few days and that acetate never left the record deck. I had become almost as obsessed as Eric had been!

At one point. I remember clearly as The Weight was playing, I heard noises outside my door. I pulled the door open sharply only for five or six people to tumble into the room as they had been listening to the music with their ears pressed up against the outside of the door!

I invited them in and they were knocked sideways by the music and wanted to know everything there was to know about "The Krackers".

Turns out that they were a band who were down in London to make their first album.

Their name was King Crimson.

I wore that acetate away (as you probably know, they aren't made for many plays) and gave it to a great but never discoverd songwriter / vocalist / guitarist called Jimmy Campbell who was a Dylan freak, and played in a little known Liverpool band called The Kirkbys.


Entered at Tue Mar 29 19:12:14 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Inside Info on Eric's infatuation

On the LFC site I go on one of the posters is a guy called bob Adcock who was tour manager for Cream in the late 60's.

He's been feeding us little snippets which though the afficianados on here will not consider to be exactly revelatory are certainly of interest to us Band fans as they're straight from source and confirm a lot which we already knew plus a few nice little insights. He's given me permission to post them on here.

Coincidentally, Kevin, it turns out Bob is currently Ray davies tour manager.

anyroad, here's the first one.

"" Bob Dylan's manager, Albert Grossman, also managed The Band and one of his promotional ploys prior to the release of Big Pink was to circulate an acetate disc of the album to the movers and shakers of the music industry a couple of months prior to the release date in order to spread the word and build up some excitement from within the industry.

The name of the band on the acetate was "The Krackers" and Clapton, being a mover and shaker, was one of the fortunate ones to receive a pre-release copy.

I was Tour Manager with Cream and we were on a lengthy American tour at that time, but after every show it was a case of us all rushing back to the hotel to stick that record on a portable record player which I had then.

It was intoxicating! Nobody had ever heard anything like it.

Clapton was obsessed with the album and I am certain that his disillusionment with Cream who remember were as big as anything back then, leading to it's eventual break-up, stemmed from his realisation that what he really wanted, was to play in a group epitomised by The Band.

When Cream split up he teamed up as you may know with southern rock outfit Delaney & Bonnie in a search for recognition as "just one of the band" who, although accomplished musicians who received critical acclaim, (particularly the horn section), were a pale shadow of The Band.""


Entered at Tue Mar 29 18:55:37 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Smokin Joe

Ha ha

Great post pete. Had me chuckling about the fumes. In our house both me mam and dad were 40 a day minimum. I reckon half of those were smoked each night. As a kid I must have gone round smelling worse than a sumo wrestler's jock strap. Still do.

Me dad used to white walpamur the back room ceiling in the summer. By autumn it'd be the same colour as this GB. It was the equivalent of painting the Forth road bridge.

And they always used to complain about being skint. :-0)


Entered at Tue Mar 29 18:53:30 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Cats

I agree. Their jazz performances in "The Aristocats" were particularly striking. Good piano playing too, but four paws would be an advantage.


Entered at Tue Mar 29 18:50:27 CEST 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

……while there may have been more crap…there was certainly less dogs…..way less……..I tripped over one yesterday…….this is not unusual…..and they all seem to be the size of tennis balls….similar colour and long leashes….the dogs I like….the owners all seem to be in need of a push off a cliff………..Cats like jazz…..and they don’t need fu*kn leashes…….


Entered at Tue Mar 29 18:33:08 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Crap

Al: Dog crap was definitely much, much worse in the past, which is why we notice it more now. When my kids were little, you couldn't go out anywhere without ending up cleaning off their shoes. It has improved. But I wondered throughout my childhood, what is that whitedog poo and why?

It's a bit like smoking. The ban came in, and you noticed people smoking indoors. Then you noticed it in the street. Now i notice it when someone with smoky clothes walks past you. When I started teaching, in every ten minute break, twenty people lit cigarettes in a crowded staff room. Many managed to get through two in the ten minutes. We must have been permanently smoke pickled.


Entered at Tue Mar 29 18:17:02 CEST 2011 from (206.47.33.101)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Thanks so much David P!

My apologies Deb!! LOL
I aknowledged Deee twice too!
imagezulu now is going to try and make it for 6:00. He'd rather see Miles Davis and Muddy Waters. ;-D

Deeee and Deb....The second time I had my photo with Robbie....I just remembered something...The person who was standing in front of me in the line to meet Robbie looked liked Ken Walker of Festival Express....So, I was telling him how much I enjoyed seeing our musical history on the screen at the same theatre I saw TLW twice in one night in 1978. I was feeling so good that I gave him a hug and then a few minutes later...I realized that he never confirmed that he was Ken Walker!....He just kept on smiling! I guess that's what happens when I get excited alright...LOL


Entered at Tue Mar 29 18:12:38 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Sorry Adam I missed your earlier post with the NPR link. I believe the content will only be available up to the release date. Regardless of NPR's recent controversies in the political arena, they contain to provide excellent music programming.


Entered at Tue Mar 29 18:03:02 CEST 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Abov link....more RR on development of his sound...


Entered at Tue Mar 29 17:42:14 CEST 2011 from (90.239.117.196)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries
Web: My link

Subject: Johnny Winter

A touching Finnish pic on Johnny Winter on www.ilkka.fi (My link). He'll be playing in legendary Tavastia scene where bands like Cream, Yardbirds, John Mayall's Bluesbreakers, Jimi Hendrix Experience played in the sixties.


Entered at Tue Mar 29 17:31:33 CEST 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Courtesy of the Dylan site Expecting Rain…….commenting on a possible Kinks reunion recently, Dave Davies had this – among other things - to say about his brother:

"I sometimes think that Ray was only happy for three-and-a-half years in his life. And those were the three-and-a-half years before I was born," Dave admitted. "[He] is a vain, egocentric, narcissistic arsehole. [But] I won't have anybody call him that except me. Because I love him to death."

…….and we thought the Band had issues…….

Thanks to Adam and David for this NPR link……lots of guitar and lovely songs….in my opinion, easily the best collection of songs since NCSL…………….The special guests don’t get in the way like U2 did on the 1987 album……..”This is Where I Get Off” is well positioned in the middle of the cd and has a few interesting lines about not wanting to leave the boys behind and knowing the mistakes he made…….hmm…….


Entered at Tue Mar 29 17:12:06 CEST 2011 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Al: we live far enough away (1500+ km) that nothing happened earthquake & tsunami-wise. As for the radiation...all's normal for now. Luckily for us the wind doesn't blow in our direction, south that is.

As for "Ned Kelly"...I was tempted, but in the end I laid off the snarky comments (i.e. everyone descends from criminal stock). My little one wouldn't have gotten the" joke". She would have deemed her dad to be an eviler fool than she already thinks he is. : ) She's a teenage girl in 21st century Japan after all, her knowledge of the world revolves around her cellphone and her incoming/outgoing calls and texts. : )


Entered at Tue Mar 29 17:05:02 CEST 2011 from (99.24.191.22)

Posted by:

Dee

Location: Wisconsin

Subject: Robbie in Toronto

BEG You are Really Excited! The news about Robbie's being in your area came from Deb, not Deeee!

Hope you get to speak with him And have your picture taken.


Entered at Tue Mar 29 16:59:07 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Jeff's unfeasible intuition

I hear you.

:-0)


Entered at Tue Mar 29 16:57:24 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Post Tsunami and Oz

Were you not affected at all Fred?

It's difficult to get a handle on how extensively people throughout japan were affected as the programmes inevitably centre on the worst hit coastal regions.

Have you tried the 'everyone in Oz is descended from Ned kelly' line yet fred? :-0)


Entered at Tue Mar 29 16:50:38 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Dog's life

Not sure why I'm being so flippant about it all. My daughter is positively obsessive about it in her concern for the kids. Peter's right, it is a feckin disgrace but I must admit to honestly not knowing if it's actually worse than it used to be or whether we're all just more aware of the mess and so we naturally think it's worse. When I was a kid there were far more stray dogs than there are now so I'm always a bit puzzled as to how the mess can be worse.

Or did people actually clean up the pavements more back then?

And what did actually happen to white dog poo?


Entered at Tue Mar 29 16:47:11 CEST 2011 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Al E: things are OK, just don't get me started about those criminals in charge of the TEPCO nuclear power plant in Fukushima.

On the homefront: my daughter after having returned from a 2 week homestay in Australia now wants to become Australian. It's "In Australia this, Australia that" 24/7. At least she hasn't began espousing upon the healthy virtues of vegemite...yet ; )

Hope all's well in your red corner of the world.


Entered at Tue Mar 29 16:42:51 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Clairvoyant Preview

A free preview of Robbie's "How To Become Clairvoyant" in its entirety is available at National Public Radio's website (link above) as part of NPR's "First Listen" program feature.


Entered at Tue Mar 29 16:42:25 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Woof woof

Bill. ha ha. Agree Bill there's more than enough shit on here already. Mainly mine like but who's counting.

:-0)


Entered at Tue Mar 29 16:37:30 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Georgie

Empty and no doubt Fred.


Entered at Tue Mar 29 16:14:59 CEST 2011 from (212.46.139.59)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Grumpy stuff

Rto, where i live the beach is zoned into dog areas and dog free areas, but aggressive owners always insist on taking dogs into the 'no dogs' area to crap. When confronted they threaten to set the dog on you, then say the dog area is full of dog crap. Exactly. Dog crap is very dangerous to kids. Responsible dog owners, fine, but there are too many who are not. /n Smoking in cars. When i was a kid my grandad always smoked a pipe in the car and insisted the windows were closed because of draughts. A couple of days ago i was parked next to two women, mother and granny, putting a baby about three months old in a car. Granny was in her thirties. They then both lit cigarettes and drove off. Of course you should be free to smoke alone in the privacy of your car, but smoking in a car with kids should be illegal.

This reminds me that a famed uk holiday centre had to introduce rules for its popular Glamorous Grandmother contest after a 28 year old won it. Now you have to be 32 to enter (age of consent )


Entered at Tue Mar 29 16:09:35 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Norbert travels and Empty's little bird

Loved the video Norbert. beautiful scenes. Something so tranquil and reassuring about vine laden landscapes like those. Reminded me so much of the Vendee where we stayed many moons ago although that was flatter so not quite so picturesque.

Empty. what a player he was. I honestly believe he might well have been the first really modern style winger. Pure dribbler. georgie best, Charlie Cooke and jimmy Johnstone could almost be said to have modelled their dribbling styles on him. Very contemporary - a la current day - style. He'd fit in seamlessly today. Loved the way the commentator said he could bend the ball because his legs were bent. ha ha. as if his bent legs had anything to do with it.

I've put up another video of him which I keep in my favourites. There's quite a bit of repeat of yours but some amazing dummies in one bit.

I'll put up my fave Georgie Best one in a mo too. some of it has to be seen to be believed what georgie could do. My favourite ever player. And personally I belive the best ever. But it's all about opinion.


Entered at Tue Mar 29 16:09:02 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Al E: Be careful what you wish for. Take those canines out of their cars and where're they gonna go? That's right, HERE. Foul up the place, bark, snarl and whine - in other words act like humans. And just as difficult to identify and get rid of: as you know, on the internet nobody knows you're a dog.


Entered at Tue Mar 29 15:44:25 CEST 2011 from (90.239.121.251)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: BTW

"Consider yourself lucky to be a Linux user. Linux and other Unix-like operating systems are a blessing when you get used to them, unlike M$ systems that develop into a curse when you try to do more complicated things."

Webmaster saith that.


Entered at Tue Mar 29 15:43:00 CEST 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Puffin' billys

I have to say I do draw the line at dogs smoking in cars while drinking and driving. But then that's just me.

:-0)

Hi Frederico - yes I'm home. All ok with you and yours. I sincerely hope so mate.


Entered at Tue Mar 29 14:46:30 CEST 2011 from (86.135.59.193)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: PV/Dogs

As a smoker that has recognised the anti-social element of the activity and taken curtailment measures fairly - AND seen sense in it - I feel I am entitled to point the finger at others now.

It HAS to be dogs, doesn't it!

Firstly, bring back the dog license. This escalates in value depending on size and "ferocity" of breed and each successive license for additional dogs is double the price of the previous license. Thus - £100per annum for dog license, £300 a year for two dogs, £700 a year for three.

Next, means testing - spatial and financial. A council inspector evaluates recreational space (this excludes public areas AND communal parts of leasehold accomodation) available at the applicant's property and gives them a list of breeds deemed suitable. Thence to matters fiscal - any benefits? Well, if you can't pay your way unassisted you definitely can't have a dog because the taxpayer isn't going to buy you one.

Neighbours complain about the constant smell of dog dirt in your back yard? Three warnings already? Bingo! Bye bye doggie!

And guess who pays for the destruction of the animal by a council approved vet? Yep, you guessed right - the former owner!



Entered at Tue Mar 29 14:35:03 CEST 2011 from (90.239.103.248)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Old Testament/David P

Thanks DAVID P for your Sunday school lesson of Canaan. My professor in exegetic used to say: "Read Old Testament; it's all there". - Do you remember EMPTY NOW's post on Kung Fu Tse (Finnish ortography) and The Book Of Song(s)? Kung Fu Tse used to say: "Read The Book Of Song(s), it's all there."

"Read The Guestbook, it's all there." I saith that.


Entered at Tue Mar 29 13:43:34 CEST 2011 from (90.239.103.248)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries
Web: My link

Subject: Daniel Lanois

Daniel Lanois has recovered and will be visiting Pori Jazz in July. A few words about this in http://www.ilkka.fi/Article.jsp?article=573808 or click My link


Entered at Tue Mar 29 13:11:28 CEST 2011 from (76.66.125.149)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

"He also had heard Garth Hudson’s recent celebration of The Band’s music with mostly younger artists although Neil Young is also on it.

Robbie: “I was really impressed with a lot of the covers on that. I think Garth did a great job on it but I think that the artists themselves really stood up and knocked it out of the park. I’m very proud of the work that everybody did on that.”


Entered at Tue Mar 29 10:15:58 CEST 2011 from (86.167.243.246)

Posted by:

Simon

Peter - I've got that Technics deck; mine was slightly shop soiled so I got it for a decent price. It isn't being used at the moment (pending a move). I've also got the same NAD 3020i amp as Rob ... I'm very happy with what I got for £70 (this was about ten years ago). I've still got the same Technics cd player from about the same time. Someone once told me the biggest improvements in sound will always be made by buying new speakers.

There's a joke about club DJs - DJ One: "Do you fancy going to see a movie tonight?" DJ Two: "Depends. Who's the projectionist?"


Entered at Tue Mar 29 10:12:00 CEST 2011 from (41.97.153.212)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: Fred / Bill M / merengue

Fred: thanks for your always fresh receptiveness of the good things that show through the GB

Bill M : you make the real point on Nasruddin. Laughing is not the primary aim. On the other hand, I defend the principle, in arts and literature, that Universality is reached through Quality.

Thanks to the GB and wikipedia; I saw at last the link between merIngue as “a type of dessert made from whipped egg whites and sugar” and merEngue as “a type of music and dance from the Dominican Republic”
It seems that the movement on the dance floor reminds one of an egg beater in action. Easy explanation ; better than no explanation.

Related : in the link above, the very original version of Tequila by The Champs, with lyrics


Entered at Tue Mar 29 08:53:29 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Rob, I'd like to sign the petition for "Ban dog owners from exercising … i.e. letting them crap … anywhere but their own back yard."

When I wander the record fairs, I always speak to the guy with the soul selection (all clean, in new polythene bags) who has immaculate taste, and brings a decent system and plays all the right stuff (Doris Troy's Just One Look last Saturday stands out). He swears by the Technics DJ turntable, and says that for singles there is absolutely no competition. There are lots of secondhand ones around (so many people fancied themselves as DJs, so bought two), but I found tiny bits of insulation breaking down to be the main cause of death on old decks, and then there's motor wear. They're expensive (£450) for something carrying no audiophile aura, but every DJ has two. I had a Technics linear tracker (anyone remember those?) which sounded great. That started humming horribly as various bits of tiny insulating material broke down.


Entered at Tue Mar 29 06:48:54 CEST 2011 from (12.51.52.166)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Web: My link

Subject: Forever Humble

see the link

quiz: Which member of The Band is most likely to be quoted as such:

“I think pretty soon they’re going to be running out of awards to give me.”


Entered at Tue Mar 29 06:12:27 CEST 2011 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Merengue

Empty: nothing wrong with the music system of that Mercedes Benz.If I'm not mistaken that originally came with the car : )

Never thought I'd see a Jerry Cala' clip linked to in the GB : )


Entered at Tue Mar 29 02:24:46 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Hi Fi / Smoking

Peter, I wish you wouldn't put banging and Unthanks in the same sentence willy-nilly.

I was conned for a while - in a retro sense. I bought a Garrard 301 turntable and Leak (Stereo 20, Varislope preamp and Troughline tuner) valve (tube to our Stateside brethren) gear. Quite liked it, but saw how they'd soared in value. Paid about £350 for the lot ten years ago; sold the Garrard for £600 and the Leak gear for £675 last year.

My turntable is actually a Goldring not a Rega - Goldring name now used as one of the many that are slapped on thinly-veilled licensed Rega Mk 2 turntables (see also Project turntables) but I said Rega as it gives a better idea of what I use. Long term, my aim is pick up an old Swiss made Lenco direct drive deck and call it a day until something breaks down. Truth be told, I have ceased to care about sonic perfection and like the convenienece of the iPod, a few docks around the house, and no need to dig out LPs or CDs from shelves. Sad? True? Both, I'd say.

Actually, one interesting point is that direct drive turntables are quieter and smoother. One of the few upgrades genuinely worth making is apparently to buy a Technics 1210 (yep, the DJ deck) and slap a Rega arm on it.

As a smoker, I defend the decision to ban it in pubs and restaurants etc because it DOES improve them. Just because I smoke, I don't need to be immersed in everybody else's exhaust. But if they ban it in private cars I will have an issue. That's the day where I start the "If I can't even smoke in my own car now, I want to see dog owners banned from exercising their pets anywhere but in their own back gardens" movement.


Entered at Tue Mar 29 00:50:51 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: At the wheel

I suspect they'll ban smoking and driving soon. But I find the SatNav and in car iPod very dangerous. The family now scream at me whenever I decide to flick through the playlists from BAND to UNTHANKS while negotiating roundabouts in heavy traffic. Banging in a CD or cassette was safer.


Entered at Tue Mar 29 00:44:55 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Audiophile stuff

Hand up. I reckon I’m the most conned by hi-fi, then. Myrad (British made) separate pre- and power amp and CD player, 20 year old Mission speakers, Goldring deck. I had a NAD deck but it died after four years, as did a NAD cassette player, so not a make I like. I have a cheaper Sony budget deck for 45s – they sound better tracking heavier, and anyway, you don’t want to abrade a good stylus on worn discs, and you don’t know till you play them. I have got mid range PureSSG interconnect. I reckon the hugely expensive HDMI connectors they’re selling for DVD are a con … it’s digital. A 1 is a 1, a 0 is a 0. But analogue does benefit from, say, not using phone wire. 20 years ago I got conned by the fad for great thick interconnect. A friend helped me run it under the floorboards to the speakers, and I was very proud of the hidden installation. Then we moved house. I couldn’t get the wire out of the tubes … £60 a side too. I had to leave it there. The people buying the house had a little Sony system with bookshelf speakers.

I’ve got a 20 year old Quad 606 (pre-, power separates) in the office, with German small satellite speakers with a subwoofer. The speakers aren’t great. Come to think of it, I have better ones unused upstairs. Think I’ll move them. Increasingly due to being too lazy to walk two yards, I listen to stuff on my computer speakers … very early Apple powered ones of a shade of colour Apple haven't used for the last four computers I've had. I keep meaning to get up, but iTunes IS convenient.


Entered at Mon Mar 28 23:57:11 CEST 2011 from (193.35.132.46)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: David P

David, same as that! Not even separate pre and power amps for me - still got the classic NAD 3020i my Dad gave me for my 19th Birthday (I'm 36). That, a Rega turntable and some Wharfedale Diamonds does me fine.


Entered at Mon Mar 28 23:29:05 CEST 2011 from (76.67.17.101)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Thanks David P....great that Atlanta took some notice.
Deee....Here's a larger photo of Robbie. Wow....None of us in Toronto were on the ball with Robbie being at Indigo Bookstore but you!!! One of your best posts Deeee!
Kevin J...Aren't we all growing old on this site as well? ;-D


Entered at Mon Mar 28 23:16:36 CEST 2011 from (76.67.17.101)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

2011 Juno Awards. Robbie Robertson introduces "Love letter to Toronto" 40th anniversary vignette. Air Canada Centre, Toronto, Ontario.
Photo: CARAS.....and others at the Juno Awards last night.

Steve would have loved Neil Young's red scarf.

The Special program on "Drizzy" was excellent. He lives and breathes his art. I only have one rap CD.....Tupac Shakur double best of........brilliant rhymes with melodies. I don't think rap is crap or any genre of music. I really like some of Eminen's latest music as well.


Entered at Mon Mar 28 23:16:04 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The Joy Is In The Music

RTO: I currently use NAD preamp & amp separates in my system, along with other modest (more bang for the buck) equipment and inexpensive Radio Shack speaker cable.

I recall reading an article about the "loudness wars", where a mastering engineer complained that a music label executive had vetoed his mastering of a well-known band because it didn't sound good when played on his cell phone :-(

Saturday I bought a LP copy of "Stage Fright" at my local used record store for $5.00. It was an original Capitol green label copy mastered by Bob Ludwig (identified by Mr. Ludwig's initials "RL" etched in the run-out area). Even on my modest system, this version kills any CD version. Rick's bass in particular shines with its punch. I already have a couple of copies of this original pressing, but I couldn't pass on another in good condition at that price. Also picked up a Capitol 45 single of "Up On Cripple Creek" b/w "TNTDODD" in nice condiition for a dollar. For a lot less than the price of a new CD, I ended up with some great-sounding vinyl that only required a little cleaning with a Hunt record brush (an English import) before a spin on the turntable.


Entered at Mon Mar 28 22:48:12 CEST 2011 from (76.67.17.101)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Thank you Deeeee! I will try and make it to Indigo Bookstore tomorrow at 6:00 so that I can have my third photo taken with Robbie. The real photographer....imagezulu already made plans so maybe "Mr. Maximus" and his partner might come along too.
Last time....Jerry T from Toronto/Vancouver was behind me in line and I didn't know it was him right away...but we starting chatting and then....so funny when I discovered he posted on The Band site too. Anyway, I took a photo of him with Robbie as it was his Dad who owned the Concord Tavern in Toronto where he drank his pop in the afternoons as The Hawks blew away everyone....Lucky Jerry T!!!


Entered at Mon Mar 28 22:06:15 CEST 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Bill M: Just finished watching Pat 2 of the Yonge Street doc and you were right - it is indeed superb, towering above Part 1……….. To anyone interested…..BEG’s link is easy access and Part 2 is the one to see for Band fans………….turn it up as there is some great music in there….love that sound of Robbie’s tele……..that said – a bit worried about this sudden exposure to Rap…… Critics and Crabs? Maybe exposure to Rap does lead to sudden and terrifying rambunctiousness among the unprepared……..Just kidding but I have not seen any criticism……..has this been street stuff or in the TO press? Part 1 really was a bit underwhelming but taken as a whole – it was a very well done feature.


Entered at Mon Mar 28 21:55:37 CEST 2011 from (50.72.46.247)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: owsley

Link is to Robert Hunter's eulogical poem. _Bear's Choice_ was the only Dead LP I ever had -- but I only had it 'cause it was 99 cents in the cut-out bin. Good record.

The name, "Augustus Owsley Stanley," with or without the "III," always reminds me of "G. Alonzo Oeuf."


Entered at Mon Mar 28 21:44:50 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: PV / David P

David P: You also wonder what will be considered "audiophile quality" and attract a higher price when MP3 standard sound becomes the acceptable standard for purchased music, don't you? Yet another cash cow for the industry that requires little more than dusting off the CD remasters and trotting them out again for the MP3 generation.

It's not so much the posh edition releases that make me think "tosser!", more the £30,000 (with £5k of it being sodding cable) that people shell out for, not realising that you can't just throw money at something like that; that a decent room with £500 of NAD separates in it and speakers wired with 30A cooker mains cable (at 59p per yard in a hardware store) could sound better than a Gyrodec, Naim CD player and all the rest of the gubbins in a room stuffed full of domestic paraphernalia. And leave enough for a restored Austin Healey in change!!!!

Peter, this fags/Kit Kat/mobile phone/even swig from a water bottle ban has its place for drivers, but I'd like to see sat-navs come under the same rule. Pull over to reprogramme a route. And how anybody that happily drives around London for six months on a scooter with a clipboard obscuring their vision by 85% is considered a safe enough road user to ever be allowed to drive a sanctioned London taxi is, and has always been, beyond me.


Entered at Mon Mar 28 21:44:49 CEST 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: all roads lead to Yonge Street ...

Kevin J: Yes, it's always a good idea to buy a bunch of the same shirt. Once the significant other(s) learn that you buy multiples, they assume the best when you are in reality wear the same one day after day.

Empty N: Interesting that you bring Nasruddin to the GB as I'm currently plowing through the Nasuruddin chapter of one of Idris Shah's books on sufism. Although I find the Nasruddin stories cited so far mostly nothing more than what a lot of us would recognise as ethnic jokes (Newfie jokes, Irish jokes, etc.), and the rest are just marginally thought-provoking, I do get the point that Shah is driving at - that they prod the mind to think outside the box. And that has truly been helpful - revelatory in some ways even.

Yonge Street all over: Maybe because she saw something on the then-upcoming Juno program, hosted by Drake, the other half wondered on Saturday why we don't have any rap music. Since we were heading to a mall anyway, I selected a Kaos best-of CD, 'cause I knew I at least liked his "Crabbucket". Almost first lines are "Walking down Yonge Street on a Friday, can't follow them - gotta do it my way ... No time to get down 'cause I'm moving up, No time to get down 'cause I'm moving up, Shake off the crabs in the bucket". The crabs being animals that, I understand, will pull down any crab that seems likely to rise above the rest and escape the bucket. Just like some of the critics of the Yonge Street doc, who can't even start to do the job themselves so content themselves with criticising those who can.


Entered at Mon Mar 28 21:31:55 CEST 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Off subject

To digress, my husband was waiting at the counter in the drugstore the the day, and by the register was a CD called Squeeze The Singles. For a couple of bucks he brought it home to me. I like Squeeze, but I had Forgotten how clever their lyrics and rhymes were. Fun to listen to them again. Bare Naked Ladies have a bit of that "cleverness".

Peter V thanks for that quote from Mojo. I quite agree about Rick.


Entered at Mon Mar 28 20:43:38 CEST 2011 from (41.97.163.10)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: Fred

Thanks i'm glad you like the link

i wish you'll be also pleased with the above video, introducing "the loudest up-to-date car stereo" not necessarily worst taste in music, ;-)


Entered at Mon Mar 28 20:20:36 CEST 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Web: My link

Patrick, welcome.

I haven't heard the "Owsley" reference in a very long time. Coincidentally, Mr. Stanley (aka Bear) just left this orb two weeks ago. He was killed in an auto accident in Australia.


Entered at Mon Mar 28 19:57:36 CEST 2011 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

Mike & Kim Hayward

Web: My link

Subject: The Remedy.


Entered at Mon Mar 28 19:00:20 CEST 2011 from (76.200.191.165)

Posted by:

Patrick Monk.RN.

Location: San Francisco

I was living on the island of Ibiza back in '66 when "Big Pink" arrived in the saddle bags of a big old Harley Davidson along with a supply of Afghani sandal hash and Owsley. What a time - 'Nashville Skyline'; "Songs of Leonard Cohen"; "The White Album" - the list is long. There never was, or will be, a Band to compare, they are part of the soundtrack of my life of 66 years, and counting. I just discovered this amazing site. Deepest thanks.


Entered at Mon Mar 28 18:32:34 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Juno Awards

I'm glad to see that the Juno Awards received some coverage here in Atlanta. Check out photo #6 at link.


Entered at Mon Mar 28 17:45:56 CEST 2011 from (216.226.180.2)

Posted by:

Deb

Web: My link

BEG, here's a link from Robbie's Facebook page about an album signing tomorrow night in Toronto.


Entered at Mon Mar 28 17:04:17 CEST 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Excuse me BEG……a soft spot for me as I am one of those men that has a habit of buying more than one version of the same get-up….then finds myself explaining to some of the ladies in my life that this is the case!

I am enjoying some of these interviews with RR…………………Funny and annoying though that like clockwork….if one bothers to read the comments that follow ALL of these……it is a 100% guarantee that after the expected “great to have a member of The Band back and making music” type posts there will be 3 or 4 ‘Robertson screwed his fellow band mates” or “They all agreed to split the songwriting but the evil Robertson took all the credit himself”, etc., etc. An amazing thing that this has continued for this many years……… Fox News has come to rock n roll music reviewing – God help us!


Entered at Mon Mar 28 16:29:21 CEST 2011 from (206.47.33.101)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Hi Kevin J. I was just trying to be light in regards to Robbie's attire.

Juno's...Too many musicians for "The Shape I'm In" but overall....Great tribute to our country's most famous musicians. If you had seen The Band's tribute when Robbie received his Canadian Star of Fame....with Sarah Harmer and Derek Miller (also in Robbie's Doc and from Six Nations Reserve as well)....In my most humble opinion...I'm not a musician...I'm a huuuge music fan of many genres of music......better tribute and musicianship.


Entered at Mon Mar 28 16:14:51 CEST 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Audiophile

It's not just the frequency range that distinguishes a properly mastered recording, but also the dynamic range. Reproducing that spectrum, from soft to loud passages, is equally important. Therein lies the flaw with so many of today's recordings released by the standard music labels, where they focus on loudness. Aimed at the MP3/iPod generation, extreme levels of compression & limiting are applied, in order to make the recordings sound loud throughout, with no soft passages.


Entered at Mon Mar 28 16:12:41 CEST 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

BEG: A few points on last night…………… Please…..I am sure RR has more than one of that style a shirt…….that was 20,000 people with a 100ft or so divide between stage and front rows…….and I did not think he was nervous at all but very composed…….what was striking was how much older he appears…….this of course happens when you go away for 10—12 year periods at a time………..The tribute to Joni Mitchell, Gordon Lightfoot, Neil Young and The Band was fine until it got to The Band……….The intro was a nice little nod to Garth but a bit a big mess the rest of the way……..Oh how no one can compare the great voices the Band had……..unless Mary Margret O’Hara is around that is………..and finally…..is there a more insane/ridiculous character than that nutjob Ben Muldoon………


Entered at Mon Mar 28 14:14:49 CEST 2011 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Web: My link

Subject: Record labels

Amusing little timewaster of a site.


Entered at Mon Mar 28 13:37:45 CEST 2011 from (76.68.81.209)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Many thanks Bonk for providing the link to Yonge Street - Toronto Rock and Roll Stories so others can access what the Toronto Sound was all about.
I really enjoyed watching it again.....seeing John Finley at the end singing his heart out. Amazing that none of us knew that he was asked to join The Hawks and he said nope. Daniel Lanois....I met him at one of our Canadian Music Weeks in town and yeah.....He appears to be a very sensitive person.....very approachable. I saw him perform with Brian Blade (one of my favourite drummers for sure) at The El Mo and they just worked so well together. I had no idea that the building that recently burned down was where country and western music was showcased a lot at The Edison. He said everything changed after 1975 on Yonge Street....It sure did because that's when I arrived in the city and most of the clubs that were shown....were gone!

Thanks Adam2 for the latest Robbie interview. Tomorrow's the day, when some of us can buy Robbie's latest.

Last night's Juno's had Neil Young in tears. Everything's different as we age....He brought wisdom to the festivities. I was very disappointed that "Drizzy" didn't even get one Juno. I loved when Shania Twain spoke....The tribute by many musicians including The Sadies, Sarah Harmer and Jim Cuddy and others on Joni Mitchell, Neil Young, Gordon Lightfoot, Ian and Sylvia and The Band.....Beautiful! Robbie seemed really nervous when he spoke but it's always a treat to see him. Did anyone else notice that he wore the same shirt in The Toronto Stories as he did in the link I provided awhile ago where he was with his Freeze Sound Retainer? Good to know that's it's one of his favourite shirts. lol


Entered at Mon Mar 28 13:17:40 CEST 2011 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Peter V: you haven't lived until you've heard J-POP or K-POP blaring from the speakers of a 500cc Diahatsu. (pimped out with pulsating neon lights )

: (


Entered at Mon Mar 28 13:06:14 CEST 2011 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: The Little Bird

Empty Now: wonderful link.


Entered at Mon Mar 28 13:05:05 CEST 2011 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Adam2 : thanks for the link.


Entered at Mon Mar 28 13:03:36 CEST 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Web: My link

Subject: Review of Rod Stewart and Stevie Nicks Show in NYC

The link is to a review of the Rod Stewart and Stevie Nicks Show at Madison Square Garden.


Entered at Mon Mar 28 12:42:55 CEST 2011 from (41.97.163.10)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Subject: 2 short souk stories

on fast meadias
Once upon a time in the souk, a picpocket picks the portfolio from an old venerable man, took to his heels, the old man runs after him, at the first corner the thug removes his turban put on glasses, unfolds an old sheet of newspaper and sit down quietly pretending to read. The old man arrives panting, he asks "did you see somebody running through?" the thug replies stupidly "the one who stole your portfolio?, he left to this side" the old man notes wisely "ah, it's already in the newspapers"

on self-esteem
One night of strong seastorm, the boat of Nasreddin is washed away from the docks. The next morning he runs at the Qadi to complain that someone stole his boat. The Qadi who had seen with other witnesses the sea taking on the boat, tries to convince Nas that clearly there is no theft, and so must him admit stoically the loss of his boat. It's at this very moment that Nas became more confused than ever, shouting at the ears of the Qadi, "Impossible! how can the tempest drift a boat that it was me who docked it and tied the mooring ropes with my own hands ?!"


Entered at Mon Mar 28 11:45:12 CEST 2011 from (99.141.31.86)

Posted by:

Adam2

Web: My link

Here's the link to hear Robbie's new album. The complete album is streaming at NPR.


Entered at Mon Mar 28 11:21:21 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Bobby Charles

That would be the backstage feed camera, I guess. The stage positioning left a lot to be desired, even assuming there would be another angle from the main cameras. It's all a bit confused visually, even though it sounds great. Visuals are probably what got it dumped.


Entered at Mon Mar 28 10:30:09 CEST 2011 from (41.97.163.10)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: Garrincha

Or more exactely "They sent a man to space, they are unable to put a man on Garrincha's path to goal"
---------- ------------

Manoel Francisco dos Santos was born with a bent right leg, which was also six centimeters shorter than the left one. As a child he was of small tall for his age, so that his elder sister began to call him Garrincha, a local name for the troglodyte wren. The nickname translates literally "Little Bird". When he began as a youngster frequenting Football stadiums, doctors firmly advised him to quit the game as a chance to succeed corrective surgery. Now the world knows what his rare infirmity and abnormal physique turned out to be on the pitch, the secret weapon of an exceptional gift and unique style of playing.

Enjoy the linked video

The memorable day of 15 June 1958 at Göteborg, the goal keeper on the Soviet side was not less than the majestic Lev Yashin, admire also the save at 0:47. In Soccer game, somebody's greatness is measured by the value of the opponent.


Entered at Mon Mar 28 10:22:23 CEST 2011 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Web: My link

Subject: Down South In New Orleans

not sure if this has been posted as part of the recent discussion of DSINO.


Entered at Mon Mar 28 09:00:51 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Audophile 1960 … I wanted my 50p Al Hirt to scan the huge STEREO cover proclamations for something I’m doing . The sound thing isn’t open and shut. By the time you’re in your fifties, you’d be lucky to detect a 14,000 test tone, let alone 20,000 (babies can pick that one up). But experiments show that people who can’t detect anywhere near a 20,000 test tone still can detect which is a music disc with a higher range and that it “sounds better”. Otherwise we’d all be happy with cassette tape averaging 12,000 to 13,000. That’s why I was interested in the 25,000 … extremely expensive speakers and amp, there!

Similarly, I haven’t shelled out for blu-ray. We have a plasma screen on the short wall of a rectangular room and watch from the far end. If you move to the distance where a square room would be, the standard DVD picture’s grainy, but it’s not from where we watch. At a friend’s house, where the plasma is on the long wall of the rectangle, meaning they’re sitting much closer, blu-ray makes a major difference to quality. A TV engineer friend said we wouldn’t notice a lot .

One for the audiophiles, I set up my own 5.1 system. Something went wrong and the guy from the shop called. He said let me analyse the room and set it up for you. I was very dubious, but he improved the sound massively. He also said a rectangular room with the main sound on the short wall was the biggest hi-fi improvement you can make.

Cars … yes, you hear those souped-up cars with huge bass speakers pumping DUMPH! DUMPH! DUMPH! DUMPH! They then open the window to let everyone really hear it. I often think that if you can get arrested in the UK for using a cell phone at the wheel, or eating a sandwich at the wheel, the distraction level of dance / drums ‘n’ bass at that level must be much higher.

A MONDAY MORNING TALE

The actions at the wheel thing may be something the police are right about. Years ago, we were crossing the road in the town centre. A car was weaving up the road with an elderly woman driving with a poodle on her lap and a ciggie with a long column of ash in her mouth. She stopped at the junction two feet from us because of traffic. The column of ash fell on the dog and smoke came up from its fur. It went ballistic naturally, and she tried to put it out by hitting the fur. The car shot forward across the main road, and everyone managed to miss it before it landed gently in the hedge opposite. We all rushed over and she wasn’t hurt, and the dog had stopped smouldering, but it bit her hand quite nastily. I could see its point. Everything turned out fine, except for the front of the car, but when we got ten yards away afterwards we started crying with laughter.


Entered at Mon Mar 28 06:01:53 CEST 2011 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

RTO: I can relate to what you're saying. I'll add this: it seems to me that people with the loudest up-to-date car stereos have the worst taste in music, sadly playing it at high volume...11 on the dial : ).. for the rest of us to hear (endure).


Entered at Mon Mar 28 04:04:33 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Disclaimer

The previous post was a bit strong but there ARE elements of the truth about it. It just so happened that the subject cropped up here after spending an hour or two with a mate that's into all that. He has a tiny little cottage rammed with boxes of vinyl you have to step round, clamber over, limbo dance underneath....and STILL persists that the acoustics in his cluttered room do not negate all the effort and money he pumps into his hi-fi.

He likes Zappa and Beefheart though, I'll give him that. The other bit about Blue Nile & Jarre stems from my days working in an independent record shop in my teens and first-hand experience of having to order boxfuls of hi-fidelity soul-free dross that showed the hi fi off and - that's about it! To this day i am convinced many didn't even like the records they bought, and even more so that the hi-fi was all about displaying their fiscal standing and very little else.


Entered at Mon Mar 28 00:56:25 CEST 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: PV (Re: Audio Fidelity)

Well said. If ever there was a point that demonstrates the snake oil out there for audiophiles* it is the fact that - yes - there may well be differences in those expensive CDs (and Mobile Fidelity LPs, remember them?) but you won't hear anywhere near all of them because the sensitivity IS greater than the human ear can detect. 50p was a fair purchase though!

*[Robpedia 2011: AUDIOPHILE; pron: orrr-deigh-oh!-file; a body of people more interested in showing off their wealth via hi-fi components than they are in listening to music; movement started with the advent of the Linn Sondek turntable and maintained some ground thanks to Naim; exact science requires a room with nothing in it but two speakers and a listener; responsible for severe outbreaks of Jean Michelle Jarre, Blue Nile and ECM muzak pretending to be "jazz".]


Entered at Sun Mar 27 23:12:31 CEST 2011 from (24.108.12.129)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: ARI- YONGE STREET STORIES

ARI. Type in digitaljournal.com/article/304892 After the clip with Ronnie Hawkins, near the bottom of the page, clic on Yonge Street-Toronto Rock and Roll Stories. Enjoy! Like Bill M said there will be a longer and more complete version in the near future.


Entered at Sun Mar 27 23:07:54 CEST 2011 from (74.82.68.18)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Sunday School

Here is our lesson for today: By the time of The Brown Album, The Band's publishing company was Canaan Music. Canaan was the biblical name for the Promised Land of the Israelites, an area of ancient Palestine west of the Jordan River. In the Old Testament we learn of Moses leading the children of Israel out of Egypt. At one point they arrive in the Wilderness of Zin, a barren place without water. The people complained to Moses, forsaking him for leading them into a wilderness, where they and their flock would surely die. The Lord spoke to Moses and told him to gather the congregation with his brother Aaron before a rock. "Speak to the rock before their eyes, and it will yeild its water, thus you shall bring water for them out of the rock, and give drink to the congregation and their animals." At first Moses and the congregation doubted the Lord but, after striking the rock twice with the rod "the water came out abundantly.". This was the water of contention, and the Lord spoke to Moses and Aaron and said: "Because you did not believe Me, to hallow Me in the eyes of the children of Israel, therfore you shall not bring this assembly into the land which I have given them." (Quotations from the New King James Version of The Holy Bible).


Entered at Sun Mar 27 22:55:45 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Quote:

“(Rick Danko) was one of the greatest guys ever. He was just completely forward in every way. To get to know Rick took about 30 seconds. There was nothing kept secret, no hidden nothing. He just happened to be in a band that had a mysterious aura to it. Rick and Richard were incredibly open, whereas Garth, Levon and me weren’t. And it’s kind of ironic that these two beautiful souls didn’t come out of the tunnel. It just saddens you even more about it. But I don’t know. I was really lucky to hear vocal performances from Rick and Richard that are as moving as anything I’ve ever heard in my life.”

Robbie Robertson, Mojo, May 2011 issue.


Entered at Sun Mar 27 22:24:42 CEST 2011 from (67.158.165.136)

Posted by:

Lil

I know what you mean BEG. There are days when I can listen to Rick's voice and just smile, and other days that it really just tears at my heart.

Jeff Newsom: thinking of you and hoping you're doing well.

Marge: If you're still looking in, thinking of you as well...


Entered at Sun Mar 27 20:32:21 CEST 2011 from (67.6.42.89)

Posted by:

Jerry

Subject: Missed Opportunities

I was privleged to see Levon here a couple of years ago and thought it was the only time I'd ever seen a member of the Band past or present. But I'm thinking that long before I really knew who the Band were I may of been at a show that Levon and Rick were part of and didn't even know it...This may of happened in 88 or 89 but I'm not sure..The place was the Taste of Minnesota and I remember seeing among other bands that day Ringo and his All Stars..I was busy chacing my two sons ages three and five around the grounds of the state capitol that day to take much of it in.. I've wondered if Levon and Rick were at that one as the time frame seems to fit..Since I wasn't a fan and really new nothing about them I had no clue what I was missing..The hook for us that day might of been hearing Ringo do It Don't Come Easy...


Entered at Sun Mar 27 19:15:12 CEST 2011 from (216.165.58.52)

Posted by:

Ari

Is there anyway I could see the YONGE STREET film? I was excited last week and when I went to BRAVO I quickly realized it was only playing on BRAVO CANADA. I was upset.


Entered at Sun Mar 27 19:09:36 CEST 2011 from (41.97.238.58)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: Little-Bird's birth's infirmity was shown an exceptioal gift on the ground

Not a secret for the GBers that I like soccer's anthological quotes. At the light of recent threads I collected some I judge worth GB posting

"They sent a man to space, they are enable to put a man on Garrincha's line" TVGlobo commentator Luis Mendes, ¼final World Cup 1958, Brazil 2 – 0 USSR

"How can you play against someone [Roberto Carlos] who is everywhere on the left line ?" David Beckham, ½final World Cup 2002, Brazil 2 – 1 England

"Their defense and their cheese look the same" Johan Cruyff, overlooked qualification game Netherlands 5-0 Switzerland

"a country of 11 inhabitants and a surface of a football field can win a football World Cup", Empty Now, simple arithmetic following a complex debate in real life about great countries and small countries in soccer, whereas my naïve belief until then was that everything happens on the field

Related: read in the link the amazing story of the football team of Koh Panyee


Entered at Sun Mar 27 18:35:26 CEST 2011 from (76.67.18.8)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

REFORMED BAND / THE WEIGHT (This time Garth is on keyboards and not on accordian) (LIVE AT THE NEW ORLEANS JAZZ FESTIVAL 1994)

Carol and Lil....For some reason....Rick's voice is hitting me really hard today. His voice is absolutely heart breaking....Robbie always talked about his voice and I'm sure his huuuuge heart. I see more clearly now why both of you loved him so much. When I was at the first Rick Danko Tribute in Simcoe, Ontario (Both of you should have been there).....One of the restaurants had a sign outside promoting a shake called....."Forbidden Fruit".

Sorry, everyone.....posting waaaaaay too much today.....It's a good thing I stayed away from forbidden fruit with my addictive tendencies....

Peace Out.....


Entered at Sun Mar 27 18:16:16 CEST 2011 from (76.67.18.8)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Reformed Band with Ringo's All Stars....play "The Weight" from a show recorded at the Greek Theater in Los Angeles on December 3, 1989.


Entered at Sun Mar 27 17:14:40 CEST 2011 from (76.67.18.8)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Neil Young, Arcade Fire, Johnny Reid, Shad among Juno Award winners...so far.


Entered at Sun Mar 27 16:18:13 CEST 2011 from (72.71.214.103)

Posted by:

Mike & Kim Hayward

Web: My link

Levon Helm on "Folktography."


Entered at Sun Mar 27 15:42:19 CEST 2011 from (76.67.18.8)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Many thanks Ignatius for the heads up re Kick Starter Ollabelle's Album!!
I met them in New Jersey at a free concert....Thanks to Crabgrass again. I was dealing with grief at the time but Canadian Glenn Patscha was such a sweet heart. I also saw them in NYC along with Buddy Cage and many other musicians who did a tribute to Dylan's "Blood On The Tracks"....Many thanks to Crabgrass again who got us front row seats. Thanks to myself...We both got to meet Buddy Cage. The first time I saw Buddy was at The Bottom Line performing with Garth Hudson and others for a Tribute to The Band. My Greenwich Village friend forgot we had made plans to go to this show, so I ended up going on my own. I remember thinking....Louuuuu was on this stage too....I had the VHS.....Another time saw Garland Jeffreys here for the first time. And....I've seen Ollabelle at Toronto's Horseshoe Tavern. On the same night.....Rollie's buddy.....Tony Furtado performed. I also think of Jeff a lot....'cause we were such good buddies on this site and off site.

I forgot to mention that Drake will be hosting The Canadian Junos tonight.

In August Serenity....Kitchener's Bluezzzz Fest again. imagezulu and I are planning to see Johnny and Edgar Winter and Betty Lavette....Maybe Bob Margolin too. Freeeeee! Sad to share here....Pinetop Perkins was to have been at this show also......


Entered at Sun Mar 27 15:07:28 CEST 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Thinking of you, Jeff Newsom.


Entered at Sun Mar 27 15:04:22 CEST 2011 from (76.67.18.8)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Canadian Juno Awards tonight @ 8:00 with Robbie being one of the presenters.
I hope he reminds everyone of another famous person from Stratford, Ontario besides Justin Bieber ...Richard Manuel.
I was really disappointed this year when I had a student from Stratford for a few weeks in my drama/dance, vocal music and gym classes and he never heard of Richard! His father was working at our Children's Theatre so I assumed when you're in the arts at least.....
Anyway, my poster of The Band is in the classroom and I showed him who came from his small town....I didn't get a chance to show him Richard of The Band performing on film as I thought he was going to be with us for a longer period of time.... :-(
There are also posters of Robbie, Dylan, Garland Jeffreys (signed thanks to Crabgrass) and Bob Marley as well.

Some huuuuge highlights of "Yonge Street - The Toronto Stories":
I got to witness The Hawks live!!!!
Also, Levon and Rick share some experiences. Watching Rick driving a car while being interviewed was an experience....It brought back flashbacks of Rick's life.
Garth was shown but no interview footage....Again....Why didn't Robbie at least ask Garth to add his magic to Robbie's CD? You can always ask, right? BTW, I have on VHS a special with Garth Hudson when he was interviewed on TVO. His famous line from this show...."Dylan took us from the bars to the stars."
I was at The Bluenote in Toronto but it was the same year I saw Rick and Levon so.....Hmmmm...not sure who was performing that night.
Of course, another highlight was seeing all these Canadian bands that Bill M loves.....especially John and Leeeee and The Checkmates......and with Michael Fonfara (thanks to Bill M I met him in Port Credit when he performed with Richard Bell, Danny Weiss and Brooks) Bill M!! I will have to have their music in my collection...so good......so good.....
Last but not least.....Watching Jan Haust (archivist and executive producer) narrate the three night series in a Bentley? I emailed him but no response as to how we can all get our hands on this great series on our TORONTO SOUNDS!

Toronto's "Drake: Better Than Good Enough" @ 5:00 today on same channel....CTV


Entered at Sun Mar 27 13:35:04 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Audiophile stuff

One for David P. I picked up a 50p LP in near mint condition yesterday, a US import on Audio Fidelity of Al Hirt. I was interested because it has a lot of stuff about Audio Fidelity producing the first stereo disc (1957). This one's 1960, but the cover notes say it should be played on equipment that has "an extreme range of fidelity" and it suggests from 16 to 25,000. That is interesting … wider than the base Compact Disc specification (and the human ear … but that's a whole other argument).


Entered at Sun Mar 27 12:53:54 CEST 2011 from (99.141.31.86)

Posted by:

Adam2

Web: My link

And here's a link to a new radio interview with Robbie about the album.


Entered at Sun Mar 27 12:51:05 CEST 2011 from (99.141.31.86)

Posted by:

Adam2

And by "Storyville vibe", I mean it seems like Robbie has a high level of quality and an artistic vision for Clairvoyant like he did with Storyville. Clairvoyant seems like it will be a really solid, well-produced 'rock' album. I'm not a fan of Eric Clapton, but his involvement in this seems to have been a positive thing. It's good Robbie had him as a collaborator, and the more conventional 'rock' sound (while very different from the rootsy sounds of Levon's work) seems like a good sound for Robbie.


Entered at Sun Mar 27 12:35:22 CEST 2011 from (99.141.31.86)

Posted by:

Adam2

Thanks for reporting Peter V. I am very excited for Robbie's new album. Which is strange, because I used to dismiss his solo work completely. In the past 6 months I've gotten more interested in his solo work, and I now find that his albums have much to offer. "Robbie Robertson" I consider a 'burn it' album - some of the '80s production and especially the guests artists don't interest me, but it has some good work on it. Between Trains should have been on there. "Storyville" I think deserves it's reputation as his best solo work. "Native Americans" and "Redboy" are both interesting, but a compilation of the best material from those two is much more satisfying to me.

I really get a "Storyville" vibe, in terms of quality and artistic vision, from Robbie's upcoming album. Straight Down The Line, When The Night Was Young, He Don't Live Here No More, and the title track, are all great. Like I said, I used to hate Robbie's solo career. I keep thinking of that No Depression reviewer who trashed Robbie's new album. In the past I would have believed him, but listening to the tracks I've heard, I have to say he's just childish and wrong to call it "the worst album ever made by a professional" or whatever he called it. How ridiculous is that. But it really is open to each individual's opinion I guess. I know some hated When The Night Was Young, which I think is a beautiful song.


Entered at Sun Mar 27 12:15:10 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Robbie / John Till interviews

There's a long Robbie interview by Joel Selvin in the latest "Mojo" (Issue 210, May 2011, Ramones cover). I've stopped buying Mojo automatically, and picked it up for the covermount disc, The Roots of The Ramones, because it contains Ronnie Spector's She Talks To Rainbows, which I've been looking for. The disc obscured Robbie's name on the cover.

It's a good interview with some new stuff. Selvin is a bit of a creep to insert the TLW microphone story in his introduction, as well as to add a "Levon" parentheses after mentioning Robbie writing the key Band songs. It's not a "great" interview. If you will ask Robbie what it was like on the 1966 tour, you will get the same story. Why does every interviewer do that? The microphone story irritates me because you can hear it's untrue at least at several points, and it stems from Levon making a humorous point, not a statement of 100% fact. You can hear him saying it. Editorializing unpleasantly in an intro is not fair interviewing.

But it's "good." He choose three seminal albums, and they're Live 1966, The Band … and The Shutter Island soundtrack compilation. As he says, Robbie is also a great music curator with his soundtracks. I put "This Bitter Earth" from Shutter Island as my #1 track from last year, a brilliant job of mixing together music recorded fifty years apart in totally different genres into a seamless whole.

Robbie has some very moving words on Rick and Richard, which is followed by a one page John Till piece on Richard.

The review in the back of the mag gives the new album three stars, as does the review in this month's Uncut. I'll wait and see. I unusually haven't ordered an import copy but have ordered the deluxe edition from amazon.co.uk, so will have to wait two weeks.


Entered at Sun Mar 27 10:03:54 CEST 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: In A While Crocodile

We once discussed Bobby Charles failure to sing his best-known song at TLW. There were some odd choices. If Joni had had any sense, she would have done one new one … Coyote … and then done Big Yellow Taxi or Chelsea Morning. It's what you do on these all-star jostles for attention. Bob should have finished with Like A Rolling Stone (with Mickey Jones on second drums). Neil Young knew the score, going back to CSNY for Helpless, as did Van with Caravan.

Given Bobby Charles long list, the screamingly obvious one to do was Small Town Talk with Rick Danko. It's slow and gentle, so low-key for the event though. I always felt Down South in New Orleans was fine, but a bit samey. Lots of songs like it. See You Later Alligator was a risky one, forgetting the royalty issue. Wider exposure was more important. But it's very hard to do See You Later Alligator without turning into Sha Na Na, Darts or one of the many oldies bands in red drape jackets at the time.That early rock & roll was not the Hawks thing. The only thing they did vaguely in that style as The Band was (I Don't Want To) Hang Up My Rock & Roll Shoes. That worked though.


Entered at Sun Mar 27 06:37:27 CEST 2011 from (99.235.255.183)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: JUNOS

Wonderful links and posts, my friends.

NORBERT: The trip made me feel like I was there.

Juno winners so far:

..TORONTO - Some of the key winners at Saturday's Juno Awards gala dinner, during which 32 of 40 awards were handed out prior to Sunday's television broadcast:

Adult Alternative Album of the Year: Neil Young, "Le Noise"

Alternative Album of the Year: Arcade Fire, "The Suburbs"

Rock Album of the Year: Matthew Good, "Vancouver"

Vocal Jazz Album of the Year: Kellylee Evans, "Nina"

Francophone Album of the Year: Karkwa, "Les chemins de verre"

Rap Recording of the Year: Shad, "TSOL"

Dance Recording of the Year: Deadmau5, "Sofi Needs a Ladder"

R&B/Soul Recording of the Year: Quanteisha, "Stars"

Blues Album of the Year: Jim Byrnes, "Everywhere West"

Jack Richardson Producer of the Year: Daniel Lanois

Electronic Album of the Year: Caribou, "Swim"

International Album of the Year: Katy Perry, "Teenage Dream" ...

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE



Entered at Sun Mar 27 05:47:47 CEST 2011 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

Shipyards by Interview. New Wave matures.


Entered at Sun Mar 27 01:25:05 CET 2011 from (70.58.143.74)

Posted by:

ladiesfree

Location: iowa
Web: My link

Subject: all invited

All invited and ladies are free for life


Entered at Sun Mar 27 01:05:54 CET 2011 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Location: East Coast
Web: My link

Subject: Boogie 4 Stu

Link is to a 'Stones' cover of 'Watching the River Flow' from an Ian Stewart tribute album. Quite fetching actually. I've avoided Stones albums for several decades but this one sounds interesting. It's not really a Stones album but they all play on it, Wyman too.


Entered at Sun Mar 27 01:04:25 CET 2011 from (99.141.31.86)

Posted by:

Adam2

Braeden C - Down South In New Orleans was originally by 1940s/50s country duo Johnnie & Jack. They also did Cryin' Heart Blues (covered by Rick), Ashes Of Love (covered by Levon), and Poison Love (covered by Doug Sahm). Down South In New Orleans appeared on Hungry Chuck's 1972 Bearsville album, which featured Ben Keith on dobro and vocals (as well as Amos Garrett, Jim Colegrove, and N.D. Smart). Bobby Charles' version from The Last Waltz follows Hungry Chuck's cover pretty closely, but with lyrics supposedly co-written by Bobby and Robbie Robertson. Bobby Charles was going through a dispute with his publisher and declined to sing See You Later Alligator, as he would get no royalties for the song being included. Bobby singing Down South In New Orleans turned out much better anyway, and it is criminal that it wasn't in the film or outtakes (supposedly for not being filmed in the first place).


Entered at Sat Mar 26 22:44:34 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Norbert

Thank you for the Bike tour.I could watch that all day. Beautiful!


Entered at Sat Mar 26 22:38:49 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Al, look out for "Blackbird" (From "The Bairns" by Rachel Unthank). Well, just look out for anything by The Unthanks. They're not playing Liverpool on this tour … Manchester is the nearest, but that's not far. The tour is unmissable.


Entered at Sat Mar 26 22:23:43 CET 2011 from (70.78.224.3)

Posted by:

Northern Boy

Location: just beyond Hope, B.C.

Subject: Yikes ! What's Next ?

First the return of the prodig(Al) Edge, and then Larry LeBlanc looking in on us. Now I'm just waitin' for the second comin' of Bumbles, (uh where have you gone ?) NB.


Entered at Sat Mar 26 21:42:02 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Web: My link

Jeffo, Stills was a close friend of another name that comes up pretty often here.


Entered at Sat Mar 26 21:20:47 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Subject: Gene Clark

Al, that bassist was likely Duke Bardwell who did a lengthy stint with Elvis' band during the 70's.

And the inevitable Band connection.....Silverado '75 opens with Gene Clark's rendition of "Long Black Veil".


Entered at Sat Mar 26 20:54:36 CET 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Al, i'm sure you'll welcome the info that Gene & Rick were good buddies before 69 , shared an apartment in NYC.Early times, I believe when The Hawks first arrived. Rick used to talk about it.

So many of these guys were friends,dating back to the early 60s, early mid 60s, or mid 60s, back in the Greenwich Village music scene. Stills'& Furay's friendship began in NY, in The Au Go Go Singers. Gram Parsons was running around too. Furay & Gram were friends, Gram taught him Brass Buttons, which made The Crazy Eyes record, and Furay wrote Crazy Eyes about Gram.i think he may have begun writng it way back then.

BTW Scouser, multiple short posts do not equal one glorious dissertation.


Entered at Sat Mar 26 20:47:16 CET 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: USA

NORBERT- Thank you for that short vacation in Europe. With all the bad news coming at us from every direction, that was a refreshing trip.


Entered at Sat Mar 26 20:32:21 CET 2011 from (173.183.162.116)

Posted by:

Braeden C.

Subject: Down South in New Orleans

Hello all, does anyone have any background info on "Down South in New Orleans"? The only version I know of is The Band's with Bobby Charles though it says the song was written by someone else. I'm really curious, it's a really catchy song!

Thanks

Braeden


Entered at Sat Mar 26 19:29:49 CET 2011 from (91.42.239.18)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Empty now thanks great job!

Al, I was hoping someone would ask what it’s about, glad it’s you.

Like Jack Kerouac Daniël takes us On The (Dutch) Road.

Me and my Els like to bike too, just click the link, pop up the back, and enjoy the ride....


Entered at Sat Mar 26 18:38:13 CET 2011 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

Al E, glad to help. I listen to the Rascals all the time. btw, there was quite a rhubarb when I pointed out similarities between the Hawks and the Rascals here oh so many years ago. Earned quite a bit of enmity from one particular regular who included in his critique that I was quite a mouthy woman and an American to boot. Probably still there in the archives somewhere.


Entered at Sat Mar 26 18:34:10 CET 2011 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

I just recalled that Ollabelle did Elijah Rock on their first cd.


Entered at Sat Mar 26 18:16:18 CET 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Decemberists v Junists

Forgot to say Pete - I really love that June's Hymn track. I'm a sucker for any song about song thrushes and jenny wrens. I agree about their latest album being their finest to date.

I guess too I'm a bit of a twitcher. I once hitch-hiked 250 miles just to see some bird.... I ended up marrying her.

;-0)


Entered at Sat Mar 26 18:04:27 CET 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Norbert's song

Ah - sorry Empty. Didn't realise that's what you'd done. thought it was something else but I see the words Wonderful day now and it starts to make some sense. I'll ponder a while on that now.

Ta

:-0)


Entered at Sat Mar 26 17:31:16 CET 2011 from (41.97.233.238)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Subject: Al

Thanks; actually many will appreciate the video

see my last post , it is an attempt translation of the song linked by Norbert; i wish Norbert homologate it, or perfect it ...for the good pleasure of all the GBers


Entered at Sat Mar 26 17:10:23 CET 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Joe and Gene

I love Gene. I think he has to be one of the most underrated major talents from any era. White Light is terrific as you already know joe.

Two others I'd recommend if you aren't familiar.

First his live album at Silverado. It was recorded for a radio show and the quality is good. More to the point gene's voice is in really good nick with it's beautiful haunting quiver and his harp/acoustic playing is top notch. He's backed by Roger white on lead who i think is great and a fine bassist whose name escapes me. Every track is superb, mostly his own and he pulls them from every stage of his career up to then.

The other one I'd recommend is Gypsy Angel purely for 3 tracks - Kathleen, Your Fire Burning and Gypsy Rider - which I feel are just so wonderful that I'd say they're essential to anybody who rates gene highly. The downside on the album is that poor Gene's voice is not at its best due i think to his operations and teeth problems. But for the three tracks in question the voice holds up fine and doesn't detract from the exquisite beauty of the songs.


Entered at Sat Mar 26 16:21:47 CET 2011 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: Moses' Rock

Thanks Pat, Al & Empty. I had an idea that the lyric might have originated in a spiritual or folk song. Continuing the Gene Clark thread, 'White Light' arrived in my mailbox yesterday. I must have a dozen unplayed CDs. I rarely get a chance to listen to music these days until late in the evening when I'm tired and at such times I usually go for comfort music i.e. old favourites.. 'White Light' was a favourite years ago but it's been a long long time since I've heard it.

Thinking of you Jeff Newsom.


Entered at Sat Mar 26 15:32:27 CET 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Empty Now - Kop a load of this

Empty I think you'll love this. Not sure if you've seen it before but I was actually in that crowd that afternoon.


Entered at Sat Mar 26 15:25:50 CET 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Daniel Lohues Prachtig mooie dag

Agree with Empty. Loved the video. It's fantastic. Loved the stork and his nest on top of the post. Ha ha. Also love the crispness and freshness of the song. Any chance of lyrics translation Norbert? Is that sort of music big in Holland? Is that why The Gourds love it over there?


Entered at Sat Mar 26 15:01:55 CET 2011 from (41.97.233.238)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: Thanks Norbert, Great video, the call of the season

The wrong at last was already right
The coffee and bread goes as it should
I was thinking tonight that it may be again
In my wonderful nice day

Not only the weather, the blues and the rest
I like anything outside today, things I usually dislike
It's a long time ago that I lived, so beautiful shiny sights
In my wonderful nice day

No No No No There is no man overboard
I am today dispensed of the cross words
No No No No mud and no mowing field
I sweat over it, that's all what counts today

With wings of wax, I fly into the Sun
I am sure that ?, because I want again
With my cup of sunlight, near the woman waiting for me
In my wonderful nice day
In my wonderful nice day
In my wonderful nice day

-------------------- ------------------ ------------------------
[link above out-of-GB concerns, I need it to keep close contact with the real thing]


Entered at Sat Mar 26 14:57:38 CET 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Holy Moses

Joe, Pat as ever has likely called it right.

Hi Pat ;-0) and while I'm at it a big belated ta muchly for the Rascals/Felix recommendations some years back too. Given me many hours of pleasure listening to them and particularly the amazing vocal quality of felix.

As for whether Robbie/Rick lifted it off Gene, it's doubtful if it was off the records as both came out around the same time in late '69. Also Rick's is just a bit of a throwaway at the end whilst gene based his whole song around the image. Then again since Rick later became huge buddies with Gene I suppose it's not out of the question they were already buddies and there was some cross fertilisation.

It's weird how When You awake is dismissed as a lightweight track by so many critics who rush to champion the obvious heavyweight tracks on The Band. I remember one even stating the track is salvaged only by the marvelous vocals of Richard Manuel. Which goes to show just how fuckin worthless the views of some of these knobheads can be. For me 'Awake' is every bit as vital to the entity as any of the the other tracks. no more no less. And that sum of the parts strength is what makes the album so incredible.

For the record very few people know that there's actually two further long concealed lines after '...and if I thought it'd do any god I'd stand on the rock where Moses stood'

It's...

"And I'd preach to the people of the Promised Land.."

"Stretched out down across the desert sand oh ohh"

Or at least they were the two extra lines in our house years ago - and still are come to think of it - when I used to sing it to the kids at bedtime. Then it was straight into Rockin Chair, Long Black Veil and All La Glory

Happy days...sigh

:-0)


Entered at Sat Mar 26 14:18:08 CET 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Subject: A Solution to ticket buying

One solution to ticket buying is to sign up on an artists website (usually to a small fee) and this allows you presale buying opportunities to shows. The window can be up to two weeks prior to sales to the general public. It's one way of getting around that maddening act of trying to call for tickets. I don't call anymore anyway - I just use the internet to purchase all my tickets these days.


Entered at Sat Mar 26 11:21:22 CET 2011 from (91.42.239.18)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: yesterday, today and tomorrow all in the same room and anything can happen

I'm not into rely but that's a great line "I could, I surely would, Stand on the Rock Where Moses Stood", thanks Joe & Pat.

Here's another great line from a songrwiter about his song.

"What's different about it is that there's a code in the lyrics, and there's also no sense of time. There's no respect for it. You've got yesterday, today and tomorrow all in the same room, and there's very little you can't imagine not happening"

The link is a Dutch song, somewhat related (from a distance).


Entered at Sat Mar 26 04:48:36 CET 2011 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

About 1:30 in.


Entered at Sat Mar 26 03:27:04 CET 2011 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

That Moses line goes way back. Mary Don't You Weep and Elijah Rock are traditional spirituals that have that line in it. I assume the 60's folks got it through the Carter Family.


Entered at Sat Mar 26 02:31:00 CET 2011 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: Rock Where Moses Stood

I was playing the second Dillard & Clark album when the words sorta jumped out at me. From the song 'I Bowed My Head and Cried Holy' credited to Clark: "If I could, I surely would, Stand on the rock where Moses stood"

So did Clark's song, released 1969, provide the inspiration for both 'El Condor Pasa' and 'When You Awake' or have I got the timeline fucked up?


Entered at Sat Mar 26 02:04:17 CET 2011 from (174.114.236.169)

Posted by:

Larry LeBlanc

Location: Toronto

Subject: Archivists

A lot of folks out there collecting archival material and preserving our musical history. Also people kind hoarding musical treasures of the past. Drives me crazy when people hold onto archival stuff that maybe they got from another source and haven't returned.


Entered at Fri Mar 25 22:11:38 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Birds' names

For Al, Roger, Simon and RTO, I don't mean Sharon and Tracy.

Check out The Decemberists' June Hymn. The song is laden with birds. I suspect they're Twitchers.


Entered at Fri Mar 25 21:49:39 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Birds of a Feather

Glenn Frey also reportedly liked the sports team connection with the Eagles name. Mr. Frey would later portray the general manager for a football team of a different feather, the Arizona Cardinals, in the film "Jerry Maguire". No doubt he was well acquainted with the concept of "show me the money". And as the song says, "the eagle flies on Friday", adding the connotation associated with legal tender.


Entered at Fri Mar 25 21:19:29 CET 2011 from (74.198.87.69)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Just thinking.......If Landmark and Julie returned...........the GB house would almost be full and we could really blow the roof off.........a good time of sustained music discussion at the old GB............Brown album territory....

Acadian Driftwood: Levon did a good bit with this song in a Murray McClauglin tv special ( late 80's ? ) I recall a canoe and period dress-up.......The special also featured the very lovely Buffy St. Marie.....had it on tape at one time but that was a many apartments and few homes ago........Can't lose useless textbooks for some reason but manage to progressively lose everything else.

"He Don't Live Here No More" Starting to warm to this.........Not sure I can ever remember hearing such an unexpected/dignified guitar break in a song of this type - really a pretty standard rock song......Glad that the "radio edit" left it in because it saves the song...................I guess this will be a comfortable song to do live for RR as well which I think might have been part of the calculation............along with rock radio in North America ( at least ) eating up tales of past drug abuse..............


Entered at Fri Mar 25 20:59:05 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

RtO: Maybe you were thinking of another Procol Harum song, but now you've got me picturing Gary Brooker's old man carrying around a whiter shade of pail.


Entered at Fri Mar 25 20:26:51 CET 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Bill - loved the My Old Man's A Dustman confusion with Pretzel Logic. I shouldn't smile too smugly though as a certain hit by Procol Harum fits it exactly too, as I heard Barrie Cryer once demonstrate on Radio 4's I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue which would most weeks feature the round entitled "one song to the tune of another"

The Eagles, one story tells, was chosen because three of the band liked the analogy of their music soaring majestically on high. The fourth (I believe Glenn Frey) simply thought the badge would look cool on his jacket. Thank god he only got a 25% share in the vote because they might have been called the Waffen-SS on that basis....


Entered at Fri Mar 25 18:59:21 CET 2011 from (70.77.200.21)

Posted by:

kristie

Subject: Loreena Mckinnitt

I am writing a paper on "The Lady of Shallot," and heard that Loreena Mckinnitt sings a version. I listened to it, and even being more of a rock 'n roll kind of girl, nevertheless, found it to be a very beautiful song. I ended up listening to the whole album. It lulled me to sleep and I only finished writing my thesis statement, but hell, that is the most important part anyway.

Are there connections between her and The Band? I can really hear her singing "Acadian Driftwood" in her strange, warbly soprano.


Entered at Fri Mar 25 17:50:48 CET 2011 from (41.97.147.205)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: the tickets century

Sadavid, Thanks for the link, i like the paragraph "the ticket economy is an essential contradiction"

our scalpers use true knives, link above



Entered at Fri Mar 25 17:46:56 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Chairman of the Board

Irving Azoff, the Eagles manager, rose first to become CEO of Ticketmaster and is now chairman of the board of Live Nation Entertainment, which recently purchased the remaining shares of Front Line Management, founded by Mr. Azoff.


Entered at Fri Mar 25 17:07:49 CET 2011 from (68.164.3.187)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

Note Garth covering both piano and the usual Garthistics.


Entered at Fri Mar 25 16:39:50 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Thanks sadavid. I honestly had no idea that Becker and Fagan toured with Little River Band. The things you learn here!


Entered at Fri Mar 25 16:16:21 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: logical song

Bill M: try this with your mid-morning latte . . . .


Entered at Fri Mar 25 16:09:31 CET 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Just like Vegas used to be a grand place when run by the gangsters and was ruined by the businessmen……….getting to big shows was ok when dealing with the old fashioned scalpers but the new breed of ticket entrepreneurs have ruined it all…………….funny thing happened driving in TO this morning…….twice in 5 minutes I saw cars with custom license plates for Jimmy Buffet………..both were very top end autos………………made me think of the great Don Henley line of seeing a Deadhead sticker on a Cadillac


Entered at Fri Mar 25 15:56:51 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

JTF: I've never been able to listen to Steely Dan beyond the wonderful "Can't Buy a Thrill". I guess it's because I therefore don't know how "Pretzel Logic" goes that causes me to think of "My Old Man's A Dustman" when I run that opening line through my head: "I'd love to tour the Southland in a traveling minstrel show". Dee dee dee dee da dit dee, dee dee dee dee dee dee. Maybe something the very young Robbie wouldn't written before he went to the south with Hawkins and Levon. And who can forget, "I was born in the wagon of a travelin' show ..."?


Entered at Fri Mar 25 14:45:16 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Like An Eagle Sues Its Prey

Jeff: I do know that the Henley, Frey et al. do own the registered trademark and service mark "Eagles". This came to light several years ago when their partnerships Eagles, Ltd. and Eagles Recording Co. filed a trademark infringement suit against American Eagle Foundation, a non-profit organization dedicated to protecting American bald eagles. The lawsuit was dismissed, not on its merits, but due to plaintiffs inability to go to trial on schedule.


Entered at Fri Mar 25 14:16:14 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: the tix sell out

Peter V: it's not just block selling, it's also block buying -- your little fingers are up against the 'bots.

Why do they call them "scalpers"?


Entered at Fri Mar 25 14:10:57 CET 2011 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

Mike & Kim Hayward

Web: My link

Subject: Midnight Ramble in Levon's words.

"The scene of crime."


Entered at Fri Mar 25 10:12:07 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Box offices

At 8.59 I started dialling for my 9 o'clock attempt to buy Paul Simon tickets. I got through to a recorded message saying "Not open until 9 a.m.' which went on each call up to 9.02. Each call was a premium rate line. At 9.02 it was "Our queue limit has been exceeded". We were trying simultaneously on the computer and got through there at 9.03, at which time the best available seat was Row J to the side, and the little dial showing seats available was at 50%. Still I got one, but pissed off as ever. You know they're block sold to agencies who will re-sell at a profit. This is why Eagles go out at the re-sell price, not the original.


Entered at Fri Mar 25 09:15:42 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: A rose by any other name …

“Eagles” reasoning sounds sound, Jeff. There’s no copyright in title with books (except in Mexico) so I assume it extends to record albums. Anyone could release a “Music From Big Pink “ tomorrow as long as they weren’t passing it off by having a similar cover and artist name. Artists have often run into issues. I mentioned a “The Eagles” from Bristol who charted in the UK in the early 60s. I reckon it’s a pretty obvious name. The Orioles, The Hawks, The Byrds, The Falcons, The Robins. I don’t think there was ever ‘The Vultures’ but it could have been composed of rock managers. Just taken on its own, ‘The Eagles’ is the best of the lot, more so if you’re thinking Americana. It must have occurred to a few garage bands without much imagination.

The British band ‘The Birds’ which featured Ronnie Wood suffered when The Byrds hit big just as The Birds were taking off. The Birds were going first, but were swamped by the success of Mr Tambourine Man. The Byrds allegedly took their odd spelling because of The Beatles.

Then there’s Cliff Richard and The Drifters who had to change their name to Cliff Richard and The Shadows (or sometimes 'His Shadows'). They either hadn’t heard of the US band, or thought it too far away. It’s what Wiki calls “disambiguation” rather than legality, I think.


Entered at Fri Mar 25 06:54:56 CET 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: recent relativity

I've always referred to Eagles as The Eagles. Makes sense, no? Pat pointing out that they are simply called Eagles, and then yesterday, noticing a Eagles CD in a schlock store showcase, with "Eagles" centered made me wonder if their egos were that huge even back at the time of the first record, that centering their name was more important than making grammatical sense was to them. Looking back tonight, a conversation I had with a intellectual property attorney today pertaining to business of my own makes sense out of this. I'm strictly speculating but it makes sense that whether or not they went to trademark or register the name, there was either a existing conflict with someone using the name The Eagles somewhere, or an attorney advised them or tehir label to the potentiality of a conflict with someone using the name The Eagles somewhere.Using plain old "Eagles" would remove the likelihood of someone claiming conflict. For example,. they might have gotten away with using The Eagles in 46 states, but if some band had been using The Eagles in any state, they could be prevented or challenged from using The Eagles in that or those states.I'm thinking using Eagles was legally safe. Using The Eagles not safe.


Entered at Fri Mar 25 06:06:15 CET 2011 from (99.141.31.86)

Posted by:

Adam2

Pat - Thanks a lot, I'll be contacting you in a day or two.

Al Edge - right on the money! I love The Band so much, so to me anything they did has value and is usually pretty incredible.


Entered at Fri Mar 25 00:52:29 CET 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Tim & BEG / David P

Guys, be thankful that you at least got Jefferson Airplane. Over here in the Uk you'd have got the sodding Third Ear Band.

David: a fair point about the new studio making the "kitchen sink" element of NLSC, and Garth's new synths. We come back to the point that PV made about studio vs live arrangements generally having more breathing space. I'm not sure NLSC fits that argument. Agree on finite number of the extended tunes working, tho' for me it is Forbidden Fruit, Ophelia and Ring Your Bell. Of course, I leave myself open by not liking Acadian Driftwood, but I can deal with that!!!


Entered at Fri Mar 25 00:47:12 CET 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Jeez

Live or Studio? Shape or Strawberry? RAH or ROA? To pogo or not to pogo?

Phew, I think I need another three year sabbatical just to recover from scanning the last day's posts.

Anyroad for me it's Live AND Studio. Shape AND Strawberry. RAH AND ROA. Fuck the pogoing for a game of soldiers though.

Hi Si, Hi Rog.

:-0)


Entered at Fri Mar 25 00:41:26 CET 2011 from (24.218.200.216)

Posted by:

Tim

Location: Boston

Subject: The Band at Brown University 1970

Hey BEG. From best I can tell the Band never played that show and were replaced by Jefferson Airplane. I checked the Brown Student newspaper and while the show was announced in the fall, the post concert reviews does not mention The Band. Great Poster none the less.


Entered at Thu Mar 24 22:22:00 CET 2011 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Location: Witless Bay (not really)
Web: My link

Pick it Moon. Link is to a Waylon video.

Great discussion here lately. Can hardly keep up. Who'd have thought 'Jake' would have been the topic of so much.

Peter M: I don't suppose your Newf ancestors were steelworkers. Saw a documentary recently on early 20th century high steel construction in NYC. Apparently Newfs and Mohawks were the preferred workers; no fear of heights. Not for me, I have trouble with second story Christmas lights.


Entered at Thu Mar 24 21:44:55 CET 2011 from (71.46.49.251)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Subject: Steely Dan

I don't post much here anymore because the Band are beaten to death for me and I rarely find anything new or worthwhile to work over about them anymore, but I always thought the title track to Steely Dan's Pretzel Logic would have been perfect for The Band to cover with Levon on lead and Rick and Richard on backing vocals. 'I'd love to tour the Southland in a traveling minstrel show....'.


Entered at Thu Mar 24 21:42:59 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Ben, I have a suspicion that this is the bootleg "Rhyme Beyond Reason" which claims to be by "Robert Allyn & The Crackers". It's the best sounding basement stuff I've heard.


Entered at Thu Mar 24 21:36:15 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: NLSC

RTO: I would note that NLSC contained just 8 extended songs, which were assembled in the group's new Malibu studio, Shangri-La. The slickness you mention can be attributed to the temptation to take advantage of the studio's full 24-track capability, with many of the tracks used for Garth's various new electronic keyboards & synths. Of the 8 songs, three work best for me -- "It Makes No Difference", "Ophelia" and "Acadian Driftwood".


Entered at Thu Mar 24 21:33:33 CET 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Dylan, Beatles and Shakespeare exempted……most great artists only have 2 or 3 masterworks in them………NCSL is not that but it does have three of many a Band fan’s favourite songs…….Ophelia, IMND and Acadian Driftwood…….I believe RR has listed these three among his favourites as well…………………

Bill M: I enjoyed last night….not sure why the Lennon drama was included but the bits with Daniel Lanois were very affecting and his reaction to the fire at the Edison was one of those moments not normally left in a documentary.


Entered at Thu Mar 24 21:31:56 CET 2011 from (86.142.91.203)

Posted by:

Simon

Web: My link

Rob, that's an interesting perspective about ROA. I'm in two minds about it as I love some of the arrangements and horns. I've posted before about how, for me, the mood of King Harvest is completely changed. Seeing as how The Band were often perceived as hewing pretty tightly to the studio versions I think it's good that there were some differences/elaborations/embellishments. There's a woozy, slightly tipsy feel to some of the horns that I love. These guys were amazing musicians.

Also have to say I much prefer the live Get Up Jake to the studio version. No contest IMO; the live version is as tight as a gnat's chuff. It's exhilarating how they almost seem to play musical pass the parcel. BTW, great job on the cover, Rob.

But wouldn't it be great if we got the RAH show officially. Looking at what was played (see link) makes me wonder if anyone left there feeling shortchanged. ("Harrumph, they didn't even play The Weight and The Shape I'm In"). I wouldn't have thought that though. Assuming that tracklisting was the complete show, of course.

Adam - good luck with those transcriptions. A very worthwhile project. I don't have the best ear but I've had a go at a few fingerstyle/ chord melody interpretations - Sleeping being one of them - but that's coming along very slowly. There are numerous examples within Band songs of those slash chords that Rob posted about a while ago. Specifically where the root is replaced by a low second i.e. Eb/F, D/E etc. It's something they share with Steely Dan. If those are omitted and just played 'regular' then it always sounds wrong to me.


Entered at Thu Mar 24 20:40:56 CET 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Bill M / PV / Todd (and my own CAH/NLSC thoughts)

Bill: Having slept on the matter, and had a day at work to think it over, I too am now very firmly my father's son on the subject of the horns. Can see why they did it - a quick live album that offers something new to the punter, on the heels of a semi-turkey (self-evaluation clearly done when considering allocation of Cahoots songs over a double live set) - and as you say, couldn't imagine LIAC without. But with hindsight, I'll take Syria Mosque or RAH any day of the week.

PV is only banging on about The Unthanks because I very stupidly confided my penchant for Rachel U in a nice frock - a good, old fashioned English girl. I bet he doesn't even LIKE them, really. Only kidding - I am sure the uber-lovely RU and her gang did display the right kind of economy, spatial awareness and sense of disciplined ensemble dynamics that our own boys did on early cuts. Might well try and see them later on in London, as you suggested Peter.

Todd - nice one. Nail & head. Cahoots suffers from the standards of the first three not being matched and NL&SC benefits from a dearth of proper new stuff after a brassed-up live set, a covers record and a shgare of a co-effort with Dylan, again live.

I think Cahoots could have been salvaged a bit better by nailing Endless Highway earlier and dusting off Bessie Smith. Not quite sure at the expense of what. Some will say Blacksmiths, some will say The Moon Struck One. For myself, it is The River Hymn that would be first against the wall, and I'm not overly fussed about When I Paint My Mantlepiece (as a mate of mine calls it). That to me is the laziest of all - relying on bloody Dylan after proving you don't need to.

NLSC is not an album I visit much. It's too glossy for me; too slick. Totally agree that it benefitted enormously from a sabbatical of new records

A mate of mine swears blind that after SF, The Band had - his words "had it". I reckon that is way over-generalised but his rationale is solid: he likens good rock and roll to good comedy and reminds me that there were only two series of Fawlty Towers and three of Porridge, and neither has earned a reputation for burning out too soon. They might, he says to the contrary, have instead got a reputation for refusing to lie down when they ought to have done, had they continued. That is how he sees The Band (and Little Feat after FDFMN) too. I don't condone it, merely offer a less diehard fan's perspective.


Entered at Thu Mar 24 19:16:32 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

BEG: Because both John Finley and Duke Edwards were featured so effectively in the Yonge Street doc, I was suddenly struck by the urge to hear the third Rhinoceros album, "Better Times", on which those two alternate on lead vocals. Backed as usual by Fonfara, Hodgson and Danny Weis, and on this album also by Larry Leishman, whose Robbiesque guitar-playing was noted in the doc too. The copy I'm now listening to (actually on a two-fer with the second LP) was purchased upstairs at Kops on Queen West. That shop is now called Vintage Sounds in case you want to call first to ask.


Entered at Thu Mar 24 18:36:53 CET 2011 from (199.233.178.254)

Posted by:

Ignatius

Location: Pac NW US
Web: My link

Subject: Help finance Ollabelle's next album

If this is already somewhere on the Guestbook, please disregard.

Ollabelle is trying to put together ten grand so they can release their third ablum - something many of us have been anticipating for a long time.

Follow the link and have a look. For 15 bucks you can help, and more or less pre-order a down load of the record.

I love these kids, great talents on their own, but openly continuing the legacy of The Band, and the practice of equal collaboration. I have been looking on without talking much for awhile, but thought this well worth breaking the silence.

Take care, everybody.

Ignatius


Entered at Thu Mar 24 18:10:13 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Truh
Web: My link

I opened up today's "Globe and Mail" for a read over lunch and was surprised to see the following heading at the top of the front page of the Arts section - "ROBBIE ROBERTSON / exclusive stream / How to Become Clairvoyant / It's his first album in 13 years. Hear it first at tgam.ca/arts" (i.e., the link above - then scroll down a bit). I expect that sadavid, our danceability specialist, will be reporting in shortly.

BEG: Thanks for the link to the Garage Hangover articles. Bev Davies, who took a number of the photos used in the Paupers piece, figures in the Neil Young story and provides some interesting historical details in the book "Neil Young Nation". She was in a trio with the two young women who accompanied Young and Palmer on their storied hearse ride south to fame and fortune. Said trio, like our guys, recorded with producer Duff Roman but the recordings weren't released (ever in their case, and until AMH in the Hawks' case).


Entered at Thu Mar 24 17:59:27 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Subject: Where Credit is Due

Peter M., the credit goes to sadavid for that one.


Entered at Thu Mar 24 17:51:21 CET 2011 from (90.239.108.221)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Subject: Peter V. and Empty Now

My sexual therapist has said that I shouldn't visit this site anymore. Shame on you!


Entered at Thu Mar 24 17:49:57 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Howard Roberts Is A Dirty Guitar Player

Bill M: The Band / Howard Roberts connection is that Robbie used a Howard Roberts model Epiphone for several cuts on The Brown Album (see link). The Sundazed label has recently reissued Mr. Roberts' classic 1963 album "Howard Roberts Is A Dirty Guitar Player", recorded at Capitol Studio A in the Hollywood Tower. A must-have for jazz fans, it features two other great musicians, Earl Palmer on drums and Chuck Berghofer on bass.


Entered at Thu Mar 24 17:43:28 CET 2011 from (76.68.83.172)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

...more bands who represented.....The Toronto Sound. (3 pages)


Entered at Thu Mar 24 17:41:21 CET 2011 from (76.68.83.172)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

The Canadian Squires/Levon and The Hawks


Entered at Thu Mar 24 17:31:02 CET 2011 from (41.97.208.3)

Posted by:

Empty Now

ah ! thus Garth playing is kind of onanism


Entered at Thu Mar 24 17:26:02 CET 2011 from (90.239.95.192)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Sacred Harp - never played live

Hark, the Master has spokeneth, but - Peter - I still think your speculations are nonsense. Look after the answer over here: What is in common with all songs The Band never played live?.

Empty Now: Comfort thee, your posts are like Garth's playing.


Entered at Thu Mar 24 17:16:41 CET 2011 from (76.68.83.172)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

The Band
Ray Charles
Delaney & Bonnie & Friends
James Taylor
Judy Collins

4/24-26/1970
Brown University


Entered at Thu Mar 24 17:03:56 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Pat B: Thanks for both parts of your post. Just to confirm, it was Robbie singing the live versions of TKC? As for Merryweather's "Word of Mouth", among the chowderheaded things I've done is dump my copy of the One Way reissue on CD on the grounds that, hey, I already have the vinyl. But now the vinyl's packed away, the turntable's died and CDs are so damned convenient (if ugly and tinny and no fun to hold and read). All this to say, I haven't heard "I Need Love" in many many years.

The link above is to a Howard Roberts discog. If you scroll about 95% of the way through, to 1969, you'll get to "Word of Mouth" and a follow-on link to Neil Merryweather's own fascinating site.


Entered at Thu Mar 24 16:57:39 CET 2011 from (68.164.3.187)

Posted by:

Pat B

A live version of AD is on the Greek Theater--as in LA-- boot, also with a horn section. Aug 76. The boot is called Tears of Grief.


Entered at Thu Mar 24 16:52:11 CET 2011 from (69.182.53.54)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Revisiting Cahoots & NLSC

Quite a few weeks ago, after a Cahoots “Friend or Foe” discussion, I decided to re-listen to both Cahoots and NLSC in some kind of weird self-imposed contest about which album had more songs that have held up over the years. My premise was that Cahoots had at least 3 or 4 really good songs, but was viewed as a disappointment to many at the time. NLSC (in my opinion) had about 4 really good songs, but was seen as a return to form and praised.

Well, I’m sure I had some well formed opinions and cogent discussion planned in my head at the time, but I got busy and now I can’t remember too much about what I was going to say, other than my original opinions hadn’t changed much. I still like 3 or 4 from Cahoots quite a bit, and also about 4 from NLSC. (Funnily enough, I have NLSC playing right now, and I’m actually enjoying it more than I did a few weeks ago). Must be in the right mood for it. Regardless of my opinion about specific tracks, it does hold together well as an “Album”. But I do think that Cahoots suffered from following directly on the heels of three fantastic albums, while NLSC benefited from an increased appetite from fans for new material that had built up over a four-year period.

The recent mentions of Steely Dan reminded me of a thought that I had a few weeks ago while listening to NLSC. It really struck me how much ‘Rags & Bones’ sounds like it could have been a Steely Dan song……even down to Richard’s vocal phrasing. Wonder if Donald Fagen has ever done a cover version of it. It would fit him like a glove.

And that I think might be the crux of my sometimes resistance to NLSC. I enjoy a lot of Steely Dan, but when I’m listening to The Band, they occupy a different musical feel for me and when I start comparing them with Steely Dan whether consciously or subconsciously, it’s distracting. If I want the Steely Dan sound; I’ll just listen to Steely Dan.

That being said, I’ve seen Donald Fagen at few Rambles with Levon, and he fits right in! But he seems to have a little more of a roots feel and organic approach in the Ramble situation….even when he performs Steely Dan material like ‘Black Friday’.


Entered at Thu Mar 24 16:52:58 CET 2011 from (76.68.83.172)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Ok Bill M.....I'm confused here. The Hawk in 1969 Toronto Pop Festival at Varsity Stadium, Toronto???? Is this really The Hawk????? Who are the other musicians????
I've walked by this place many times as I live downtown and previously attended University of Toronto but have only written an exam here. :-(


Entered at Thu Mar 24 16:50:39 CET 2011 from (68.164.3.187)

Posted by:

Pat B

Bill M, there are at least two boots with TKC on them: the Isle of Wight set that preceded Dylan and the Winterland show, unfortunately ID'ed as their first show. I kinda recall a poorly recorded vinyl that was supposedly a California show that had it on but I haven't listened to those in years/decades so don't quote me. I still listen to Isle of Wight occasionally. On the live version, Richard is on piano instead of clavinet, Garth is on the keys and accordian, members of the horn section play the flutes and possibly recorder, and I think Larry Packer plays violin. Not sure who was in the horn section but Howard Johnson is a good guess on tuba.

adam2, pjlbrennanatmindspringdotcom.

Bill M, again, I saw a somewhat extensive review of Mord of Mouth on the inet somewhere and listened to I Need Love for the first time in a long time. That organ has not mellowed with age. Still a screamer.


Entered at Thu Mar 24 16:38:02 CET 2011 from (76.99.245.65)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: Drexel Hill, Pa.

Subject: hey hey Bob

Bob, your timing was impeccable. Yesterday I was driving to work listening to NPR and I got tired of the gloomy news about the world situation, and switched to WXPN, only to hear the last few "deedle ums" of Acadian Driftwood fading out. I muttered "Damn!" and thought that maybe I had my Northern Lights CD in the bag I bring in to work. No such luck, but it got me to thinking about whether there was a live version of this one out there. It's been a favorite of mine since I first heard it in 1975. My father's father migrated to New York from Newfoundland, and met and married my grandmother, a fellow Newfoundlander in Brooklyn. There's an expression that "Newfies find each other". I lived in Tulsa in the early 1970's and witnessed this when I told my grandmother that a friend's grandmother was also from Newfoundland. Turns out they were both from Witless Bay, and knew each other. I returned to the Philadelphia suburbs after a few years in Oklahoma and took up again with my high school girlfriend. We lived together for several years before realizing that her father's side of the family were all Newfies as well. After the disappointment of catching just the last few notes of Acadian Driftwood in the car yesterday, it was refreshing to see and hear your post first thing after I woke up today! And I love live music, "warts and all". Yeah, the studio stuff has the ability to be worked on and polished until the musicians feel it is ready for release... but live is a whole 'nother animal.


Entered at Thu Mar 24 16:34:21 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Speaking of songs sung live, did Robbie ever sing "To Kingdom Come" onstage? I wonder if the prospect of doing so is what caused his famous case of stage fright (wasn't it?) before the Band's first big gig. Maybe he didn't need the hypnotist, just quiet assurance that his mike would be turned off forever more.


Entered at Thu Mar 24 16:31:28 CET 2011 from (69.231.25.234)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland Tx

Subject: Safety Masters

Me, I've always been very satisfied with 75 Basement Tapes album, and really felt that got the core of it, controversies noted. A year or so back this guy at the "Croz FM" website (he archives the Dylan Radio Show) had all these fantastic boots you could download, and I got a bunch of stuff. I'll pay if he ever puts his site up again. Anyway, he had this thing called "The Basement Tape Safety Masters" which were first generation copies of some songs Neil Young got off Garth or something. Anyway, almost by accident I started listening to them, and they sounded really great on my computer, a lot better than the "Genuine" series which has pretty bad sound if you ask me. Finally I took down the Sid Griffith book and found out why, these were two track stereo as Garth mixed them, later put into Mono (on the tracks used) on the album. Anybody else got these? Man, they sound great.


Entered at Thu Mar 24 16:01:46 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: First Tour

Shortly after the release of "Music From Big Pink" in the summer of 1968, Rick suffered a broken neck in a car accident and the group was unable to tour until the following spring.


Entered at Thu Mar 24 15:18:10 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Web: My link

Such a shame this amazing song didn't get its due in TLW. Over the years it has become my favorite Band song by a wide margin and has aged beautifully. Quintessential.

Thanks for the reminder.


Entered at Thu Mar 24 14:58:29 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Web: My link

sadavid, here's the link for the lineup on the original recording. May be some help in sorting out that great live rendition.


Entered at Thu Mar 24 14:48:36 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: live music

Who plays what on this version?


Entered at Thu Mar 24 13:33:13 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

BEG: Yes, that was Michael Fonfara, with fellow Lou-vet Peter Hodgson on bass. The drummer went on to play with the Crazy World of Arthur Brown, the taller singer wrote songs with Bruce Cockburn and is on a couple of Bruce's early LPs and of course John Finley got to sing out yesterday's show by providing the vocals to Hawks backing tracks of "Please Please Please" recorded in '64. 'Mazing.

RtO: I'm with the old boy re the horns. Can't imagine "Life Is A Carnival" without them, but otherwise would prefer just Garth on sax (if that). And like Peter V I'd prefer just about all studio versions to their live counterparts - pretty much for the reasons he states.

Pat B: The Yonge doc had a nice clip of Ed Roth playing with the Tripp in '66 (post Richard Bell). At a related party last night the original Sparrows organist (CJ Feeny) and I were nattering on about how great Ed was/is. And CJ, like you, knows quality.


Entered at Thu Mar 24 12:53:33 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Happy Birthday, dlew.....and many, many more in good health.


Entered at Thu Mar 24 12:33:33 CET 2011 from (76.68.83.172)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

The Band
Guelph, Ontario
1969

Joe Harrison
musician and designer from Guelph, Ontario


Entered at Thu Mar 24 12:20:15 CET 2011 from (76.68.83.172)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Toronto Pop Festival
Saturday June 21, 1969
The Band
Music From Big Pink

"Other highlights were Al Kooper with a whole horn section and The Band changing instuments every 4 or 5 songs."

The night I met Bill M and Jan Haust...I also met "Wittgenstein" who apparently was at this first lgig The Band performed live!

Dominic said...
"Hey, I was there also....Saturday was great, most memorable was Winter and Sly..we were right up front! I got a poster of Winter, by John Parr....still have it, but it's now signed by Winter...what a great show....I have some fotos I took of Alice, Man, Rotary, the Band, Winter none of Velvet or Sly....I was also gone by the tyme Steppenwolf came on Sunday...do you remember the food fight on the field on Sunday afternoon??? Later, I went to Woodstock, and again, was right up front on Saturday!!..what a great year that was! Now all we get is 50 Stinks and Lady Crap Crap...." December 5, 2010 8:37 PM


Entered at Thu Mar 24 11:28:36 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: In praise of spaces

When The Band first appeared on record, the spaces were what struck people. In the early 60s, the average five piece group played all the time. You’re on organ. You play right through the song, after all the others do. As soul came in and horn sections appeared, the others looked askance at the horn players, who were quite content to stand there waiting for their part. If you’re a trumpet player you expect to spend most of the evening standing around. No one expects you to play along with the riff. The Band left spaces. They had no urge to play all the time.

Going back to The Unthanks last night, they had two singers and eight musicians. They very rarely had all ten going at the same time. In most numbers, one or two would go offstage because they weren’t needed. That gives the variety and dynamic that the early Band had. I think there’s enormous pressure on a live stadium show not to just sit on your hands, but to join in and do SOMETHING. Anything.


Entered at Thu Mar 24 11:12:31 CET 2011 from (41.97.208.3)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: Cortez, Cavaignac, Shirō Ishii... and Lothar Von Trotta

Guns and diseases inoculation alone were not enough for the Conquistadors to genocide 10 millions Incas in 50 years. The mission required techniques and imagination, as what Neil Young sings "They carried them to the flatlands / And they died along the way"

The "enfumades" episod in 1845, [asphyxiation of indigenous people inside caves by the French troops], would have remained completely unknown for history, if a certain Captain Pelissier haven’t addressed a report to the Royal Commission.
One of the massacre commanders, Marshal Saint-Arnaud, who had a perfect knowledge of the psychological profile of his Captain who for sending the report was mainly motivated by the need to write a beautiful text, responded during the collective trial to the Royal Commission with one single phrase:
"I always believed that nobody distrusts enough of the literature"
Indeed, in Pelissier's report, you can taste as delightful paragraphs as "We massacred entire populations whose guilt still remain that they just exposed themselves to our furor"

[about Unit 731 – paragraph self-censored by poster in association with current News]

all that jazz, you can always find matter for fun or curiosity, but poisoning wells in the desert,…
where water is so rare and poison may remain a long time,…
this was the Herero-Namaqua genocide, see link above for more

Band Connection: more than often my posts are motivated by the only need to write (onanism ?)


Entered at Thu Mar 24 11:04:02 CET 2011 from (86.162.219.38)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Filling the spaces

Yes, Peter - filling the spaces. All that gratuitous lead guitar over UOCC on TLW. What was that all about?


Entered at Thu Mar 24 08:53:03 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Band Live / The Unthanks

Live recordings … inferior is the wrong word. I prefer the studio cuts on almost everything. There’s a subtletly in the interplay that gets slightly lost. They rarely focus on the lyrics with such intent, and there isn’t quite the sense of space and gaps in the music. They tend to fill the spaces. Recording live gigs was nowhere near as good as it became either. I remember thinking at Wembley 1974 that everything was the best they’d ever played it, but recordings show it wasn’t by any means. Same with recordings of the British 90s tour. Live is better when you’re at the event.

On the other hand, I saw The Unthanks last night for the second time in a week. Trust me, “Last” their new album is superb. They play most of it on new shows too. I listened right through going to the show … it lasted exactly the 35 miles, and again coming back. The live bit in between really was the best of the lot. They have a string quartet, trumpet, piano and two guys switching between acoustic bass, drums, electric bass, guitar and ukulele. There’s something about the sound of a live string quartet that is unsurpassable. In a hall (a small theatre) with a brilliant acoustic, it was magical. We floated out afterwards on a cloud of serenity. I don’t know how you describe it. Their roots are Northumbrian folk song, but they really have created something new. Avant-folk? They also cover Tom Waits and King Crimson AND incorporate it seamlessly into their sound. They covered Robert Wyatt too on Saturday, but didn't do that one last night.


Entered at Thu Mar 24 06:58:42 CET 2011 from (99.141.31.86)

Posted by:

Adam2

Pat - I've also been meaning to ask you: if you feel like corresponding via email about Band chords/music theory, please let me know. I'm looking for a knowledgeable theory person to check some of my transcriptions with, and I know I've seen you post stuff related to that before. Let me know if you'd be up for it. Thanks!


Entered at Thu Mar 24 06:51:44 CET 2011 from (99.141.31.86)

Posted by:

Adam2

Pat - Thanks for clearing that up. My impression that they toured regularly came from the multiple bootleg recordings that are available, which suggests they were more active touring-wise than they actually were. Being from Chicago as well, I envy you so much for being around at the time of those shows! (Any chance you were at their first Chicago show at the Auditorium Theater?) Mapping out the bootleg recording dates does give us a rough idea of their touring schedule:

1969:

04/19 - Winterland, San Francisco, CA

05/09 - Fillmore East, New York, NY

07/xx - Civic Auditorium, Pasadena, CA

08/16 - Woodstock Festival

08/31 - Isle Of Wight Festival

12/xx - Felt Forum, New York, NY

1970:

01/01 - Colden Auditorium, Flushing, NY

01/31 - Community Theatre, Berkeley, CA

06/xx - Festival Express

07/xx - Festival Express

07/10 - Hollywood Bowl, CA

11/xx - Syria Mosque, Pittsburgh, PA

11/05 - Cousens Gym, Medford, MA

11/07 - Polytech Institute, Worcester, MA

1971:

05/xx - European tour

06/xx - European tour

06/30 - Central Park, New York, NY

08/21 - Borough Of York, Toronto, Canada

12/06 - Boston Garden, Boston, MA


Entered at Thu Mar 24 06:44:20 CET 2011 from (69.182.53.54)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Is it rolling Bob?

I thought they played 16 years on the road together! At least that’s the impression that I got from The Last Waltz? ;-) (Just kidding really….I’m aware of the gaps in the schedule).

But, I think the take-away from the point that Adam is making, is that The Band functioned at their best as a live ensemble whether on stage or in the studio. Their studio approach being more of a live off the floor situation rather than an extensive layering of tracks approach ala The Beatles in their Sgt. Pepper mode, or some of the Steely Dan in-studio constructions.


Entered at Thu Mar 24 05:35:38 CET 2011 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

Adam2, the Band never toured regularly, and after RoA I don't think they saw much of each other until the MM sessions--Levon went to Boston to the Berklee School of Music while RR and Dominique went to Montreal. I recall them playing Chicago twice before RoA: late 69 (probably December) and October of 71. After that, Jan 74 with Dylan and Aug(?)76 headlining. That's 3 shows on their own in 8 years from BP to NLSC. Mybe there's one I forget.

After 8 years of grinding it out, they had definitely lost the urge to be road warriors. And even their last "tour" had trouble keeping the wheels on. From 1983 on, however, they played Chicago at least a couple of times a year, sometimes opening big shows (CSN, the Dead), mostly clubs.


Entered at Thu Mar 24 05:17:55 CET 2011 from (76.66.124.50)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

.....and this one is for "Red" who actually saw him back in the day.....Thanks so much again for making a copy of his CD for me. Bumbles searched for his own copy.......


Entered at Thu Mar 24 04:48:29 CET 2011 from (76.66.124.50)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

This is for you Cabbagetown Bonk! Bill M! Is that Michael Fonfara on organ?!!! I get it now......I missed so much....


Entered at Thu Mar 24 04:45:27 CET 2011 from (99.141.31.86)

Posted by:

Adam2

Thanks for the encouragement on my transcriptions, RTO! It's going really well. I'm learning more and more every day studying this wonderful music.


Entered at Thu Mar 24 04:42:09 CET 2011 from (99.141.31.86)

Posted by:

Adam2

RTO - I see your point of view, and I apologize for misinterpreting what you specifically were trying to say.

But for instance, your comment on Great Divide kind of confuses me. Like I said, that arrangement (the segue, dropping the key from G to F) isn't really all that altered though - they had been doing that since early 1970, and on ROA the only thing different with the arrangement is that it's in F and there's a full horn section with them. The structure is just the same as it had been on the 2nd album. Likewise, the Dixie/Great Divide is exactly the same on Royal Albert Hall '71 and Hollywood Bowl '70 (less than a week after Festival Express).

You are right that they worked heavily with Hawkins and Dylan, and then decided to kick back and write their own music/record their own albums. Correct me if I'm wrong, but they toured quite regularly in 1969, 1970, and 1971. I personally don't count 1972 as an "off" year, as they were focusing on the production/mixing/release of Rock Of Ages (and all the work that went into that). 1973 is definitely seen as the "lost" year, with the group hesitantly starting up again with Moondog Matinee and the three '73 shows.

But my comment that they were a live band at heart isn't really referring to them playing tons and tons of live shows during their career as The Band. I meant that playing in a live environment, on stage together, was probably where they felt most comfortable, and where their musical personalities and arrangements really gelled the most naturally (free of studio confines and deadlines). Just look at the first three studio albums: while they did overdub horns and other things here and there, they are mostly the sound of the group playing together live (albeit polished).


Entered at Thu Mar 24 04:39:55 CET 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Further to my last post

By the way Adam, keep it coming! I'm enjoying this bit of good banter. Keeps us all away from pink scarf territory, or whether Levon is really taller than Robbie despite all the photographs showing that he isn't!!!!

Here's a tale from a couple of years ago: My father rang and I mentioned RoA because I had the expanded CD on in the background. "Oh, I didn't like it much, son" said Pa. "Those bloody horns got on my nerves on every song. Would have been effective used sparingly, but ended up like poxy Blood Sweat & Tears". A different view, but the old boy is entitled. As time goes on, having heard a lot more 70-71 stuff from the basic Band quintet - and despite having a better grasp than Dad of the character of a Crescent City horn arrangement versus BST! - I find myself starting to agree in some ways.

Sadly it is so late in Surrey, UK now that it is almost early! Time to retire, but will check in again tomorrow. Good luck with your transcriptions, Adam - sounds a fascinating body of work to be involved in.


Entered at Thu Mar 24 04:13:49 CET 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Adam2

I don't think that "live performances are inferior" is the message that was trying to be put over, Adam. Certainly not from me anyway. As I said - you have to separate out a good live performance from the completely different topic of arrangement adaptation, and how your taste finds these adapted arrangements compared to some (even then) cherished and highly regarded recorded songs. Rock of Ages is one of my favourite live albums, period. Few here would disagree with that. Allen Toussaint, too, is a huge hero. Across The Great Divide dropped a tone to F to enable a harmonically workable segue out of Dixie in C? Sounds laboured to me; don't like it; ATGD dances along nicely in original G. But the musicians playing this revised arrangement are doing a great job of it. Two different topics.

Stuff like Festival Express and Albert Hall '71 renditions, on the other hand, I prefer because not only are they ridiculously good performances, but the familiar arrangements and thus original concept of the song remains. But still two different arguments.

And were The Band really a live act at heart? They were extremely good live, for sure. But weren't they also the band that after years working themselves to death with The Hawk and Dylan, decided to kick back and write some songs, make a record? Weren't they the act that Bill Graham had to beg on his knees to do any shows at all? Didn't they stay off the road for much of 72 and 73 because of some members' condition/health?


Entered at Thu Mar 24 04:13:35 CET 2011 from (24.108.12.129)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: Toronto really used to rock!

The last five minutes of to-nights show on Bravo made me cry. Here's a guy that brought so much feeling and great music to YONGE Street and he probably doesn't have a dime to his name. I was 17 in 1969 and I have so many memories from that time. Shit, Edjo, owes me a cigar that isn't wet!


Entered at Thu Mar 24 01:47:56 CET 2011 from (99.141.31.86)

Posted by:

Adam2

I'm surprised some really think live performances of The Band are "inferior" to the studio versions. While studying the chords and arrangements to the songs I'm transcribing, I had the exact opposite revelation. While the studio albums are masterful and carefully crafted classics, all of the songs matured and evolved in the live setting.

For example, W.S. Walcott. The subtle arrangement tweaks when they played it live greatly improved on the studio original. The re-structured intro (much more exciting), the instrumental refrain added after Garth's solo (which gave Robbie space to play some really rocking guitar), the ending. It's a perfect example of a song that they really improved on and perfected the arrangement live.

I think it's funny that some would consider the live performances inferior, because to me that's missing the whole point of the group. They were, at heart, a live band. I mean they spent the better part of 16 years on the road. The studio albums were works of art, but once they got back home on the road, the songs really gelled and settled in to their natural arrangements.

Rock Of Ages has been a great source for my arrangement studying, because I feel that they really were at their musical peak by the time of the 1972 break. They didn't really change their arrangements for ROA all that much - Caledonia Mission and Get Up Jake are the only real songs I hear any big change in arrangement. King Harvest, W.S. Walcott, Dixie (not including the added horn intro), Great Divide, Rag Mama Rag, Unfaithful Servant, Chest Fever - they all featured the same live arrangements they were playing live up to that point. Which really reinforces what Allen Toussaint said about the album (paraphrasing) - "I wanted to make sure that I didn't change what they already had musically, and instead embellish the sound around them as if I was an instrument in the group."


Entered at Wed Mar 23 21:23:09 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: through these doors

A nice period photo of The Hawk's Nest (exterior, unfortunately), plus some other stuff.


Entered at Wed Mar 23 21:17:08 CET 2011 from (86.142.91.203)

Posted by:

Simon

Subject: Steve, Marge and family

I've just finished a bunch of exams and deliberately stayed offline as much as possible the last six weeks or so and only discovered the sad news about Steve a fortnight ago.

I just wanted to say that I've been thinking a lot about Marge and family and what they must be going through. Despite any differences of opinion we may have had (and that's all they were) I always respected Steve and was a secret admirer of his idealism and hardworking nature. There was a keen sense of him wanting the world to be a better place ... and if I may paraphrase something Norbert said about Steve: you could just tell he was the kind of person you'd have been proud to call a neighbour, someone loyal to his family and friends, someone who'd always be willing to help others out if need be.

Sincere condolences to Marge and family and I do hope Marge can check in from time to time to let us know how thing are going.

RIP Steve ... I will raise a glass to your memory.


Entered at Wed Mar 23 21:05:04 CET 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Live Vs Studio

Again, good debate. Some say better live, PV says not...

I think that the Albert Hall '71 is a great show but that the performances there were more faithful to the original arrangements. In such a situation, I would agree that the live versions are killer and, without making changes, might well improve upon the feel of a tune such as TSII. Move on a few months to the Rock of Ages shows and you aren't getting the same deal. Arrangements tweaked (often for the horns) and altered rather than just played well as originally intended. I think you've got to separate a great live performance from arrangements that have been tampered with and evaluate each in turn. I love the former scenario but by and large am with PV on the latter.

Like I've said before: Time To Kill with accents and pushes in the opening phrase, Chest Fever with different verse dynamics and lyric pauses...two examples where the fragile character of the originals are obliterated in the name of "Raaawwwk!"


Entered at Wed Mar 23 20:17:16 CET 2011 from (76.66.125.216)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Many, many thanks Butch.....via David P!


Entered at Wed Mar 23 19:39:40 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Hall & Oates do "The Weight"

Daryl Hall's recent webcast salute to his former bandmate, the late-great T-Bone Wolk, includes a wonderful version of "The Weight", along with some other great content. (Thanks Butch for the link!)


Entered at Wed Mar 23 19:37:14 CET 2011 from (86.169.140.150)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Roger

Thanks, Roger. I'll be going if it works out.


Entered at Wed Mar 23 19:31:34 CET 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Bill M: Thanks….I won’t miss tonight…………the news of E. Taylor’s demise reminds me for some reason of my favourite Rick Danko story….that of his meeting with the one and only Mae West.


Entered at Wed Mar 23 19:15:17 CET 2011 from (41.97.233.97)

Posted by:

Empty Now

the ten best German novels ... to be serious


Entered at Wed Mar 23 19:14:12 CET 2011 from (76.66.125.216)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

....especially for NYC Jon Lyness!
Before we met in NYC....I bet we were at many of the same shows. I think one time when Crabgrass and I were at The Bottom Line to see Buddy and Julie Miller one New Year's Eve that you were there too!

Hey Ray. Many thanks for the info. Ever since Louuu got involved with Amnesty International....He saw the light and developed his political awareness.

Jerry and Deee....Both my late parents worked in factories (my paternal grandfather who I also lived with did own two businessess but once we lost them when I was quite young....We quickly became proletarianized....as Karl Marx would say.) I'm also a Union member even though it's a professional one called a Federation. I call it a UNION....'cause all I own is my labour power and my dignity.

Bill M...I was just being overly dramatic with you the other day. When I have more time I'll post about the Yonge Street - Toronto Rock and Roll Stories.....For now....

Jan Haust!!!! BRAVO!

Bill M even hung out with him and Maud and Joni Mitchell's daughter at one of Garth's shows. It was the night I first met Bill M. So funny.....He goes up to my friend who has green eyes......Bill!!!! I'm the brown eyed girl! LOL


Entered at Wed Mar 23 19:12:09 CET 2011 from (41.97.233.97)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Wow! Ilkka, I began wondering "where are the two coasters gone ?"

I begin to accommodate with riddles at the google age, I guessed that if NorthWestCoaster leaves it at the title level, it's surely the first google result that appears using the straight expression "Finnish female writer" as searchkey ===---- google result : Umayya Abu-Hanna

On a Sacred Harp related chapter I would take benefit while I have the micro in hand to add that Thomas Mann's Doctor Faustus is among the most serious list of "the best German novels of the 20th century" m see link above please


Entered at Wed Mar 23 19:07:07 CET 2011 from (94.172.128.233)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Brum UK

Subject: Paul Simon

Paul Simon tickets go on sale (public on Friday at 9.00, priority if you have access on Thursday) for a short tour this summer - late June. Glasgow for Dunc, Bournemouth for Peter, Birmingham or Nottingham for me...

Not cheap - £50 - £70. I recently bought tickets for the Webb Sisters in May which were a quarter of the price. But it's probably an opportunity not to be missed.

Good to hear from you Al...


Entered at Wed Mar 23 19:06:55 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: the pursuit of chastity . . .

. . . could make even 79 years seem much, much longer . . . .


Entered at Wed Mar 23 18:41:52 CET 2011 from (90.239.84.53)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Subject: Any wiser paraphrase is welcome

Sorry, no wiser paraphrase, but it reminded me about the words of a Finnish female writer: "It is easy to be brave if you are not scared."


Entered at Wed Mar 23 17:42:16 CET 2011 from (64.129.187.2)

Posted by:

Bashful Bill

Location: Minoa, NY

Subject: dancin to the oldies.....

At one of the CSNY shows at which The Band opened I saw David Crosby, sidestage, dancing his ass off as they played TSII. Conversely, at a later show(I saw 2 of the CSNY reunion shows) I saw him dancing as Santana played. At the latter show I also saw him smack his lips and pick up and pocket a joint which someone tossed up on the stage at his feet. Maybe he's a bad example to use as an argument that TSII is dancable......


Entered at Wed Mar 23 17:26:09 CET 2011 from (99.124.83.242)

Posted by:

Dee

Location: Wisconsin

Subject: Al's Post

Al

You're right....damn depressing film.

Things aren't as dramatic here of late. Court said passing the bill ending collective bargaining was NOT legal. Violated the Open Meeting laws.State Top Legal Elected person said it was....now to an Appeals Court.

The company I was with simply sent the work out of the country. Not many Union folk left at GE. Am guessing the Governor couldn't "out-source" the schools!:)


Entered at Wed Mar 23 17:15:59 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

sadavid: 79 seems a pretty good run, and I really don't see that a pursuit of chastity would have helped.


Entered at Wed Mar 23 16:59:48 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83 not to be missed.

Good to hear from you Al...


Entered at Wed Mar 23 19:06:55 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: the pursuit of chastity . . .

. . . could make even 79 years seem much, much longer . . . .


Entered at Wed Mar 23 18:41:52 CET 2011 from (90.239.84.53)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Subject: Any wiser paraphrase is welcome

Sorry, no wiser paraphrase, but it reminded me about the words of a Finnish female writer: "It is easy to be brave if you are not scared."


Entered at Wed Mar 23 17:42:16 CET 2011 from (64.129.187.2)

Posted by:

Bashful Bill

Location: Minoa, NY

Subject: dancin to the oldies.....

At one of the CSNY shows at which The Band opened I saw David Crosby, sidestage, dancing his ass off as they played TSII. Conversely, at a later show(I saw 2 of the CSNY reunion shows) I saw him dancing as Santana played. At the latter show I also saw him smack his lips and pick up and pocket a joint which someone tossed up on the stage at his feet. Maybe he's a bad example to use as an argument that TSII is dancable......


Entered at Wed Mar 23 17:26:09 CET 2011 from (99.124.83.242)

Posted by:

Dee

Location: Wisconsin

Subject: Al's Post

Al

You're right....damn depressing film.

Things aren't as dramatic here of late. Court said passing the bill ending collective bargaining was NOT legal. Violated the Open Meeting laws.State Top Legal Elected person said it was....now to an Appeals Court.

The company I was with simply sent the work out of the country. Not many Union folk left at GE. Am guessing the Governor couldn't "out-source" the schools!:)


Entered at Wed Mar 23 17:15:59 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

sadavid: 79 seems a pretty good run, and I really don't see that a pursuit of chastity would have helped.


Entered at Wed Mar 23 16:59:48 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: "puts into . . . question"?

Bill M: puts into question? What part of "dies" did you not get?


Entered at Wed Mar 23 16:50:00 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: blasted vs blissed

Sadavid: The difference was the Y#1 featured harmless booze whereas Y#2 featured dangerous marriage-oo-onna.


Entered at Wed Mar 23 16:46:21 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: it's Taylor, folks

Kristie: Not being an NYT subscriber, I had to resort to other sources to see which Liz has left us. I must say that this news puts seriously into question the findings of the US study mentioned under the "Must Reads" section to the right of the main story. Thank heavens!


Entered at Wed Mar 23 16:42:32 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: part 2

Bill M: it's a super series, (the other) Jan and all concerned are to be congratulated. I found it particularly interesting that the bourgeoisie seemed quite content to allow all sorts of mayhem in the rounders' joints on Yonge, but the Yorkville scene reduced them to saucer-eyed panic. Also interesting was queenpin of history Mary Martin -- I'm quite willing to take her 20/20 hindsight at face value; she knew what the Hawks needed & how to give it to 'em . . . .


Entered at Wed Mar 23 16:36:57 CET 2011 from (24.108.12.129)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: Bill M

I thought it was a much better show last night. Part one just seemed to go by too fast. (and to many commercials) Regardless, it's been a fun and bittersweet 2 nights.


Entered at Wed Mar 23 16:35:04 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Kristie: John D reported here a couple of days ago that there's to be a longer internet version that will include parts picked up off he cuttingroom floor. If you check Jan's What's New section for March 2 you'll find a link to the show's official website, which may provide details.

Kevin J: Yes, a bummer. I was sitting there last night, saying to myself that this'll please Kevin J - much longer song snippets this time. Plus our guys were a constant theme. Plus there was some footage that I've never seen before, and I'd seen the very young Robbie / Levon stuff on part 1 two or three years ago. Tonight's the Grand Finale.


Entered at Wed Mar 23 16:20:25 CET 2011 from (70.77.200.21)

Posted by:

kristie

Web: My link

Subject: R.I.P. Elizabeth


Entered at Wed Mar 23 16:18:26 CET 2011 from (70.77.200.21)

Posted by:

kristie

Subject: Bill M

I would have watched it, but I do not own a television. Any chance I could catch it online somewhere?


Entered at Wed Mar 23 16:09:29 CET 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Bill M: I had thought part 2 was tonight! What a bummer……………..When is part 3? Only solace I take is I was watching the wonderful movie “The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo”


Entered at Wed Mar 23 16:06:54 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Subject: Jan H's Post

If anyone is interested please email me at bwigo at verizon.net. I'll explain in my return email. Thanks.


Entered at Wed Mar 23 15:58:39 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: yet another record titled "The Shape I'm In" ...

... was released by Robbie's old band-mate Johnny Rhythm under his own name - John Rutter - in 1974 on the Daffodil label. Daffodil's big artists were King Biscuit Boy and Crowbar, on whose "Official Music" Rutter appears. Rhythm / Rutter then and now appeared in the first part of the Yonge Street documentary, and his first record, "Wouldn't It Be Nice", was one of those played in part on the soundtrack.

I hope all you fellow Canuckistani Band-fans caught yesterday's part 2, which made something of the little-known fact that our guys offered the magnificent John Finley the job of being their new front-man after they left Hawkins. He turned them down after thinking it through. They knew him well from his regular appearances to sing a couple of songs as a guest at their Saturday matinees; his big number was "Please Please Please".


Entered at Wed Mar 23 15:12:10 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Gonna Tear Your Playhouse Down

From Poolhouse to Playhouse:

The Band originally intended to record "Stage Fright" live before a select audience at the Woodstock Playhouse. After the town council vetoed the idea, the venue was used merely as a makeshift studio, much like they'd done with Sammy Davis Jr.'s poolhouse. However, the change in the group's recorded sound could largely be attributed to the decision to replace John Simon with Todd Rundgren.

Peter: I don't think Greg Milner in "Perfecting Sound Forever" really chastises Steely Dan for their dry studio sound, but rather points out that they were among the pioneers of that approach to recording, focusing on the music itself, rather than the sound of the room. In illustrating the '70s trend, especially in West Coast studios, of isolating & close-miking the instruments & musicians, Mr. Milner describes the early Steely Dan records as "technological masterpieces made with the engineer Roger Nichols".


Entered at Wed Mar 23 13:58:45 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I found an original copy of "that" The Shape I'm, In a couple of weeks ago. It would have been a well-known title for The Band.


Entered at Wed Mar 23 13:55:59 CET 2011 from (158.39.165.116)

Posted by:

jh

Subject: New tee!

Hey, Bob, thanks for the shirt. Love it! You did know that the logo on the front is exactly the same as the tattoo i got years ago on (what used to be) my delta muscle? :-)


Entered at Wed Mar 23 13:08:09 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Web: My link

"The Shape I'm In" not danceable? Try telling it to these folks.


Entered at Wed Mar 23 09:34:22 CET 2011 from (41.97.233.97)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Charles Aznavour performs an English Version "Take Me Along" in which the official chorus is

"When you are poor / It's easy to bear / With sunshine and soft Summer air"

So the official paraphrase ought to be

"When you are poor / It's easy to bear / With a substantial amount of Money in your pocket"

Any wiser paraphrase is welcome

In the link above the English version starts at 3:36 – it is not the integral translation of the original, an awesome line is missing

"Taking the road which leads / To my child's dreams / On distant islands / Where nothing is as important / As to live"

As for my previous linked song of Shakira, all native English speakers ought to have the English lyrics [available at Expand Description] to "hear" what Aznavour exactly says

Footnote: to keep the full spell of this wonderful forum, I would like to invite all the GBers youtube linkers as I to instaure a self discipline , enough time spacing between clips, an effort to preserve harmonic transitions, etc…


Entered at Wed Mar 23 09:06:27 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: … might start a ruckus

The only thing wrong with the original The Shape I'm In was failing to capitalize on the obvious rhyme with "ruckus", but you couldn't get away with it in 1970. The arrangement / lyric connection runs right through. That repetitive aggressive beat echoes characters striding into town, like edgy turkey-cocks, wired, so liable to get into trouble right away.

I think very few Band songs are better live than studio. But they not only did The Shape I'm In right to the end, but they continued to do a Richard song with Rick seamlessly taking over the vocal.

In Perfecting Sound Forever, he takes Steely Dan to task quite heavily for "perfecting" a dry studio sound, which he says was very influential on other producers.


Entered at Wed Mar 23 08:55:45 CET 2011 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: Live versions od songs

Adam2, I think alot of The Band's tunes were better live. Probably because they had a chance to grow into the songs and try different things. The RAH songs from the box set are good examples - as are all the official tracks from TLW. There are exceptions. I don't like any of the live versions of The Weight and some songs like The Unfaithful Servant just had a magic that they didn't quite recapture live - even if the live versions weren't at all bad.

I don't think any of the versions to come out of the 80s or 90s Band came close to the originals.


Entered at Wed Mar 23 08:36:50 CET 2011 from (198.36.218.33)

Posted by:

Jerry

Thanks Ray, nice of you to say...Glad you're sharing this with your students...One of the most powerful movies I've ever seen..


Entered at Wed Mar 23 06:04:42 CET 2011 from (24.124.107.16)

Posted by:

ray pence

Location: the heartland/flyover country/lawrence Kansas

Subject: harlan county usa

Jerry Web: My link Subject: Harlan County USA Yesterday they showed Harlan County USA, the great doc about the coal miners working for the Duke Power company owed mines who orginized with the United Mine Workers of America in 1973...I'm sure many of you know of this film but in case you havn't seen it, it's well worth taking the time to do so...This is a stark reminder of the importance of the union movement then and to insure it in the future. I am a union man and hope I have what these folks had if ever called upon to fight the fight..Not only is the message so strong but the music through out the film is a treasure. I'd love to hear Levon and friends take on this music at some point...My link is the trailer for this movie and can be seen in it's entirity on You Tube if interested..

Me: Thanks Jerry. A masterpiece, one of the greatest of documentaries. I've shown it in my American Studies classes here at the Universam a union man and hope I have what these folks had if ever called upon to fight the fight..Not only is the message so strong but the music through out the film is a treasure. I'd love to hear Levon and friends take on this music at some point...My link is the trailer for this movie and can be seen in it's entirity on You Tube if interested..

Me: Thanks Jerry. A masterpiece, one of the greatest of documentaries. I've shown it in my American Studies classes here at the University of Kansas. Will do so again soon, as we're starting a unit on Cesar Chavez and United Farm Workers.


Entered at Wed Mar 23 05:55:11 CET 2011 from (24.124.107.16)

Posted by:

ray pence

Location: the heartland/flyover country/lawrence Kansas
Web: My link

Subject: Japan Relief Concert with LOU REED

Brown Eyed Girl (Great Great Person!) probably beat me to this announcement but even if she did, it's worth repeating...see the link. Wish I could be at the show.

Steely Dan/The Band--idolize them. Gotta witness a Levon/Fagen show one of these days. That is a major goal of mine.


Entered at Wed Mar 23 03:29:58 CET 2011 from (99.235.255.183)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: Yonge St.

Hi all!! Just a few comments...

KEVIN: Right you are about the commercials. 1st was at :08, 2nd at :10. That's rediculous. ROBBIE looked better tonight from front/side view. Levon should be on.

A good show is Neil Young's "MusiCares".

NORBERT: Thanx for post on Japan. These poor people, and nice too. I heard they never tried to steal/loot from anyone, like they did in Haiti or LA or New Orleans, after destruction hit. God Bless them and help them all.

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxo


Entered at Wed Mar 23 03:22:32 CET 2011 from (99.141.31.86)

Posted by:

Adam2

Now that I think about it, I think it's pretty clear that all of the "standard" live songs from the Stage Fright album were all subsequently improved in concert. Strawberry Wine was transformed from a loose, rubbery blues tune into an amazingly raw, loud stomper. Just Another Whistle Stop had those great 1974 performances, and even a few in late 1970. I've come around to preferring the Rock Of Ages version of The Shape I'm In... Stage Fright as well. W.S. Walcott obviously bloomed wonderfully on ROA. The Rumor from the ROA bonus tracks is exquisite.

I think because the album was recorded more quickly than the first two, some of the master takes have a slightly "undercooked" feeling when compared with the "intense craftsmanship" of the first two albums.


Entered at Wed Mar 23 03:22:19 CET 2011 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

The Royal Scam is a desert island disc.


Entered at Wed Mar 23 03:06:59 CET 2011 from (70.77.200.21)

Posted by:

kristie

Subject: What the heck is a pogo?

Peter-I really enjoyed that link, thank you.


Entered at Wed Mar 23 02:46:58 CET 2011 from (24.193.158.70)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC
Web: My link

BEG, note that Garland Jeffreys is Levon's guest for the May 7th Ramble. I bet that show would put a smile on your face. Hope all is well!


Entered at Wed Mar 23 02:34:28 CET 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Simon

Well, you came out of it good then! I was asked how I could even LIKE The Band when I don't care much for Steely Dan. To me that was a reworded "How can you even think of having a pastrami sandwich when you don't even like turkey chilli?"

I think that Dirty Work is a masterpiece, right enough. But they were a band then...

There is a clinical sense to the studio verson of Shape I'm In, to be sure. Agree that one benefitted from stage-woodshedding. It's when they change arrangements wholesale I prefer the originals, by and large.

I don't like the reverse procedure either: how did Pink Floyd ever descend into playing note perfect covers wearing suits when once they made Ummagumma?


Entered at Wed Mar 23 01:34:36 CET 2011 from (86.142.91.203)

Posted by:

Simon

It wasn't anything near abuse, Rob, just a disbelief that I could feel that way about that track. As for Steely Dan, I've been listening to them a lot. Well, the tracks I connect with which is about half their tunes. Donald Fagen and Walter Becker seem like eminently sane chaps to me.

Different strokes but I find them pretty soulful in their own weird way. I mostly love 'em and consider them just as valid a slice of Americana as any bewhiskered, flannel-shirted, sepia-tinted, agrarian-themed, bustin'-a-gut-to-appear-authentic pump organ, fiddle and dobro proponents.


Entered at Wed Mar 23 00:52:52 CET 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Simon (on the subject of flak)

Buddy, you aren't part of the furniture here until you've had some dogs abuse! I once dared to admit that, first LP aside, I find Steely Dan to be clinical, soulless and incredibly smug. Sometimes telling the truth gets you a tanning!


Entered at Tue Mar 22 22:48:24 CET 2011 from (86.142.91.203)

Posted by:

Simon

While it's certainly true that the officially released live versions of The Shape I'm In have a great feel and groove - the farty Roland synth on TLW version notwithstanding - I'd have to agree with sadavid that the studio version is indeed boring, non-swinging and undanceable. Is it possible for a track to be both stiff as a board yet limp as a warm lettuce sandwich? I think I got a bit of flack for once suggesting that the studio cut was a dull plodder. Nothing has made me change my mind on that one.

Another point that sadavid made recently was a general ennui concerning The Weight ... something I can also relate to. Don't get me wrong, it's a wonderful song/track/performance and an integral part of the MFBP experience but it wouldn't be in my Top Ten Band tunes and there are too many cover versions ... it's just lazy and the results are occasionally cringeworthy.

And I still think The Moon Struck One is a good song.

Plus a warm welcome back to Al.


Entered at Tue Mar 22 22:04:15 CET 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Bar band Band covers and dancing

Even over here TSII is the standard non-Weight choice for any bar blues band that want to represent our guys in the set. Ophelia comes second, because it is basically a progression that blues musicians can understand having that Bessie Smith vamp feel and chords. Cripple Creek comes third; done that with a couple of acts over the years.

As for TSII not being danceable - and without wishing to be smutty, predictable or gratuitous -I once played it at a gig where a very foxy lady in her fifties plus twenty-something daughter were both in the audience. One in tight jeans (daughter) and one in leather pants of a similar fit (foxy mum). Both also keen to "shake it down" here and there if the tune caught their mood. As a red-blooded straight male, I assure you - there is NOTHING whatsoever wrong with The Shape I'm In as a tune for dancing. Indeed, the elder of the two women gave the title a whole new meaning for me!


Entered at Tue Mar 22 22:01:40 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Kevin J: I noticed that too. I think it was a case of, if you spoke later on in the show, you got a caption to go with your photo. As there was no Garth interview later on, I guess it was a good thing that the producers left his photo in - presumably as a sign of respect / acknowledgement that he's still around. But yes, a caption would've been nice.


Entered at Tue Mar 22 21:12:21 CET 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Sadavid: Thank you. Too bad about Garth……the record business never has been fair…….Glad to hear about The Sadies – a band I have great respect for.

Speaking of fairness – was it just me or was Garth the only musician featured at the opening of last night’s show that did not have his name highlighted under his picture.


Entered at Tue Mar 22 20:32:39 CET 2011 from (134.174.21.2)

Posted by:

Tim

Location: Boston
Web: My link

Subject: Robbies new album

You can listed to 30 second bites of each song on the album now. so far, I like it.


Entered at Tue Mar 22 20:20:38 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: 'a Canadian celebration' at the Junos (not)

Kevin J: Garth's record isn't nominated in any category; closest degree of separation is that The Sadies and Blue Rodeo's Cuddy and Keelor are scheduled to perform. Neil Young is nominated for "artist of the year" and has been announced as recipient of the Allan Waters Humanitarian Award. Great Big Sea is one of the presenters. As is Robbie Robertson.


Entered at Tue Mar 22 19:58:32 CET 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Ok….that better explains it……..The new Garth album has a couple of beauties that would work well at that type of party…….BTW……Does anyone know if it qualified for any categories at the Juno’s? I hope so……….


Entered at Tue Mar 22 19:27:17 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

They didn't have pogo sticks. They just jumped straight up and down as at punk concerts. It was for English language students so not just Europeans, but also Africans, Latin Americans and Asians all added their grace to the pogo-ing.


Entered at Tue Mar 22 19:24:42 CET 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

On second thought….more talk of “Get Up Jake” please…….If just to erase the thought of a bunch of Europeans pogo-stick dancing to Band songs…………………….”Hey Elizabeth…it’s been a tough day….forget that Wilf Carter you’ve been playing and get out the Stick as I think I ‘ve just heard The Band on the radio”……………………..Yikes!


Entered at Tue Mar 22 19:24:57 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Jet Harris

… and Jet Harris. Founding member of The Shadows and an early champion of electric bass.


Entered at Tue Mar 22 19:18:36 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

Subject: Jet Harris

… and Jet Harris. Founding member of The Shadows and an early champion of electric bass.


Entered at Tue Mar 22 19:18:36 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Pinetop & Mooney

The passing of Pinetop Perkins is indeed sad news. I got to see him play several times with Muddy Waters back in the '70s.

The great steel guitarist Ralph Mooney passed away Sunday. I was fortunate to have seen him playing with Waylon Jennings several times also during that decade.

In the last few days we've lost two legendary musicians from two different backgrounds, who both contributed a great deal to American music.


Entered at Tue Mar 22 18:36:34 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Dancing to The Shape I'm In

I sometimes used to be inveigled into doing the disco when a DJ friend was on holiday. I always loved the striding start of The Shape I'm In. I tried it late 70s, and people pogo-danced to it. Try it in the comfort of your living room. It really works with the song.


Entered at Tue Mar 22 18:34:20 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: The Unthanks

The Decemberists, yes … go even folkier and seek out The Unthanks. The Northumberland accents are great, and they're becoming ever more eclectic. On Saturday in Exeter they covered songs by Tom Waits and Robert Wyatt before closing the main set with a re-invention of King Crimson's "Starless." That's not what you'd expect from a roots English folk group … but try it on the link. They were SO good that I'm going to see them again tomorrow night near Southampton.


Entered at Tue Mar 22 18:27:49 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Kristie: Certainly true of "The Shape I'm In", which seems to have become an Ontario a bar-band stable. And yes, people do find a way to dance to it, often aided by alcohol.

Kevin J: Me, I didn't mind, but I suspect you also found it too choppy for your liking. I can see people wishing the director had stuck longer with a point rather than presenting it in little bits and expecting the viewer to make sense of it all. Maybe Bruce MacDonald is a closet sufi? As Grant Smith says, Yonge Street was a mixture of sex and violence. That kinetic mixture was famously present in Hawkins and the Hawks, as we knew long before now. Sex and violence breed rock and roll and rock and roll breeds sex and violence. No surprise that Yonge Street had lots of all of them. Maybe it should be seen as as sociology and urban planning and not just music history.


Entered at Tue Mar 22 18:21:36 CET 2011 from (64.105.104.209)

Posted by:

Pat B

People, people, people. Pinetop Perkins was at TLW and helped sing Caledonia. Played piano on that and Mannish Boy. C'mon.


Entered at Tue Mar 22 17:55:12 CET 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Bill M: I understand this but things just seemed a bit more clipped than usual………..My sense was that last year’s doc on the history of Canadian music presented a lot more performance in a much shorter period of time…….I am not sure we needed 15 minutes on who carried what knives and how many fights there were in place of actual music…………or decent conversation with people about the MUSIC………..Levon set more of a scene in a 15 second clip from The Band documentary and gave people a sense of what Yonge street was really like back in the day than a lot of what was presented last night………………


Entered at Tue Mar 22 17:53:07 CET 2011 from (79.202.178.152)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: letter from Japan

A Japanese colleague of ours, from our Japanese plant, wrote an email to us all explaining the situation over there. Luckily they haven't been hit at that location, but, i.m.o. it gives a good inside information of the situation in Japan at the moment and their remarkable ability to stay calm.(below a part of his well written letter).

"On March 11, an earthquake measuring 9.0 on the Richter scale occurred in the northern and eastern parts of Japan facing the Pacific Ocean, which was felt as far as 500km inland in the Tokyo area. The earthquake shook us for more than five minutes, compared with the 15 seconds of the 1995 quake in the Kobe and Awaji area.

In addition to its magnitude, since the earthquake occurred under the sea, it triggered a tsunami – more than 15 meters high in some places – which reached the coast within ten minutes. North-eastern areas such as the Iwate, Miyagi and Fukushima prefectures suffered catastrophic damage.

Evacuated Five days after the disaster, the number of casualties and missing people already exceeds 10,000, while 450,000 have been evacuated and are staying at 2,500 emergency shelters which have been set up at schools, hospitals, city halls and various other locations.

In addition to the physical damage of infrastructure such as roads, communication is also down (mobile phones have not worked since the disaster occurred due to excessive demand on the available capacity). This has resulted in a continuous shortage of aid supplies such as water, food, heating equipment, medicine and even blankets. In some places with no accessibility and no access to communications, no aid supplies had been delivered even after five days, despite the existence of tens of thousands of public services operating in the areas. The weather forecast is another problem, with winter temperatures and even snow expected.

The other shocking news caused by the disaster surrounds the Fukushima nuclear power plant, which again is raising questions about the credibility of safety standards. The nuclear power industry in Japan has very strict safety standards, but special teams are struggling to cool the reactors with sea water following the failure of back-up cooling systems. These back-up systems – many of which rely on electric power – were knocked out by the tsunami. Due to increased radiation levels, the evacuation area around the plant was expanded from 3km to 20km on the fourth day.

Due to the shutdown of the Fukushima facility – which also provides electric power to Tokyo and its surrounding area – power cuts have been imposed since the fourth day after the earthquake. This obviously affects people’s lives and the economy. Tokyo and eight of the surrounding prefectures are divided into five areas where power cuts are in place. These last for a maximum of three hours in some areas if expected demand exceeds the current capacity of power supply. Tokyo city center is excluded and no power cuts are being imposed there.

This has a big impact on our daily life in terms of public transportation, traffic signals, water supply, using cash machines, telephones, the internet, elevators and so on. There’s also a shortage of gasoline, not only due to fires at several oil refineries, but also because of increasing demand to supply fuel for rescue activities in the worst affected areas. Fuel is also needed to allow aid supplies to continue. Supply of gasoline has now been limited to up to 20 liters for each individual. Long queues of cars on many roads is now a familiar scene. I went to the grocery store today. More than 80 percent of the food shelves were empty.

Industry Japanese industry is also starting to suffer. For example, car manufactures have stopped operating, not only because of the power cuts, but also due to the unavailability of parts from suppliers. Many different industries depend on small companies spread around whole country. Some have been seriously damaged by the earthquake and tsunami. The chemical industry is also suffering due to plant damage for upstream product lines such as oil and ethylene. Nippon Steel, Sumitomo Metal, Hitachi, Kobe Steel, major pulp and paper manufactures and some food manufactures are also facing shutdown of some production lines. The current structure of our society is proving to be far weaker than people thought.

All of this is having a negative impact on global financial markets. On March 15, the NYSE dropped $300 in the wake of European and Asian stock markets. In the commodity exchange market, the price of oil and gold has become volatile.

Yet in spite of such severe and testing circumstances, people at the emergency shelters are unified and are trying to help each other cope with the situation. In other areas, people are cooperating by saving energy and spending more time commuting without complaining. People are becoming more tolerant than they were just a few days earlier and are thinking more about others. Many say they can’t complain if they compare their own situation with that of those in the worst hit areas.

This is the first time for many years that so many Japanese people have started to think seriously about their own safety, the safety of their family, their neighbors, their city and their society. It has become a top priority. We believe that we can overcome this disaster and rebuild a more harmonized society. Safety will become our key word.

Once again, we appreciate your support. We are looking forward to working with you again very soon here in Japan.”



Entered at Tue Mar 22 17:46:30 CET 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: DEE - Battleground Wisconsin or Wirral

Your pain is shared certainly in UK Dee.

The linked video is a thoroughly depressing example of just how international capitalists have become totally unaccountable for their salivating self serving greed.


Entered at Tue Mar 22 17:40:02 CET 2011 from (41.97.180.231)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Subject: onanism - addendum

indeed, it was implicitly meant in my last post, the author of the text himself can read it later, then it belongs to him a second time, etc...


Entered at Tue Mar 22 17:38:50 CET 2011 from (72.78.32.29)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love
Web: My link

Subject: Pinetop

The great Pinetop Perkins passed away yesterday at 97 and by some strange twist of fate on the birthday of the man he replaced in the Muddy Waters Band, Otis Spann. The link is to guitarist Bob Margolin's account of the Last Waltz for those who may not have seen it.


Entered at Tue Mar 22 17:36:03 CET 2011 from (70.77.200.21)

Posted by:

kristie

Subject: Dancing to The Band-The Decemberists

My friend from Simcoe has told me that you can not go to a party in Simcoe, or anywhere else in Ontario, without hearing and/or dancing to a few Band songs, namely "Ophelia and Shape I'm in." I don't know if this is true, but it made me smile, as I always put The Band on my party playlists.

I was also told by this friend(who is a tree planter in the summer)that The Band is very popular in camp.

Peter-I have had the pleasure of seeing The Decemberists live twice and they were both fantastic shows. To me, the female vocalists really shine. And I appreciate their quirky take on old sea shanties, etc. They covered a Vashni Bunyan song at one show, I can't recall which one, and that got me listening to her music.


Entered at Tue Mar 22 17:13:36 CET 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: NY
Web: My link

Subject: Donald Fagen & ABB 3-17-11


Entered at Tue Mar 22 17:12:50 CET 2011 from (41.97.180.231)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: onanism

I am partisan of the ideology

"As soon as a text is published, it belongs to whom reads it"

.. "belongs" extends to its widest significant, including knowledge, responsibility in a certain extent, property in the bounds of ethics and commercial laws, etc…

this has nothing to do with anything, just read a quote in a local newspaper, I found it funny enough to be worth GB posting :
"poverty is less painful under a lot of incomes"
paraphrasing the famous line of Charles Awnavour "poverty is less painful under the sun" I hope nothing is lost in translation


Entered at Tue Mar 22 16:54:50 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronno
Web: My link

Subject: Yonge Street

Kevin J: I thought there was lots of music, though because we were listening to a soundtrack to a documentary that was - almost be definition - mostly talking, what we heard was snippets of songs that were chosen to go with specific bits of film. Just like movies, where if you want the full versions of the songs you buy the soundtrack album. Among the songs heard on part one were one by Jackie Shane, two or three by Tommy Danton, one by the Blue Tones, one by Curley Bridges backed by rest of Frank Motley and the Motley Crew, a bunch by Hawkins and the early Hawks, one by Max Falcon, one by the Canadian Squires, one by Levon and the Hawks, one by Tommy Ambrose and no doubt others than aren't springing to mind. Let's hope that there will be a separate soundtrack album that will include the songs in full.

The link is to a CBC podcast featuring a good, long interview with Duff Roman about the show and its contents, including a fair bit of talk about Robbie's style and influence. Note that Duff comes on second, meaning you'll have to listen to or skip over a dull discussion of legal sentencing.


Entered at Tue Mar 22 16:37:16 CET 2011 from (66.102.79.162)

Posted by:

Nick

Location: Kingston
Web: My link

It's got fear of falling, straight down the line...


Entered at Tue Mar 22 16:37:08 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: Pinetop

Mr. Perkins joined Levon, Garth (and Butter) etc. behind Muddy on _The Muddy Waters Woodstock Album_ (1975). I think Pinetop takes a vocal verse or two on "Kansas City" if memory serves . . . .

The link says Levon on bass _and_ drums; could that be right?


Entered at Tue Mar 22 16:26:47 CET 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Yonge Street

A few observations on the Yonge Street Rock n Roll documentary last night:

* Documentaries of any sort don’t work well in one hour segments with commercial breaks that seem to come every 5 minutes….Makes for a frustrating viewing experience. Just as things heated up last night and they really did in the last 20 minutes or so, the hour was over. Such are the commercial realities of TV but you wonder if the producers would have been better served to find a main sponsor and present the special in a CBC/PBS format of “brought to you by” rather than the approach they chose of multiple advertisers and what seemed like 20 commercial breaks.

* I thought of my Dad last night……..in that for my entire life he seemed to me to be the same age…..and then suddenly at 80 he seemed to get older………Ronnie Hawkins has always seemed to me to be exactly the same…so last night was a bit jarring to see how frail he was……..This is life of course….it happens to us all but director Bruce McDonald is like that crazy cousin at Christmas parties that takes pleasure in snapping off candid photos of guests…….His camera angles used with Ronnie and Robbie could not have been more unflattering ( what was with that sideways up-close shot of Robbie’s face? ) ……….Minor aesthetics I know but this sort of thing bothers me.

* Let’s hope that there is some music in the next two segments as there was almost none last night………………That all said, for Band fans at least there was Robbie whose charisma is still quite powerful……….and he is in fine form telling stories about the bands he was in before the Hawks and just setting the Yonge street scene such as it was in 1950’s Toronto….. …..Funniest story of the night though was the guy who talked about playing prisons and the first few rows of every joint he performed in was the exact same guys that were the regulars at all gigs on Yonge Street!


Entered at Tue Mar 22 16:16:40 CET 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Onanism

Ha ha

Nice one Bill

Quietly fumes to himself - why didn't i think of that one...

:-0)


Entered at Tue Mar 22 16:07:55 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Would any of you care to give Peter a hand in his battle with onanism?


Entered at Tue Mar 22 15:27:35 CET 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Jeff's jock ularity has me in stitches

Lol - :-0)


Entered at Tue Mar 22 14:55:29 CET 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Fab story Al. May your likeness be sewn on every pair of Jockey Brand underwear.


Entered at Tue Mar 22 14:47:22 CET 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Dancing to The Band

""The main trouble with "The Shape I'm In" is the rhythm; it's just undanceable for a Band track.""

I know Sad lad, have the same trouble with Tears of Rage and Suzie. It's a bitch but you just have to grit your teeth and take it real real slow...

;-0)


Entered at Tue Mar 22 14:45:07 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Strawberry Wine

I think "Strawberry Wine" is an excellent song. In addition to songwriting co-credit & lead vocal, Levon also played rhythm guitar (see link).


Entered at Tue Mar 22 14:35:11 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: see the man

The main trouble with "The Shape I'm In" is the rhythm; it's just unusually boring / non-swinging / undanceable for a Band track. But it has many fine and redeeming qualities . . . you could hear this one on the radio from time to time -- what a treat to hear something as cool and bizarre as Garth's long solo, on the crappy top-40 radio.

Can't let a mention of "Daniel and the Sacred Harp" pass without mentioning my working theory that the tune is a bit of a nod to P. Butterfield. The funny thing in this regard is the "would you mind . . . if I look it over." I don't know how eager guitar players are to let someone else's hands caress the neck of their sweet blonde Telecaster . . . for a harp player, the lending of an instrument takes on a whole other level of intimacy . . . .

Picture the barker at the World of Wonders: bow tie, arm bands, straw boater, sweeping his cane around to point: "See the man with the stage fright . . . "


Entered at Tue Mar 22 14:25:32 CET 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: True Story - honest guv ;-0)

A group of primary school infants, accompanied by two female teachers, went on a field trip to Cheltenham Races [famous UK racecourse] to see and learn about thoroughbred horses.

When it was time to take the children to the toilet, it was decided that the girls would go with one teacher and the boys would go with the other.

The teacher assigned to the boys was waiting outside the male toilet when one of the boys came out and told her that none of them could reach the urinal to have a wee.

Having no choice, she went inside to help the boys with their underpants and stuff and began hoisting the boys up, one by one, holding their little willies to direct the flow away from their clothes.

As she lifted one, she couldn't help but notice that he was unusually well endowed. Impressed yet trying not to show that she was staring, the teacher said, 'why you must be in year four.'

'No, love,' he replied.

"I'm riding Silver Arrow in the next race"

True story... I was that jockey...I married the teacher and that is why I always put up these smiley faces

;-0)


Entered at Tue Mar 22 11:52:15 CET 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Web: My link

Subject: Emulation is flattering

See link to find the paralell.


Entered at Tue Mar 22 11:20:42 CET 2011 from (41.97.218.128)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: the hourglass scene

Bravo Mr Peter V, for everything, the “what’s new”, the posts, the links, and anything I forget

the musician Gustav Von Aschenbach, the character in Visconti’s movie “Death in Venice” played by Dirk Bogarde, is a combination of writer Gustav Aschenbach from Thomas Mann’s novel of the same title, and musician Adrian Leverkühn from “Doctor Faustus“, another Mann’s novel
in the novel, Leverkühn has been offered a hourglass as gift from Satan, and twenty four years of power within which to achieve the breakthrough in his music.

The hourglass scene in the movie Death in Venice [link], Aschenbach watching a hourglass :

“I remember there was one in my father’s house.
the aperture through which the sand runs is so tiny
that at first sight
it seems as if the level in the upper glass never changes
to our eyes it appears that the sand runs out only
only at the end
and till it does, it’s not worth thinking about
till the last moment when there’s no more time
when there’s no more time to think about it

related :

from Doctor Faustus novel. Dr Eberhard Schleppfuss :“Whenever the subject was the power of demons over human life, sex always played a prominent role.”


Entered at Tue Mar 22 10:51:29 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Pinetop Perkins departure (aged 97) made the main BBC Radio Four News this morning, and they even played a bit. Deserved, but still surprising.


Entered at Tue Mar 22 08:52:29 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: As a dog returneth …

Just re-read my own article. An onanistic task. But at the end I pointed out why Daniel & The Sacred Harp wasn't played live:

Why wasn’t the song ever performed live? It would have meant Rick playing a sustained fiddle part, and someone else playing bass (it has a great Rick bass part). Levon could have, which would have placed Richard on drums live. I don’t think he drummed on his lead vocals on stage. Levon would have had to sing lead and play bass - unprecedented on live shows, and we'd lose the second guitar. Robbie would have had to choose between guitar and autoharp. Garth would have had to synthesize the pump organ part - possible by 1975, but impossible in 1970. It wasn’t a practical proposition.


Entered at Tue Mar 22 08:43:27 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Daniel & The Sacred Harp

Link to my article, which begins:

When my elder son was born the midwife said, “Daniel? Like the song?”

“I hadn’t really thought about it,” I replied, “Maybe it is. It was always a favourite.”

Daniel is leaving tonight on a plane … she sang.

“What? No! No way! Not the Elton John song!”

Actually I like the Elton John song very much. But that's not what had come to mind. The article is convoluted but there are lots of quotes about the song. Todd summed it up perfectly.


Entered at Tue Mar 22 07:41:47 CET 2011 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: Stage Fright

Strawberry Wine would still be one of my favourite Band songs. DATSH - I much prefer the feel of the outake.

AS for the 90s Band not playing SW - they did make some strange /lazy choices.


Entered at Tue Mar 22 04:02:25 CET 2011 from (99.235.255.183)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: Bravo music...

Here's the rest of the lists. Hope they are OK. Some, of course are repeats, but all goodies.

++++++++++++++++++++++++

Wed. 3/23/11

At the Concert Hall...... Nikki Yanofsky

Description ... Canadian jazz-pop singing sensation Nikki Yanofsky takes to the stage at the legendary Masonic Temple.

Station Channel ... BRAVO 40

Start Time Duration . 9:00 pm 60 minutes

Genre Rating ... Music

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Thurs.3/24/11

Playlist... Juno Playlist

Description ... Playlist celebrates Juno's 40th birthday by paying tribute to four decades of great Canadian Music.

Station Channel... BRAVO 40

Start Time Duration ... 8:00 pm 60 minutes

Genre Rating .... Music

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

At the Concert Hall... Michael Bublé

Station Channel .... BRAVO 40

Start Time Duration ....... 9:00 pm 60 minutes

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Friday, 3/25/2011

Live at the Rehearsal Hall..k.d.lang

Description ... Canadian singer-songwriter k.d. lang takes centre stage in the next instalment of Bravo!'s Gemini award-winning concert series 'Live at the Rehearsal Hall.' The Grammy Award-winning artist will perform songs from her new album, 'Watershed.'

Station Channel ...... BRAVO 40

Start Time Duration ... 8:00 pm 60 minutes

Genre Rating ... Music TV14

++++++++++++++++

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxoxo


Entered at Tue Mar 22 03:52:48 CET 2011 from (69.182.53.54)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Jake

Great discussion lately. Unfortunately, I can’t even read all of it properly at the moment, let alone make any sort of meaningful comments. Too busy trying to make a dollar. Hopefully I will get some free time to dig back into it soon. The recent discussion did inspire me though, to bring the Brown album and Rock of Ages along in the car today to listen to the different versions of ‘Get Up Jake”.

Not that we’re voting, but I’ll go on record as saying that I think the studio outtake of ‘Get Up Jake’ is superb, and would belong nicely on Brown. I never really thought about the lyrics that much before Adam and others’ interpretations, but it’s one of the tunes that the kids used to sing along to from the back of the car when they were about 5 and 7 years old. Never really thought about the morbidity factor. It was just a good sing along.

I’m one of those who feels in many ways, that everything that made the band great is represented in some way in ‘Daniel and the Sacred Harp’. Which is funny because it’s not one of the songs that I paid much attention to when I was younger. But it really grew on me after the remastered CDs came out.

‘Whispering Pines’ really grabbed my attention today while driving through a misty mix of light snow and fog. The way that Richard and Levon’s voices intertwined towards the end with Garth swirling around them was sublime.

Thanks all for the inspiration to listen to some Band music today.

Norm, I haven’t forgot about your recommendations from last week, but I’ll have to return to that another day. Ahoy!


Entered at Tue Mar 22 03:43:32 CET 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Pinetop Perkins has left the stage.


Entered at Tue Mar 22 02:14:49 CET 2011 from (99.235.255.183)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: Yonge St. etc..

To add to John D.'s...

Here is the lineup I have for now.

Yonge Street: Toronto Rock and Roll Stories (1955-1960)

Description

Features interviews with Robbie Robertson, Ronnie Hawkins, Cathy Young, Grant Smith, Stan Endersby and many more key people in the music scene.

*NEW EPISODE*

Station Channel

BRAVO 40

Start Time Duration

10:00 pm 60 minutes

Genre Rating

Documentary TVPG

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

TUESDAY, 3/22/11

MusiCares Person of the Year... Neil Young Description Awards

Station Channel

BRAVO 40

Start Time Duration

9:00 pm 60 minutes

Genre Rating

Awards TVPG

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

At the Concert Hall......... Johnny Reid Description

Juno Award winner Johnny Reid performs fan favourites from his hit album 'A Place Called Love.'

Station Channel

BRAVO 40

Start Time Duration 8:00 pm 60 minutes

Genre Rating

Music TVPG

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Yonge Street: Toronto Rock and Roll Stories... (1960-1965)

Description

Features interviews with Ian Tyson, Sylvia Fricker, Gordon Lightfoot, John Finley, Kay Taylor, Shawne Jackson and many more key people in the music scene.

*NEW EPISODE*

Station Channel ... BRAVO 40

Start Time Duration

10:00 pm 60 minutes

Documentary TVPG

Neil Young's on now

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxoxo


Entered at Tue Mar 22 02:09:56 CET 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Adam2 (again!) - Just Another W S

Actually, Brins likes the tune because Stage Fright is his favourite album. He fathoms that BP and Brown are both so well known and universally lauded that if you could get beyond the austere front of SF, you had the most rewarding listen. Take his point totally.

Brins even bought a vibrato pedal so we could play Time To Kill! As I have said before, for life I will consider it an enormous shame that band never took off. It was a blast playing all that stuff withg him, and getting to play all Bob Andrews' old Brinsleys and GP & the Rumour parts that I had pulled apart and dissected for years before! But Brinsley had been retired too long, I think.


Entered at Tue Mar 22 01:53:27 CET 2011 from (208.57.247.136)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland Tx

Subject: The Two Jakes

After reading the mention of the "Rock Of" flub on the disc in "Mystery Train" I raced home from some record Store on the North Side of Chicago ( help Pat?) which kept a large rack of in print singles on hand just like the albums. What a cool thing to find. If they hadn't done "Get Up Jake" live, seems to me Robbie could have slipped the studio version onto "The Basement Tapes." Though the songwriting feels like "The Band" the music leaves Sammy's basement and heads back to Woodstock. Unlike most Band songs, when you get down to it, it is a rare example of the song being really given a different feel onstage. If they had really put it on hold (ala the Doors, "Indian Summer" a good track no matter what Peter V says) it might have been an interesting entry on "Cahoots", and eliminated the redundant theme of "Last Of The Blacksmiths" and "Where Do We Go From Here?" If "Where Do" had gone the way of the Bison.


Entered at Tue Mar 22 01:34:02 CET 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Adam2

I know EXACTLY what you mean about D&TSH. It doesn't do it for me either. It tries TOO hard to be sophisticated and at the same time so simple, of which it is neither. After All La Glory as the sublime "mellow" tune of the LP, it doesn't come close for my tastes.

That's a good comment on Strawberry W - take it for what it is, not throw it away because it isn't Elanor Rigby or MacArthur Park. Like I say, it is the exotic flourishes of the lead instruments and the somewhat elastic form to at least one verse that makes it stand head and shoulders above - for example - the turgid, plodding and lumpen blues rock that my home turf served up in bucketloads and people inexplicably lapped up like manna.

In general I don't like "souped up" live versions of songs that destroy the fragile beauty of the original. I mentioned a dislike for Get Up Jake in the later incarnation but The Band have a few interpretations I don't care for. Why did they NEVER sing the verses of Chest Fever in the right place? Even bootlegs as far back as Woodstock confirm this. Time To Kill is another one - why is there that horrible gratuitous accent on the opening guitar that changes the feel of the piece from homespun quirk into stadium rock? As a nascent songwriter, I blame the rhythm section. It is a devil of a job to convince them that some songs SHOULD trot along like a clockwork cart-horse and not be a hotbed of dynamics, accents and clever rhythmic measures that, if truth be told, make it fun for them and destroy the concept in mind!

Agree fully on Don't Do It, though! Just thought that after a bootleg version had become a radio hit, it might have been a good move.


Entered at Tue Mar 22 00:42:49 CET 2011 from (99.141.31.86)

Posted by:

Adam2

I think the heroin interpretation provides a pretty clear reason why the song hasn't ever been played by the '90s Band, or by Levon these days. That, and the co-writing credit with Robbie maybe.

Daniel & The Sacred Harp doesn't quite make it for me. Some of the lines are a bit uninspired and seem forced, which would prevent it from being "perfect". Opinions here are often pretty different, which is what makes discussing these things interesting in the first place. Daniel really stands out to me as the one song on Stage Fright that's really experimental and ambitious, but that doesn't quite make it.


Entered at Tue Mar 22 00:20:30 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Pub Quizzes

As in most exams, the secret is knowing what answer is written on the question master's card, rather than the real "right" answer. So, in a pub quizz, when they say "Who were Terry & Julie in Waterloo Sunset?" you churn out the answer on the card. It's not true, the film is three months later than the single, but you know what's written on the card.


Entered at Tue Mar 22 00:17:16 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Ah, I'm in agreement that Side Two of Stage Fright is perfect, so Stage Fright & Daniel & The Sacred Harp are part of the five perfect songs.

Strawberry Wine – I never understood why the 90s Band didn't play it. It was better than three other fairly generic R&B songs in their set. They should have played it. But it's not a great or distinctive-enough song to compete with the rest of Stage Fright. A very good Levon warm up. No more.


Entered at Tue Mar 22 00:13:06 CET 2011 from (99.141.31.86)

Posted by:

Adam2

I'd have to agree that the live versions of Get Up Jake and Don't Do It improved the arrangements, but I still love the studio versions of both. With so little outtakes from the "classic" period, it only seems appropriate to treasure each one.

I can totally understand why Just Another Whistle Stop would be one of Brinsley Schwarz's favorite Band song. His group (with Nick Lowe, as he described on Elvis Costello's TV show with Levon) lent the Band their rehearsal space for the 1974 Wembley concert. I'm sure anyone watching the Band warm up in rehearsals, starting with Garth's sax into that powerful Hard Times (The Slop) / Just Another Whistle Stop pairing, would have the memory burned into their minds forever.


Entered at Tue Mar 22 00:03:31 CET 2011 from (99.141.31.86)

Posted by:

Adam2

Interesting comments from all of you guys re: Get Up Jake and Stage Fright.

I have to say I disagree with some opinions on Strawberry Wine though. Many seem to rate it lower because of what it isn't, rather than taking the song as is. It's a great, simple blues rocker that has the guys writing some original lyrics with the blues format. Interesting recording too, with Richard's very creative drumming, Garth's accordion effects, Rick's galloping bass line and Robbie's guitar work. I agree that it would be very self-conscious and not realistic at all for Robbie and Levon to sit down and decide to write a song about heroin use. I don't think they were TRYING to write a song about heroin use, which makes it all the more haunting to me. Wasn't the song literally supposed to be about Levon or Rick's uncle making homemade moonshine? I thought I read that somewhere once in an article here. The song is haunting to me because it WASN'T consciously about heroin, yet the dark interpretation of the lyrics is right under the surface. I just find it hard to believe that a song from the Stage Fright period, where drug use and personal troubles supposedly began affecting the group, could have the lyrics and title of Strawberry Wine and be interpreted as not having any allusions to heroin use. It's even documented that the 3 singers in the Band began their heroin habits around this time.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 23:21:22 CET 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Pat (Jake/Don't Do It)

True Pat - the boys didn't reckon them, so off they stayed. It's funny, isn't it - I don't like the later, slower arrangement of Get Up Jake at all. I took my cues from the bonus cut on the brown CD. Each to their own - it makes the world go round!!


Entered at Mon Mar 21 23:09:57 CET 2011 from (12.51.52.166)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Al,everyone wants to return to their roots in their old age.

Discussing The Band and Springsteen going back 40 years in the same paragraph, maybe even the same sentence, was a giveaway. Referring to Eagles as fab, cmon man, only a Scouser would do that. Smiling after was saying hi guys, it's Al. I'm home.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 23:05:18 CET 2011 from (64.105.104.209)

Posted by:

Pat B

There's a reason the Don't Do It and Get Up Jake studio efforts didn't make the first three albums: the boys didn't think enough of them to put them there. The live version of Don't Do It is far superior to the studio recording--not even close. I suppose Get Up Jake live via ROA benefits from Richard taking the first verse instead of Levon, and the overdubbing of the Hohner electric piano (and corresponding redaction of the real piano) from the track behind RR's guitar solo adds some pizzazz. There's a new, more thought out arrangement with the start on the verse plus Garth and RR soloing. But where Don't Do It was and continued to be a concert staple, Jake died literally after RoA.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 22:32:35 CET 2011 from (81.58.164.25)

Posted by:

René Vis

Location: The Netherlands

Subject: Time To Kill (1970)

In 1970, at the age of of 10, I bought the single Time To Kill/The Shape I'm In in the Dutch blue sleeve. I still think they're 2 great songs. I just read that this 45 is very rare. And I threw it away after buying Stage Fright...


Entered at Mon Mar 21 21:58:32 CET 2011 from (76.66.127.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Ooops! Now I'm getting sloppy......Lars: Here's Bill Avis again.....road manager of Levon and The Hawks.....and you'll see Jerome. Even his kit has LEVONHELM.COM on it. My memory of Bill that day in Cobourg, Ontario was introducing me to his son....and of Bill playing with one of his grandchildren in the park. Another Road Warrior at Toronto's Silver Dollar told me that Bill was at Levon's show with The Barnburners but I missed him that night.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 21:45:55 CET 2011 from (76.66.127.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

I thought Jason didn't sound right.....but then Bill M is such an expert that I gave him the benefit of the doubt. When I looked at the photos I took of Jerome Avis (Levon's Godson) son of Bill Avis (Band Road Manager)....yes, it's Jerome. BTW JD....imagezulu has our clock radio and stereo radio programmed for 91.1 FM because of his love of jazzzzzz....but for the past 20 years, he also had it on.....but different name then....CJRT.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 21:39:18 CET 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Jake/Stage Fright running order (and Billy Paul for Bill M)

Bill, once when I saw the Welsh psych band Man, lead guitarist Micky Jones (RIP) soundchecked with Me & Mrs J. Of course, it wasn't anywhere near so risque under the circumstances, just a declaration of domestic status!

Right then, Stage Fright etc. Some good banter on that today, I thought and had to chip in. Agree: 1) There are some weak songs 2) You could make half a 'good as Pink & Brown' album out of it as the selection stands. So here goes my "Fantasy Stage Fright":

1) Shape I'm In - yes, a no-brainer, should have been the opening cut.

2) Sleeping - always neck and neck in the race for "RTO's favourite RM song" with We Can Talk, and couldn't imagine it anywhere else but track 2

3) Time To Kill - Surprised that PV finds it weak; I've always rather enjoyed it. Has all my favourite little quirks: the vocals, the opening guitar measure with the vibrato effect on it (would love to know what JR2 used as most amps had tremolo which is a different kind of modulation - must have been an old Magnatone amp like Buddy Holly had); that old school vibe to the chords: A-F#7-Bm-B-E in the verse - and for me a much needed return to the simple, rustic air that the first two albums abounded in and SF lacked.

4) J.A.W.S. - Again, disagree with PV on this one being weak. Interesting structure, a real sense of despair and believe it or not one of Brinsley Schwarz's favourite Band tunes. He had us try and learn that one a few times.

5) W.S.W.M.S - Gotta love the medicine show. Enough said!

6) Strawberry Wine - Yes, it's a bit "pub blues" but with enough eccentricity (Garth's wah-wahed accordion; Levon's extra bars "more than double fine...that rich man down the line" to make it work PROVIDING you don't expect it to open an album. Interesting too that the answer to all the JRR/LH feuding over credits etc - and some feedback I had about making a special overseas trip to see a Midnight Ramble - are all possible here: Levon is quite happy playing bluesy stuff like he always did in the Hawks. THAT SAID - like TTK, I always thought that compared to the rest of the dark and claustrophobic vibe of SF vs the first two LPs, it added a much needed sense of good rootsy music, certainly in tune with the original brief of SF that JRR has said was to be a chance to lighten up a bit and just play some rock & roll after the intense craftsmanship of the Brown LP.

7) Don't Do It - it had been a radio hit, there are enough versions of it knocking around and if they'd pulled it out for Cahoots it would have clashed with LIAC stylistically.

8) Get Up Jake - as has been mentioned, has the style and sound of a tune that is post Brown LP particularly in the TSII style intro - and a fitting tune musically and stylistically to bring "Side 1" to a close where I placed it originally - but swapped with WSWMS to spread LHs vocals out more evenly over the record

9) All La Glory - a gentle wind-down time before the final, familiar closing tour-de force of...

10) The Rumor. Could YOU imagine anything else to close that LP? Me neither.

But now I've said it, I hear "WHAT WHAT WHAT? Do you REALLY mean that for you, the title track and Daniel & The Sacred Harp are the WEAK ones?"

Yep. That's it in a nutshell, for me anyway. Daniel & The Sacred Harp just bores me a bit, and the title track I always thought was a bit glossy and schmaltzy, almost sounded like TLW in advance. So yes - you'd have to call the album something else!!!! But whatever personal ideas and thoughts we have from the outside and with 20-20 hindsight, as Macca said during the Anthology series on the much-debated issue of whether the White album would have made a stronger single disc set "....but then again, it sold millions, it's great, it's the bloody Beatles White album..shut up!". Or similar.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 21:39:19 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Lars Millar: In this instance, you get to choose.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 21:36:47 CET 2011 from (99.254.209.45)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Lars

It is Avis Lars. Son of Bill Avis, former road manager for Levon and the Hawks.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 21:21:00 CET 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: NY Nitpickers Assoc.

Subject: nitpicking

Is it Jerome Ivis or Avis?

FYI: Rando will be playing with the Charles James Blues Band at the High Falls Cafe on April 9th.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 21:20:41 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Emmett Miller & His Georgia Crackers

Then there's the obscure minstrel singer & blackface comedian from Georgia -- Emmett Miller (1900-1962). He was famous for his renditions of such songs as "I Ain't Got Nobody" and "Lovesick Blues", which influenced singers like Jimmie Rogers, Hank Williams and Merle Haggard. Later immortalized in Nick Toches' "Where Dead Voices Gather".


Entered at Mon Mar 21 21:12:59 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Jerome, not Jason

Oops - my mistake. As John D says, Ivis the younger is Jerome. Says right on the poster I failed to read properly! I also agree with John D re John Kay; he looks 50 tops to me.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 21:12:48 CET 2011 from (99.254.209.45)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Joan

Will do.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 21:11:04 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Internet Documentary

John D please let us know when it will be available for viewing on the Internet. We can't get it here in the US.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 20:53:19 CET 2011 from (99.254.209.45)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Toronto R&R & R&B

Thanks to the producer and Bravo, I have seen all three episodes of the show that begins tonight at 10:00 p.m. Will be anxious to see what people think. There will be an "internet" version; which will be longer and those cut for time (me for one) will be in that version. I will say that John Kay looks incredible. Coming from Oshawa it was nice to see footage of The Sparrow.

Footage of Yonge Street; both black and white and in colour takes you back.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 20:49:08 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: something's happening, but he don't know what it is ...

sadavid's reference to McCabe and Mrs Miller reminds me to ask if any of you know if Mr Jones ever found out what his wife was up to with Billy Paul? Always seemed so unfair to me, them taking up while he was trying to help out that the New York mining disaster. It's unlikely that anything would've come out at all if Bob Dylan hadn't opened his yap, but that's life.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 20:44:27 CET 2011 from (99.254.209.45)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Jerome

The last time I saw Jerome Avis he was still named Jerome. Known him since he was a young lad. Great young man!!!


Entered at Mon Mar 21 20:41:30 CET 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Rescuing The Hollies

Jeez sadavid.

Balance restoration required on Manchester's finest


Entered at Mon Mar 21 20:38:14 CET 2011 from (64.105.104.209)

Posted by:

Pat B

Rhett Miller from the Old 97's, and he did Dang Me on a Pine Valley Cosmonauts CD.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 20:33:57 CET 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Wink Martindale

Best name of any artist ever.

Not sure if the rumour he had a tick in his left eye is true tho


Entered at Mon Mar 21 20:33:34 CET 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Miller

And my favourite one Peter - Jerry from Moby Grape!!!


Entered at Mon Mar 21 20:29:05 CET 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Ball of Confusion

I think it's simply the christian names Pete. I'm easily confused. Especially these days.

:-0)

Seriously, at the time they had those big hits it was all clear. Have to say both were fine songs and I loved both. Then around ten years later in a pub quiz one of the questions was who sang Yesterday Man. I was that convinced it was Chris Farlowe I ending up having this huge punch up with a mate in our team who was equally convinced it wasn't but couldn't remember who it was. [Slight embellishment here - we actually threw beer mats at each other :-0)]

Since then I've seen Chris Farlowe twice in concert. Great singer. And seems like a good egg too.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 20:23:33 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: and Mrs. Miller . . .


Entered at Mon Mar 21 20:20:55 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: And which of them was the talkative one in Procol Harum's "Whiter Shade Of Flour"?


Entered at Mon Mar 21 20:01:08 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Milibands

What a lot of Millers there are.

Betty, Buddy, Gary, Glen,Frankie, Jimmy, Jody, Kenny, Ned, Roger, Bob (1), Bob (2), Steve. But who can name a tune by each of them?


Entered at Mon Mar 21 19:51:07 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: England Swings

Al, I've always confused Ned Miller and Roger Miller. Let alone Arthur Miller, who got the best-looking wife of the three. I keep trying to find the right spoof version of Deck of Cards (When I look at the deuce, I think of the two wise men. When I look at the three, I remember there were three of them … probably not that, but something like that). Who did it? I thought it was the David Frost version, but i found it and it's not.

But I've never confused Out of Time with Yesterday Man. Is it physical appearance that's causing the confusion?


Entered at Mon Mar 21 19:47:03 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Put a rope around their necks and hang them

Not at all. I've been listening to The Unthanks all day yesterday and today after seeing them on Saturday, and it was just a case of being in a different league … like all day with the Premier League (The Unthanks) then down to the old Third Division (North) for Buddy Miller … a reference for Al Edge there.

I loved Shawn Colvin (track 8) and Emmylou Harris (track 10). I thought Freight Train is what happens when four very adept guitarists get in a room and noodle about with no particular purpose. I thought Why Baby Why (which is on the DVD) dull, certainly not worth showcasing, and there was a sameness about the sound throughout. I like Bill Frisell's playing normally. I like the Buddy Miller CD I was sent by a poster here.

It's a case of putting Shawn Colvin and Emmylou Harris on my iTunes playlist and forgetting the rest. Most of it's pretty mediocre, but Dang Me! is just SO misguided that it leaps out.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 19:46:22 CET 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: The Miller told a tale

Okay. Honest answers only. Smart arses not allowed to answer. :-0)

Who never ever got muxed ip between King of the Road Roger Miller and Jack to a King Ned Miller?

Whilst I'm on it. Maybe just the Brits. What about Chris Farlowe Out of Time and Chris Andrews Yesterday Man.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 19:34:53 CET 2011 from (67.42.3.239)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Buddy Miller's

Peter V - I think your negative take is a bit OTT, and maybe even innacurate: given that those 2 players (Frisell & Ribot) are renowned for their guitar noodling, there really isn't much of that on this record. I'm in 100% agreement with David P on Dang Me.

On R Miller, there were a couple of nice "Husbands & Wives" covers that came out last year, by Bill Kirchen and John Doe & The Sadies.

Are you in a grumpy mood today or what?


Entered at Mon Mar 21 18:55:27 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: On the Marcs

Peter: I rather enjoyed the reinterpretation of "Dang Me", in which Roger Miller's humor is replaced with the mood of desperation that matches the lyrics. Marc Anthony Thompson (Chocolate Genius) and Marc Ribot first performed this variation while briefly working together in clubs in a group called the Crackers.

While he didn't appear on Roger Miller's original recording of "Dang Me", the longitme friend of Garth & The Band, guitarist Thumbs Carllile, played in Mr. Miller's road band for many years. Pianist Hargus "Pig" Robbins did play on that recording and later worked on Dylan's "Blonde On Blonde".


Entered at Mon Mar 21 18:51:26 CET 2011 from (79.202.168.62)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: The night of the hunter
Web: My link

Subject: The Night of the Hunter

For those in Europe with Arte on the dish; at 8.15hr (Amsterdam time) The Nigh of the Hunter. Dated? .... just pretend.

Bill M. thanks for your comment on that TLW tube (have to look again).


Entered at Mon Mar 21 18:43:39 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: Language!! Better stick to "Dang Me" if you're planning on being in the presence of Morris Levy, apparently.

BEG: My first, and perhaps only, show at the Colonial had former Hawk Scott Cushnie on keyboards backing Bill Amesbury on his "A Thrill's a Thrill" 'tour'. (The song was inspired by Lou, as I suspect you know.) As for the myth-related beef stated a few minutes ago, the immediate problem was the apparent inability of that particular journalist to absorb what was in the documentary. So instead of doing the hard work of relaying the facts as stated there, he seems to have fallen back on recylcing the easy ol' myth. Jan Haust certainly doesn't need a call from me to set him straight! Congratulations would be more like it.

BEG again: The bassist in the LW tribute clips is Dennis Pinhorn, who you saw in action at least a couple times a few years ago - with Danny Brooks in Port Credit and with Garth and the Country Radio semi-reunion (dlew alert!!). He's also with the current edition of Robbie Lane and the Disciples.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 18:04:01 CET 2011 from (76.67.17.88)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Ahhhhh.....I want the mike on LOUDER!

Bill M!!!! Phone Jan Haust and make everything right......once and for all concerning our Canadian Music History! Please! As I said before, you can help Robbie with any info re The Hawks!


Entered at Mon Mar 21 17:57:15 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Dang Me … F*ck me!

Anyone else got Buddy Miller's "Majestic Silver Strings"? I heard the lovely Shawn Colvin version of Lefty Frizzell's "That's The way Love Goes" and bought the album, which is unfortunately mainly quite dull guitar noodling.

However they take on the Roger Miller classic "Dang Me" and this is a contender for most misguided cover version ever. It would definitely win the 2011 category. They take it as high drama, somewhat as The Sensational Alex Harvey Band might have done. It could have been funny if Big Daddy or Weird Al Yankovic had committed such a travesty. It might even have been dramatic if someone with Alex Harvey's vocal power had tried it, but I have a horrible feeling that these guys (Buddy Miller, Marc Ribot, Bill Frisell, Greg Leisz) are serious in their reworking. It is monumentally dreadful.

The annoying thing is I now have to find the Roger Miller, which I only have on a vinyl LP in one of four boxes I keep meaning to sort out. But I have to clean out my ears by hearing it done properly.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 17:56:38 CET 2011 from (76.67.17.88)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Who's the bass player Bill M?

It was Jason Avis who told me to save up my pennies for a Ramble. He was playing with a couple of Hawks in Cobourg at one of their festivals. I also finally met his dad Bill as well. The person who was doing the sound for them told me there was always tensions between Robbie and Levon but that's what helped to make the music of Levon and The Hawks and later with The Band so great......along of course with Rick, Richard and Garth!!! The best band ever!!!!!


Entered at Mon Mar 21 17:53:36 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronno

BEG: Thanks for the clip to the news story, but it's annoying in at least a couple of significant respects, and points up how hard it is to dislodge a myth. One of the most enduring myths is that Ronnie Hawkins introduced us to rock and roll. Not at all: he didn't arrived until '58, by which time decent rock records by local guys had already dented the local charts. I don't think the documentary spells it out as clearly as I'd like, but Frank Motley and the Motley Crew moved here in '55. They didn't play rockabilly like Hawkins did, instead coming at rock and roll from the other feeder stream, jump blues.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 17:44:15 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Here's a clip of Jason Ivis, son of Hawks road manager Bill and godson of Levon, singing "It Makes No Difference" at a Last Waltz tribute show in Kitchener. Another one's coming to Port Credit (just west of Toronto, near the foot of the Dixie Road that is mentioned in Levon's telling of the story about the airport bust.) Here's a promo sheet I received:

The Last Waltz – A Tribute to The Music of The Band
Saturday April 23rd, 8 PM
Port Credit Legion, 35 Front St N

This will be a night to remember. A night with some of the finest musicians and vocalists playing some of best music written by The Band and Robbie Robertson!

A Night of Canadiana, if you will. A night of song and dance, to sing and dance to.

You can sing-a-long, relax and watch or shout and jump up and down.

This show “The Last Waltz – A Tribute to The Music of The Band” has played to sold out shows in Kitchener-Waterloo and Orillia, where it was used as a fundraiser for the Orillia Jazz Festival.

The Last Waltz at The Legion in Port Credit will feature Port Credit’s own Tom Barlow(3 time JUNO nominee), Chuck Jackson(multiple Maple Blues Award winner & lead singer of Downchild) and Johnny Max(2 time JUNO nominee). As well as an All Star band led by Lance Anderson(Fathead, Oscar Peterson) as musical director, and, of course, Jerome Avis(Levon Helm’s godson) giving off the personal vibe that is Levon.

The Last Waltz Tribute plays music form the last concert of The Band,a s filmed by Martin Scorsece.

The Last Waltz was a concert by the group The Band, held at The Winterland Ballroom in San Francisco. The Last Waltz was advertised as the end of The Band's illustrious touring career,[1] and the concert saw The Band joined by more than a dozen special guests, including Paul Butterfield, Eric Clapton, Neil Diamond, Bob Dylan, Emmylou Harris, Ronnie Hawkins, Dr. John, Joni Mitchell, Van Morrison, Ringo Starr, Muddy Waters, Ronnie Wood, Bobby Charles and Neil Young.

“The Last Waltz – A Tribute to The Music of The Band” is is the brainchild of Lance Anderson, an iconic performer, producer and also the owner of Make It Real Records.

The Port Credit Legion is located at 35 Front St N, downtown Port Credit.

Tickets are $25 ($30 at the door) and can be found at 2 local PC shops.

Impressionable Gifts, 74 Lakeshore Rd E, 905 271 8999 Ric`s Recollections, 257 Lakeshore Rd E, 905 891 1523 The show is on Saturday April 23 at 8PM

Below are two songs form The Kitchener Fundraiser with Paul Reddick & Jerome Avis and the full band [...]


Entered at Mon Mar 21 17:40:48 CET 2011 from (76.67.17.88)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

'Yonge Street: Toronto Rock & Roll Stories' recalls 1960s music scene

I was here at The Colonial Tavern to see The Mighty Clouds Of Joy with my first flame in Toronto in 1975......and yes.....He saw The Band with Dylan the year before!! I of course was not in Toronto then...... :-(


Entered at Mon Mar 21 17:39:15 CET 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Out of the closet

Cheers Pete, Kev, Bob and all the GB neighbourhood.

The reason I try to stay under the radar is to avoid being sucked in like usual. I mean I was sorely tempted to wade into the Lefty Frizzell/Rick debate but managed to resist. I felt it had such a significant undercarriage in terms of the whole folk/country/rock issue.

But the thing is with with Jeff 'Nimrod' Alexander around there's more chance of Inspector Clouseau disguising himself as a gardener than me dipping my toe in and out of here unnoticed.

:-0)

Anyroad, it's infinitely better to be back in the open amongst all the fine folks on here than skulking around in the bushes. Just have to learn to temper the drivel a bit better. Not easy for a born driveller. :-0)

As I'm sure Pete and Fred know only too well I spend too much time on websites of my beloved LFC - as I assume Simon does also. Anyroad in the general music section of one they recently had a greatest ever albums poll. To my surprise - and delight - amidst the more obvious selections there were at least half a dozen Band nominations which for a UK footballing site is pretty impressive and prompted me to start a dedicated Band thread on there.

The upshot is a few tasty morsels that may interest the folks on here. First is a little eulogy from a lad named Cass. Nothing we on here don't already know but a nice piece, succinct yet powerful and heartfelt especially for a fairly recent addition to the Band brotherhood. Anyway, I was really moved by its sentiments. I'll post the other one soon - a far more juicy morsel I might add - but for now here's Cass's:-........

......""I was just listening to their second album earlier on. Just fucking timeless beautiful gorgeous life-affirming weep-in-your-ale brilliance. The same goes for the earlier Big Pink and the ensuing stuff like Stagefright, culminating in that incredible concert and The Last Waltz movie.

What a bunch of ludicrously talented musicians they were. Ones who steadfastly refused to show off their individual virtuosity and Clapton the crap out of it, but instead put everything at the disposal of the song, not wasting a single solitary note lest it would detract from the essence of what they were truly about.

And what songs eh? The Weight, Tears of Rage, We Can Talk, Dixie, Cripple Creek, Whispering Pines, the definitive versions of I Shall Be Released and Long Black Veil.

The Band. The Perfect name. Because that's what they were. The ultimate band.

Everything you need is is here. Country, rock, folk, roots, R&B, and the exquisite soul music of Richard Manuel. Give that man a plinth and an annex of his own in the Hall of Fame. And make every fucker who comes near it take off their shoes before entering. Oh and bow down and genuflect Poindexter. After listening to the second album I had a listen to 'Danko/Manuel' by the The Drive-By Truckers. Has this line: 'Can you hear that singing sounds like gold?'

Er...Amen Truckers.

I would just add a by the way:

Not just the singing sounds like gold."".......

Nice sentiments - yeah?


Entered at Mon Mar 21 17:27:16 CET 2011 from (64.105.104.209)

Posted by:

Pat B

Whoops, that was me, intended to address Bill M.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 17:25:55 CET 2011 from (64.105.104.209)

Posted by:

Bill M

I think a bit of that 8mm is in one of the trailers for the show.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 17:15:50 CET 2011 from (86.162.219.38)

Posted by:

RTO

Some good thoughts on Jake vs Stage Fright contenders. Will pitch in later with my four penn'orth. Would do it now but on the iPhone even this little message feels like nine days journey by yak. RM


Entered at Mon Mar 21 17:13:32 CET 2011 from (76.67.17.88)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Uh.....One of the Road Warriors would have appreciated Robbie's last name on that previous recording that I just posted. Ha, ha....."G Man". ;-D


Entered at Mon Mar 21 17:07:27 CET 2011 from (76.67.17.88)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Another album sleeve for Robbie.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 17:02:02 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: 2fer

Kevin J et al.: I just checked the Bravo! schedule; they're leading into the Yonge St. doc with a screening of Jonathan Demme's 2006 Neil Young doc _Heart of Gold_.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 16:42:38 CET 2011 from (76.67.17.88)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Mary Martin on Garth Hudson via _Whispering Pines_.

"So I made Leonard come to my apartment on Bleecker Street and I made him sing his songs in the bathtub into my little tape recorder. Then I called Garth Hudson and asked him if he would be able to make lead sheets from these tapes in order to copyright the songs, so Garth did that and they were masterpieces of calligraphy. Leonard's songs were not what you might call short, but Garth was ever so diligent and I have no idea where those beautiful pieces of artwork are now. I knew that Leonard and Judy Collins were friends, and I knew Judy, so I gave her these tapes and off she went with "Suzanne," and that was the wonderful beginning."


Entered at Mon Mar 21 16:40:49 CET 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Bill M: Thank you……..I don’t remember having a television doc that I have more looked forward to watching………That said, a bit worried about director Bruce McDonald's involvement as I did not like 2001’s “Road Stories” – at all. The format used just did not work……..Anyhow, let’s hope that they dispense with the cute stuff and stick to straight documentary style ( much like that history of Canadian rock that aired last year on the CBC )……………….The footage your article refers to of Levon and Robbie playing together BEFORE Robbie had joined the Hawks is most interesting……………….A great street with so many memories.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 16:30:57 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Web: My link

Nobody delivers the goods any better than Bruce. I've seen him maybe fifteen times now, dating back to 1972 at the Main Point, and the energy is always there. He gives it all away with every performance.

I appreciate your passion for his music and his energy, Al.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 16:23:44 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Toronna
Web: My link

Subject: yet more Yonge Street

I think I like this article the best, and not just because the guys spells my city's name the right way, that is, anything but correctly.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 16:09:21 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: more Yonge Street

This time pay particular attention to paragraph 4 in the link.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 16:03:28 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

First, here's a link to an excellent article about the Yonge Street documentary, the first part of which runs tonight. Note especially the last sentence of the fifth-last paragraph. Very few people will have seen this clip before.

Peter V: I think I'd trade a worked-up version of Jake for Jemima, which I find repulsive in a couple of places.

Adam2: I don't agree that "I give it all my money" is Levon and Robbie's version of "There's a hole in daddy's arm where all the money goes" - or anything like it. Just can't imagine one of them turning to the other and saying, "Hey Lee, why don't we write a song about your habit?" (if that part's even true). Not much of a song, I agree, but likely more about strawberry wine than anything else.

Pat B: Some of us oldtimers knew the Ian and Sylvia version of Jake long before ROA. (I mean 'long' as perceived at the time - when five years was unimaginably distant.)

Norbert: Thanks for that link. Watch Van looking right when Richard starts to sing (not that you can year him yet), then left as if to indicate "what the fuck?" to the sound guys, then right again to Richard, whose mike is eventually turned on. And who were those chowderheads cluttering up the stage and standing in the camera's way?; at least someone got them to move off - but not before the potential of a magical moment was lost. Richard's voice was magnificent and passionate but wound up on the cutting room floor for lack of technical support (from camera people and sound people), it seems to me. Makes me sad and mad.

BEG: Echoing Bob W, thanks for that phenomenal link to the Record Fiend page. Took me forever to get down to the I&S piece because I got waylaid by the Turkish thing, the blues things and, especially, the Clarence White thing. As I posted last year (or maybe it was '09), a guy with Hawks links who played on a lot of that White / Paxton stuff was Alberta guitarist Hugh Brockie, who worked with White, Jerry Sheff and Mike Cannon (?) on a series of budget LPs that Paxton recorded, and then worked with White and Sheff again for a series of Alshire budget LPs - all over the course of about a year. He then returned to Edmonton, and was eventually hired into an early '70s version of Ronnie Hawkins and the Hawks, which evolved / split into two noteworthy groups - Skylark (whose "Wildflower" lives on, after almost 40 years) and Bearfoot (aka Atkinson, Danko and Ford).


Entered at Mon Mar 21 15:49:56 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Get Up Jake

Link to another fine cover version of "Get Up Jake" recorded by the Deadstring Brothers.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 15:27:42 CET 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

…..and just when I thought it might take one of my kind of/sort of/ almost anti-Springsteen rants to get the great one back and posting again…………………..welcome back


Entered at Mon Mar 21 15:24:47 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Confirmed sighting

How are you, Al? Great to see your name in print.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 15:14:02 CET 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Kevin J - Thoughts on Get up Jake

I deffo should have plumped for Robert Mitchum instead of Gary Cooper.

:-0)


Entered at Mon Mar 21 15:06:23 CET 2011 from (71.62.70.35)

Posted by:

Charlie Y

Location: Down in Old Virginny

Subject: "Strawberry Wine"

"Strawberry Wine" is certainly the weak link on STAGE FRIGHT. I love that album but would not have cut that song. It just shows how strong the rest of the songs are. I think the first three LPs worked as a trilogy in a way, like Dylan's BRINGING IT ALL BACK HOME, HIGHWAY 61 REVISITED and BLONDE ON BLONDE. Classics all, with the artists working at the peak of their creative powers.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 15:04:13 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: overtake and undertake

It's weird - "Strawberry Wine" and "Forbidden Fruit" both take addiction as their theme. Both Levon leads, both opening tracks. "Fruit" has the warnings; "Wine" is almost a manifesto -- "I'm an alcoholic, and I dig it!"

Love 'em both.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 15:03:16 CET 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Thoughts on “Get Up Jake” anyone?


Entered at Mon Mar 21 14:33:32 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: I'll bring over my Fender

Get Up Jake (studio) at 2m 17s would have been easily the shortest song. I can't see where it would fit in the sequence. I think Jemima Surrender is a lot stronger. I don't think squeezing in 2m 17s would be drastic on sound, but it's that Side One / Side Two sequence concept that has been lost nowadays. The new Paul Simon is going to be 38 minutes total. An album is what it is.

More than one reviewer (and I agree) has suggested Stage Fright Side 2 is as good as the first two albums. That consensus suggests Side one isn't. Both Sleeping and All La Glory are magnificent … which leaves the other three, which I think are just a tiny notch down. We had this discussion years ago, but The Shape I'm In was the logical first song for Side One, not Side Two. Their preference for it over the years suggests everyone liked it more, right up to the end. It's just a better song. That leaves Strawberry Wine a bit out on a limb though. A political choice?


Entered at Mon Mar 21 13:56:34 CET 2011 from (90.206.50.171)

Posted by:

Specto

Location: Scotland

Subject: Richard

I just used a link to hear a montage of Richard and the vocals of a song listed as "Words and Numbers" (Big Pink-The Band 1967)..Never heard this before.Was it an outtake? and is it available anywhere? Regards


Entered at Mon Mar 21 12:58:06 CET 2011 from (99.141.31.86)

Posted by:

Adam2

Get Up Jake would have fit on the original album without deleting anything, would it not? The 2000 remaster and the box set both place it right after King Harvest, which might just mean it's the logical track to begin the bonus tracks.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 12:43:07 CET 2011 from (59.101.55.143)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Get Up Jake - we're still talking about you...

I suspect the discussion would have been 'Get Up Jake' or 'Jemima Surrender'... 'surrender' makes it... but, interestingly, I always play 'Jake' twice...


Entered at Mon Mar 21 12:42:52 CET 2011 from (99.141.31.86)

Posted by:

Adam2

Peter - Good comments on the meaning of Get Up Jake. I also loved Desert Tortoise's film interpretation. Brilliant!

I found your comments about Stage Fright interesting too. That is the album I'm transcribing next. Along with The Band album, my appreciation for it has really gone up. It's the same old comment, but - coming after those first two albums like it did, how could it not be initially seen as the weakest of the three?

It really is a wonderful album though. I would rank all the tracks on the same level as the first two, with the exception of Daniel & The Sacred Harp. Now I know it's a favorite of many fans, and I do love the song. For me though, I've always seen it as the one real "ambitious" song from Stage Fright that doesn't quite make it lyrically. The line "To his brother he took his troubled mind / And he said 'Dear brother I'm in a bind'" always seemed a little clunky and uninspired. But I do love the song and meaning behind it.

Like Get Up Jake, my understanding of all the songs has greatly improved by reading the lyrics. Stage Fright has always been described as a more rock & roll party album, with the dark undercurrent of the group's state/drug use coming out in the more personal lyrics. I think that's exactly true. I'm convinced Strawberry Wine is about heroin. Levon had the co-writing credit on that of course, and Rob Bowman even suggests that he was on it when the recording was made. I'm sure a lot of people have seen what addiction looks like, and to read the lyrics about "I just wanna feel good all the time" and "I give it all of my money but it makes me feel fine" is pretty chilling. I always loved the song as a good-time rocker like Jemima Surrender, but with that added lyrical dimension the song became truly haunting to me, and totally representative of that reputation the Stage Fright album has. Sleeping is one of the saddest, most beautiful songs I've ever heard, and must surely be considered one of Richard's/The Band's greatest songs. It's so beautifully sad yet rocking too, with some of the best lyrics Richard wrote (or co-wrote). I feel that Sleeping and Just Another Whistle Stop are absolutely on the same level as the deeper tracks from the 2nd album (When You Awake, Whispering Pines, Jemima Surrender, Look Out Cleveland, Jawbone). I think Look Out Cleveland and Jawbone are two of the most musically satisfying songs on the 2nd album, and I get that same wonderful vibe from Richard's Stage Fright songs. Time To Kill, along with the stunningly beautiful All La Glory, seem to be the only purely positive songs on the album. I don't think Time To Kill has any dark qualities except for the title, and the lyrics seem to be a genuine affection for his love and simple living. I don't see much negativity in W.S. Walcott. And everyone already knows, but The Rumor is pretty haunting as well and definitely one of their greatest.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 12:01:26 CET 2011 from (76.67.17.88)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Ok...Just found the long version where Diamond approaches Robbie.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 11:53:44 CET 2011 from (76.67.17.88)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Thanks Ari. We don't get that channel here....so we always miss out. Once we were in upstate NY in 2005 and we were able to see Robbie, Clapton and Buddy Guy perform via VH1. Here's a little snippet I found of Diamond and Bruce and Robbie hangin' close by. While in NYC a couple of summers ago....I finally took a walk through the Waldorf Astoria Hotel just so I could get a feel of the place where these functions take place......Wow....I would love to be there one day.

Tonight's the night...first night of the Toronto Stories on Bravo Canada. Last night there was a replay of Ian Tyson.....I downloaded "Love Without End".

To all who appreciated the previous link.....You're very welcome from brown eyed link.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 10:43:55 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

If you play the studio Get Up Jake, and think of The Shape I'm In, there's a connection in the intro concept, but The Shape I'm In is vastly richer and more powerful. That would explain why it didn't get carried over to Stage Fright.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 10:37:47 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Get Up Jake

I've heard rob's fine version more times in the last year than the studio orginal or the RoA one.I agree that it's a great one to cover because you're not facing a gigantic mountain of expectation like (say) King Harvest. The original studio cut (which I had on the single) was a last minute reject from The Band album. Robbie says in the remasters notes says it's connected to Rockin' Chair in story and was 'part of the same mold.'

The studio version sounds "thin" next to the other brown album songs. I can't imagine displacing any song on there to find room for it. I think it's around the same level as what I see as the "three slightly weaker songs" on Stage Fright: Strawberry Wine, Time To Kill, Just Another Whistle Stop. In other words it would have been fine on Side One of Stage Fright, and the second-best song on Cahoots. I still wonder why with Get Up Jake and Bessie Smith in the can, neither made it to Cahoots. Bessie Smith would have been the best song on there.

I don't know if Jake is dead, deceased, no longer with us at the end or not. I assumed the reason people were lining the shore when Jake fails to get up is that they're waiting for the ferry, and when Jake is too hungover (from the rye whiskey) to get up, the ferry doesn't run. They're a pair of "characters." I think Annabella could be crying whether Jake is dead or not, but it's a nice twist if the narrator says "I know it's not true" all the way, but it is true. Or he could just be comatose from drink. It's one of those Band lyric questions that hangs, and you kinda know it's a question, but you don't expect an answer. A very Robbie thing in a song.

Why Robbie wouldn't join in Sweet Caroline. He knew what people would say here? Would many want to follow Bruce?


Entered at Mon Mar 21 10:27:38 CET 2011 from (41.97.221.225)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: Harlan County USA

Jerry: Thanks for the post and link

A lot of guns in the trailer, this presence in a union movement of first degree violence is not an exclusivity, specially by strike times. Perhaps unnecessary
a short wikipedia tour, I guess the music treasure refers to Hazel Dickens, composer of the soundtrack

The link above has nothing to do with anything, I have to keep links for my job outside-The-GB


Entered at Mon Mar 21 05:52:01 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Web: My link

"The Weight".......Live From Daryl's House......Tribute to T-Bone Wolk

{Select "The Weight" from the Playlist at lower right}.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 05:47:41 CET 2011 from (74.101.167.209)

Posted by:

Ari

If anyone gets a chance, try to catch the rerun broadcasts of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction. Great performances by Tom Waits (with Marc Ribot), Dr. John (who plays Such A Night and there are even some Last Waltz snippets), and Darlene Love. The best of the inductees was Leon Russell, who plays a beautiful version of A Song For You with the surprisingly tasteful guitar from John Mayer (very Curtis Mayfield like). My favorite part of the night was Neil Diamond's induction when he goes down to the crowd singing Sweet Caroline to close the night. Asking for members of the audience to join in on the chorus Diamond offers the mic to Lloyd Price, Bruce Springsteen and Robbie Robertson who is sitting there right in front. Springsteen graciously accepts, Robbie refuses to open his mouth.


Entered at Mon Mar 21 03:15:31 CET 2011 from (99.141.31.86)

Posted by:

Adam2

David P mentioned the cover version of Get Up Jake from the early '70s. BEG also posted a link to one I just recently heard - by Ian & Sylvia And Great Speckled Bird. Great Speckled Bird was the great, obscure country-rock group they had with them for two albums. Amos Garrett and Buddy Cage played in the first lineup. The lineup heard on the cover of Get Up Jake features the late Ben Keith on steel, who of course played with Neil Young, Bobby Charles, Hungry Chuck, and is on Moondog Matinee.

Ian & Sylvia's version is pretty good, and it's great to hear Ben's steel on a Band song. But to say that it "out-Bands the Band"? That seems like pretty sloppy writing. Their version is good, with Ian's vocal choices sometimes being a real acquired taste.


Entered at Sun Mar 20 22:47:51 CET 2011 from (108.68.87.233)

Posted by:

Dee

Location: Wisconsin

Subject: BEG

Many many thanks!!!!!


Entered at Sun Mar 20 22:23:32 CET 2011 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

Rob the Organ

Subject: Jake / PV

Hi all - hope you are all well. Having another one of my self-imposed band from chat sites in the last leg of mixing the record. Which promotes two further topics:

Having recorded a version of it myself, I too saw/read/digested the lyrics of Get Up Jake extensively this year. One of the reasons the wife suggested it was that the style of music is that little bit more upbeat and (dare I say) "throwaway" than the stately feel that so much Band stuff has. One of the reasons I seconded the decision was that for all its throwaway, light-hearted sound, somebody still dies, in fine tradition!

Mr Viney, please be good enough to drop me an email. Have had Mac gremlins that entail me making a temporary boot-up solution from a USB drive, while I wait for "DiskWarrior" to arrive and hopefully fix the ailing hard drive (or cream off what I need then reformat it). Not only would it be good to hear from you, but it would give me your email address again (no contacts in Mail at mo!) and also if you have any experience of this situation being an old hand at Mac.

Love to all and will speak soon,

Rob Millis


Entered at Sun Mar 20 19:57:14 CET 2011 from (67.6.46.211)

Posted by:

Jerry

Web: My link

Subject: Harlan County USA

Yesterday they showed Harlan County USA, the great doc about the coal miners working for the Duke Power company owed mines who orginized with the United Mine Workers of America in 1973...I'm sure many of you know of this film but in case you havn't seen it, it's well worth taking the time to do so...This is a stark reminder of the importance of the union movement then and to insure it in the future. I am a union man and hope I have what these folks had if ever called upon to fight the fight..Not only is the message so strong but the music through out the film is a treasure. I'd love to hear Levon and friends take on this music at some point...My link is the trailer for this movie and can be seen in it's entirity on You Tube if interested..


Entered at Sun Mar 20 18:58:37 CET 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Looking at RR's upcoming release realistically,. and in context with the times......

it certa at RR's upcoming release realistically,. and in context with the times......

it certainly is possible that it might be very successful....it seems like a lifetime since singers were expected to be singers. Singing has becomne faddy, odd, singers don't sing, don't have to be melodic, convey emotion or nuance. RR did pull a few rabbits out of his vocal hat on that first solo album, there were a couple interesting deliveries. At this stage of the game that's not likely. But again, today, younger people dontl expect real vocals, real singing. And older folka re becoming hard of hearing....Rap passes for vocals. Vocal shenanigins pass for vocals. Odd deliveries pass for vocals. Timing is everything.


Entered at Sun Mar 20 18:43:33 CET 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Am I the only one here who's anxiously awaiting RR's upcoming appearance on The View?

I hope those ladies are doing their homework, listening to Band records. I'm thinking Joy Behar and Whoopie would be the only 2 ladies who might have much exposure to or knowledge of The Band's music. I'm guessing Joy more so, but you never know.


Entered at Sun Mar 20 16:54:37 CET 2011 from (65.93.119.183)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Extraordinaire, Angie. I'm set for the day.


Entered at Sun Mar 20 13:02:34 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

BEG, you have posted many a link here over the years but I believe that last one may be the best you have found yet. Great stuff there. Thank you.


Entered at Sun Mar 20 12:43:18 CET 2011 from (76.66.26.25)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

"Things get off to a rousing start in which the duo out-Band the Band with a superb rendition of Robbie Robertson's "Get Up Jake."

Scroll down.....

Get Up Anyone....You could also feel like you're dyin' when you're forced to work at a job that doesn't feed your soul.


Entered at Sun Mar 20 11:47:28 CET 2011 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Another candidate for Robbie's ghostwriter; Sylvia writes a novel.


Entered at Sun Mar 20 11:01:10 CET 2011 from (59.101.55.143)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: My two cents on 'Get up Jake'

I found it interesting looking at the variant interpretations - I agree with Adam's (and I wonder if this a younger (... well, Adam's younger, and I'm younger than some of you... :) ) man's approach. I think the key is 'Annabel's crying and it's all for you' - why would she be crying for Jake, if someething wasn't up (if she didn't like Dirty Dan, than that's it...) I do understand that there are all kinds of subtleties and variants in life, but the drama of Dirty Dan 'getting' Jake makes for a terrific Robertsonian (or Bandian) drama...


Entered at Sun Mar 20 10:39:03 CET 2011 from (41.97.160.236)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: another beautiful song for

another beautiful song "Endless Sea" ... for The GB regulars and The GB ghost-readers who shall find it a beautiful song

transl. my preferred lines 2:19 - 2:40

"Long may we take refuge In another harbor
We relive by thoughCET 2011 from (12.51.52.166)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Adam { 2 }

Since you profess to be a young lad, Dr.(Friend0 wishes to dispense this observation that refers to a statement of yours: In one way or another, many a thing in life "has more meaning than it might initially seem." Don't forget that and there is a chance you shall succeed in your undertakings.


Entered at Sun Mar 20 01:50:34 CET 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Scouser

Neon sign was flashing from Liverpool to the friggin desert.

I hope the good spirits are smiling upon ye.


Entered at Sat Mar 19 20:37:49 CET 2011 from (79.202.163.158)

Posted by:

Norb

p.s. notice the cocain eyes, but she did it with a more than great finish.

have a nice weekend all.


Entered at Sat Mar 19 20:18:18 CET 2011 from (79.202.163.158)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: Tube hour
Web: My link

Subject: 1976 Stevie Nicks: Rhiannon

Looking back Stevie didn't only have the looks, but also masters a fantastic voice.

She would have pulled any Fleedwood Mac from obscure bars to the top of the world. And I still like her.


Entered at Sat Mar 19 19:16:57 CET 2011 from (79.202.163.158)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: Germany
Web: My link

Subject: Lost Waltz Footage

Don't know if this was passed on already, anyway see the link.

"The amazing finale to The Last Waltz! This amazing footage gives you a whole new idea to just how great the lineup was, and now thanks to this footage, Richard Manuel is seen singing his verse in the Bob Dylan classic he was known for . You also get to see Eric Clapton playing the guitar solo, and Paul Butterfeild playing harmonica, as well as all the other guests."

"this is the camera from the centre of the concert hall that shot the full 6 hrs you can find a bootleg dvd of the full concert unedited and all the songs besides dont do it"


Entered at Sat Mar 19 15:49:32 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Are we witness to the return of Al Edge?

Welcome back.


Entered at Sat Mar 19 13:29:53 CET 2011 from (76.68.83.209)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Here's another one Serenity.

Also, belated thanks for the heads up on Louuu's "Berlin" show. Some of it I really liked, but at times his voice was so shot that it's better to go back to the record. It was always such a HEAVY recording for me that I can rarely revisit it. I still can remember thinking the crying children in one song was really happening.......I was so freaked out at the time.

"Get Up Jake" always reminds me of Bashfull Bill telling his son to get up. ;-D


Entered at Sat Mar 19 12:35:32 CET 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

The Desert Tortoise

Subject: Death scene - minor detail adjustment

I can see it now. Rain sheeting down. Mississippi riverboat tied up at the quayside. A tearful Gary Cooper cradling the grimacing Burt Lancaster in the mud outside the saloon, telling him he's not about to die. Burt, indignant, insisting he is. Henry Fonda and his endless leather coat walking off in the distance, pausing to growl at a kid on crutches. Barbara Stanwyck giving Lorne Greene and Parnell Roberts down the banks. :-0)


Entered at Sat Mar 19 12:20:26 CET 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

The Desert Tortoise

Subject: Jeff A. and Jake [the peg(ged out)]

Fuck me Jeff - you got extra sensory perception or what!!!!!!! More chance of sneaking up on Obama than you. The Bronx friggin bloodhound.

;-0)

And trust feckin Tennessee Ernie Ford to try and spoil a good weepie. Always the same. Ever since Adam [2] was a lad. Always the advocate of the devil. Well BWNITWIT I'm with Adam on this one. It's far too good an interpretation to spurn.

I can see it now. Rain sheeting down. Mississippi riverboat tied up at the quayside. Gary Cooper cradling Burt Lancaster in the mud outside the saloon, begging him not to die. Henry Fonda and his endless leather coat walking off in the distance. Barbara Stanwyck giving Lorne Greene and Parnell Roberts down the banks. :-0)

Mmmmm.


Entered at Sat Mar 19 10:21:45 CET 2011 from (99.141.31.86)

Posted by:

Adam2

Who would have thought there would be in-depth interpretations of Get Up Jake? I think the song is really great, and has more meaning than it might initially seem.


Entered at Sat Mar 19 10:10:47 CET 2011 from (41.97.156.150)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: what's in a portrait

“Grandson, just have a strong sense of justice and you‘ll enjoy general consideration, it’s not for wealth, nor warlike or theocratic power”
Being a child I didn’t really understand, I had just to recall, remain in admiration towards this credo which over the decades I wished and tried to fit, but never know, all I know is that him, he truly embodied this values of justice, and many more… my brain template and model of admiration

Excerpt from biography ( [link] expand Ve République) :

“He weighs the consequences of his opinions and knows that his life was threatened, but he refuses vehemently any protection. On August 28th, 1959, he is murdered”

As I once posted before, even president Eisenhower expressed his admiration towards this stand


Entered at Sat Mar 19 09:47:47 CET 2011 from (99.141.31.86)

Posted by:

Adam2

Tenn - I appreciate your interpretation and certainly welcome it. But...

What lines do you interpret as representing Jake "hiding out from Dirty Dan"?

I don't think saying "There's no need a-dyin'" to someone dying in your arms is unrealistic at all. In fact, it seems rather poignant. If someone you're close to was dying in your arms, wouldn't you hold them close and try to talk to them and keep them with you... even if you knew the wound was fatal? "Come on Jake, don't go now. You're too young for this. We're gonna get you to fixed up, ok? It's gonna be ok." I think it's extremely logical that someone in that situation would say something like that. The narrator isn't calmly saying "Jake, there's no need for dying" in a straight, flat voice. He's pleading with him, wanting Jake to fight to stay alive even though he knows Jake is going. "Come on Jake, there's no need a-dyin'. Annabelle's cryin' and it's all for you". I really wasn't separating the final two lines at all in my interpretation. The narrator tells Jake that "Annabelle's cryin' and it's all for you" in the same way I described - as motivation and to strengthen his will to stay alive. How are the two lines not tied together in my interpretation? And who said Annabelle is nowhere to be found while all this is going on? It seems pretty clear that she's right there, or around the scene. Hence the narrator hears her crying, and tells Jake so that he fights to stay alive.

If Annabelle's crying because she loves Jake and not Dirty Dan, why doesn't she just tell Dirty Dan she doesn't love him? Why wouldn't she just go to where Jake was in secret, or better yet just leave and start a new life with Jake somewhere else? What doesn't make sense is that Annabelle loves and wants Jake, but she just accepts that she can't have him simply because some other guy is around who she doesn't love.


Entered at Sat Mar 19 06:44:36 CET 2011 from (99.141.31.86)

Posted by:

Adam2

Pat - I agree about the arrangement/solos on the live version. As a guitarist I've always held Robbie's solo in high regard. But I have to disagree with the other points you made. I always thought it was a somewhat weaker song, but my mind has been changed. The studio version has a more rollicking feel and features that wonderful Levon/Rick co-lead vocal thing they were so great at. The story is also more complete and clearer in the studio version.

The ROA arrangement is more thought out, and benefits from having Richard take the first verse, as well as the added solos and ending. The singing at the end sounds more like a sorrowful refrain (listen to Richard's voice especially) rather than a sing-a-long at odds with the lyrics. But they do omit Jake's death in the lyrics.

I've always thought the non-horn ROA songs were wonderful. As Rob Bowman said, the album was always so satisfying hearing the horn songs with select non-horn songs mixed evenly throughout.


Entered at Sat Mar 19 06:39:17 CET 2011 from (74.179.54.146)

Posted by:

BWNWITenn

I never particularly paid much attention to the lyrics of "Get Up Jake," but reading through them, I disagree with Adam's interpretation of the significance of the last two lines. I think the meaning of the song is not that the narrarator is holding a dying Jake in his arms, but that Jake is hiding out because he's afraid that Dirty Dan will kill him if he goes out.

I don't think it's a realistic interpretation that if someone was dying in your arms, you'd say "There's no need for dying." And Adam's interpretation seems to separate the final line from the previous line - basically "Don't die/Annabelle's crying because you're about to die."

I think the significance of the final line is that Annabelle's crying because she wants Jake and doesn't have him (possibly because he's been busy hiding) - she's missing him because she loves him and not Dirty Dan. That interpretation cleanly ties the final two lines together, and makes the meaning of them as "Nobody's going to die because Annabelle doesn't love Dirty Dan anyway (so there's no point in a duel for her affections)."

That makes more sense to me. I just don't buy "There's no need a-dying" as a line that would be spoken to someone who's in the process of dying, it doesn't make sense. And that also renders the final line as somewhat awkward - why would she be crying if he wasn't even dead yet? She knows he's been mortally wounded, the whole town knows, she's crying for him, but she's nowhere to be found as his co-worker cradles him in arms as he dies? That's too illogical.

Taken my way, the whole point of the song is that Jake's buddy is telling him, "Get up, stop hiding out, you don't need to worry about dying because Dan's not going to kill you, but people are waiting for the ferry, so get up and go to work."

All of this analysis has also made me realize what a crappy name "Dirty Dan" is for the antagonist - come on Robbie, couldn't you at least have come up with "Outlaw Pete"?


Entered at Sat Mar 19 04:55:40 CET 2011 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

Jake always struck a wrong chord with me. Most of us oldtimers heard it first on RoA, and the thing I remember most is Garth's amazing solo--unbelievably melodic and economic. Then after a number of listens you eventually realize Jake is dead. The music is so jaunty and fun that it doesn't match the lyrics at all. I can see why it didn't make the cut for the Brown Album, and I don't think they played it live much. I sure never saw them perform it live.

I do think they improved on the arrangement. The studio version is very back and forth with no dynamics. The live version shows they worked on making it more interesting with the organ break and the sing-alongs at the end, but even those sing-alongs are weird given that you've just learned Jake is dead.

One last thing. It's placement on the vinyl really worked against it. RoA was such a rush with the horn section blazing away for three songs. Then here's this little ditty that seems like an outtake followed by Walcott and the blazing horns again, including Garth on tenor sax. I listened to that first side with a friend named Don who was/is a superb classical bassist. We needed to hear those first three songs then moved on to the rest of the three sides. I know there are other songs without the horns, but they all did pale to the songs with the section. Funny, too, I didn't realize they divided the show up ala TLW, bringing the horns on for the second part, until I got Academy of Outtakes.


Entered at Sat Mar 19 03:50:56 CET 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Hare of the dog.

Scouser, welcome back. Your brevity is uncharacteristic.


Entered at Sat Mar 19 00:23:10 CET 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Ben Pike & Garth

You asked about thoughts on the Garth CD.......Check archives of this GB for my version of a review - January 4 was the post.


Entered at Sat Mar 19 00:15:09 CET 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Lars: Stu Cutler is a bad ass guitar player. Machan is Danny's wife. They don't need help, but no telling who sits in at that gig.


Entered at Fri Mar 18 23:47:37 CET 2011 from (99.141.31.86)

Posted by:

Adam2

Thanks for the comments on Get Up Jake. It definitely sounds like another Civil War-era story, and I wonder if the two examples posted (the Civil War USS Baltimore or the one that crashed near the Hudson River) were the inspiration for Robbie's use of the name. Although Greil Marcus can get so dense and incomprehensible when analyzing songs, he has an interesting take on Jake being so lazy that the townspeople line up along the shore to see. However, I just thought the lined showed how people wanting to use the ferry had to line up and wait during the instances where Jake wouldn't get out of bed and was late for work.


Entered at Fri Mar 18 23:46:44 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: Queen Mum and her records - from Wilf Carter to Scaffold to Paul Simon

Who'da thunk it?

Fred in Japan, who could probably use something to smile about, will appreciate the fact that Wilf Carter was also Stompin' Tom's idol. Wonder if she ever heard "Sudbury the fact that Wilf Carter was also Stompin' Tom's idol. Wonder if she ever heard "Sudbury Saturday Night"?


Entered at Fri Mar 18 23:28:32 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Get Up Jake

Adam2: Great job. Like others, I hadn't really paid attention to the lyrics past the lazy-slob start. Still, I can't help but suspect that it started out in Robbie's mind as one thing but ended up as something else entirely - from the old ditty about the drunken sailor all the way to "Long Black Veil" meets "Staggerlee".


Entered at Fri Mar 18 22:32:40 CET 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: NY

Subject: High Falls Cafe- Phel. Phunk

I have a 10 year old yellow Lab that I named Jake, after the song "Get Up Jake." I've always liked that song, but I never heard it at any of The Band concerts I went to.

On this deal with Randy Ciarlante and Phelonious Phunk at High Falls Cafe tomorrow (Sat) night: be advised that I just got off the phone (845-687-2699) with the HFC and they have all the tables sold out & they have standing room only, or you can belly up to the bar and HEAR the band, but you won't be able to see them from there. They ARE taking dinner reservations for the other (newly renovated) dining room on the other side of the bar, which is not even close to the dining room where the band is playing.

I just wanted to let people know before they traveled all the way to High Falls to see Randy & the phunkers.


Entered at Fri Mar 18 21:43:16 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Get Up Jake

Thanks for that analysis. The lyrics go through my head often, but I never actually thought about them as a whole story.


Entered at Fri Mar 18 21:00:11 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Get Up Jake

That version of "Get Up Jake" from YouTube is the stereo mix that was included as one of the bonus cuts on the 2000 Capitol remaster of "The Band". The stereo version was also later included on the compilation box "A Musical History". More recently, the mono single mix was included as a bonus cut on the 2009 Audio Fidelity gold-CD version of The Brown Album. This audiophile disc is the best-sounding CD version, as it is the only digital version mastered from the original master tapes which were unavailable for previous CD reissues.


Entered at Fri Mar 18 20:44:10 CET 2011 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

Mike & Kim Hayward

Web: My link

Subject: Phelonius Phunk gig tomorrow night in NY.

Randy Ciarlante (frmr The Band co-drummer) & bandmates are @ Hill Falls Cafe (NY) tomorrow night.


Entered at Fri Mar 18 20:33:13 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Web: My link

Thanks, Kevin and Joe. I am happy to give any band their due for a great performance. And happier yet if I am in attendance!

My friend out in Carmel works for Monterey International and Great Big Sea is on their roster as is the Levon Helm Band (according to their website) among many others. He sees a lot of great performances and really enjoyed the show. If you ever have the opportunity to see a show at the Sunset Center in Carmel......GO!


Entered at Fri Mar 18 20:27:03 CET 2011 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Great Big Sea put on a great show but their music doesn't work as well on recordings. The album of (mostly) traditional music "The Hard and The Easy" is the one to have. I say mostly because one song identified as traditional was actually written by Shel Silverstein. Somebody didn't do their homework.


Entered at Fri Mar 18 20:05:43 CET 2011 from (70.53.46.130)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Great Big Sea are not my cup of tea……..but to their credit they have earned a well-deserved reputation for putting on great shows…. With cd/album sales in the industry being ¼ of what they were just 5 years ago……..and much more money being made in concerts for the “made it” rock acts (Jazz guys still play for peanuts with some of the bigger venues in town not even paying scale but that is another story….), the reputation one gets for leaving people dancing in the aisles is of increasing importance. I was at an event in town some years back and to say Great Big Sea stole the show would be an understatement……….there was not an ounce of energy left in the room when they finished…..and going in the room was neutral…..


Entered at Fri Mar 18 19:47:14 CET 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

The Desert Tortoise

Subject: Jake - again

Notice the You Tube write up wrongly credits it as being on The Band album.


Entered at Fri Mar 18 19:43:44 CET 2011 from (99.235.255.183)

Posted by:

Serenity

Web: My link

Subject: Assorted passings

Link is very interesting to recent passings. Music related.

CYA soon xoxoxoxo


Entered at Fri Mar 18 19:45:02 CET 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

The Desert Tortoise

Web: My link

Subject: Jake

Is this the 'B' side version? Looks like a recent addition to You Tube. First hearing seems sparser than ROA live version.


Entered at Fri Mar 18 19:23:14 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Get Up Jake

The British Capitol B-side (which coincidentally I sent Jan a scan of earlier this week) doesn't mention Rock of Ages, so they'd sussed it by then.


Entered at Fri Mar 18 19:10:16 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Outtake Jake

Dave H: Instead of Side A, Cut 1 on "Stage Fright", a mono mix of the studio version of "Get Up Jake" was first released as the B-Side of the single "Ain't Got No Home" in 1973 (see link). I've mentioned my copy of that 45 in a Vinyl Siding post in the past. The label incorrectly identifies it as the live version that first appeared on "Rock of Ages" in 1972.


Entered at Fri Mar 18 19:03:54 CET 2011 from (41.97.192.30)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

just found a picture of the man on the net, in a local newspaper i once described his portrait with one concise phrase :
"looks like somebody to better not have him as your boss"
it says it all


Entered at Fri Mar 18 18:34:45 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Get Up Jake / Dr John / Brown album photo

I was interested in Get Up Jake too … one I’d never really thought about either.

Dr John was 10 years ago. How time flies. I’ve seen Van clock off at 90 minutes two or three times, and been in audiences he’s sworn at. I’ve also seen him do two and a half hours, and those are sublime nights because he goes on when he’s enjoying it. But Van does it rather better than Dr John. When Van decides to go for 90 minutes, the decision is made around 75 minutes. There will be a song like Help Me, where he’ll clock watch and add or subtract verses or solos. He knows on those nights (when he inevitably does the final medley with Brown Eyed Girl & Gloria) exactly how long the medley is. Say it’s 9 minutes. Then he’ll truncate the earlier song so the medley begins at 81 minutes and is complete. Thus it all rounds off with a proper ending. Dr John just stopped.

Article on Robbie in the April “The Word.” He discusses the brown album cover and how the iconic look that every Americana band copies got done. It was raining. They were cold and wet. The photo session (from a stepladder on a road) kept going on and on. Their “serious” look is simple being cold and pissed off.


Entered at Fri Mar 18 18:07:43 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Get Up Jake

The timing is perfect for discussing "Get Up Jake", as it was recorded during The Brown Album sessions in Sammy Davis Jr.'s poolhouse, March-April 1969.


Entered at Fri Mar 18 18:05:26 CET 2011 from (99.235.255.183)

Posted by:

Serenity

Web: My link

Link to Mr Husky's passing. Lots of his goodies here too.

CYA soon xoxoxo


Entered at Fri Mar 18 17:53:32 CET 2011 from (99.235.255.183)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: Ferlin Husky, dead at 85 [RIP]

BEG: Thanx heaps for the pics of ROBBIE and LEVON. Those new ones of ROBBIE from Flickr are really good. Love his smile.

BOB W: More Canadians to be proud of. I have seen Great Big Sea many times on TV, and have their CD. When you hear their music you just can't keep still.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Just rec'd this in my mailbox with a few of his songs. So sad as he was a true C/M singer. I have seen him live many moons ago. Wasn't sober, but still put on a great show. Lots of energy in this great singer.

Country Music Hall of Famer Ferlin Husky dies at 85 By PETER COOPER.. The Tennessean (Nashville)

Country Music Hall of Famer Ferlin Husky, the innovative recording artist whose 1957 smash "Gone" helped usher in the pop-leaning Nashville Sound era, died Thursday at his daughter's home in Westmoreland, Tenn. He was 85 and suffered from congestive heart failure. Husky's classic singles "Gone" and "Wings of a Dove" each topped country charts for 10 straight weeks, and each became Top 20 pop records. A well-rounded performer, Husky also starred in motion pictures and entertained with his comedic alter ego, "Simon Crum," but he is best known for his contributions in sweetening the sound of Music Row in a way that allowed the music to appeal to twang-phobic audiences. "By reaching No. 4 on the pop charts, 'Gone' demonstrated what became the ultimate goal for Nashville producers: A country hit that could 'cross over' to pop success," wrote Rich Kienzle in the liner notes to Husky's Vintage collection of Capitol Records material. In addition to scoring hit records, Husky was a master of stagecraft, a dashing and energetic performer who impressed audiences and fellow artists.

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxoxo


Entered at Fri Mar 18 17:41:26 CET 2011 from (136.167.102.118)

Posted by:

Dave H

I'll have to register my friendly disagreement on the subject of the Decemberists not having a distinct musical identity. I feel like their style is very distinctive and I don't have any trouble identifying one of their songs as opposed to other bands. "Mariner's Revenge Song" or "We Both Go Down Together" or "A Cautionary Tale" sure seem to me like products of a fairly consistent sensibility, and hardly seem to denote a lack of confidence (in fact, the usual slam on the D's is that they're too pretentious and in love with their own cleverness). Sure some of their work is more folky and some of it is more (prog-)rocky but this type of variation is true of many artists who experiment with different musical styles--Dylan, Young, Beatles, etc. etc. Or, say, a band (Band?) that covers both Lefty Frizzell and Marvin Gaye with equal mastery...

I like the speculation on "Get Up Jake." I have to say I haven't thought much about the lyrics, but it's interesting stuff. That's a song that kind of got away from the Band, given its quality. Should have been Side A, Cut 1 of "Stage Fright" in my book.


Entered at Fri Mar 18 16:53:50 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Baltimore

sadavid: History shows that there was also a ferryboat named Baltimore, which sunk in 1906 after colliding with another boat while crossing the Hudson River from New Jersey to New York City.


Entered at Fri Mar 18 16:48:34 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Web: My link

Subject: Great Big Sea

A good friend in the music business saw these guys perform last night at the Sunset Center in Carmel, California. Said they were fantastic. There was dancing in the aisles.


Entered at Fri Mar 18 16:46:27 CET 2011 from (216.226.180.2)

Posted by:

Deb

Thanks for your comments on "Get Up Jake", Adam. I'd never put all that together before either and I've always liked the song a great deal. As to accents, I like what Jason Isbell has to say on the subject in the chorus of "Outfit", recorded when he was still with the Drive By Truckers. For those who don't know the words, it's a father's advice to his son:

Don't call what you're wearing an outfit

Don't ever say your car is broke

Don't worry 'bout losing your accent

'Cause a Southern man tells better jokes.


Entered at Fri Mar 18 15:49:32 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: new take on "Jake"

Adam 2: I add my thanks to those of The Desert Tortoise (don't ask about the turtle) -- I never thought much about "Get Up Jake," I just accepted the line (I think it's Greil Marcus) that the song was about a guy so lazy that the townspeople would turn out to see him get out of bed. (I mentally amended "lazy" to "hung over," but that's a nuance.) Your interpretation fits better, I think, and we don't need to bring lazy (or hung over) into it at all; the chronology's not quite clear -- I don't think the verb tenses are precise -- so the people lining up along the shore might well be there to see if J is alive or dead, or just to see the body carried out.

It's my pet idea that the ferry is the USS BALTIMORE (see [My link]) which would make "Jake" another Civil War-era piece. ("Annabella" has the sound of the Old South; it's also latinate for "years of war" . . . .)

It's also intriguing (but probably a red herring) to find mention of a 1928 Lionel Barrymore film titled _The River Woman_; can't find a plot summary, but the characters have names like "Bill Lefty" and "Mulatto Mike," and allmovie.com's 'keywords' include "bar, drowning, love triangle, rival, romance, self-sacrifice."

Keep 'em coming.


Entered at Fri Mar 18 15:15:09 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Cruel To Be Kind

Among this week's releases it was great to see that the Yep Roc label has reissued Nick Lowe's excellent 1979 album "Labour of Lust". Mr. Lowe at the time was a member of the group Rockpile along with Dave Edmunds, Billy Bremer and Terry Williams, who provide backing on the album. The group also recorded another great album, "Repeat When Necessary", with Mr. Edmunds in the lead role, at the same time.

Adam2: Roger Tillison, a friend of Levon & The Band, recorded a fine cover version of "Get Up Jake" on his 1971 Atco LP. It featured a great group of supporting musicians including Jesse Ed Davis, Jim Keltner, Larry Knechtel and former Hawks Stan Szeleste & Sandy Konikoff. The album also included covers of Dylan's "Down in the Flood" and the Motown classic "Loving You Is Sweeter Than Ever".


Entered at Fri Mar 18 14:41:10 CET 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Ed Voci's desert tortoise

Subject: Get Up Jake and Decemberists

Thanks for that Adam. D'you know I've never read the lyrics to Jake before so I've never joined all the pieces together before. Forty years just loving the whole ambience of the song without ever realising all along the song was Jake's buddy cradling poor Jake in his arms in the pouring rain as Jake's lifeblood is getting washed away. Sad huh.

I wonder if the Dirty Dan character who got poor old Jake is the same one who Springsteen's Outlaw Pete stabbed through the heart 40 years later. Like to think so. :-0)

PV - Decemberists are terrific. Love their first album and their latest. Have to say the stuff in between doesn't grab me as much as it's a bit too close to my son's favourites Belle and Sebastian for me to really get steeped in.

The slight problem I have with them is I don't think they actually realise just how feckin good they are or how good their songs are - or should that be just how good Colin Meloy and his songs are as he's manifestly the John Fogerty of their line up. And I think this might explain why they still haven't established a truly distinct identity that stamps what they churn out as DECEMBERISTS music. And they really should because they are superb.

It means that with virtually each track they seem to inhabit the guise of different past artists. It still sounds great but it's just not distinctive. They're a bit like musical chameleons. You can never pin them down. Unless you actually recognise the song you can never safely say ah yeah that's The Decemberists since it could be one of a few dozen preceding artists from Neil Young to fairport to the Adventures to REM to Witness etc etc. Even Lucky Town Springsteen is in the mix.

There's lots and lots of examples but I think it can best be illustrated with Calamity Song off their latest album which is actually a mix of several REM tracks off Reckoning and Life's Rich Pageant. Don't get me wrong, it's a great track but it's actually REM. Not them.

To me it's also pretty clear Meloy has been influenced a lot by Gerard Starkie of Witness as more than a few of their songs seem to have absorbed snatches of his sublime melodies and are structured like his.

Perhaps it's a lack of confidence in their own unquestionable ability which may explain why they keep switching styles. I mean contrast them with say Nick Cave or The Gourds or going back as far as our own boys. One listen and you know exactly who you're listening to. But with the Decemberists each track could be a different group even though Meloy does nearly all the lead vocals.

Then again maybe they don't crave marking down their own distinct identity. As long as they keep delivering such terrific music I won't be complaining.


Entered at Fri Mar 18 13:35:10 CET 2011 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Sorry Bob. Let me go on record as not advocating alcohol consumption, anal sex nor corporal punishment. To each his own though


Entered at Fri Mar 18 13:01:26 CET 2011 from (76.66.26.18)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

The way we were.....


Entered at Fri Mar 18 12:57:54 CET 2011 from (76.66.26.18)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

In the year of?


Entered at Fri Mar 18 12:52:47 CET 2011 from (76.66.26.18)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link


Entered at Fri Mar 18 12:52:41 CET 2011 from (99.141.31.86)

Posted by:

Adam2

Subject: Lyrics / Get Up Jake meaning

My lyrics/chords songbook is going pretty well. Seeing those wonderful lyrics right in front of you really makes the songs come alive. It's been a joy realizing once again how lyrically and musically sublime the second album really is.

I really love Get Up Jake a lot more now. I realize now that I never understood the story before I saw the lyrics written out. I always heard it as an ok song about laziness: "Get up Jake it’s late in the mornin’/ The rain is pourin’ we got work to do / Get up Jake there’s no need a-lyin' / You tell me that you’re dyin’ but I know it’s not true". The last line being just an excuse Jake is giving. The song is brilliant because it does tell us that Jake is sometimes lazy about getting up for work ("Now me and Jake we work down on the river / On the ferry Baltimore / And when Jake don’t rise up in the mornin’ / People line up all along the shore"), so we're initially supposed to think the chorus is another instance of his laziness. The 2nd verse tells how the two guys blow all their money on gambling, booze, and women (linking it with Up On Cripple Creek). By the 4th verse Dirty Dan comes up from Savannah to settle things with Jake, as they're in love with the same woman. The final two lines of the studio version ("Get up Jake there’s no need a-dyin’ / Annabelle’s cryin’ and it’s all for you") confirm that Dan shoots/kills Jake, and that the chorus is the narrator pleading with Jake to stay alive as Jake dies in his arms. So the chorus wasn't about Jake's laziness as it suggested up to that point, but was foreshadowing Jake's death since the beginning of the song.

Not sure if everyone already figured that out, but it was new to me. And I think a great deal more of the song now. Wasn't it one of John Simon's favorites? I now see why, and why he probably may have had a hand in reviving the song for Rock Of Ages (though it does suffer when you realize how the lyric change blurs the story a great deal).


Entered at Fri Mar 18 12:45:58 CET 2011 from (76.66.26.18)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Robbie Robertson in WFUV's Studio A

Robbie Robertson - Songwriter, performer, and former member of The Band - in WFUV's Studio A, March 2011.

Photos by Neil Swanson


Entered at Fri Mar 18 12:11:19 CET 2011 from (98.150.205.156)

Posted by:

Nick

Web: My link

Subject: leave hin alone


Entered at Fri Mar 18 11:26:47 CET 2011 from (99.141.31.86)

Posted by:

Adam2

Peter - I think not "forgiving" Dr. John for what you described is a little silly. I mean as a Van Morrison fan I'm sure you know there's a lot worse than that. I thought I read awhile back that he told one audience to f***k off recently, or words to that effect. Plus similar stories re: performance duration are infamous with him.

Dr. John may not have been in a good period when you saw him, as I know he got clean about 20 years back or so.


Entered at Fri Mar 18 10:40:09 CET 2011 from (41.97.238.235)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

related


Entered at Fri Mar 18 10:39:08 CET 2011 from (41.97.238.235)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

A popular tune which was sung by the common people of the time, from which one verse translated from dialectal original version
“Monsieur Morinaud, why are you always dressed in khaki [color] while the loden [color] suits you far better"
The day i’ll fully decrypt this puzzling verse/song, i will post about in the GB.
Constantine in its today’s aspect is considered as one of the most beautiful cities in the world. The city in its today’s aspect is the result of one man’s work, Emile Morinaud, deputy-mayor of the city for 35 years at the turn of the 19-20 century. Alsacian rigin, known for his overt antisemitism. a builder by soul as history rarely produce, he did of the modern urbanization of the city his affair, all the impressive realizations, “building in the Colony what Napoleon didn’t build in Paris”

I was with a French friend who was in a short travel, standing at the extreme bottom of the ravine, he kept hypnotically silent for a while in low-angle sight of the suspended bridge which actually appears as being in a far galaxy, (he had exactly the sight at 0:20 picture in the linked above song-clip), the he challenged me with a sudden question “what the hell was reason to build a bridge at that place?!” I had to think quickly to forward a non ridicule answer, it’s surely not functional, as the traffic is never disturbed the days of strong winds when the bridge is closed, so I said “the reason was Prestige, the days following the inauguration of the bridge in 1912, newspapers of the time reported “France has realized the greatest technical exploit ever achieved by the human race”.

related,

a quote of Jean Atlan (google the name please) “whoever is born in Constantine is condemned to be artist”

I was walking one day in the streets, then an unknown guy with a disposable camera who looked like a poet lover of the city (they are crowds and at the international scale) stopped me politely, “Sir, can I take a photograph of you please,”
I just asked why specially me,
he to me “You have the look of a character from the Ottoman Centuries”.
I accepted “yup!, just let’s just walk a hundred meters this way, there’s an angle where nothing could reveal later that the photograph wasn’t taken in the Ottoman Centuries”


Entered at Fri Mar 18 08:14:58 CET 2011 from (12.10.75.2)

Posted by:

JQ

Peter - I think a lot of British singers, particularly in the 60/70's, sang with a Southern US accent rather than American. Richard Thompson, as a folkie, is one that sounds British - as you indicated. I can't think of too many others though -


Entered at Fri Mar 18 07:45:37 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Colin's English accent? / Paul Simon & The Seekers

Complain, eh? They used to do that here in the 1950s about all popular singers adopting an American accent. When Anthony Newley started singing in a strong London accent it sounded weird. It was a trick David Bowie picked up from him. I don’t hear a Brit accent in Colin Meloy’s voice, but there is an English folk song intonation on a couple of the pieces, which sound specifically “English” rather than “British.” I think it’s the genre, a bit like Van Morrison or Rod Stewart singing rock with a certain American intonation pattern. There’s an English folk song lilt, which is different to the Irish and Scottish folk song lilts which influenced American music more strongly. You could just say it’s “Fairport-ish”. Actually, there is one line “This I hear you say …” where the “hear” has an odd upper class English sound “hyy-are” which he reproduced exactly live. I pondered it and thought it was just his idiolect on that word.

The vinyl collectors here may know the habit of picking up cheap singles you don’t want, with excellent clean company sleeves that you can later apply to more desirable discs. I was looking through a 29p selection and found a Seekers record in an “as new” 1966 EMI Columbia sleeve, and thought “Ah, that’ll go on my copy of Big Time Operator which has a tatty sleeve.” Then I looked at the song, “Someday, One Day” – a UK #11 hit written by Paul Simon.I knew the song, but not that Paul Simon wrote it. He never recorded it himself. I looked it up. Paul Simon wrote three songs with Bruce Woodley of The Seekers, including The Cyrkle’s “Red Rubber Ball.” The record’s stayed in its original sleeve, of course.


Entered at Fri Mar 18 04:15:54 CET 2011 from (208.57.247.136)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland Tx

Subject: Music

Spoken like a gentlemen. Glad The Decemberits pass your ear test, some critics here complained of the (American) singer doing a brit accent. Speaking of lonely vigils trying to wise up the GB, Loudon Wainwright's career spanning box set is out this month, the "best of" disc chosen reasonably well. Some of Loudo's hollywood pals have up his street cred in more recent years, but during the days I argued for major artist status round these parts it was a lonely vigil indeed. NOW his kids jam with Levon and Garth. An early critic said of Wainwright "He has it in him to be the Chaplin of Rock." As it turned out, I think, we got something like a musical Thurber for our times.


Entered at Fri Mar 18 02:17:21 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Joe J., good thing I knew that album title!

Thanks.


Entered at Fri Mar 18 01:48:29 CET 2011 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Location: Streams of Whiskey
Web: My link

Subject: Paddy's Day

Been busy. I keep checking in. Link is to the Pogues. Bob W. why don't you try 'Rum, Sodomy and the Lash'? Remastered.

Thinking of you Jeff.


Entered at Thu Mar 17 22:50:43 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Then I thank you, Ben. Though I also thank an old school friend who insisted I buy "The Crane Wife."


Entered at Thu Mar 17 21:25:50 CET 2011 from (71.130.8.5)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Subject: It's Hellfire, man

Peter, a hard search of this guestbook will tell you you first came to The Decemberists when I told you about them here and you had never heard of them, if I do say so myself, and I do! Early US Press compared them to Tull. Anyway, I thought this sort of sums up the terrible moment.... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5bpBEQUXEMY


Entered at Thu Mar 17 21:16:33 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Stoneman's Cavalry

And it was one of Gen. George Stoneman's Union cavalry divisions, under the command of Brig. Gen. William Averell, attacking that fateful day.


Entered at Thu Mar 17 20:39:55 CET 2011 from (64.105.104.209)

Posted by:

Jeb Stuart

Web: My link

My compliments, Sir.


Entered at Thu Mar 17 19:37:02 CET 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: USA
Web: My link

Subject: March 17th

The Gallant Pelham remembered.


Entered at Thu Mar 17 18:30:08 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Dawes

Dawes, who will be working with Robbie, have also performed with Levon, albeit on one song. In August 2010 they were on the bill at the Newport Folk Festival with the Levon Helm Band. They joined Levon onstage to sing backup on "I Shall Be Released", along with other Festival performers including the Felice Brothers and Ritchie Havens (see link).


Entered at Thu Mar 17 17:45:52 CET 2011 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

Mike & Kim Hayward

Web: My link

Subject: Great The Band & Keith Richards video.

Thanks Bob W. for originally sharing this link. Great tune.


Entered at Thu Mar 17 11:21:55 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Web: My link

Happy St. Patrick's Day.


Entered at Wed Mar 16 22:54:16 CET 2011 from (64.105.104.209)

Posted by:

Pat B

Hmmmm...Eagles number 9 on that Amazon list.


Entered at Wed Mar 16 22:43:01 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Decemberists

From my blog

The Decemberists


02 Academy Bristol


8 March 2011


Set list:
 


July July


Calamity Song 



Rox in The Box



Rise To Me



We Both Go Down Together



The Sporting Life



Grace Cathedral Hill



Won’t Want For Love (Margaret in the Taiga)
 


The Crane Wife 3



The Rake’s Song



Don’t Carry It All



Down By The Water



This Is Why We Fight



16 Military Wives



The Chimbley Sweep / “Blues” 


First encore



Red Right Ankle



The Mariner’s Revenge Song


Second encore



June Hymn 


I used to scribble down setlists, but have avoided it since being near-assualted by an aggressive Van Morrison female fan / acquaintance (“I was backstage before the show” she told me) who saw me taking notes and asked if I was writing a f*cking review, because Van hates f*cking reviewers and I’ll f*cking nut any f*cking reviewers. Nice girl. It’s so much easier to take setlists off the net the next day. Then you tend to look at the previous three nights. Fascinating. It’s a very “unfixed” set list for The Decemberists. The songs from the new album The King Is Dead got aired at Bristol except one of the ones I most wanted to hear, January Hymn, which only appeared in Glasgow, and All Arise which appeared at Birmingham and Dublin. (If I hadn’t seen the set list, I would have said All Arise was played at Bristol, with the pedal steel, but this must be false memory!). The rest was pretty moveable, though the big set pieces, 16 Military Wives, and The Mariner’s Revenge Song appeared every time and June Hymn always closed the show. Even The Crane Wife 3 and The Rake’s Song only made three out of four shows, though luckily we got both at Bristol. 


Chronologically then. The support band were Blind Pilot, like The Decemberists, from Oregon. They had an unusual line up: guitar / vocal, acoustic bass, drums, vibraphone, trumpet doubling on accordion, and banjo doubling on dulcimer. Like The Decemberists basic line-up, they featured one woman, the banjo player. I knew they were officially a two-piece with four extra musicians. I hadn’t realised the two piece were the lead singer and the drummer … I’d assumed the banjo player who did most back-up vocals was the other half. Like The Decemberists, they featured joining in to drum on a bass tom-tom. Like the Decemberists, they featured intelligent lyrics, and based everything round one vocalists. They were a lot like The Decemberists all the way round. Extremely good too. I immediately bought their CD in the interval. 


To sum up The Decemberists, in the words of the guy behind me (who said it about fifty times): fucking outstanding. I thought of typing it fifty times, but I badly cut my typing finger on the razor sharp door handle of a typically filthy Bristol taxi (both the ones we used were filthy anyway) so I won’t. 


I wanted an image of Colin Meloy for this piece. I Googled. Either he has a lot of near identical brown plaid shirts or he’s got two years’ use out of just the one on stage. He has a comfortable charisma, a stunning voice, and relaxed, natural audience rapport. Meloy has done solo tours. I was extremely surprised how little the rest of the band sang. They have to import a “Sixth Decemberist” on tour to replace their female guests from the albums, this time Sara Watkins (from Nickel Creek) on backing vocals, fiddle and guitar. If you take Robbie Robertson’s 1970 quote about The Band, that they were five equals with four singers, while Creedence Clearwater Revival were instead “John Fogerty and some guys,” there is an element of that about The Decemberists. Ray Davies and The Kinks or Raoul Malo with The Mavericks is another comparison. You have one guy writing the stuff and the same guy singing lead and doing the introductions. But Meloy has wisely avoided the solo ego bit (it really doesn’t look his kind of thing) ; wisely because The Decemberists play with such mutual empathy, and are obviously (judging by the setlists) totally able to follow whatever mood the show takes. 


I came to The Decemberists at The Crane Wife then worked back. I thought The Hazards of Love brilliant, but something that had to be consumed in one go, and which I thought was quite deliberately “difficult.” The radio-friendly The King Is Dead apparently annoyed some purists, but to me it’s far and away their best album. When I saw the folkie Fairport Convention, I thought “folk-oriented bands just don’t have drummers this good!” That was Dave Mattacks. The same thought struck me about John Moen. What a drummer! 


How do you pick outstanding tracks when, in our friend’s words, it was all fucking outstanding. The Rake’s Song with everyone beating bass tom-toms? This Is Why We Fight with its unintended topical references to current events in Libya? 


When we die



We will die



With our arms unbound



And this is why



This is why



Why we fight



Come hell


Perhaps Colin Meloy working the audience up for “being eaten by a whale” noises before The Mariner’s Revenge Song. Or June Hymn? A sublime piece where the singer is even better than the record? Not much question really: The Rake’s Song and June Hymn. 


Criticisms? The long comedy pieces establish rapport, but shave off three minutes (easy) and we could have had January Hymn as well as John Moen’s piss-take on the blues. 


The sound was excellent, but not impeccable. The O2 Academy doesn’t look the sort of venue where the acoustic is ever brilliant. I noticed the care that had gone into the small Fender amplifiers mic’ed into the PA, and what looked like an authentic Orange valve amp … there was a second Orange amp, but it looked later. Also the racks of guitars on both sides of the stage. These guys really care about their sound. My fucking outstanding guy complained early that it’s not very loud for rock and roll. I thought they hit perfect volume for the room, loud enough to be exciting when they rocked and audible when they were subtle. But to be curmudgeonly, I would have brought up Sara Watkins’ microphone about 20% in the mix, and lifted the keyboards a tad. They had undistorted bass (hard in bad halls). I know it’s rock and roll to have everyone crammed together standing, and it’s great to see a band at their peak … The King is Dead went straight to #1 on the Billboard 200 in the USA … for a mere £15 too (compare the aged Ringo Starr going out with guys who haven’t had an American hit since the seventies, and who’ve never had a British hit, at FOUR times the price this year. And Ringo still can’t sing in tune.) But I’d love to see The Decemberists in a proper concert hall with decent natural acoustics, and I’d love to be sitting down too with decent eyelines. I’m sure that the right room would reveal their balance to be into the Leonard Cohen / Paul Simon range of perfection.


Entered at Wed Mar 16 22:20:35 CET 2011 from (76.79.75.218)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland Tx

Subject: Various

I like Adam2's point about songs done live. I once tried to establish every song the Band had done live. Sadly, many have no decent recording, even stuff, I would imagine, done on the 74 tour! Amazing to think in this day and age.... Hey Peter, glad you finally got hip to "The Decemberists!" I should talk, I'm still playing there first or second album. Hey, any comments on Garth's project of last year? I'm finally getting ready to buy it....


Entered at Wed Mar 16 22:15:08 CET 2011 from (86.169.140.150)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Robbie

That's Robbie number 1 in classic rock in Amazon.

I'll still buy it from my local shop.


Entered at Wed Mar 16 22:11:49 CET 2011 from (134.174.21.2)

Posted by:

Tim

Location: Boston

Subject: Dawes

So Robbie is using this band for TV and festival shows. And The Dawes are scheduled to play Mountain Jam in June, 10 miles from Woodstock.. what are the odds Robbie plays this festival???


Entered at Wed Mar 16 22:07:43 CET 2011 from (86.169.140.150)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Peter V, Jeff

Peter, if you go into BBCiplayer theres a good programme on when Harry Benson met Albert Watson, the two iconic Scottish photographers. Its called Artworks. Worth a look alone for the Beatles pillow fight photographs and the John Lennon death 'Why?' photograph, if you've got half an hour.

Jeff That's us Scots. Talking at ninety miles an hour.


Entered at Wed Mar 16 21:15:37 CET 2011 from (174.89.122.247)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Northwestcoaster: All in fun…..but those names can become confusing at a quick glance!……………..funny point about corporate names and identities…….silly to become attached to anything of the sort but it does happen……..A Canadian icon Molson’s ( beer and owner of the fabled Montreal Canadiens ) is now owned by Coors and hearing it referred to Molson-Coors in the press is just jarring.


Entered at Wed Mar 16 19:49:33 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: Nokia rubberboots

NWC: in UK they call it a "welliphone," in US it's a "phone boot."


Entered at Wed Mar 16 19:42:13 CET 2011 from (90.239.116.26)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: More of Linux - why Mr. Linus Torvalds is a genius

(Yes I have posted something like this before!) In the late seventies my wife studied computer science at the same Academic Institute as Mr. Torvalds for a few ears later. It was their Unix system which he was unhappy with. We played with the same system and never even IDENTIFIED this problem!!!


Entered at Wed Mar 16 19:10:06 CET 2011 from (90.239.116.26)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Kevin's post and Linux (mainly to jh and Peter V.)

Kevin, thanks. Always touching to be compared with - even negativelly - the pseudonyme of B. Dylan ;-).

About Linux: It is simply like this guestbook. Community based. Open. And Unix = The Hawks. BTW you who have Anroid phones are holding Linux in your hand. I am ashamed that Nokia is now married to Micro$oft - afterall I had Nokia rubberboots in Finland when I was five years old.


Entered at Wed Mar 16 16:06:48 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Jeff

Funny you should mention that Bob. I was thinking of Jeff yesterday, and playing his CD as well. Hope his quality of life is still holding up some. We always have to give thanks of how lucky we are.

Yesterday as well, I watched an interview with a Major of our armed forces telling how the new "Act" in our government has taken so much of their benefits away from our disabled veterans....disgusting. This poor man had his legs blown off, and one of his testicals, is deaf in one ear, plus other complications. The spirit and positive attitude of this man after all he has endured is heart wrenching. Giving his, and his wifes entire life to try and help other people. Lets not complain too much.


Entered at Wed Mar 16 13:44:20 CET 2011 from (41.97.181.245)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

The previous post must be read listening to the link above, 36 years old not a pinch of freshness lost


Entered at Wed Mar 16 13:43:06 CET 2011 from (41.97.181.245)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: TNTDODD chorus / Congrats Jan / Hotel California

I was prompted by the restart of the “na na na” debate (TNTDODD chorus), provided that if it is kept at the pure auditory perspective, it could be exciting. Meanwhile a guy I know who is a reference in linguistics, told me that the sound na/la used in chorus exists only in Norwegian language (he called it “Retroflex N”), I thought by instinct what a post in The GB it could make, with a tailor made title “TNTDODD is The Band connected at last”, aftermath I thought that it is possible that this information was stupidity given my ignorance of the matter; even if I have right to One stupidity per year in the GB I’de better reserve it to something else. Now everybody have an opportunity to make their own judgement by their own ear in Jan’s link and 15 minutes of fame, Congrats Jan

---------

Hotel California : in the link above an article a la Viney

“Locked into the Hotel California” by Ger Tillekens

A must reading for the older elite of The Band GB

excerpt
“Its real theme, however, is the paradox of the pop/rock scene that, having started as a counter culture, now had spawned its own rank and fashion of artists with all the isolationist marks of an older elite. The fast evolution of pop music into an art scene had erected a fence within the culture itself, separating the artists not only from their audience but as well from their own past. Suddenly finding oneself locked-up in this cultural enclave: that's what the song is really all about. Or, as Henley himself once said: "Hotel California was our interpretation of the high life in Los Angeles.”

That which makes Hotel California a concept album


Entered at Wed Mar 16 12:39:29 CET 2011 from (65.93.119.183)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Me, too. Hope you're OK, Rollie.


Entered at Wed Mar 16 11:55:38 CET 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Web: My link

Link is to article about the Rock-n-Roll HOF induction ceremony.

Like I said earlier, there was a time that I greatly enjoyed the Eagles but overexposure (outside of one or two songs) killed them for me. Funny, all this Eagles talk and yesterday after dropping my daughter off at karate, I was flipping stations and Witchie Woman was on one. I chuckled at the irony and moved on - now I have to turn off Hotel California another 100 times before I hear a different song of theirs.


Entered at Wed Mar 16 11:49:41 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Web: My link

Subject: Dawes......

......will be backing Robbie Robertson. {From "What's New".}


Entered at Wed Mar 16 11:12:05 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Thinking of you, Jeff Newsom.


Entered at Wed Mar 16 08:37:19 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: We're only in it for the money?

Concert prices vary so wildly. The Decemberists at the top of their form last week were £15. The Unthanks on Saturday will be £15, acclaimed hugely in the UK. Ringo Starr & The All Has-Been Band are going out for £65, or more than four times the price. The Decemberists have probably sold more records this year than solo Ringo has in twenty years.

"Eagles" are working on the mark-up the resellers were taking on their shows and charging it themselves instead of letting the sharks have it.

The Decemberists at £15 (and instant sell-out and a great support band, Blind Pilot) are almost a political statement. But I wish they'd play some seated halls. My old moans about poor eye lines are repeated here.

Dr John I will never quite forgive for having a clock on his keyboard, and stopping mid-song halfway through the second encore when it hit 90 minutes. That really does say "I'm only in it for the money." It's just that fewer people want to pay to see Dr John than want to see Eagles. I suspect that's mainly due to a certain sameness in post-Gris Gris material.


Entered at Wed Mar 16 08:32:30 CET 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Dunc, Dawes is not that good. I heard their last record , cut on tape when it came out. Some of em are pretty good musicians, some very basic. Unless they really turned it up a notch, Robbie could do a whole lot better.But they are young, semi happening,m and that MIGHT be a big attraction for RR.

Got a crazy scotsman I run into localy here. works at the laundromat at night. 23 year old kid, works 2 jobs to get by. Can't understand a goddamn word he's saying.On top of the accent, he talks faster than a speeding bullet.


Entered at Wed Mar 16 08:24:00 CET 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Adam2, Never fear, had he knowledge of such travesty, I doubt The Good Doctor would be offended.

For my tastes, The Eagles were far more effective as a recording unit in the early days. Hotel California was a great work, but Lying Eyes was pure pap. I can't Tell You why, wonderful, In The city, wonderful., but... whilst their artistry never faltered, their art certainly took a downward spiral. Saw em a few times in the 70s before Leadon and Meisner split.Once in 94. My lady of that time was walking on air, before during, and for days after that show, she was sabra, apprently the Eagles were huge in Israel in her youth.

All this said, I enjoyed seeing Black Tie, Randy Meisner, Billy Swan, The Griffin guy from Bread, Blondie Chaplin, David Kemper, at The Lone Star just as much. Plus, did not drive as far, did not spend as much money, and no crowds to deal with.


Entered at Wed Mar 16 08:18:48 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Eagles

"The" Eagles were also one of the many Shadows / Ventures style instrumental groups in the UK, famous for their work with Valerie Mountain on the 1962 soundtrack of "Some People". I think they were from Bristol, a city I'm visiting today.


Entered at Wed Mar 16 05:12:08 CET 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: NY

Subject: Eagles

Eagles music has always been something I've been very fond of, maybe because, like The Band, they occupy the questionable genre of "country rock" (probably both groups despise that term). But I think I liked Them Eagles better in the '70s than after Hell froze over and they reunited and started charging what I thought was an awful lot of money for a concert ticket. It was almost as if they were just doing it for the money and not for the love of the music (if there ever was such a thing).

Adam-2: If I don't write this, somebody else will.


Entered at Wed Mar 16 04:37:02 CET 2011 from (70.77.200.21)

Posted by:

kristie

Subject: Eagles-Bill M

I have very strong memories associated with Eagles songs... Camping with my best friend and her parents when I was a kid, her dad playing Eagles songs on his battery operated tape player. That was the first time I heard "take it easy," and hearing "take it easy" now stirs up such happy memories. The opening line is so associated with the smell of campfire to me now.

Bill M-Fascinating rhythm used to be my old haunt when I lives in Nanaimo. I found some great records there!


Entered at Wed Mar 16 04:30:32 CET 2011 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

Adam2, please, that would be "Eagles".


Entered at Wed Mar 16 03:38:43 CET 2011 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Adam2: the real world's a lot like that too - a whole bunch of people running around talking about stuff they want to talk about instead of stuff I want to talk about. Just keep going and enjoy the intersects when they happen.


Entered at Wed Mar 16 02:31:21 CET 2011 from (99.235.255.183)

Posted by:

Serenity

Web: My link

Subject: R&R HOF

My link to Rolling Stone's Ceremony ...

CYA soon xoxoxo


Entered at Wed Mar 16 02:21:37 CET 2011 from (99.141.31.86)

Posted by:

Adam2

This is an example with my frustration with the GB - an attempt to discuss the brilliant recent work of Dr. John goes completely unnoticed, but an in-depth discussion praising The Eagles prevails. Ugh.


Entered at Wed Mar 16 01:14:36 CET 2011 from (204.138.58.96)

Posted by:

Bill M

There was also an earlier Eagles, an R&B vocal group who did the original "Trying To Get To You" - available on the most excellent "Mercury Jump Blues" comp along with a bunch of Buddy and Ella Johnson stuff and Cleanhead Vinson stuff. Westcoaster: I almost bought it some years ago at that great store in one of those malls in the endless mall-land that is the northern 'burbs of Nanaimo, Fascinating Rhythm, but I bought the Specialty boxed set instead.

The famous Eagles I've liked only spottily aside from "Take It Easy", but I saw them in the local stadium last year (in an act of selfless devotion) and it was very good. Even the awful songs - "Hotel California" beyond the guitar intro, "New Kid", all of the castrati choir stuff, etc. - were impressive: great sound, great staging, great performance, fantastic impression of old friends still relishing in each other's company ...


Entered at Tue Mar 15 23:10:42 CET 2011 from (59.101.55.143)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Joe Hill and the Long Black Veil

Has anyone noticed that 'wobbly' songwriter Joe Hill's story and 'Long Black Veil' are similar - just checked Peter V.s (fantastic) article: it's not there. I wonder if the songwriters also put in the story of Joe Hill (as well as the other 2...)


Entered at Tue Mar 15 23:01:16 CET 2011 from (85.255.44.145)

Posted by:

jh

The Dell laptop runs Linux, Peter. Just like The Band web server. In fact, your Mac (and mine) also runs (sort of) Linux. Under that sleek interface of the Mac OS X lurks our favorite operating system since the late '60s -- Unix!


Entered at Tue Mar 15 22:37:31 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Great posters on the wall, Jan. Shame about the Dell laptop though. Time to go Mac?


Entered at Tue Mar 15 22:32:12 CET 2011 from (85.255.44.145)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Subject: Our 15 minutes of fame...

...actually more like two minutes. Check link above for a short TV "news" story (and an article) about this site and your webmaster, taped about a month ago. All in Norwegian, I'm afraid... except for Levon, that is. Also features Jonad Fjeld!


Entered at Tue Mar 15 22:10:11 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Kevin's road to hell

This is what your road to hell looks like Kevin......probably every day.

I agree Pat the stuff more resent is of little interest. But when we saw them last May in Vancouver, that same sound of the old stuff is maybe even better than ever. The sound system in GM Place, (now called Rogers Arena) in Vancouver is as good as it could ever get for a stadium that size.


Entered at Tue Mar 15 22:08:39 CET 2011 from (174.89.122.247)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Westcoaster: There is a Band connection to Camper Van Beethoven….If you get it I might just decide to never go west of the Rockies again……

Pat B…….Understood and liked that reference to Niemi……Sometimes I will hear a score on the radio or some talk about goaltending and it reminds me of those discussions last year…..life is funny that way…..


Entered at Tue Mar 15 22:04:25 CET 2011 from (86.169.140.150)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland
Web: My link

Subject: Robbie to play live

Will it happen?


Entered at Tue Mar 15 21:47:52 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: It's a Long Road Out of Eden to Wal-Mart

Kevin J: And then there's the Wal-Mart deal for the last Eagles CD.


Entered at Tue Mar 15 21:46:55 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: A band that should have been bigger????

I think I'm gonna kill myself!.......that's a song of Waylon's by the way. Now seriously Kevin, I looked at that outfit, and I was going to turn my sound on but didn't.

That outfit looks like something out of Deliverance, specially that yeller haired feller in the middle. You can't be serious now can you??? See that's why we don't like non of youze gawd damn easterners out here. Yuh rarely make any sense:):)


Entered at Tue Mar 15 21:28:41 CET 2011 from (64.105.104.209)

Posted by:

Pat B

Kevin J, only talking about Eagles back in Seventies, and perhaps a bit of Eighties. Eagles today of little interest.

I mentioned a year ago that Eagles most recent bio was great. Probably still is.


Entered at Tue Mar 15 20:38:15 CET 2011 from (174.89.122.247)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Let’s see now…………A definition of Hell……would it be having to listen to Eagles or watch the View or does Baba Wawa now insist we call it View …………….I did like the album “One of these Nights” and the song Hotel California is one of those rare songs that even I cannot believe I have never tired of listening to but really - let’s be serious……..this never ending tour of a bunch of people that can’t stand each other playing for bank presidents and their wives just reeks of everything that is wrong with life as we now know it…………………..and on top of all that I blame Eagles for the truly horrific sight and sound of all these sort of country/sort of rock n roll/sort of wimpy half dressed-can’t dance f*ck wits that populate all that is country music video channels these days……………..See attached for a band that should have been bigger…….


Entered at Tue Mar 15 20:10:51 CET 2011 from (99.235.255.183)

Posted by:

Serenity

Hi guys! Me again. I seem to be posting a lot lately.Hope you don't mind too much?

BEG: Thanx for the link via Levon. Thought some of the comments were really nasty. Why wouldn't anyone go on to better things, if the chance comes along? They all would have done the same thing, as others have done.

EMPTY NOW: Thanx for the response to Anwar, he was a good man. Too bad he's gone. Maybe Egypt wouldn't be in such a turmoil if he had lived.

JEFF: I always watch "The View" and I didn't see ROBBIE on it so far? Maybe you watch a different version than ABC's.When was he on?

PBS had the Moody Blues, and they still sound good. Frank,Dino, Sammy and Johnny Carson were on last night, but I hate those pledge breaks. I know they need the money to keep going, but we don't have to like them.

Until Next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxo


Entered at Tue Mar 15 18:47:04 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Sad News

After mentioning the Atlanta Rhythm Section, I just learned that the group's former lead singer Ronnie Hammond died yesterday of heart failure at age 60.


Entered at Tue Mar 15 18:45:49 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Web: My link

Subject: Eagles( The) etc

A lot of years ago we went to the Bottom Line to see Karla Bonoff. The opening act was someone I didn't know.Jack Tempchin. He opened his set saying this is a little tune I wrote, and launches into "Peaceful Easy Feeling" I was sort of like Oh, that's Jack Tempchin. I never saw him around after that, but it was a great evening


Entered at Tue Mar 15 18:22:11 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Web: My link

Subject: Joe Morello

John Donabie reminded me today that Joe Morello was Levon's favorite drummer. He was a gifted player.


Entered at Tue Mar 15 17:41:10 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Common Thread

Before the Eagles reunited for their 1994 Hell Freezes Over tour they first got back together to appear in Travis Tritt's video for his cover of "Take It Easy" (see link), which was included on the "Common Thread: The Songs of the Eagles" country tribute album. Mr. Tritt would later appear with Levon in the film "Fire Down Below". Mr. Tritt's contribution to the film's soundtrack was a fine cover of the Atlanta Rhythm Section's "Back Up Against The Wall".


Entered at Tue Mar 15 17:38:25 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Disco for Todd

There take that Todd.....you criminal!


Entered at Tue Mar 15 17:33:02 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: raptors, rumours, rush

Re: Eagles: whatever else, you gotta admire how they named their band in obvious homage to The Hawks. Also works for The Rumour, Fanny and probably a bunch of others I can't think of at the moment.

It's nice to see Leon Russell inducted into the RRHoF . . . and normally I wouldn't give a rodent's rear end, but I saw most of a documentary the other day (_Rush: Beyond the Lighted Stage_ -- molto highly recommended, and I'm not a fan at all) and I am now among the legion who cry "injustice!" at the Rush / RRHoF freeze-out. Thirty-something years, twenty-something albums that are pretty much all gold or platinum. Plus they seem like nice guys; perhaps that's a disqualifier. Or it's because they're Torontonians . . . .


Entered at Tue Mar 15 17:11:50 CET 2011 from (64.105.104.209)

Posted by:

Pat B

David P, and on top of it all, I believe Meisner tried out for Buffalo Springfield.


Entered at Tue Mar 15 16:39:09 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: With eyes wide open

Thank you Pat.....when I've seen Eagles I felt the same way. I wonder if anyone knows that quirk Henley & Frey have. They HATE being called "the" Eagles. You're supposed to just say "Eagles".

Your reference to their likeness to the Band, for their attention to their music in every way is something else I have often thought of.

In my own small experience with the last band I had, the four guys I played with were the same way. Although we played bars, and mostly small clubs, my guys were very critical of what we did. I learned a great deal from them regarding sound control, placement of speakers, even lighting. The entire show. Those guys were so good, none of us hardly ever had a drink. If you were under any influence, I don't see how one would have kept up.

It puts me in mind of some musicians I have known and been around quite a lot who got into drugs, and in particular cocaine. What it did to most of them, they thought they were great, but they became terrible concerning timing and every aspect of their performance to where it was embarrasing. One friend of mine who is a killer guitar player, would get wrecked on cocaine. I would have to get away from him. I couldn't stand to watch him. There were times he was playing guitar with me and I just wanted to kill him he became so bad. But the 4 guys I had my last band with were the experience of a life time for me. They were far better musicians than I but they encouraged and supported me to where I sometimes wondered if I deserved it.


Entered at Tue Mar 15 16:37:25 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: This Eagle Has Flown Before

Pat: Yes, and Timothy B. Schmit owes Randy Meisner a great deal of thanks, as he replaced Mr. Meisner in both Poco and the Eagles. As I recall, Mr. Meisner also quit Rick Nelson's often overlooked, but very influential, Stone Canyon Band after a very brief tenure in between those other gigs.


Entered at Tue Mar 15 16:20:47 CET 2011 from (64.105.104.209)

Posted by:

Pat B

Randy Meisner made the mistake of developing a reputation of a reluctant performer. He became afraid of singing Take It To The Limit and started to come up with excuses--warranted or not--for not performing the song. Even he will tell you he was away on the shit during that period. Then, when razzed about his reluctance, he gets into a fistfight with one of the principals of the group. He quit but word was he wanted back after receiving little support from Walsh and Felder, but the die was cast.

I saw Ronstadt open for Poco when Frey and Henley were backing her and they sounded as good as Poco if not better--and I was a Poco fan, saw the original band a bunch. Then I saw the Eagles as a four piece open for Yes (I know, weird) and I thought they were really good even though I was there for Close To The Edge. But when I saw the Eagles in on the Hotel California tour, they were spectacular. Very Band-like in a serious musical way. Great sound, precise arrangements, immaculate harmonies, and a set list to kill for.


Entered at Tue Mar 15 15:55:23 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

I must be getting senile; how could I forget The Hawk?! I guess that qualifies me to become a RHoF voter. :-)


Entered at Tue Mar 15 15:33:01 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: R&R Hall of Fame

Ronnie Hawkins isn't listed as an inductee.


Entered at Tue Mar 15 15:11:02 CET 2011 from (41.97.131.46)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: Re: Serenity - Song for Anwar

Serenity: Thanks for your echo, in the link is a song for Anwar Sedat, Enrico Macias was a personal friend of him, he released the single for this song “Un berger Vient de Tomber” (translate Just a Shepherd Falling) the week following his death, so the sorrowful mood of the song signs-up the sincerity of the message, without altering the beauty of music, music is beauty first.

translation of preamble and selected verses

spoken: for all the martyrs of peace who died for us all, for our children our grandchildren and the future generations

All those who in front of his body are rejoicing
Forget that death is not a defeat
He traced the path we all remember
Martyrs force the doors of history


Entered at Tue Mar 15 15:06:55 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Chuckles.......

Todd's just trying to piss me off now.........it ain't workin' TODD!..........oh my heart.......disco......I think one of us here don't know what disco is, and it ain't me.

Just wait 'till I get my hands on that gawd damn Todd.....I'm going for my coffee now


Entered at Tue Mar 15 14:44:08 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The Last Waltz Hall of Fame

Yes, two participants from The Last Waltz were officially inducted last night into the Rock 'n Roll Hall of Fame: Dr. John and Neil Diamond. Previously, in 1995, both Van Morrison and Eric Clapton (as a member of Cream) were inducted. Mr. Clapton was later inducted as a solo artist in 2000. In 1997 Joni Mitchell and Neil Young (as a member of Buffalo Springfield) were inducted. Mr. Young was previously inducted as a solo artist in 1995.

Let's see, so far I believe the only Last Waltz participants not inducted are Paul Butterfield, Bobby Charles and Emmylou Harris. Mr. Butterfield did get to act as presenter when Muddy Waters was inducted in 1987.


Entered at Tue Mar 15 13:20:52 CET 2011 from (69.182.53.54)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Eagles

I like a lot of the Eagles music, and would classify a lot of it as Rock & Roll, but the song that Norm linked to is DISCO! To be fair, it's not pure disco, but has that 4 on the floor drum beat that other groups like Fleetwood Mac and even the Strolling Bones were doing at the time.


Entered at Tue Mar 15 11:33:50 CET 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

For me, The Eagles are one of those bands that went from 'like very much' to 'turn the radio to a different station please.' Most likely over exposure due to time and the lack of imagination radio stations in the NYC/tri-state area have in insisting to play Hotel California 100 times to every one (you pick the song) that they also created. Hotel California is one of those songs I can't listen to anymore - it goes on the list with Layla, Aqua Lung, Walk on the Wild Side and Brown Eyed Girl as the most over played songs I don't listen to anymore on the radio.


Entered at Tue Mar 15 10:42:20 CET 2011 from (158.39.165.127)

Posted by:

jh

Subject: The Eagles

One of our guilty pleasures, I'm afraid. Early Eagles, that is. They sort of lost us sometime before 1980 -- too much coke-fueled studio perfectionism, I guess.


Entered at Tue Mar 15 09:27:31 CET 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Ed Voci's Buddy

Subject: Birdie groups

GB exclusive!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Hear it here first

The Eagles were.......... fab

:-0)


Entered at Tue Mar 15 08:44:43 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I like The Eagles too. Like many bands, adverse criticism rises in direct proportion to record sales, an issue that has afflicted many fine groups and never goes away. I had a conversation with a record store owner yesterday who complained tht Noah & The Whale had “followed The Decemberists” in going “radio-friendly.” In both cases it really means they have hit a melodic vein so good that more people like it than liked the stuff before.

Last year a friend was asking me about 5.1 systems. I demonstrated ours to her, and (as usual) put on The Eagles “Hell Freezes Over” DVD as a demo. Most budget 5.1 systems have a very crude “.1” or bass speaker which is designed to handle loud bangs and crashes in movies, but booms horribly on bass guitar or bass drums. The Eagles is an example which shows the difference, because with Hotel California the instruments come in one at a time, and demontrate the bass guitar and the low congas very clearly, as well as positioning the vocals. It’s an ancient DVD now, and was given to me with my first 5.1 system (long since replaced) by the store. Our friend sings in a first rate classical choir and used to teach singing, and her knowledge of rock is zero (to the point of never even having heard of The Eagles.) She was most impressed with the sound, but wanted to race over to the USA and give Don Henley singing lessons, because she said he wasn’t opening his mouth properly and projecting. I realized she’d sung on many stages but had never sung directly into a microphone in her life. I had to explain microphone technique (which Henley is a master of). Years ago, when I was recording spoken voice a great deal, some actors just couldn’t do it in studios because they couldn’t switch off their stage projection.


Entered at Tue Mar 15 07:19:40 CET 2011 from (12.51.52.166)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Just saw RR is doing The View. Now that could be one for the record books. Garth, Garth should do The View.


Entered at Tue Mar 15 07:16:09 CET 2011 from (12.51.52.166)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Always been a big fan of The Eagles.some killer songs, music.... but...........still say they shouldn't be considered in the same breath as Poco, The Burrito Brothers, The Band.....Amazing thing, heavy duty musician like Bernie Leadon having the balls to walk away from that kind of money. and then Randy Meisner doing the same.


Entered at Tue Mar 15 04:55:44 CET 2011 from (99.141.31.86)

Posted by:

Adam2

Web: My link

New Orleans legend and longtime Dr. John drummer Herman Roscoe Ernest is also among the notable musicians who have recently passed away. Ernest had been battling cancer for the past two years. Read the article above - he was working on a project recently and was in a great deal of pain, but refused to go home and rest. He said how playing music was the one thing that took the pain away completely. For the past two years, he toured with Dr. John when he felt healthy enough. I was so fortunate to see him on the drums when Dr. John came to Space in Chicago last fall. It was one of the top 2 shows I have ever seen, and I've seen my share. Roscoe Ernest is topped only by Levon as the greatest drummer I have ever seen in person. Rest in peace.

I was especially saddened by the news, as Dr. John's Lower 911 band is one of the most incredible bands in existence today. I very rarely see Dr. John's recent work or live shows mentioned here. Do yourself a favor and pick up his two recent albums Tribal and City That Care Forgot. Tribal was supposed to be a collaboration with the late Bobby Charles, but his death prevented that. Instead, the album is dedicated to Charles' memory and features three songs he co-wrote with Dr. John. City That Care Forgot heavily featured Charles, as he co-wrote half of the album. These two albums are amazing. Two of the best albums in Dr. John's whole career.


Entered at Tue Mar 15 04:43:46 CET 2011 from (76.67.18.109)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Learn To Be Still

The Eagles were part of my soundtrack in University. I'd sit in the Library with the headphones and just listen.....and connect.


Entered at Tue Mar 15 04:32:12 CET 2011 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

Owsley Stanley died over the weekend. The producer of a very clean form of LSD, he influenced a whole lot of musicians and listeners. Of course, the government arrested him, but he ended up designing a sound system for the Dead that was the basis for stadium PA's.

I'm sure Steve would have had something to say about Antti Niemi tonight.

The Eagles and the Band have a lot more in common than what most folks would like to admit. Both were highly attentive to replicating their recorded output in a live setting, sometimes taking more time with the soundcheck than with the actual show. Neither had much contact with the audience and let their music speak for itself. Singing drummers. Tight arrangements with no jamming. The Eagles get rapped for being soulless purveyors of a watered down version of country music, or a vanilla version of rock, take your pick, but they have connected with a vast audience for whom their music means much. I for one like it a lot. Some of it I love.


Entered at Tue Mar 15 03:26:46 CET 2011 from (76.67.18.109)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

http://levonhelm.tumblr.com/page/4


Entered at Tue Mar 15 02:45:22 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Good One

I had a chuckle. That was a good one JQ. But you were bad mouthing Eagles, (as many here do). Their music is great! I don't give a shit what anyone says. Good writing, good music, and good musicians. And in the words of Foresst Gump, "That's all I have to say about that."


Entered at Tue Mar 15 01:50:37 CET 2011 from (99.235.255.183)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: Music

Me again...Forgot to mention that the latest R&R HOF inductee, Neil Diamond is on tonight at 9PM on BRAVO.. And the Chieftains are on Jimmy Fallon.

CYA soon xoxoxo



Entered at Tue Mar 15 00:58:25 CET 2011 from (166.205.141.189)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: rag geezer rag

Westcoaster - I remain unsure of my offense. But millions of people can be wrong, just look at the election of Bush x2.

That one was for Steve -


Entered at Tue Mar 15 00:39:08 CET 2011 from (99.235.255.183)

Posted by:

Serenity

Web: My link

Subject: Beach Boys

Hi!! You guys probably know this news in my link, but a reminder from this great group that are still aroumd.

BEG: Nice poem. Prof. Bowman might be a good choice as he knows him so well.I'm sure he will find a goodie to help him along the way. I don't believe he'll write his bio on his own.

EMPTY NOW: In your post on kings, what king of England? I only know of a Queen, and I live in Canada. King Farouk was a real baddie from what I remember years ago. Anwar Sedat was a good guy. At least he tried to make peace, until he was shot.

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE [if only...] xoxoxoxo


Entered at Mon Mar 14 23:59:58 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: This is Rock & Roll!!

This here is for that gawd damn JQ - ol' rascal. I'm comin' down the beach there pretty soon. I'm gonna get him out for a beer and I'll probably jump acros the table and bite off his left ear......old son-of-a-bitch.

It don't matter what you say, there isn't much better rock & roll any where than stuff like this. And the whole point is, millions of people can't all be wrong!


Entered at Mon Mar 14 22:17:59 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: In Memoriam

Two legendary figures from the world of music have passed away in the last few days: Jazz drummer Joe Morello, famous for his work with Dave Brubeck, including "Take Five". And recording engineer Stan Ross, co-founder of Gold Star Recording Studios in Hollywood.


Entered at Mon Mar 14 21:29:01 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Jeff Beck / Shangri-Las

David P: I've always liked the Shangri-Las. What's not to like about white boots and kohl-covered eyelids? Let's not get onto the British equivalent, Twinkle ("Terry").

I've been playing Peter Gunn, but also Apache. I have the original on the iPod (I mean, who doesn't?) and also a later Shadows version. I can't really believe it, but the Jeff Beck version is better. The guitar is pretty faithful, but the bass part in particular sounds way better.


Entered at Mon Mar 14 20:18:12 CET 2011 from (174.89.122.247)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Norm………You are the only guy I know that can call someone a “Gawd damn criminal” and put a smile on their face!

Jeff Beck: As mentioned the tribute to Les Paul is that but also a whole lot more………just a gloriously fun night of rock n roll…….I picked up the DVD and it’s guitar heaven…………….Gary US Bonds does a number as does Brian Setzer but just a blast to see a master of the electric guitar do his thing on a bunch guitars and songs I have never seen him play…….The version of Peter Gunn with guitar and horns going at it just about blows the roof out of the place…………The “Extras” section of the dvd includes a good little bit at Beck’s home where he tells the stories of some of the guitars he has in his collection……..Other than Roy Orbison….has there been another example of someone just soaring like this in the last innings of their career………Jeff Beck in his 60’s has had more acclaim and “not put a foot wrong” moments than at any other period in his career – surpassing even the George Martin mid 70’s period.


Entered at Mon Mar 14 19:45:47 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Albums

I totally sagree with choice of Richard & Mimi Farina, but I would chose Reflections in a Chrystal Wind.

Pat also reset my mental jukebox. Karla Bonoff has a really good one in "Restless Nights

The second Yonder Mountains String Band collaboration.

I've got more but those do pop over the years


Entered at Mon Mar 14 19:20:03 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The Shangri-Las

Peter: In a way The Shangri-Las have been rediscovered recently. The duo Nikki & Rich sampled the group's "Give Him A Great Big Kiss" and channeled that "girl group" style in their song "Cat and Mouse". Critics have described the result as doo-wop meets hip-hop.


Entered at Mon Mar 14 18:34:47 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Shangri-Las

One of the links between the new Marianne Faithful and the new Jeff Beck (with Imelda May) is that Marianne covers"Past, Present & Future" while Imelda May with Jeff Beck does "(Remember) Walking In The Sand."

That reminded me that one rumoured Band session was at Red Bird and some hazarded whether it was with The Shangri-Las. The Shangri-Las covered You Cheated You Lied too at this time, and credited it to "Helm." I think we worked out that the Red Bird references were the John Hammond sessions though.

BUT artists are constantly rediscovered. Maybe it's The Shangri-Las next!


Entered at Mon Mar 14 18:17:56 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

BEG, Lou Reed does the guitar solo on "The Old House", the last track on Marianne Faithfull's new "Horses & High Heels."

Other listening today. Jeff Beck's "Rock & Roll Party Honouring Les Paul." A friend recommended it, and I said I wasn't that mad on Jeff Beck, and he said "Get it for the Imelda May vocals." Right. She's brilliant on this.


Entered at Mon Mar 14 17:50:17 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

BEG: Seems to me that they're just farting around, playing with words, the only thing that matters being the need to end with that exceptional double-entendre, "I can't leave her behind". Being a (b)assman, Rick would have relished the idea of harmonising on the final word, just like he did live on "One Too Many Mornings".


Entered at Mon Mar 14 17:30:48 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Blurred?????

Awright Kevin! just what does that mean? We're both just a couple old geezers......you criminal! Now get back there and sit down you young punk!


Entered at Mon Mar 14 17:10:04 CET 2011 from (76.69.86.60)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Bill M and......Garland Jeffreys fans!

Wow....speaking of Garland....I just received an email from Garland letting me know that finally.....finally....his latest CD....THE KING OF IN BETWEEN is ready and will come out in May!!

For Kevin J......I think....Therefore I am.

On A Rainy Afternoon/Does She Need Me?/I Can't Leave Her Behind


Entered at Mon Mar 14 17:04:18 CET 2011 from (174.89.122.247)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Every now and then ......the lines between Northwestcoaster and Westcoaster become blurred - do they not......yikes!


Entered at Mon Mar 14 16:53:20 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: On another subject..........

Bill!......BILL MUNSON!!.........where in the hell is Bill??

Ok here's the story. I hire this guy as a deckhand a few days ago. Big fella, 6'2", says he's about 230....more like 260 at least. 52 years old, and so out of shape I thought he'd have a cardiac just climbing off the tug onto the barge the way he was gasping. Anyway he's from Trana . Been out here quite a few years living on his sail boat, so considers himself quite a sailor. Point is there is a great difference riding around on a boat site seeing, and working on a tug.

After a couple days he says to me......I think I bit off more than I can chew. Nice guy tho'. So what I'm coming to. He plays guitar a little, and is into music. So I said to him, you must be one of those guys who hangs out down in that Yonge Street country then? He says you must mean those days of Neil Young and all them. I said yeah, and explained to him about the Band. He says, oh, do you know of Ronnie Hawkins? I said fer chris sake man I have know of Ronnie Hawkins since about 1958, and explained to him the whole evolution of Rockabillie music. He says oh yeah, well.....around the lake where I grew up, Ronnie used to play there all the time. His daughter is a friend of mine!

Now there you go see.......I don't even got to go anywhere, and this BAND connection just appears all the time right in my face.

Anyway this fella, Duncan Morley his name is , well he was quite put out with hisself. He's 14 years younger than me, and just can't do this work he is so out of shape. He says, I can't believe how bad a shape I'm in. He was a supervisor at Lafarge cement for the last 8 years. Lost his job to layoff for "down sizing". Pretty hard for guys that age to find employment, especially when you let yourself go physically. I said you better practice up on your guitar!


Entered at Mon Mar 14 16:38:52 CET 2011 from (174.89.122.247)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Joe Ely - should have read "Live at Liberty Lunch" not "Love"


Entered at Mon Mar 14 16:35:28 CET 2011 from (174.89.122.247)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Encore - ipod additions

Enjoying these suggestions on these possibly obscure but no too obscure lists………a few additions to my list that make a good addition to any ipod:

Joe Ely……….”Love at Liberty Lunch” – starts off with the “Me and Billy the Kid” and just gets better

The Replacements………One of my desert island discs to be sure is “Pleased to Meet Me” – their best album produced by the late great Jim Dickinson but a bit brash for some……so as a sampler of this album and some other songs of theirs perhaps downloading “Can’t Hardly Wait”, “Skyway”, “Bastards of the Young”, “Here Comes a Regular”…the latter being the best song ever written on the hopelessness of being a drunk………

Paul Weller……….”Modern Classics” – A fine best of covering his solo years……..or just download the following cuts “Out of the Sinking”, “Sunflower”, “Brand New Start”, “Into Tomorrow” and a great cover “Tobacco Ash Sunday”


Entered at Mon Mar 14 16:29:35 CET 2011 from (76.69.86.60)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Photo of Garland Jeffreys and Levon Helm. Garland's better half Claire sent this photo to me which I then shared with this site.

Bill M: Garland is acquainted with Levon so I didn't think he'd be the right one to write Robbie's memoirs!! Ha, ha! He never said anything negative about Robbie when we spoke about it but still.

Also.....I'd nominate you to help Robbie out with any Hawks related history.....I think here is where your real passion and expertise would be greatly appreciated.

I think Peter V would be a great help as well after The Hawks became The Band.

I still think ray pence would do a great job because he's a trained writer being a prof and all in history and loves both Levon and Robbie. What I've really respected about him is his strong sense of fair play and respect to all.....So perhaps.....may be more objective in general. Which reminds me ray......Why haven't you sent the Webmaster the paper you wrote on The Band????

Bowman.....too close to Robbie....but is a musicologist........However, maybe Robbie would trust him the most. I still think Robbie should write his own story as he wrote most of the songs.....but needs to acknowledge more that Levon gave him a lot of stories to transform into songs......They were a really good team for a long time. Anyway, just my opinions as a music fan.

I would love to read Robbie's memoirs just as much as I'd love for the three remaining Band members to even put out one song together for themselves and for their fans.....even if they have to be in different studios.......

Love Hope and Forgiveness (difficult for all of us but as we become wiser.....It's the only way to keep on keepin' on in this world.)

For Sebastian: If I asked any inappropriate questions about your father.....please forgive me.


Entered at Mon Mar 14 15:54:26 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Vinyl Siding

Had some time this weekend to catch up on listening to some recently acquired 45 singles.

Dylan's "On A Night Like This" (Asylum) -- A double-sided, mono/stereo radio promo copy. The mono mix, with Garth's accordion and Rick's driving bass front & center, really has more punch than the stereo counterpart.

Another Dylan release "Lay Lady Lay" b/w "Peggy Day" (Columbia) -- A classic mono single.

Lee Dorsey "Holy Cow" b/w "Operation Heartache" (Amy) -- An amazing collaboration with Allen Toussaint.

Thanks BWNWITenn for the heads up on The Civil Wars. I hadn't heard them before, but some people I know were very impressed when they saw them perform at Eddie's Attic in Decatur, GA. a while back.


Entered at Mon Mar 14 15:47:25 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Adam2: My ears tell me that the chorus is a mixture of Na and La - an attempt, as per my oft-stated theory, to reflect the conflicted feelings of the people of the south. (As you might image, there were millions who would've seen the South's loss as a Very Good Thing.)

BEG: I am disappointed that you, of all people!, didn't nominate Garland J to ghost-write Robbie's autobiog.


Entered at Mon Mar 14 13:48:15 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Thanks again, EVERYONE. Some wonderful recommendations that are greatly appreciated. Hope your Monday is a good one.


Entered at Mon Mar 14 10:32:17 CET 2011 from (99.141.31.86)

Posted by:

Adam2

Thanks for the help. I'm going to see if I can split the audio channels on the original recording, because it really sounds like Levon (right side) is singing a combination and the other guys' backing vocals something a little different. It's a beautiful sound.


Entered at Mon Mar 14 09:11:30 CET 2011 from (41.97.133.213)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: wrong link

sorry Adam2, in the hurry i mislinked, this one is the ultimate reference


Entered at Mon Mar 14 09:06:05 CET 2011 from (41.97.133.213)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

definitely na na na na na na na na na na na na na na


Entered at Mon Mar 14 08:59:31 CET 2011 from (99.141.31.86)

Posted by:

Adam2

Another lyrics question - is there a definite answer on the last line of the chorus of The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down? Is it "na" or "la"? It's always been hard for me to tell. Thanks for helping out...


Entered at Mon Mar 14 08:50:30 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Obscure stuff to seek out

I've always got a mental list of obscure stuff I'm either waiting for the CD to appear, or that I like so much I'd buy another copy if one fell into my hands (cheaply) in a second-hand store. I like the idea of listing them here.

Mordicai Jones “Mordicai Jones” (often classed as a Link Wray album) 1972. Bits are available on CD, but not the whole thing. Stand out tracks: Precious Jewel, Walking in the Arizona Sun (aka Tucson Arizona, and also on a Link Wray album in a different version).

Broth "Broth". I have this. Same line-up as "Mordicai Jones" cut at the same place. Everyone except Link Wray is the same. This is WAY obscure, so much so that the Link Wray fansite had never even heard of it. I bought it new, just noticed the names.

Forever More “Yours Forever More” 1971. Dunc also knows this pre-AWB band. Never on CD. Also "Words on Black Plastic."

Big Daddy “Sergeant Pepper’s Lonely Heart’s Club Band.” The best rock pastiche ever. Only on CD, I think. I'd buy a vinyl one.

Craig Douglas / Doug Sheldon … CD compilation. It only came out in 2007, disappeared after the first run, and now is advertised at £75 on the net. I haven't got it, but keep looking for a shop that hasn't sold its original copy and doesn't know the price hike. The wimpy 60s covers by Craig Douglas are on a dozen cheapie compilations, but Doug Sheldon is hard to find. He did the British cover of Runaround Sue, then I Saw Linda Yesterday, Live Now Pay Later, and Your Ma Said You Cried In Your Sleep Last Night. Definitely a Dion imitator, but a good one.


Entered at Mon Mar 14 07:11:44 CET 2011 from (70.77.200.21)

Posted by:

kristie

Subject: Bob w-music

I hope I am not too late with my contribution to your music collection. These are five I have been enjoying lately. Not really unknown, but good, nonetheless.

1.Bruce Cockburn "High winds white sky." In my opinion, one of the best albums ever to come out of Canada.

2.Jenny Lewis and the Watson twins "Rabbit fur coat."

3.Mimi and Richard Farina "Memories." Two great talents. I also recommend Richard's novel "Been down so long it looks up to me."

4.The New pornographers "Challengers." Another great Canadian album.

I also like Bill M's suggestion of "Tinderbox" by Fred Eaglesmith.


Entered at Mon Mar 14 05:53:31 CET 2011 from (12.51.52.166)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Domino Theory

Charlie, Bobby Whitlock has a book that is either out, or about to come out. I know it's been selling on Amazon for a while.


Entered at Mon Mar 14 00:58:57 CET 2011 from (99.141.31.86)

Posted by:

Adam2

Peter - I'm glad I'm not the only one who thought "God, please not Greil Marcus".


Entered at Sun Mar 13 23:51:36 CET 2011 from (71.62.70.35)

Posted by:

Charlie Y

Location: Down in Old Virginny

Subject: The Band in a Book About the "Layla" Album

Eric Clapton's Derek and the Dominoes "Layla and Assorted Other Love Songs" is about to be reissued for the 40th anniversary and I'm reading Jan Reid's 2006 book (Rodale Press) on the making of that album. I don't know much about Mr. Reid's background but know his publisher does not generally do many music books. When he writes the following--"it's hard to listen to the Band's erratic first efforts and fathom why BIG PINK was so influential..."--it makes me understand why the book was published by a health book publisher, not one that generally does music books.

The book talks about Robbie Robertson inviting Eric Clapton to hang out with The Band in Woodstock while Clapton was touring the US with Cream and mentions the usual quote from him when he was first exposed to their music: "I got hold of an acetate of The Band, listened to it and thought...I'm in a group that's a raging success, it's a con, it makes a lot of money...and here's a band that's been working for ten years and THAT'S where I'd like to be..."

Mr. Reid goes on to write, "Clapton was spun on his heels by The Band's melodic arrangements, their vivid storytelling, and [Robbie] Robertson's insistence on doing away with those long screaming, guitar solos..."


Entered at Sun Mar 13 20:04:30 CET 2011 from (41.97.161.243)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: my toyota is fantastic

On the style of Ed Voci:
NorthWestCoaster wrote “EMPTY NOW, kindly take your Land Rover and check out this for us, please”

switch back to the style of Empty Now please
There’s only one 4X4 - SUV - Crossover, the gasoline fueled Toyota Land Cruiser , that everybody here – natives & tourists – call “Toyota Station”, or simply “The Station” often with tenderness, and sometimes with terror.
add on the Sahara hardships, the problem of large scale bandits and smugglers, not yet exposed in the international public opinion (as long as Press Agencies don’t tackle the question) , bandits with a substantial logistics now, and no assigned political doctrine nor purpose (as long as THE Agency doesn’t tackle the question). In the beginning those were people who owned Kalashnikovs, which helped them to acquire the newest Toyota Stations.
A guy who works for an American Oil company told me that every time colleagues of him were left in the desert by bandits who robbed their Toyota Station , the next day the managers of the wealthy American Oil Company buy them a new Toyota Station, the only reason be targeted by bandits.
As he was telling me about this situation, I was silently envisaging what a creative publicity it could make for Toyota. Later on I discovered that there’s a camping–car model called Toyota Bandit, maybe without any relevancy, thus I rather pondered about the commercial logics and ethics of the name of the latter model.


Entered at Sun Mar 13 19:40:04 CET 2011 from (69.126.52.26)

Posted by:

Bob F

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Garland Jeffreys

The first song from Garland Jeffrey's new record is available for download from Amazon. It's called 'Coney Iland Winter'. The song has a Velvet Underground feel in the music and a great Garland vocal. Wonderful stuff. Garland and Lou are both from Brooklyn and I believe went to the same college, Syracuse.


Entered at Sun Mar 13 18:16:21 CET 2011 from (12.51.52.166)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Turtle Peter

Another customer with desert tortoises in the backyard. One came out, headed for the gate, cozied up in the corner by the gate. The woman said this one never comes out till May. I wonder if summer is desert toroise racing season around here.


Entered at Sun Mar 13 17:41:49 CET 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Ed Voci's Buddy

Subject: Pushed her Down

Hmm - not sure how I missed Pushed her Down, Ed. Stonewall classic. It's been corrected as we speak. Must have had a momentary lapse of concentration.

Roll and Tumble? Considered for selection as was Bottle and Dime from Fowl and of course many many others from that album and also the other albums. However, I reckon I can just about survive life without them for the time being. Same with Max's Blankets.

Now Jimmy's Billy Goat Bridge - that's an entirely different matter. Surviving without that could present a major genius deprivation problem.

And I'll certainly give your Mississippi Missive a go.

Peter - Gin 'n' Juice is just bubbling under. The problem is it's similar 7 minute length to High highs/Low Lows and that sort of just shades seeing as it's an original Genius Jimmy composition.


Entered at Sun Mar 13 17:35:21 CET 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars again

Location: "south of the line"
Web: My link

Subject: Gabriel and the Angels

That about sums it up for me (see link).


Entered at Sun Mar 13 17:27:20 CET 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: the woods

Subject: the fox and the Blue Chicken

ED- good to have you back in the friendly environs of the Band Guestbook. No, I haven't been practicing basketball. In fact, soon after you beat me 1-0 (then the heavy rain ended the game) I took a chain saw and cut down that high stump that was holding up my backboard and hoop. I can't even tolerate watching a hoop game on tv. No big deal.

I went to the Falcon to see Blue Chicken on Friday night, but the place was sold out. No place to sit. So I handed a book off to Rando and left. I would have loved to have seen the show, but that's the way it goes ("How much does it cost?.....It cost 20 cents....but I only got a nickel....a nickel...whoa oh, that's tough." - Gabriel and the Angels).



Entered at Sun Mar 13 14:55:29 CET 2011 from (75.32.35.17)

Posted by:

The Gourdfather

Location: East Gourdistan

Subject: The Gourds

..........Correction: thegourdfather@mac.com............. E.V. Buddy,,,,your compilation is your compilation is your compilation is your compilation and I dig it. Compilations of The Gourds are a fluid proposition given the wealth of material. I would add Max's "Blankets" and "1st In Line", but also "Pushed Her Down" and "Roll & Tumble". Now, having said that, the Russell/Voci tune "Mississippi Missive" on Best of Boots 2005 is a sleeper and available from Archive.org (http://www.archive.org/search.php?query=Mississippi%20Missive%20AND%20collection%3Aetree).


Entered at Sun Mar 13 14:42:33 CET 2011 from (76.68.80.24)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Oh I used to stay up every night
I be so all alone
In my hand my trusty pen
I work it to the bone

Ghost writer, writer, writer, writer
Everybody thinks I'm doing fine
Ghost writer, writer, writer
I'm gonna lay you down a line

I used to live down on Ludlow Street 1964
Then I was so innocent
But now I know the score

Ghost writer, writer, writer, writer
That's what they call me by name
Ghost writer, writer, writer
For fortune and for fame

We got Shakespeare, Spencer,
Sydney too
We all know what they do
I'm a poet of a kind
I know that you are too

Ghost writer, writer, writer, writer
Just tryina' make my way
Ghost writer, writer, writer
I'm gonna lay one down today

We got Chaplin with his funny face
Jolson with his mask
Movie stars all in a race
I'm going to Hollywood at last

Ghost writer, writer
Like a phantom on the trail
Ghost writer, writer, writer
Yesterday I paid back all of my bail

I got buffaloed down on Barrow Street
Everybody knows it's true
Now I'm standing on my two feet
You're with me and I'm with you

Ghost writer, writer
I'm a New York city son
Ghost writer, writer, writer
Just tryna' have my fun

I've been writing down these old stories now
For 'bout eighteen years or so
People are startin' to call me a genius
I gotta' tell 'em no, no, no, no

Ghost writer, writer
Tell me what do you have to do
Ghost writer, writer, writer, writer

To get your story through


Entered at Sun Mar 13 14:37:16 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

My knowledge of The Gourds is limited, but I find Gin & Juice hilarious and catchy every time.


Entered at Sun Mar 13 14:25:31 CET 2011 from (76.68.80.24)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

February 25/11 photo of Robbie

"Legendary composer and guitarist, Robbie Robertson, checks in with his new Freeze Sound Retainer
Robbie was overheard saying: “What an amazing sustainer… and who among us doesn’t need a good sustainer now and again.“

bob w:
Mink DeVille...Cabretta
Holly McNarland...Stuff (Canadian who toured with Wallflowers)
Black Uhuru...Liberation (reggae)
Donna The Buffalo (upstate NY band that even imagezulu really digs)...Positive Friction
Everclear...Songs From An American Movie Volume 1
The Skydiggers (Toronto Band)...Still Restless The Lost Tapes 1999
Steel Pulse...True Democracy (reggae from England)
Bush X (now called Bush)...Sixteen Stone
Garland Jeffreys...Escape Artist and Guts For Love
The Waterboys...A Pagan Place and This Is The Sea

I'd nominate ray pence to write Robbie's memoirs if Robbie didn't want to do it himself.


Entered at Sun Mar 13 14:00:41 CET 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Ed Voci's Buddy

Subject: The Gourdfather

I'd be interested in what you think of this for a Gourds collection I've recently burnt to CD.

Any you'd miss out or add?

Or is it as damn near perfection as I'm starting to think?

Magnolia

Boil my strings

My name is Jorge

Plaid Coat

Web Before you walk in it

El paso

Plaid Coat

County orange

Lowlands

jenny brown

Clear night

When wine was cheap

Trampled by the Sun

Last letter

Steeple Full of swallows

Caledonia [Jimmy's own not the bland blues version of course]

Promenade

Dying of the Pines

High highs Low Lows

Two Girls

Raining in Port arthur

All the Labor

It's been on continuous play this past month in the house, on the PC and in the car. Thirst to hear it again and again still unquenched. With Jimmy and kevin so contrasting in style I find there is such amazing varied yet outstanding quality of writing both lyrics and music. the quality of vocals and playing speaks for itself. Only thing missing is a [sex] cymbal or should that be symbol.


Entered at Sun Mar 13 13:07:55 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Please not Greil Marcus! I couldn't take the rambling incoherence. He used to be one of the best rock writers, but it's long gone. I found recent stuff near unreadable. The obvious candidate is Rob Bowman who did all the remaster sleeve notes, but having seen that he's tried before, I'd guess that would be who he tried with.

I bought Jason Schneider's "Whispering Pines" ages ago, and started it, then mislaid the copy. A major tidy up last week revealed it and I started again. His chapter on The Hawks, Levon & The Hawks and the Dylan tour is clear, concise, clarifies some chronology for the first time, and has that hard to find item,. "new" quotes. An excellent read too. I'd put him forward as another candidate.


Entered at Sun Mar 13 10:06:20 CET 2011 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: Serenity

Yes a book co-written by Robbie and Greil Marcus would be highly readable. "yeah right" as they say over here (or "not" as they used to say in the rest of the world.)


Entered at Sun Mar 13 04:23:49 CET 2011 from (99.140.220.162)

Posted by:

The Gourdfather

Location: East Gourdistan

Subject: "Ten years ago..." or 7 or 8 at least

Lars, I heard that! Hope you're well, practicing your round ball and gettin' ready for a rematch. The Gourds will be recording their next CD at Levon Helm Studios with Larry Campbell very, very soon so stay tuned. Hello to all who may remember or still have a memory. thegourdfather@aol.com "[Lars:] Subject: Still at it Seeing the name of Ed Voci makes me smile. The dirtiest hoop player I've ever met. I still have the scars. I wonder if he stepped it up a notch and starting sitting in with the Gourds with only one symbal. Illka- it's not like it used to be. Good luck."


Entered at Sat Mar 12 23:24:50 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: Yonge Street stories

I love this one, drummer Duke Edwards talking about his first trip to Toronto.


Entered at Sat Mar 12 23:02:35 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

sadavid: I'm sure you're absolutely correct that 444 referred to either 04:44 or 16:44, similar to Moby Grape's lovely "8:05" (AM or PM remaining unspecified). I was thinking more along the lines of Tarheel Slim's fabulous "Number 9 Train" (which Steve and I discussed briefly a few months ago) - see/hear link.


Entered at Sat Mar 12 19:09:37 CET 2011 from (74.179.54.146)

Posted by:

BWNWITenn

Web: My link

The Civil Wars' "famous" song.


Entered at Sat Mar 12 19:07:23 CET 2011 from (74.179.54.146)

Posted by:

BWNWITenn

Web: My link

Subject: The Civil Wars

The Civil Wars are a new duo from East Nashville (although David P might disagree) whose debut album hit #1 on iTunes downloads and #12 (briefly) on the Billboard top 200, and who would probably appeal to fans of The Band. The first single, "Barton Hollow," on the link, although musically appealling, isn't totally representative of their sound, which is generally a little more folky/melodic and less bluesy. Great songs, too - again, "Barton Hollow" is probably their most run-of-the-mill song, lyrically. But they're fantastic, have been selling out lots of club shows, and really need to win Best New Artist at the Grammys next year - definitely at the AMAs. Their album is available for download on Amazon for $5 throughout March.


Entered at Sat Mar 12 18:59:56 CET 2011 from (91.42.244.36)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: The Weight; Levon, Derek, Susan & Ray L.

"Ray LaMontagne, Levon Helm Band, Susan Tedeschi & Derek Trucks playing "The Weight"" (link)

Thanks for the Lucinda Williams link the other day, great singer\songwrtier, realy enjoy her.

Fred good to see you around.


Entered at Sat Mar 12 13:54:03 CET 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Web: My link

Every March the Allman Brothers set up shop in New York City and play a long string of dates. The link above is a review of Opening Night of their stay. Personally, I've seen them play about 8 or 9 times but that was back in the 80's, they were always a jam.

Fred - glad to hear you are doing good - hope it stays that way with the recent nuclear events taking place.


Entered at Sat Mar 12 11:19:32 CET 2011 from (86.165.78.209)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: David P

Thanks. I didn't know Johnny Cash played in prisons so early. The 'Live at San Quentin' album was very popular here. I still enjoy and regularly play 'The Sun Sessions'.


Entered at Sat Mar 12 11:04:56 CET 2011 from (86.165.78.209)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Bob W 5albums

Hi Bob I've broken the rules and selected 6 very different albums.

Aaron Neville - 'Bring It On Home - The Soul Classics'. I wondered at the time if I should buy a reworking of the soul classics, but I think the productions are beautiful. Remember too, Bob, the Scottish contribution to Soul - sadly because of the Scottish role in the slave trade.

John Martyn - 'No Little Boy remastered' - rerecording of John's classic tracks with a great contribution from Levon.

A'Jock Tamson's Bairns' - 'The Lasses Fashion' - Recently read again it is one of Richard Thompson's top five.

Dr Feelgood - 'Singles' - the best of British R n' B.

Maura O'Connell - 'Stories' - beautiful album - Irish singer crosses to USA.

Richard Hawley - 'Coles Corner' - perhaps 2005's greatest British album. I think a really great British album. Try downloading the track, Coles Corner or see him on You Tube.

Hope you and your son are fine.

Fred, Glad you are OK


Entered at Sat Mar 12 09:45:09 CET 2011 from (41.97.156.122)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: Sadavid / NorthWestCoaster/ and some corrections

Sadavid , funny and so true

NorthWestCoaster, these kinds of bugs i do them in the everyday, and often with good intention, the last one is in my last post

Actually, Farouk was King of Egypt and Sudan, Nubia, Kordofan, and Darfur.
I commited a crime of lese-majesty, and those moving boundaries

in due respect to The Band GBers, I have also to correct the other big mistake in my last post. according to wikipedia, ref 5 in the link above, the exact quote is
"The whole world is in revolt. Soon there will be only five Kings left — the King of England, the King of Spades, the King of Clubs, the King of Hearts, and the King of Diamonds."
The King of England seems used at an impersonal form, just the title
It was so easy to wikipediate before posting


Entered at Sat Mar 12 05:44:41 CET 2011 from (99.235.255.183)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: Band

On my link, check out page 3 for the BAND.

CYA soon xoxoxo


Entered at Sat Mar 12 03:35:09 CET 2011 from (99.235.255.183)

Posted by:

Serenity

Web: My link

Subject: R&R HOF inductees

LINK: I think you guys may like this from Rolling Stone mag.

ROBBIES' memoir would do well if he had Griel Marcus [Sp?] to help him somewhat.

All our prayers are with the people of Japan. Just heard that a 6.8 magnatude aftershock has taken place. These poor people. God Bless them all. and keep them safe from any more harm.

FRED: Glad to hear you are OK. Hope it stays that way.

Until next time LOVR AND PEACE xoxoxo


Entered at Fri Mar 11 23:21:40 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Kevin, same here......just "Ghost Writer" from your list. I appreciate your suggestions and all the others as well. Sincerest thanks.

Having recently made the jump to a 160GB Ipod, and spending countless hours cleaning up and organizing my collection, I am curious about some of those hidden gems that I know the folks here can reveal.

The ability to plug an Ipod into my car's audio system, see the album art on the nav screen and operate all of the Ipod's control options on that same screen is amazing. I feel like I'm driving my own radio station. I know technology has a down side but this particular gadgetry has made my extensive car travel a lot more enjoyable.

Thanks again, everyone.


Entered at Fri Mar 11 22:34:11 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: name that train

Bill M: unless I'm mistaken, these numbers refer to scheduled arrival times, so the "two-nineteen" and the "four-forty-four" could be the same train in different places. "Rag Mama Rag"'s "four-nineteen" is, I think, a repurposing of Richard M. Jones's "two-nineteen" from "Trouble in Mind," first recorded in 1924 and since covered by everybody and his or her dog.

Jones's vision is a lot darker than [whosever it was's that wrote "Rag Mama Rag"]:

"I'm gonna lay my head on some lonesome railroad line and let the 2:19 train satisfy my mind."


Entered at Fri Mar 11 21:21:54 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: official (pre-release) lyrics: "When The Night Was Young"

Please see [My link] for a nice scan of the lyrics, signed by JRR and decorated with personalized picks.

This is all pursuant to a contest to provide comic captions for the 'mysterious hooded figure' photograph.


Entered at Fri Mar 11 19:59:32 CET 2011 from (90.239.96.21)

Posted by:

NothWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Scarborough Fair

Thanks Peter V for our info. Better check it out by myself, because 1968 was such a strange year with demonstrations in Paris and Prague!

More of NorthAfrican missunderstandings: I had a female colleague from Somalia, traditionally dressed. No one sat beside her in our lunchroom. I sat beside her just for being nice and had a chat with her - with her 25 words in Swedish. - Afterwards someone told me that there is a reason for no one sitting beside her. "You must marry her or her brothers will cut your throat", was the message. Luckilly just another racistic joke.


Entered at Fri Mar 11 19:53:26 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Mystery Train to Tozeur

Empty N: While you're at it, would you mind finding out the number of the train that used to run to Tozeur/Tawzar? It would be a blast if it turned out the 444 "that don't stop here anymore".


Entered at Fri Mar 11 19:39:27 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The last time I was in Scarborough was about 1968, and it was a Tuesday and there was no fair to my memory. A lot of rude postcards, though.


Entered at Fri Mar 11 19:01:51 CET 2011 from (90.239.75.26)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Is there (1) a train station in Tozeur and is there (2) a country fair in Scarborough?

(1) Good to see that 'Il treno a Tozeur' is still accepted by the music lovers like BILL M! - My problem is this: Once I had a student from the south of Jumhuriya at-Tunisia. All other students had left and she still gathered her books and writings. If this happens the best thing you can do as a teacher or an instructor is to keep your mouth shut and wait for what happens. As a fool I didn't. I said: "I like the song The Train To Tozeur from Eurovision Song ". Her dark eyes were flaming when she answered: "There goes no passenger trains to Tawzar anymore." I felt myself really stupid. EMPTY NOW, kindly take your Land Rover and check out this for us, please.

(2) I have heard that there are not any country fair in Scarborough at Saturdays anymore (Simon and Garfunkel: Scarborough Fair/Canticle). PETER V., kindly take your Saab and check out this for us, please.


Entered at Fri Mar 11 18:29:30 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: pay the tips, I'll collect the chips

Empty: it reminds me of the saying that marriage is like a hand of cards: in the beginning all you need is two hearts and a diamond, but by the end you're looking for a club and a spade . . . .


Entered at Fri Mar 11 18:27:39 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Great Idea

I only have one, Ghost Writer. I'll think of five later!


Entered at Fri Mar 11 17:35:26 CET 2011 from (174.89.122.247)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: 5 Suggestions - possibly not known but not totally obsure

This is a great topic because it leads to music that just about everyone here can be turned on to if they choose……that said, a bit daunting to make suggestions to the likes of David, Bob, Peter, JQ and Bill as they seem to have quite extensive collections already……My older brother is in that same category…..a true true music fan that has always had an amazing interest in all areas of music…….funny guy about his music though as he has always had a strict rule about never, under any circumstances, lending any album or cd…..had I not snuck down to his room and played Rock of Ages when I was 15 I sometimes wonder whether I would even be here ( at the GB that is )….anyhow – to the task at hand……..my early bet would be that Bob probably has 2 of the 5 but let’s see!

Murray Head……..”Say it Ain’t So”

Garland Jeffreys………..”Ghost Writer”

Garfield French…………”Reason to Be” Impossible to find but a great unknown album

54-40………………’Sweeter Things – a compilation” – well done greatest hits and a good introduction to the band

Tom Cochrane…………”Ragged Ass Road” An album written about the break-up of his marriage. I was not really a fan of Cochrane’s and this is the only music of his I own……but it is a good one with some lovely tunes…..strong all the way through…


Entered at Fri Mar 11 17:27:00 CET 2011 from (41.97.192.76)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: Bill M / ...and continued

Thanks Bill M - I just recalled that the great ABBA started in ESC. I redirect your echo to Ilkka who is as you know my other GB furnisher in outstanding knowledge

Musically speaking, all I knew before about Bey of Tunis (King of Tunisia) was the linked above song, track#11 Qoudam Darek (the palace of my heart) praising one Bey of Tunis – assume they're all the same – I never heard Enrico Macias singing as heart and soul as in this song, I deduced that this Bey dude is the best human being who ever lived

During an interview of late King Farouk of Egypt with a French journalist who dared to use the phrase "Great King" as attribute of Farouk. The latter corrected him promptly, "There will always by only four Great Kings in History…", where all expected a 4-name-list of the likes of King Georges, Leopold, etc… Farouk continued "… the King of Club, the King of Diamond, the King of Spade, and the King of Heart"

Epilog with a quote of Jean Gabin from a movie I forgot the title "Life is a train with First class passengers, Second class passengers, Business class passengers, Economic class passengers, … at end of line station it's " terminus, everybody out! please"


Entered at Fri Mar 11 16:56:02 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Of course I knew you'd say that, Landmark, but thanks.


Entered at Fri Mar 11 16:45:00 CET 2011 from (70.28.32.74)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

I nominate Bill M to ghost-write the Robbie memoir. Anybody second the motion?


Entered at Fri Mar 11 16:16:19 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronno

Empty N: One listen to that Alice and Battiato song and I knew it would have made a perfect comeback hit for Sonny and Cher. Sonny could probably have done his part in the original language. Sadly, with Sonny gone it'll never happen.

Rod: Good point about having some objectivity in the room, but the flipside of that is the danger of ignorance. You'd want someone who is not a slavish fan of Robbie but who knows enough of the obscure background stuff to ask the leading questions that will tease out more than the superficial and/or tired tales. (Stephen Davis, I'm thinking of you, although you did have the wit to ransack Ronnie Hawkins' book for stories.) And let's hope the ghostwriter isn't paid by the syllable or Adam2's gonna have a heart attack.

Bob W: I wish I could say it was a typo, but with the '0' and the '1' being so far apart I have to admit it was a brain-fart. The proper address was 20 Granite Creek, not the place across the street. Also, since David P's mentioned the Geoff and Amos album, I'll append Geoff and Maria's "Sweet Potatoes" to my list.

Landmark: "Second Contribution" did well enough in Toronto too, though certainly not like Montreal. Seems to me that Phillips attracted a surprisingly large audience to a concert here some time in the last few years - but maybe I'm making that up.


Entered at Fri Mar 11 16:03:42 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Good to hear you and yours are safe, Fred. Thoughts and prayers go out to all those impacted by this disaster.

Thanks again to everyone for the great recommendations.


Entered at Fri Mar 11 15:38:00 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Great to hear things are fine, Fred. I correspond around ten times a day with people in Japan on one thing or another, I've been to Sendai twice and have friends there. My thoughts are with them and everyone in Japan.


Entered at Fri Mar 11 15:26:22 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Under the Radar

A few suggestions for bob w:

"Southern Nights" -- Allen Toussaint (Water Music)
"Blues Boy" -- Geoff Muldaur & Amos Garrett (Rounder/Umgd)
"Avalanche" -- Eric Andersen (DBK Works)
"Stratosphere Boogie: The Flaming Guitars of Speedy West & Jimmy Bryant" (Razor & Tie)
"No More Mr. Lucky" -- Randall Bramblett (New West Records)


Entered at Fri Mar 11 15:18:42 CET 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Glad to hear you & your family are okay, Fred.


Entered at Fri Mar 11 15:04:07 CET 2011 from (216.227.83.24)

Posted by:

Lil

Thanks Fred. I thought of you and your family immediately when I heard about the devastation there. I am so glad you're all ok.


Entered at Fri Mar 11 13:57:15 CET 2011 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: All's well...for the time being

No earthquake tremors where I live, although we are under a tsunami advisory/warning at the moment. I wouldn't have know about the big earthquake had I not turned on the TV to watch the 6 pm news.


Entered at Fri Mar 11 13:51:04 CET 2011 from (216.227.83.24)

Posted by:

Lil

Thoughts go out to those in Japan during this time.

Fred: I hope all is ok. Could you please check in when you can?


Entered at Fri Mar 11 13:48:37 CET 2011 from (59.101.55.143)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Lines... and obscure albums...

Thanks Peter V! (I meant to put Peter will know this stuff), but I can comment on syllable length... Count out the syllables...

Obscure albums (Not terribly obscure, but Best of Acoustic Jethro Tull has plenty of gems)

Newgrass Revival (again, obscure here...)



Entered at Fri Mar 11 13:39:41 CET 2011 from (70.28.32.74)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

Subject: Bob W's question

1) Les Dudek - First solo album. 2)Journey - First album. Back when they were a hybrid Santana/Mahavishnu styled band. 3)Shawn Phillips - Second Contribution. This album was huge in Montreal and unheard of everywhere else.


Entered at Fri Mar 11 13:04:34 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Thanks, Bill and Bonk.


Entered at Fri Mar 11 10:37:14 CET 2011 from (41.97.182.118)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

if more interested, check out the link above, if more than more interested you can get an easier and closer view on the TV News (no matter what channel)


Entered at Fri Mar 11 10:35:54 CET 2011 from (41.97.182.118)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: NorthWestCoaster : Re - Franco Battiato

actually, nowadays it takes Empty Now to find everything in anything.

Grandiose!!! inter-alia I halted at I Treni Di Tozeur [link] – ESC winner 1984, who said that ESC were bullshit ?

Here's a Cut-Paste from wikipedia, as it is

The train line referred to in the lyrics runs from Metlaoui in the north through the Gorges of Seldja in the Atlas Mountains to Tozeur on the border of the Sahara desert in the south, the frontier mentioned is subsequently the Tunisian-Algerian. The track was built in the early 1900s at an enormous cost of both state finances and human lives in order for the Bey of Tunis (the King of Tunisia) to travel in grand style to his winter palace in the oasis town of Tozeur and largely also to impress foreign dignitaries on visit. There was originally only one train set, built in Paris in 1910 and this was an official gift from the state of France to the Bey of Tunisia when the country was a French protectorate. With all five carriages painted deep-red it was colloquially named 'Le Lézard Rouge' (The Red Lizard) by the oppressed and empoverished Tunisian people and was seen as a symbol of both the emperor's power and extravagant Western-influenced life-style and the French imperialism.
After the bankrupt Tunisia became an autonomous republic in 1957 and the then reigning Bey from the Husainid Dynasty had lost both his political influence and his substantial inherited personal wealth, the train set with its luxurious Belle Époque interiors of brocaded velvet armchairs, overhead antique-globed lighting, brass fittings, mahogany marquetry and panoramic windows was confiscated by the new government but due to its symbolical value stored in a depot and left to its destiny. After some thirty years in decay it was however restored by the Tunisian state and the SNCFT (La Société National de Chemins de Fer Tunisiens) and today the Red Lizard and the train line Metlaoui-Tozeur, often referred to as the North-African Orient Express, is again running and one of the country's greatest tourist attractions.

In Wikipedia they specify "This page was last modified on 17 December 2010 at 23:04"


Entered at Fri Mar 11 10:16:50 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I would. The syllable count seems more important than how something is written or contracted.


Entered at Fri Mar 11 08:33:11 CET 2011 from (99.141.31.86)

Posted by:

Adam2

Thanks Peter. So I should just go by the number of syllables in the original vocals?


Entered at Fri Mar 11 08:10:54 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

‘bout … not a small question, because ‘bout has one syllable, and “about” has two syllables. While Levon and Rick were adept at adding syllables in Robbie’s lyrics in live performances, they added rather than subtracted. I think Dlew’s right in adding that semi-vowel “a-feelin’” in the original.

But in writing out lyrics, I’d follow the number of syllables in the original line. You’re not “cleaning” up because contracted forms are considered just “English” nowadays. I think it’s a problem when writers try to reproduce accent too carefully though.


Entered at Fri Mar 11 07:59:49 CET 2011 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: Robbie's book

yes I agree Robbie should get a "ghost writer" to help him. Historically he is a big name so there should be writers lining up to do the job. Hopefully the writer won't be a major fan and will be able to add some objectivity to the project.


Entered at Fri Mar 11 07:33:48 CET 2011 from (59.101.55.143)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Hey Adam...

As you feel comfortable - the lin is actually something like 'A pulled intoo Nazareth, was-a feelina 'bout haf pas' dead...' /n SO, as you would remember is the best way...


Entered at Fri Mar 11 06:09:40 CET 2011 from (99.141.31.86)

Posted by:

Adam2

Subject: typing out song lyrics

I have a question for you guys. I'm typing out song lyrics so that I can write chords names by the words, and use it as a nice reference. Do you think I should simply write the words as they're sung on the original studio recording? For example, should the first line of The Weight be written as: "I pulled in to Nazareth, was feelin' 'bout half past dead" ? Or should it be cleaned up a little, like: "I pulled in to Nazareth, was feeling about half past dead" ? A small question, but please let me know what you think.


Entered at Fri Mar 11 04:32:34 CET 2011 from (24.108.12.129)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: bob w

I think another one would be Spott Farm.


Entered at Fri Mar 11 04:21:37 CET 2011 from (24.108.12.129)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: bob w

"Ultimate Spinach" and it's over 40 years old. I think Ari would like this one.


Entered at Fri Mar 11 03:31:17 CET 2011 from (99.235.255.183)

Posted by:

Serenity

Web: My link

Subject: Robbie and Eric C.

LINK: to Mr. Clapton's guitar auction. One sold for $38,000 from 1948.

SADAVID: Thanx for the info on our ROBBIE.

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxoxo


Entered at Fri Mar 11 03:12:21 CET 2011 from (12.51.52.166)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Peter, I'd suspect that you know this all by your own self: Not likely RR will self publish his auto bio, and no publisher of significance will take this or any other baby on without a (hopefully) good editor. This is not going to be a random act, it is likely to be written and edited with a good eye towards marketing. Same as This Wheel's On Fire was Levon's marketing of his life story to that point, this will be RR's present marketing. Don't get me wrong, I'm not damning the project, I'm just as interested in reading it as the next guy.


Entered at Fri Mar 11 00:35:58 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Bob W: Garth's "Our Lady Queen of the Angels", Moby Grape's "21 Granite Creek", Fred Eaglesmith's "Tinderbox", "Chilliwack" by Chilliwack, "Folkjokeopus" by Roy Harper.


Entered at Thu Mar 10 23:49:51 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Recommendations for five little known albums that would make good additions to any collection??? Not too much emphasis on "little known" but a list that moves away from the obvious. I would greatly appreciate suggestions from all the posters here. And......if five turns to ten.....we'll all be better off for it.

Thanks.


Entered at Thu Mar 10 22:48:42 CET 2011 from (174.89.122.247)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Todd……..A clever line……about the questions being free and having to pay for the answers!………like sitting back and soaking up all the stories of the South and then writing some songs…………It is the way many writers do operate but it can be a bit a bit of a rub………..good one…..

As to the biography……..there is something special about reading the actual words of the subject…….the problem with RR is he does tend to take his time doing things……..if anything gets published within a 5 year period I would be shocked………If anyone remembers a documentary called “The Hawk” ( Tracy and I talked about his many many years ago )…..it was done in the early 80’s and I remember Robbie telling some interesting stories in it about playing bars in Quebec and extra-large beer bottles, etc………A whole lot of work to get all of this down……..the upside of having him actually write it is while a ghostwriter might well have just taken his stories and repeated tales we have all heard before……..the act of RR doing it himself might well lead to far less of that and a bit more introspection…….more like Chronicles and less like Hammer of the Gods Davis…….


Entered at Thu Mar 10 21:57:41 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: Smitty / Steppenwolf

Harkening back to link to the 27 Toronto songs that BEG posted (and I've reposted above), the Smitty fans among us might like to listen the third-last song, "Thinkin' About You", on which the great man plays organ. The one two songs before that, "Take It Slow", is sung by Jerry Edmonton backed by the other members of the proto-Steppenwolf. I trust that you all have noted that there are two early Hawks tracks there too (though nothing we haven't heard before).


Entered at Thu Mar 10 18:36:27 CET 2011 from (90.239.73.235)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Jaime Robbie Robertson and the music of origine people

Samii people are origine people living between Arctic Circle and North Atlantic Sea in Norway, Sweden, Finland and Russia (sorry for my German punctuation but it is the only I have learned). Their public service radio programes play the own traditional and contemporary music and sometimes the music of other origine people. The language has historical connections to my own language. I was more or less forced to take a course even in Samii language at the University as a part of my degree, so I listen to Samii Radio for nostalgic reasons.

And not for nothing: Yesterday I just heard the words "Robbie Robertson" and "Clairvoyant" and enjoyed a strange swinging blues. Yes, Nordic Samii people are listening to Robbie!


Entered at Thu Mar 10 18:28:34 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: it's official

. . . looks as though the previous announcement ("Robertson . . . will be the face of the Juno awards . . . ") had a little spin on it. JRR is to be merely one of the presenters . . . I'll still tune in . . . and there's that Bryan kid again . . . .


Entered at Thu Mar 10 17:59:58 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: watching TV vs watching radio ...

sadavid: I think Richard can be spotted very briefly in the "Tears Are Not Enough" documentary. My guess is that he was written into the list of singers but either arrived too late to do his bit or just couldn't come up with something that fit.

BEG: Thanks for the 27 songs, many of which have the Hawks sound in their DNA. As for the quote from Anonymous re the Yonge Street documentary, my guess is that Anonymous is someone in media who was on the scene at the time but whose views weren't sought; in other words, the words reflect the bitterness of the forgotten. Imagine saying that a TV documentary on a scene is unnecessary because a radio documentary about a single singer had already been run! Even if the radio show had been about the entire Yonge Street scene, it couldn't compete. I've watched radio, and it's boring. (The TV shows cited were national in scope, and certainly weren't focused on any street in any city.)


Entered at Thu Mar 10 17:37:08 CET 2011 from (90.239.73.235)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: North-African music

He is an avant-gardist named FRANCO BATTIATO. A Sicilian multi-artist he is, and half-Arabo like all Sicilians. Highly recommended but it my take Empty Now to find Northern Africa in his electronic techno opera.


Entered at Thu Mar 10 11:46:25 CET 2011 from (41.97.171.160)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: ancient melodies

I was interested with music only when I got involved in History of North-African Music, I just discovered on the way more history, hence politics and anthropology, than music. I once posted I was overwhelmed from the first listening by the line from Toto's song Africa, almost premonitory, I had no idea, and David Paich had even lesser than no idea that I will become one day the old man "hoping to find some long forgotten words of ancient melodies" (whom somebody else stopped along the way) unfortunately I didn’t yet take some time to do the things we never have, fortunately music isn't made of texts only, there is also music in music…

The Questions posted artlessly by the GBers in The Band GB to Sebastian, following his demand and on behalf of Jaime Robbie Robertson, supposed The Answers to be posted in The Band GB, or at a minimum willingness, a compilation of answers to be posted in The Band GB
it's the basics of ethics, it supposed that all intervening people are honest people


Entered at Thu Mar 10 09:02:28 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: New Biographies

I’ll get Robbie’s book the first day, BUT I hope he realizes the need for a good editor. One of the reason’s Levon’s This Wheel’s On Fire is so readable (apart from the anecdotes in his own voice) is the writing of Stephen Davies. I know Bumbles memorably called it “Stephen Davies’ novel” and there’s an element of that in it, but note the way he tied things together, interviewing others … with long quotes from Rick Danko etc. Davies, like him or loathe him, is a successful professional rock biographer, and his skills greatly enhanced the narrative flow and construction. Telling great stories isn’t enough.

I hope Robbie doesn’t resort to stringing together oft-told tales. The guitar story from Yonge Street was great. The Morris Levy one is one he told ten years ago on a programme, and I transcribed it, and he told it better the first time. It happens to us all. I picked up an old VHS of me giving a talk in 1989. I told a story I'd told many times since. I told it much better then. Better detail, better timing too.

NEW BIOGRAPHY … is a lovely tune from Van Morrison. He really objected to biographers digging up Belfast aquaintances. There was also the bizarre spectacle of several pages of text being devoted to an alleged incident with two women in a Warminster travel lodge, followed by four albums summed up on just one page. The lyrics I can appreciate, but all the “Not on my Wavelength” stuff was a direct dig at the "Wavelength" magazine which appeared four times a year and reviewed every show and had long articles, and never resorted to the gossip-mongering crap. Van tried to stop it throughout and eventually succeeded in strangling it. Why bother? Anyone who’s ever had an interview reported in a newspaper or magazine knows that by omissions and editing and sometimes stupidity, the result is always inaccurate. If it’s 90% accurate and the other 10% isn’t actually hurtful, fine.


Entered at Thu Mar 10 06:56:06 CET 2011 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: Robbie

Looking forward to Robbies book more than his new album. 10 years ago I would have looked forward to the album more but my tastes have changed and these days I'm more into the Americana of Dirt Farmer. The book should be good though - firstly to provide some balance with Levon's book and secondly to fill in the gaps from the previous books. Gaps such as the "lost" years from 71 - 74 and 78 - 87 and the works project . To be honest I'm not too interested in what happened after Storyville. Even though Levon's book was written by an insider I get the impression that alot of his memory of the 70's was from magazine articles.


Entered at Thu Mar 10 06:31:30 CET 2011 from (59.101.55.143)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Bob - Thank you!

That was fantastic! Beck's reaction when Stewart walks out - clearly not expecting it... just wonderful!


Entered at Thu Mar 10 05:55:53 CET 2011 from (69.182.53.54)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT
Web: My link

Subject: Larry Speaks

Kevin J. The link above is the EPK for Electric Dirt, and has some footage with Larry Campbell around the 2 minute mark, talking about making the album along with some behind the scenes stuff. It's pretty cool.

He also speaks now, quite a bit at some of the Road Rambles introducing songs and guests in his role as music director. Kind of nice that Levon puts him front and center, which is an opportunity that he never got with Dylan. He's a talented guy, and I think it was really good for both Levon and Larry to get to make music together. I think Levon thinks of him as a brother, and the connection they have brings the music up to a higher level. Plus the dude can play anything with strings! I agree that the Dylan live shows aren't quite the same without Larry.


Entered at Thu Mar 10 05:10:08 CET 2011 from (69.182.53.54)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Questions and Answers

That's right Bonk! The questions were free, but we have to pay for the answers. Maybe Norm was on the right track. Wink Wink!

I'm just kidding really....I'm looking forward to reading Robbie's book. Especially stuff about the early days, and touring with Dylan in 1966.


Entered at Thu Mar 10 04:41:03 CET 2011 from (24.108.12.129)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: Robbies answers.

Is it just me? All those questions that we asked Robbies son last year. Don't you think that this is his dads way of answering, what with the new album, Toronto Rock and Roll stories, and now his book? Just wondering.


Entered at Thu Mar 10 04:12:09 CET 2011 from (76.68.83.35)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

"The Japanese edition of "How To Become Clairvoyant" will feature a bonus demo version of “Won’t Be Back” with Eric Clapton. 429 Records will also release it as a deluxe double disc package featuring demos of The Right Mistake (Demo Version); He Don’t Live Here No More (Demo Version); Fear Of Falling (Demo Version); This Is Where I Get Off (Demo Version); Madame X (Demo Version) and Houdini (Demo Version). These demos also feature Eric Clapton."

How To Become Clairvoyant.

It's out first in Robertson's native Canada on 29 March
US on 5 April
UK and EU on 12 April."


Entered at Thu Mar 10 03:17:25 CET 2011 from (70.77.200.21)

Posted by:

kristie

Sadavid-Thank you for the link. I really enjoyed that. I think Ronnie Hawkins has a really great presence on screen, even just briefly. He should have had a talk show, or something.

Kevin-I am thinking about going to teach in Japan! And yes, I found Bryan Adams playing in the oddest of places. I even heard "cuts like a knife" playing as a ringtone in the middle of the jungle in Nepal.

Ari-Thank you! I am really looking forward to reading Whatever Robbie writes.


Entered at Thu Mar 10 02:11:40 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Web: My link

Always liked Van's take on it.


Entered at Thu Mar 10 01:19:39 CET 2011 from (67.6.40.201)

Posted by:

Jerry

Subject: Robbie Robertson's book...

Whether you sit on the fence such as myself or if you happen to take sides, Robbie writing his take on the Band will be very interesting to say the least...It goes with out saying that there will be some lively conversation in here as well...


Entered at Wed Mar 9 22:31:25 CET 2011 from (174.89.122.247)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Bashful Bill: She was very firm on the thought that the Laszlo character was the better choice and that any man she would even consider being with would have to understand why……If you do find yourself single again…….keep this in the back of your mind…..It might be a clincher late one night!

Lars: Thanks for that link…..odd but that is the first time I have ever heard Larry Campbell speak…..seem him play a number of times – always a great joy…..and he comes across as a good guy in that clip…….With Charlie Sexton back in the fold I imagine the Dylan band has regained some umph……but Larry Campbell’s departure really left a noticeable hole for me….

bob w: Slowly getting back to normal is a good way to describe it…..I will never tease anyone about complaining about a move again………………and David P…….Don’t forget about that Broadway play that was in the works for years???


Entered at Wed Mar 9 21:24:45 CET 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Just reinforcing Bayou Sams report - various Band related Facebook pages and Robbies as well stating Robbie will pen an autobiogrgaphy.


Entered at Wed Mar 9 20:54:32 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: more Bryan

The local paper reminded me that "today in music history" 9 March 1985 "'Tears Are Not Enough' by Northern Lights, the Canadian record in aid of Ethiopian famine relief, was released. The song was written by Bryan Adams and his regular songwriting partner, Jim Vallance." David Foster was also a co-writer.

Richard Manuel and Ronnie Hawkins participated in this project. Hawkins can be seen, briefly, in the video. I don't see Richard.


Entered at Wed Mar 9 19:44:32 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: How to become promotional?

Hell, after thirteen years I'm still waiting for the actual release of that new music from Robbie that we've been reading about for it seems like the last year or so. Is his pen mightier than his guitar?


Entered at Wed Mar 9 19:21:42 CET 2011 from (24.47.42.238)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: ny

Subject: Robbie's Autobiography

FANTASTIC. It's about time Robbie. Can't wait ti read this. This GB will be on FIRE after that little tome comes out. (not that I wish that, but do you disagree?)


Entered at Wed Mar 9 19:09:05 CET 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: NY
Web: My link

Subject: Larry Campbell interview

I've always admired Larry Campbell. This interview sheds some light on him and his work with the Levon Helm Band. From the sound of it, I guess Levon is in a good place in his life right now.


Entered at Wed Mar 9 17:12:10 CET 2011 from (41.97.185.230)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: perhaps this interest Ilkka ?

a line in Ras Mehna
phon. : “hor enta wala mamluk Hartani ?”
trans. : “were you a free man ? or an owned Hartani ?”
In the inquiring part of the text, when the curious traveler is asking the skull, all verses follow this construction
“were you [somebody] ? or [the opposite] ?”
the challenge is less in retrieving the original song-text; or what is pretended to be an original manuscript, than to retrieve its meaning. Many words disappeared from the usage in today spoken North-African language. The French presence has been a linguistic disaster.
Hartani once meant slave or dark-skinned, more slave than dark-skinned. The linked above etymology states “The name itself is of obscure origin”. I reply that the name itself is origin, there was, and still is, a pure North-African language, at least pure North-African words. words having emerged over the centuries from pure local activities and concerns. With no known Berber root nor Arab, Turkish, Greek Latin, Hebrew,…. Hartani just bears a syllabic crossing with Arabic verb “haret” meaning “work the land” or “plough”, and Berber “harit” meaning brown. coincidences are more straying than enlightening.
The behind re-giving life to words, since any word is strongly tied to a reality to be discovered. This anthropological phenomenon : dark-skinned people are sedentary and white people are nomads, is typical of Northern Sahara, where Oasis are called Ksar, it have some remnants today and may have the highest meaning on the political landscape, but this GB is only a Robbie forum
as soon as a regular is interested with History


Entered at Wed Mar 9 16:56:15 CET 2011 from (134.174.21.2)

Posted by:

Ti

Location: boston
Web: My link

Robbie is writing autobiography, not sure if this is new news?


Entered at Wed Mar 9 14:38:55 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Web: My link

dlew, this one's for you.

Kevin, let's hope they get that project rolling. Hope things are settling down a bit for you.


Entered at Wed Mar 9 05:43:09 CET 2011 from (99.236.13.43)

Posted by:

Serenity

Web: My link

Subject: Music..

Hi guys. My link is for those interested in the new Neil Young tour coming up.

JOAN: No doubt I will be getting the news in my e-mails, as I get a letter from Dave every week on his latest shows for the week. Justin Bieber is on tonite. Another Canadian we can be proud of. Bryan Adams is another one.

ARI: Thanks for the vid of ROBBIE, and the news of his memoir. I hope he writes it in his own words [which he probably will do]. Not to quote the other books.

BEG: Thanx for your link to Adam Bunch. So true too. Looking forward to the Bravo docu.

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxoxo


Entered at Wed Mar 9 04:57:51 CET 2011 from (76.68.81.213)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Episode Descriptions for YONGE STREET – TORONTO ROCK & ROLL STORIES:

Bravo! uncovers the heart and history of Toronto sound with original Canadian documentary series

Anonymous "Ummmm...How is this story "untold"? A book called "Before the Goldrush - Flashbacks to the Dawn of the Canadian Sound" (1998) and resulting CBC documentary "Shakin all Over" (2006), a recent CBC radio documentary about Jackie Shane (2010), and several notable blogs have all revealed the "trail-blazing first steps of how Yonge Street became the leading destination for musicians".


Entered at Wed Mar 9 04:51:43 CET 2011 from (76.68.81.213)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Thanks Ari!

Especially for Bill M!!

The Most Hard-Rocking City Of Its Time
by Adam Bunch
27 songs to download Bill!

Bumbles would love these songs too!


Entered at Wed Mar 9 03:22:17 CET 2011 from (216.165.58.52)

Posted by:

Ari

Web: My link

AND APPARENTLY HE'LL BE TELLING MANY MORE VERY SOON. Reuters reports he is set to write his memoirs.


Entered at Wed Mar 9 03:15:50 CET 2011 from (216.165.58.52)

Posted by:

Ari

Web: My link

This is the best story I've ever heard Robbie tell. From Yonge.


Entered at Wed Mar 9 02:31:05 CET 2011 from (166.129.238.224)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Buddy Miller's new one

David P - I think all the girl singers there are terrific. And the guy that does Dang Me too. I'm not so crazy about Buddy Miller's voice though; I think it's too ordinary in comparison to the women and the instrumental arrangements, particularly that last, holy track. I recognize that beautiful melody as the theme song on Bill Frisell's Disfarmer, just superb, eh?

I've already got a track list in mind for the next one they do, think they'll listen to me?


Entered at Tue Mar 8 23:19:23 CET 2011 from (72.230.109.86)

Posted by:

Bashful Bill

Location: Minoa, NY

Subject: Kevin J - who did the English teacher like.....

....and why? Just in case I find myself single again and meet up with her......


Entered at Tue Mar 8 21:56:41 CET 2011 from (76.66.25.49)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

HAPPY INTERNATIONAL WOMEN'S DAY DEEEE and all the women here!!

All the kidzzz heard this over the PA this morning.


Entered at Tue Mar 8 20:41:46 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: where it's due

Bryan Adams is a very good photographer; of women with very good legs, mostly. He's done all sorts of high-priced campaigns and special events. He did the British queen.


Entered at Tue Mar 8 20:24:40 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Majestic Silver Strings & Horseshoes

JQ: A very adventurous & enjoyable album. While there's no "Long Black Veil" interpretation, Shawn Colvin does a great job with Lefty Frizzell's "That's The Way Love Goes".


Entered at Tue Mar 8 19:52:29 CET 2011 from (166.205.143.78)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Buddy Miller's Majestic Silver Strings

This came in yesterday and although I'm still at it, I really like what they've done. It's basically top-flight & very creative musicians like Bill Frisell & Marc Ribot bringing something new to the country songs of their childhood. I think they're all guys in their late 50's now so the songs are exclusively classic country songs of the 50/60's.

No LBV though, too bad -


Entered at Tue Mar 8 19:48:32 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Robbie on Letterman

He is due to be on Letterman's show April 5th.


Entered at Tue Mar 8 19:17:50 CET 2011 from (174.89.122.247)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Kristie……………Don’t get Westcoaster started on Adams….he loves the little fella…………….Interesting point about his popularity around the world though……………..in the late 80’s, I spent some time travelling around Asia and vividly remember being in Vietnam – we were travelling north up along the coast from Saigon to Hue with stops in places like Danang and Na Trang and ……..at all these stops we would rent bikes and travel around……..at night you would just keep peddling until you saw a light on at some roadside bar and often we would hear Bryan Adams music being played…..so often that it became a running joke…..Hearing Adams meant beer was close by…….you would poke your head into these little makeshift bars and usually find a few fellow travellers ( I recall most being English teachers on holiday )…….All over the country these little bars had rock music on cassette but their library seemed to only consist of CCR, Eagles and Bryan Adams………………….Funny sidebar…….one of the English teachers I met at one of these bars was Australian on leave from teaching English in Japan……..I still remember her telling me that she made decisions on men based solely on whether they thought Rick or Victor Laszlo ( from the movie Casablanca ) was the better man…….

As to Adams……he was a great little rock n roller in the early days….a real breath of fresh air………then off went his writing partner Jim Valence and in came Mutt Lange……..20 years of Muttinized schlop has followed………..he HAS become extremely wealthy however and he is very loyal to his bandmates and that is to be admired……final note: Roger Waters cast him perfectly in the Wall show of which Rick and Levon also were part of.


Entered at Tue Mar 8 17:54:14 CET 2011 from (99.91.226.113)

Posted by:

Dee

Location: Battleground Wisconsin

Subject: Hello BEG

Isn't there a "wise saying" about those who forget History are doomed to repeat it?

That's how I feel about Union Busting. Are there too many people feeding at the public trough? You bet! But I also remember that ALL of the benefits the union (at the Fortune 500 company where I spent 40 years) fought for and received through collective bargaining were given to salaried folk too! AND the civil Rights Act of 1964 made it possible for me to manage Both Genders!(A woman supervised the Steno Pool, the Only woman supervisor.)

I've given up on TV news for a while....between the chaos in the state capitol and the guy fired by CBS, I need a holiday from news!


Entered at Tue Mar 8 16:11:49 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Web: My link

Thanks, David.


Entered at Tue Mar 8 15:54:27 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Beck Blows Up

This one's for you Bob.


Entered at Tue Mar 8 13:52:12 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Web: My link


Entered at Tue Mar 8 10:06:37 CET 2011 from (59.101.55.143)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Kevin J: good news about beck and stewart

I still think 'People Get Ready' from 1983 or 84 is definitive... if only Rod Stewart worked at that level more...


Entered at Tue Mar 8 10:03:21 CET 2011 from (41.97.231.154)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

I worked four months on Ras Mehna with the erudites from the Learned Society, and nobody ever explained nor even evoked the commercial genesis of the records. Let it on the account of the mysteries of Africa
I borrowed this last expression from a quote of Joao Havelange. Short after World Cup 2002, the Brazilian team, automatically n1 of FIFA ranking, played a friendly against Chad, if not the very last just ranked before countries where soccer doesn't exist . The final score was – Chad 1 : Brazil 0
This victory of Chad against Brazil by 2002 even friendly is a mechanical impossibility. in a press talk, Havelange no more then FIFA president, was asked to comment technically the defeat. Havelange said only one phrase : "Those are the mysteries of Africa"
there are also the mysteries of Europa. Brazil-England 1970 [link] Banks is on his left post to close the angle for Jairzinho, who rather kicks a fast pass to Pele at the opposite side. Pele blasts down a header of Stars-War's energy. The ball goes low and bounces gaining more speed, it is almost in the goals when Banks dives backwards to catch it. Nobody ever explained nor even understood how Banks was teleported across his goals. This save of Banks is a mechanical impossibility
Pele commented later on this action with his historic quote "I scored a goal but Banks wanted it otherwise"
Pele's phrase is as fascinating as the goal save itself, the name Gordon Banks is used as a synonym of fate, destiny, spell
For the Band connection, Jairzinho means literally little-Jair. Jair was famous in the 50's


Entered at Tue Mar 8 07:29:00 CET 2011 from (70.77.200.21)

Posted by:

kristie

Kevin-Still wearing the hats...all over the world!

Brian Adams-What are people's thoughts on Brian Adams? He is insanely popular in Nepal and India, and I was just curious how people in the GB feel about him as a musician? I used to enjoy his songs when I was really young..I honestly have not given too much thought to him in the last 15 years, though.

Serenity-Thank you.


Entered at Tue Mar 8 03:15:53 CET 2011 from (99.236.13.43)

Posted by:

Serenity

Web: My link

Subject: Music..

My Link to Frank Ifield's site.

PETER V: Thanx for renewing my interest in this great C/M singer. Went to youtube.com and was listening to some of his hits. "I Remember You:", "She Taught Me To Yodel",[he imitated Hank Snow at the beginning of his career, so he says]. "Wayward Wind", were real gems. Made it to the Guiness Book of Records in 1980 with a "staggering 158 weeks in the UK Pop Charts, and sales held #24 in the Top 100 Chart Hits of all time." Still going strong at 73.

JOAN: Just call it good programming. It is an excellent channel for goodies.

BRAEDEN: Welcome! Always glad to see newbies, and of the younger generation. You have good taste in music, like the rest of us who enjoy the BAND.

KRISTIE & NORBERT: Welcome back.

PBS is showing some great Celtic music now [with pledge breaks here in Canada] Will also be seen again later in the evening. I never heard of these singers, but they are very good listening.

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxoxo


Entered at Mon Mar 7 23:42:59 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Norbert: Thanks to Ryan and sadavid, here's a recent photo of Mary Margaret O'Hara with Garth.


Entered at Mon Mar 7 21:52:04 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: the celebration sessions

Ryan: thanks for the Facebook link; some foto fun there. In this one, Garth has an issue with the tone of the tom-tom: not "woody" and "thuddy" enough, probably.


Entered at Mon Mar 7 21:27:40 CET 2011 from (99.230.247.42)

Posted by:

Ryan

Web: My link

Subject: Tracks from Garth Hudson Presents a Canadian Celebration of The Band

There are 4 full tracks from the album streaming on this facebook page dedicated to Garth's new release http://on.fb.me/g77GQf


Entered at Mon Mar 7 20:49:04 CET 2011 from (174.89.122.247)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

For bob w and other fans here………..Attached is a link from today’s Toronto Sun which is an interview with Jeff Beck……..He’s recording a new one with Rod Stewart………Let’s hope he gets his old partner to buckle down and really work at this……if so, it could be a beauty…

Nice to see Kristie back………..hopefully you are still wearing those funky hats around town?

I have been moving house over the last few weeks………………remember when a house move was not much more than getting a brother and a few friends to help move a couch or two and then ending the day with beer and pizza? Things have gotten much more complicated……………


Entered at Mon Mar 7 19:49:03 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Don Law

Producer Don Law was an Englishman who immigrated to Texas in his early '20s. He worked his way up the ladder in the music business, first working with Brunswick and later American Record Corp., which was acquired by Columbia. He first gained fame in the late '30s when he recorded Robert Johnson. By the time he took over as Columbia's house producer in Nashville, his keen ears spotting talent & material had gained him a Midas touch for producing hits.

During a ten week span in 1959 he cut Johnny Horton's "Battle of New Orleans", Stonewall Jackson's "Waterloo", Lefty Frizzell's "Long Black Veil", Marty Robbins' "El Paso" and Ray Price's "Heartaches By The Numbers". This created a dilemma for Columbia's overextended promotion department. According to Marijohn Wilkin, Mr. Law received a telegram from the head honcho at Columbia urging "For god's sakes, stop cutting hits. We can't promote them all." The downside for Lefty Frizzell was that Columbia's promo men concentrated on plugging "The Battle of New Orleans" and "Waterloo", which crossed over into the top of the pop charts. While "Long Black Veil" climbed quickly into the top ten country chart, without promo support, it failed to become a crossover hit.

When the late Mr. Law reached mandatory retirement age, Bob Johnston, who was producing Dylan, Johnny Cash, Leonard Cohen and other top artists, took over the top spot at Columbia's Nashville studio.


Entered at Mon Mar 7 19:16:13 CET 2011 from (41.97.141.170)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Subject: the real meaning of "funny"

in my precious post below. this early presence in our suburb world of the official American Recording Industry (and the light side of America in general) from a previous geologic era, is worth the question, or I am an Ignatus who begins to discover himself


Entered at Mon Mar 7 18:54:00 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Van's shakin'

I've seen Van do Shakin' All Over live. Unfortunately it wasn't the night in 1999 when Mick Green joined him on stage for half the set. Mick Green didn't play on the 1960 original, but he must have spent three years playing it nightly!


Entered at Mon Mar 7 18:45:26 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Bravo channel

Why is it that Bravo Canada has excellent programing Like The Yonge Street stories and Bravo US has things like "Bridezilla" And "The Hoarders " and other shows of that "quality?


Entered at Mon Mar 7 17:50:02 CET 2011 from (70.77.200.21)

Posted by:

Kristie

I really have to stop traveling so I can catch up on some live music. Levon and Lucinda?! That sounds Phenomenal. My favorite male and female singers at one show. Sigh.

Bill M-Thank you very much. It seems as if the Band legacy is continuing to grow, and this makes me very happy. I am very sad to hear the news of Steve's passing, however.


Entered at Mon Mar 7 17:36:19 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Web: My link

Subject: Johnny Kidd and the Pirates.........Van Liked THEM Too

Van covered "Shakin' All Over" on his fabulous live recording "A Night in San Francisco". {link}


Entered at Mon Mar 7 17:31:16 CET 2011 from (41.97.141.170)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

funny, it's an RCA record


Entered at Mon Mar 7 17:24:37 CET 2011 from (41.97.141.170)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Subject: Bill M - Re: Bar Amar

Thanks for your stimulating interest, I was rather focusing on the 16th cent. poet Ben Khlouf author of the ballad (the song of my link). apart Bar Amar there are many others who sang the ballad – here’s a translated excerpt – skull talking :

Then came Bedouins, they killed me
My corpse was left on the naked ground
So was left a fate to reach me again
An old woman cut-off my head, put in a chest
Sold it, tool of divination, to a sorcerer
Who lighted a flying fire inside the skull
Forgive O Lord to the skull*

*once again problem of synonyms, the original word "ras" means all a the same time : crane / head / brain / soul /etc... ...the beauty and untranslatability of poetry


Entered at Mon Mar 7 17:07:41 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Shakin' All Over

The recent Wanda Jackson cover (with Jack White) sent me back to the 1960 original by Johnny Kidd & The Pirates. It isn't on YouTube either, though a later version is. There's a simple perfection that eclipses The Guess Who's #1 Canadian hit, or The Who's Live At Leeds cover, good as both are. The Who said the Johnny Kidd original was the greatest pre-Beatles Rock Record. I think they're right. It's the only British-written one that has an unarguable place in the "Best Twenty Classic R&R Songs" or whatever. If you have a copy listen to Joe Moretti's fluid guitar playing.

I saw Johnny Kidd & The Pirates late 63 or early 64, when Hungry For Love was the current single. They were astonishingly loud, simple and brilliant. That would have been the later line up with Mick Green on guitar. And it was a ballroom gig which was always better. They had to wear striped "Smee" shirts and silly pirate hats, but it didn't detract.


Entered at Mon Mar 7 16:41:26 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Kristie: Nice to have you checking in here. Levon's carved out a nice 'iconic' niche for himself, Robbie's got a new album on way (see second thumbnail pic to left), Garth's tribute album, featuring him backing an impressive herd of Canuckistani artists - up to and including Neil Young - is fantastic (see third thumbnail) and our guys as Hawks are central to the three-part "Yonge Street Story" that is to air on Bravo on March 21, 22 and 23. But still I'd say that the most significant development here at the GB was the recent passing of our chum / sparring partner / dart-board, Steve.

Re Levon's recent appearance at Massey Hall, a sister-in-law who went said last night that he was physically frail and vocally so-so, but still great to see. Lucinda Williams, she said, was phenomenal - but that's really who she went to see.

A visit to Goodwill yesterday yielded only a spare copy of Native Americans. I spied a copy of the "Coal Miner's Daughter" soundtrack, with Levon singing "Blue Moon Of Kentucky", but there was no record in the jacket.

Brien Sz: Hit songs aside, surely you expect to be recognised in your dotage as having been part of "The Hippest Generation", a term that will have been created by our collective children to make us feel good, just as we coined the term "The Greatest Generation" for our collective parents.

Empty N: I dug a bit deeper and have to say I prefer this ElBar Aman song (see link) - I think because it reminds me of the Muslim Call To Prayer (the sound of which always stirs me, even if it's just woken me up at 05:30 am).

Joe J: I'm pretty sure that "Give Ireland Back" was released here, as I heard it a number of times on CHUM-FM back in the day. Maybe John D will remember playing it, as he was there at the time.

Speaking of John D, two of the other three DJs mentioned in his post about the Yonge Street documentary had serious connections to our guys: Dave Mickie had managed (and perhaps even played with) Richard's old group, the Revols; and Duff Roman, as we know, produced Levon and the Hawks' first session after they left Hawkins (see disc 1 of "A Musical History"). John of course was at the Last Waltz with Rollie et al.

Peter V: Was interesting to see Lindisfarne on the chart. I've never even heard of that song - or really anything else by them that I can think of other than "Fog On The Tyne".

David P: You mentioned Columbia's Nashville house producer Don Law. Law visited Toronto regularly through the '60s because, for whatever reason, his dentist was a member of the Travellers (essentially Canada's Weavers, politics and all). They were, coincidentally I believe, signed to Columbia Canada, for whom they recorded a bunch of albums, the most successful being one whose title song, "This Land Of Ours", was adopted as the theme song of a long-running CBC TV show. Lenny Breau was their accompanist for awhile, but likely not on record. Amos Garrett was with them for a couple of years and a couple of albums, and also the one foray they made to record with Law in Nashville, which yielded a single 45.


Entered at Mon Mar 7 16:16:20 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: perfecting sound with the Dan

Peter V: The Classic Albums DVD on _Aja_ is almost as much fun as the _The Band_ one . . . . I haven't studied the subject, but as far as I know Walter & Donald recorded live-off-the-floor rather than pasting together individual parts done in different times and places as so many do.

_Aja_ took the Grammy for engineering in 1978; Rick Marotta opens this clip with a comment about how this record captured subtleties that would formerly have been lost in the mix.

What they did do that was different was play "musical bands" until they found the players that fit the song. 4,5,6, 7 or 8 lead guitarists were sacrificed on "Peg," for example.

Re: 'live off the floor,' I heard that for the new animated film _Rango_ J. Depp and the other voice actors were taped while they (inter)acted out their parts on a sound stage.


Entered at Mon Mar 7 13:50:32 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Web: My link

Subject: Darlene Love

Local PBS stations are currently running "Darlene Love: The Concert of Love". Well worth checking your local schedules. Darlene Love is an amazing talent who brings incredible energy to every song she sings. She is backed by an extraordinary band and the show is wonderful from start to finish. I hope you find it and enjoy it as much as we did.


Entered at Mon Mar 7 12:36:36 CET 2011 from (70.95.155.38)

Posted by:

Nick

Subject: Lucinda Williams

Lucinda is still delivering the goods at 58. Fantastic singer/songwriter who wrote the piece in Rolling stone on The Band being listed as one of the 50th greatest artists of all time. Of course they are #1 in my book and most here I would imagine. She just played two shows in Toronto on the bill with Levon and joined him for "the Weight" and "Released". Here's a link to her great new single "Buttercup" and below is a link to a review of the toronto show:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5P6z7b5aIi4

http://www.torontosun.com/entertainment/columnists/jane_stevenson/2011/03/05/17507096.html

Apologies if this was already posted!


Entered at Mon Mar 7 09:57:53 CET 2011 from (41.97.141.170)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: Harraga

*google the meaning of the post subject please

Funny story Norm. Reminds me of a joke we have here from the 70's which was also the great plane hijacks era :
On the interior flight Constantine-Algiers, the hostess suddenly appears and warns the passengers
"No panic! a gang of armed revolutionaries full of ideal are tacking the crew in hostage, they demand to redirect the plane to Canada"
to which all the passengers responded all in choir : "HORRAAAYYYYY!!!!!!!!!!!"

Al Stewart's On The Border (1976) , intriguing are the lines

Smuggling guns and arms across the Spanish border
From Africa the winds they talk of changes coming

Perhaps the Harraga phenomenon always existed, its mediatization increased over times. I learned a long time ago that the news which makes the biggest incomes for the Press Agencies "ARE" the most important concern of the honest population of the world


Entered at Mon Mar 7 08:43:20 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Ringo

Blending the players is the secret. Ringo did it best with the Levon / Rick / Billy Preston / Joe Walsh / Nils Lofrgren / Dr John / Jim Keltner / Clarence Clemons line-up, but another good one was the mainly British 2001 tour which is on DVD – Sheila E, Roger Hodgson, Ian Hunter, Howard Jones, Greg Lake. A definitely “melodic” song-oriented line up, and people whose hits run into the 70s and 80s, so mainly younger than Ringo. There are also at least three who could fill the hall on their own. I was watching Greg Lake, who’s my age, circa 1964 in local bands (winning the local battle of the bands “Beat Contest”) , but the others came on the scene later. In terms of profile / recognition / hit factor in Britain, Edgar Winter, Gary Wright (he didn’t have a solo hit here) and Rick Derringer are low, so for selling tickets IN BRITAIN, an ill-considered line-up. Not for the USA. They’re relying only on Ringo’s name on this one, and it’s his first All-Starr Band tour here in many years.

Sorry to harp on about "Perfecting Sound Forever" but he selects Steely Dan as one of the major "change points" in recording techniques. He's negative (as he is on several bands I like).


Entered at Mon Mar 7 05:26:41 CET 2011 from (12.51.52.166)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Peter, I beg to differ, maybe.I saw the edition with 4 guitar players, Lofgren, Walsh, Rundgren & Dave edmunds, Tim Schmidt on bass, Burton Cummings on keys. They did some of the various players hits. Saw the edition with Eric Carmen and Dave Edmunds, and Jack Bruce They did hits, but Bruce did a solo "The From An Imaginary Western" on piano & vocal. Speaking of Steely Dan, Tuesday night at The P & G bar in NYC, Jonny Rosch has Steely Dan's drummer & guitar player joining him


Entered at Mon Mar 7 00:34:12 CET 2011 from (70.77.200.21)

Posted by:

Kristie

Subject: Hello, everyone

Hello. I just got back from a four month trip to Nepal and India. I thought I would check in and and say hi to everyone. I hope you are all well. I also wanted to add that I heard "shape I'm in" and "the weight" drifting down the streets of Kathmandu, and that made me smile.

I will try to catch up as much as possible. But if anyone could give me a brief overview of any news Band related, I would be very appreciative!


Entered at Mon Mar 7 00:24:23 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

I always think of Rick Derringer's guitar work on Steely Dan's "Show Biz Kids" as his high point. Great tone and a perfect fit for the song.


Entered at Mon Mar 7 00:09:27 CET 2011 from (76.66.125.212)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Uprising in Wisconsin
Tom Morello who's featured on Robbie's latest CD


Entered at Sun Mar 6 23:48:49 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Hang On Sloopy

Jeff … there is something about the All-Star Band ethos that would mean Hang On Sloopy, isn't there? You also have two guys who've recorded "The Weight" … Gary Wright did it as Spooky Tooth's single in 1968, while Ringo did it live with Levon & Rick.


Entered at Sun Mar 6 19:14:23 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The sea was angry that day my friend.....

Like an old man trying to send back soup at a deli..... (from Seinfeld, George talking about when he pulled Kramer's golf ball out of the whale)

Gawd damn........you're scaring me now Empty! I got about a hour & a half to go. Try and behave while I'm gone.

Now I gotta tell yuh this sailor's tale. It was told to me years ago by an old bartender named Casey on the "Queen of the North" We whiled away a little time in the bar one day running from Vancouver up to Port Hardy.

This girl comes from Australia with great dreams of a new country, new life, and much enthusiasm. After several months in Vancouver, she can't find a job, her savings are gone, she is homesick & miserable. In desperation she decides to try and stowaway on a ship and make her way home.

Very early one morning she is on the docks trying to determine how to get on a ship and where it may be going. A sailor comes along whistling with his duffel on his shoulder. He spots her and says, "Hey baby! what're you doing hanging around down here?" So she sadly tells him her tale of woe.

He says..."Hell, I'm shipping out this morning, I'll smuggle you aboard." "Oh would you?" "Sure, but it's gonna cost you a little every day." "OH!.....well ok, I really need to get home." "It's a done deal!"

So he smuggles her aboard and hides her in a nice cozy life boat warm and snug, brings her a little food every day and she keeps him serviced. After about 5 days, a mate comes along checking all the life saving equipment. He peels back the tarp on this life boat and here she is! "Lady what in hell are you doing in here?"...."Oh, I'm stowed away going to Australia.".....scratches his head, "Lady you are getting screwed!"...."Oh I know, but I really need to get home."........."Naw- naw - naw, lady I mean you are REALLY getting screwed.......this is the Prince Rupert ferry!"


Entered at Sun Mar 6 19:08:52 CET 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Chances are Derringer will do Hang On Sloopy.

I was never a fan of Edgar Winter till i caught him live. He & leon Russell had a touring band together. I went cause of Leon, first chance i had, and they were superb. So I kept going. Winter is incredible on every instrument imaginable. They always had a hot band, mostly the same members.It was a drug band, that was obvious right away. I don't condone narcotic abuse, but, it did not interfere with this band'sperformance.. Had a real ultra fine, ultra sexy blond gal dancing & singing back up in the beginning.

Speaking of not condoning narcotic abuse, one of the things I learned in this GB is to never mistake people who were addicted to narotics for people who were addicted to alcohol. They really get pissed off. A conversation with afriend of mine, who in his 60s has seemingly finally kicked heroin, is also one of the things that has led me to this conclusion. This guy is really proud of his years as a honest junkie. Got up, went to work every day, never screwed noone over for money. Stopped shooting many years ago, I met him & a bunch of people from Brooklyn at The Lone Star at a Band show. Prior to Richard's exit. This guy was only smoking pot and not even drinking. Then he started drinking again, then he started snorting horse again. These says, he smokes weed, thats all. Not in a program, doing it his own self. Have another friend, in his 50s, been fightign the good fight a while now, Coke, and heroin both, in his program every day, reigiously, 5 months now. I can hear it in his voice, having a tough time, but making it.


Entered at Sun Mar 6 18:37:58 CET 2011 from (166.129.29.20)

Posted by:

JQ

Web: My link

Sheesh Peter V, is this what you do when you come to our country?


Entered at Sun Mar 6 18:31:57 CET 2011 from (41.97.244.85)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: partial translation Fr - En

It is not the man who goes to sea / It is the sea that takes the man / Tatataaaan
The sea it took me / I remember a Tuesday
I swapped my cowboy boots / And my leather Perfecto
Against a couple of Dockside / And an old yellow slicker
I deserted the stags / Who were saying "Be careful
The sea is disgusting / Fishes fuck within”

Chorus : As soon as the wind blows I will leave / As soon as the winds turn We will go away

It is not the man who goes to sea / It is the sea that takes the man
The sea it took me off guard /I was so sick / On the raging sea
I vomited my four o'clock / And my midnight too
I got banged around / I slept in wet sheets / It cost me money
It was good time / it was pleasure

It is not the man who goes to sea / It is the sea that takes the man
But not the woman / Who prefers the countryside / Mine is waiting on the port
At the end of the pier / The horizon is dead / In her faded eyes
Sitting on a cock / Mooring, she cries
Her man who leaves / The sea is her misfortune

[…]

It is not the man who goes to sea / It is the sea that takes the man
The sea it took me / I remember a Friday
Weep no more mother / Your son is a sailor
Weep no more father / I live over the water
Watch out your child / He is gone a marine
I know it's not funny / It is just destiny

RENAUD


Entered at Sun Mar 6 17:56:49 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Georgy Girl

I had to go and search through our shoeboxes of “free DVDs” to see if I had Georgy Girl. Sadly not. British newspapers love these two week runs of classic films free and we have several boxes full. I wish they’d do the late 60s movies along those lines. I’ll Never Forget Whatsis Name is another. I have seen Georgie Girl comparatively recently – in the last 5 or 6 years. London in 66 was pretty good. I remember walking along The Kings Road in Chelsea as Dudley Moore came out of a coffee bar with P.P. Arnold (with full hair too) and thinking this was the centre of the universe.

The Seekers title track was one of those songs that are perfect with the film, then get to be big hits, and are just so irresistibly catchy that they eventually become annoying. Judith Durham! A name that hasn't crossed my mind in years.


Entered at Sun Mar 6 17:53:12 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Yeah! Yeah! Yeah!

Well.....other day,just 'cause I misplaced a couple of years in Long Black Veils......Yuh made fun of me!! Right in front of every body too.......cut me to the quick....


Entered at Sun Mar 6 17:30:32 CET 2011 from (166.205.143.78)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: What gives?

What a you mad about Westcoaster? Have you not had your morning-geezer elixir yet?


Entered at Sun Mar 6 17:23:27 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: "I can see clearly now"

Awright..........now we got the straight goods. Thanks David. JQ..........I don't want to hear another gawd damn word from yuh. By the way what do you mean "up here"?? You're down there:):):)


Entered at Sun Mar 6 17:08:55 CET 2011 from (74.82.68.36)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Long Black Veil

I dug out my copy of Daniel Cooper's fine biography of Lefty Frizzell. It turns out that it was quite fortuitous that we were discussing "Long Black Veil" last week, as that song, along with three others, were recorded on March 3, 1959. The four hour session, produced by Don Law, took place at the old Bradley studio located at 804 16th Ave. South in Nashville. A few years later, this site would evolve into Columbia Studios. Leading the session on guitar was Grady Martin. Mr. Frizzell accompanied himself on guitar, along with Harold Bradley on guitar, Don Helms on steel guitar, Buddy Harman Jr. on drums, Joseph Zinkan on bass, Marijohn Wilkin on piano and an unknown vocal chorus group. It's also interesting to note that Fred Carter Jr. would later play electric guitar and act as leader on some sessions for Mr. Frizzell in 1970. Among the songs recorded with Mr. Carter was Harlan Howard's "Watermelon Time In Georgia", which Levon would cover a decade later, with Mr. Carter on guitar, in the opening song on his "American Son" album.


Entered at Sun Mar 6 16:56:12 CET 2011 from (166.205.143.78)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Decembrists, Portlandia & Georgy Girl

As well depicted in the new show Portlandia we're mad fans of The Decembrists up here. The word amongst the hupsters here is that the new record is a bit too fashionable (see commercial) with its rootsy style. I think its the best yet and look forward to PV's concert review.

PV - I'm watching Georgy Girl this morning and it's interesting and loaded with subtle sex - it's worth it just for a look at C Rampling @ 22; was that how it was there then?


Entered at Sun Mar 6 16:56:03 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Brien, You have to look at the longetivity of American Pie (even if kids only know Madonna’s version) and Let’s Stay Together. I’ve enjoyed some chart stuff recently … Sugarland, Bruno Mars, Cee Lo Green, not that I listen to MTV or Top 40 radio. There’s been a good batch of soul and British neo soul … Duffy, Paolo Nutini, Amy Winehouse in recent years. Sure some will stick. But try and get “Perfecting Sound Forever” where he describes the “loudness” race since 1992, and he quotes studio engineers saying anything more than three single tracks is tiring for them because of the way they’re compressed and mixed. He shows wave form diagrams of songs from the early 70s versus songs from the 2000s. All the peaks are the same on modern stuff, right up at the top. You have to wonder if it will survive as well. It's all mixed for downgraded audio like iPods or compact systems.

Anyway, the “perfect” recording system for the future, he says, will be WFS or Wave Field Synthesis. Trouble is, you need a special room. Wikipedia says:

“The first live WFS transmission was on July 2008 from the Cologne cathedral lecture hall 104 by the Technical University of Berlin. The room contains the world’s largest speaker system with 2700 loudspeakers on 832 independent channels.”

I can’t see me persuading Mrs V that this is a necessary addition to the house.


Entered at Sun Mar 6 16:49:11 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Stars on Stars

Awright! I got to head out to sea today. Y'got to watch this and tell me how many musicians, actors etc you can spot here. I'm gonna be checkin' up on yez....later.

Sounds like fun Norbert. Hope you enjoyed your trip....later.


Entered at Sun Mar 6 15:41:00 CET 2011 from (69.126.52.26)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: The Decemberists

Peter V, you and David P were so right about the new Decemberists record. It really stands up to repeated listens. It has a retro folk rock feel but sounds completely fresh at the same time. I really love what Gillian Welch adds to the harmony vocals. There is something special about seeing a band when they're touring behind a great new record. Enjoy the show.


Entered at Sun Mar 6 15:00:24 CET 2011 from (91.42.250.220)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: street art

Just saw this Berlin artist EVOL on Arte TV (German/French art broadcast), makes some great work I think (see the link)

Joan, you're great, never leave us here!

Norm thanks, I'm just back from Gran Canaria not far from Madeira, although a little touristic the weather is great there. Madeira is more quite I think. Still have the book, great book. Portugal must be nice to, have to see it one of these years meself, maybe next year.



Entered at Sun Mar 6 14:55:28 CET 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Peter - I'll defend 2011, to just defend it not that I necessarily disagree with you: First, in 1972 - you had no idea if some of those songs would become classics over time - time is the key. For the 2011 top 40, you have no idea who is going to be the flash in the pan and who isn't. Also, you present that list to nearly anyone under 30 and they'll look at you with crossed eyes. Surely they may have heard some of those songs but they won't nearly know the name of them or who they were created by which brings to the larger point. Most top 40 music is written for a demographic that you and I no longer belong to. Top of the charts music generally reflects the voice of a much younger generation and doesn't reflect our overall morays, values, wants, desires, confusion, etc.., 40 years from now a 25 year old may present a list from 2011 and say something nearly as exact as you have presented and utter the words - bet you you can't say that about 2051. Music (top 40) in general, is relative to the time and to the younger generation it relates to. I look at a top 40 list and go, who the hell are these people? But it doesn't matter what I think in the grand scheme because todays music for the most part does not represent my voice and that is the way that style of music has been, will be and should be. We had our day with pop music. It's their day now, so lets let them enjoy it and we can enjoy the many other avenues of music that relate to us.


Entered at Sun Mar 6 14:13:59 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Edgar Winter

Yes, that's right. I never liked Edgar Winter that much even in his heyday though. But like anyone who's lasted from that era, I'm sure he's good. I often feel you should go, because even the ones I didn't like much at the time tend to be excellent if they've survived. I've said before, friends had tickets for the Moody Blues who I couldn't stand in 1970, but I went and they were brilliant. I suppose Ringo won't be doing it much longer either, which is why I wanted to go. If I thought Rick Derringer would play Hang On Sloopy (a moment he never bettered), I'd definitely go!

When I went on the web to find info, there's an awful lot of "hate" comments from Liverpool (about the Liverpool gig) because of Ringo's offhand TV remark a couple of years ago. Let's be honest … his old family house in Liverpool or a large beach house in Malibu?


Entered at Sun Mar 6 13:40:25 CET 2011 from (12.51.52.166)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Peter, I;'m thinkign there arent; a lot of oportiities these days to see Edgar Winter perform in England.. Though the last time I saw him perform was possibly as much or close to a decade ago, I;ve seen him many times, I ca'lt imagine him not delivering the goods. And though I'm not moved by everything Derringer does, I would think he & Edgar together would be first rate.


Entered at Sun Mar 6 13:07:11 CET 2011 from (12.51.52.166)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Endangered Species

Buffalo Springfield (Furay, Stills, Young, plus...)is performing at Bonaroo in Manchester, Tennesee this coming June.

Richie Furay is doing two nights in Steelville Mo, the Wildwood Springs Lodge, in April. His band is being joined by his old Poco bandmate Rusty Young.


Entered at Sun Mar 6 12:09:16 CET 2011 from (41.97.204.101)

Posted by:

Empty Now

At the end of his journey, the traveler RETOLD in every souk his adventure

is the correct vocabulary


Entered at Sun Mar 6 11:50:54 CET 2011 from (41.97.204.101)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

link to the grave of the poet Lakhdar Ben Khlouf who earned sainthood [title Sidi] The mausoleum is a tourist trap in Mosta, the 500 years old palm tree irrupting from the grave


Entered at Sun Mar 6 11:49:14 CET 2011 from (41.97.204.101)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: Skull of Trouble

The correct vocabulary requires "huge tent' to be corrected by "marquee", Renaud used to hold concerts in a private circus like marquee
---------

Lakhal Ben Khlouf, erudite, poet, theologist, and warrior, from Mostaganem, 16th century; a hero of the naval battle of Mazagran against the Spanish Armada, he is also considered as the greatest poet of his time, it is said that he died at age 125 years.

Among his work, Ras Mahna (translate "Skull of Trouble") anthological epic poetic composition, of the genre ballad narrated at the first person.
Plot:
A traveler stops besides the remains of a watch-fire, when he wanted to start the fire he was surprised to find a burned human crane among the stones.
The text creates a special mood around the solitude of the desert. Haunted by an irresistible curiosity and the need to communicate with somebody, the traveler began asking eagerly the skull to get life again and to tell him his story. Under the magic and the beauty of the phrases – "was this steppe a hostile land for you or once your possession ?" – the skull ends up telling most of his life and his passage down here, as the skull spoke, the poet grew more indiscrete. The skull put a final period with the chorus climax : “Talking brought me here.”
At the end of his journey, the traveler related in every souk his adventure, basically motivated by its unusual side, casually forgetting what the skull told may prejudice living people.
The fact reached the ears of the Sultan who by instinct saw a security of State alert. In the culture of those countries, State means persons, ie the gang who usually place himself at the head of State. He took the situation in hands, ordering the Vizir, the Mufti [religious authority] and the patrician guard, to accompany the poet in the desert to see the true sense of his tale. This time the Skull kept silent as any inert object. After an enough delay, the guard captain concluded the traveler was drunk or stoned or simply fool. The Vizir rather said "this man imagined all the story to create subversion among the subjects" and ordered his head to be cut. All the living left the place, after a securing delay the Skull asked the killed poet “what's wrong ?” to which the new dead replied “Talking brought me here!”

The linked record dates from 1930's [awful sound - powerful message] has only a documentary value. I am subjugated how behind all this rich cultural patrimony, nothing appears learned


Entered at Sun Mar 6 10:48:07 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Joe J: Yes, there’s a whole lists of classics that you imagine were big hits, but scarcely dented the chart, or didn’t at all … Brown-Eyed Girl never charted in the UK. She’s Gone by Hall & Oates was a modest #46. But here they then get on the pretty limited but influential Radio Two “Golden Oldie” playlists (quite rightly) and they spread to other stations.

On Golden Oldies, I spent Friday debating whether to go for Ringo Starr & The All-Star Band tickets locally for June. They’re a heavy price at £60 … or four times what I’m paying for The Decemberists this week. Also they didn’t announce the composition of the All-Star Band, which is a crucial factor. Anyway, they listed them today in the Sunday Times, and I’m glad I didn’t buy. Rick Derringer, Edgar Winter and Gary Wright. The last is the only one I’d want to see in concert, because as the years progress my boredom at long guitar solos has turned into positive dislike of long guitar solos. I’d like to see Gary Wright, but only doing Spooky Tooth songs, which he won’t be! I don’t think the line-up will be worth four Decemberists shows.


Entered at Sun Mar 6 03:41:54 CET 2011 from (24.47.42.238)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: NY

Subject: Ramble

A guy I know just went to his first Ramble. He's in his late 40's and has been to a million live shows. he said that the Ramble was the best experience he's ever had at a live show.


Entered at Sun Mar 6 02:02:11 CET 2011 from (76.66.127.242)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Wrap My Head Around That


Entered at Sun Mar 6 02:05:46 CET 2011 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: Duncan

My father was a fisherman and my mother was shocked at the sexual and religious imagery in 'Duncan'. "And this is the same boy who wrote 'Bridge Over Troubled Water'?"

I was thinking about regional variations in playlists back in the day. The Al Green classic 'Let's Stay Together' barely dented the local charts while Donnie Elbert's 'I Can't Help Myself' was huge with at least one local cover version. Another band, the Hurricanes, who probably never recorded, did a killer version as well. Long time ago.



Entered at Sun Mar 6 01:54:00 CET 2011 from (76.66.127.242)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Concert Review: Helm, Levon
Massey Hall, Toronto, March 4, 2011
By JANE STEVENSON, QMI Agency


Entered at Sun Mar 6 01:36:28 CET 2011 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: 72

What a great chart eh Peter?

Actually I've never heard the Wings song. I suspect it was never released here. I never heard the Lindisfarne or Elvis songs at the time either.

One of my brothers had the Paul Simon album w 'Mother and Child Reunion' and we just wore it out. I think I need to hear 'Duncan' right about now.


Entered at Sat Mar 5 19:47:06 CET 2011 from (41.97.241.115)

Posted by:

Empty Now

sorry Joan it seems we have the same posting schedul, can you please displace your post such my 3 ones be continue


Entered at Sat Mar 5 19:43:50 CET 2011 from (41.97.241.115)

Posted by:

Empty Now

FOUR long ears


Entered at Sat Mar 5 19:41:05 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: David P/Norbert

David, that was a beautiful tribute/memory of Richard.

Norbert Thanks for the story of Bertha. She was quite a woman. I'm proud to be thought of in the same class with her.


Entered at Sat Mar 5 19:39:32 CET 2011 from (41.97.241.115)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: dlew / NorthWestCoaster / Border Check / Renaud

Thanks dlew, and Ilkka

Talking of border check; Here, we rather have a little everywhere those walk-through metal detectors, often in inappropriate places. I was honoured with an invitation for a Malouf concert, me and a friend from the Learned Society, the man is a famous public figure in the musical scene of Constantine. At the concert hall entry we were both asked to pass under the walk-through check. I felt offended and my VIP friend he seemed not disturbed by the practice, so I frankly refused to attend the concert at all, as long as I must pass under the check point; in reality I was also afraid for my creditcard; I nastily said to the officer
“thus the respectable society who organizes the concert is supposed to invite terrorists !”
The officer just responded me with a large smile, and the miraculous phrase which at the same time relaxed all the atmosphere
, “do know with El Qaida, they can enlist a honourable citizen when we send him the invitation, and turns him a bomber at concert time” [*two days delay in average]
I remember far in time and in normal circumstances, I didn’t buy the principle of security vigils in a music concert. An adequate anecdote was in a concert of Renaud [link above] 30 years ago he used to do his concerts in a huge tent he assemble himself. When he came on stage he took the mic and shouted, “Good evening Brussels, I am happy to be among you this evening […] I am just really surprised to see there in the back two long ears which exceed above the mass”
followed a general boooo!!!; I turned back and noticed two tall unsmiling immobile policemen; one at each edge of the tent entry; inside the tent.


Entered at Sat Mar 5 19:06:50 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: New Levon albums

Thanks John. Keep us updated … nothing on Levon's site yet. Hope that Yonge St documentary gets shown in the UK.


Entered at Sat Mar 5 18:04:15 CET 2011 from (99.254.209.45)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: 2 from Levon

Looking forward to the release of two new CD's; coming from Levon Helm studios. One is the audio from the 2008 Ryman Auditorium show and the other a collection of songs from the Rambles, called Best of The Rambles Vol. III. I understand that Levon himself oversaw the project and selected the material and sequencing. Should be here in May.


Entered at Sat Mar 5 18:04:15 CET 2011 from (24.218.200.216)

Posted by:

Tim

Subject: Boston

Hey Ben. Got any details on that show(Club name, date)? Im collecting information, tix, reviews, articles for that era. any info you can share is appreciated. i have a tons of stuff from that era but noting on that show. Thanks Tim


Entered at Sat Mar 5 18:02:31 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Norm: Border checks. I got taken out of the line into a cubicle in the USA. The city shall be nameless. There was a curtain, but you could see the floor. The security guard was polite and asked me to take off my shoes. He glanced at my bag, and said “If we don’t take out any white middle-aged people we get accused of prejudice. So that’s why you’re here … let’s just stand here quietly for 20 seconds.” We did.


Entered at Sat Mar 5 17:59:40 CET 2011 from (99.254.209.45)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Yonge Street Rock 'n' Roll Stories

I had the pleasure of being a part of this 3 hour broadcast; as they decided to interview a few "mature" D.J.'s; from that period. I was joined by the legendary Duff Roman, Davie Mickie and Bob Laine. If you are of a certain vintage and live (lived) in the Toronto area, you will know their names.


Entered at Sat Mar 5 17:57:44 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: 1972

Joe J, in Britain this week’s Top 40 1972 included:

American Pie (2)

Without You – Nilsson (3)

Got To Be There – M Jackson (5)

Mother & Child Reunion (7)

Day After Day – Badfinger (10)

I Can’t Help Myself- Donnie Elbert (19)

Let’s Stay Together- Al Green (20)

Give Ireland Back To The Irish – Wings (21)

Meet Me On The Corner – Lindisfarne (22)

Brand New Key – Melanie (24)

Horse With No Name – America (28)

Baby I’m A Want you – Bread (29)

I Just Can’t Help Believing – Elvis (34)

Stay With Me- The Faces (38)

Half a dozen classics at least? And glancing through my chart book, it was a weakish week for 1972. Certainly 2, 3, 7, 20, 34, 38. You can argue whether there were more. I really don't think that's true of 2011.


Entered at Sat Mar 5 17:22:31 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Rock of Ages

Norbert, thank you for your kind words. It's always nice to hear from you. The years have been good to me Norbert. I still have all my hair, too much actually my hair has always been too thick and grows to fast. The north american habit of wearing baseball caps, I've never been able to do. Too hot! My hair is so thick I've never been able to wear hats...just a real hot head.

Susan and I are discussing coming to Europe in the near future. Next year probably. Portugal most likely, as I want to get out to the Island of Madeira. My great grandfather, (the author you and I discussed so long ago) Frank T Bullen is buried there, and I have a cousin who lives there. It is such a beautiful place, it intruiges me.I suppose it wouldn't be unrealistic to get over to Germany from Portugal.

Lars, that is a great offer, but imagine trying to bring meat across that border now a days. Things are real crazy now. I don't understand the rational of some of this. Even in the airport in Puerto Vallarta. I had an unopened bottle of gingerale. I went thru the first check and they said I could take it with me. (The waiting time we had, I just wanted something to drink.) Then we came to the final check where we go into the boarding area. No way am I taking my bottle of soft drink. You either stand here and drink it, or put it in the trash can. I don't know.

It's pretty funny, the lottery they use for baggage check down there. You come to a guy, and you push an electric button, randomly it flashes either a red light, or a green. If it's green you go, if red you get checked. It came up red for me....well all I had was one small bag, in which I had enough clothes, (pretty much shorts & T shirts to last me a week. Well for all the checking that young guy did, it didn't even matter.

Now the border check guys in Prince Rupert, the yankee boys, they can get pretty different. As I'm coming along I'm watching how they are handling some people....yikes! But when they got to me, this young guy pretends to look real stern, he says to me as he's searching my bag "You got any bombs in here!" I said, "Hell...I thought we was friends?" He slaps me on the shoulder and laughs and say, "I guess so." Then I'm away. But this Germany woman who was a kind of hippy sort, she had fresh raspberries, carrots & what not she was eating. Holy smoke. You are not going any where with any of that stuff. I can just see me trying to bring meat over here......he shudders! I'd be in hand cuffs.


Entered at Sat Mar 5 16:29:10 CET 2011 from (79.202.174.254)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: behind a cold esperesso
Web: My link

Subject: Norm, Lars, Bertha Benz & all women posters

Enjoyed that last touching post from Lars to Norm, that’s real love and I can understand it, Norm‘s a men’s man. Who wouldn’t like to go hunting or fishing with Norm, take Norm on a Harley ride, hair in the wind, ah! (if it’s still there of course).

Behind every great man .... reminds me of the great late Bertha Benz ….

“Nothing has changed daily life like the automobile. It changed modern society and is part of Germany’s industry. It was not easy, in the beginning. People laughed at the first car. It had three wheels and a stinking, noisy one-cylinder engine. It was a horseless coach. Carl Benz made a patent for his invention on January 25, 1886. He did not know what to use the car for. Then, one August morning in 1888, his wife Bertha secretly took their 13- and 15-year-old sons and drove from Mannheim to Pforzheim to visit her mother. The trip is 106 km. After 45 km they ran out of fuel which was a cleaning fluid. She bought some at a pharmacy. Also, the motor overheated, so they had to refill water at every roadside inn they found. On uphill slopes they had to push the car. Berta fixed the brakes with leather pads and repaired the ignition cable. She cleaned the fuel duct with a pin from her hat. When Berta later returned to Mannheim, people were more interested in cars and inventors started having ideas on how to make cars better. Berta had proven that the horseless coach was absolutely suitable for daily use. Without this brave woman’s trip we might not have cars today. In May 2008 a sculpture was placed in Pforzheim to remember Bertha Benz’ first car journey.”

Anyway and this again reminds me of all the great and brave women in this GB, there aren’t many of them left (I’m not going to name them here, afraid as I am that I might forget one), but thanks all brave women posters to bear out here, and please forgive (every now and then).


Entered at Sat Mar 5 14:09:45 CET 2011 from (59.101.55.143)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Since Empty Now started it... (and I loved his joke)

The bartender says 'We don't serve your type here'.

A time-traveller walks into a bar.


Entered at Sat Mar 5 12:26:07 CET 2011 from (90.239.123.36)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster's Cow

Subject: Swiss inventions / Empty Now

Worst is yet to come. Sooner or later this EMPTY guy will tell us that Swiss milk chocolate is not a Swiss invention. I say only moooh.


Entered at Sat Mar 5 09:50:39 CET 2011 from (41.97.241.115)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: just an archaic joke

Contrarily to a wrong common belief, the gearing mechanism is not a Swiss invention, but was first made by a Chinese inventor from the Western Zhou Dynasty a thousand years BC, as asserted in "The History of the Song" text, which is also known as "The Book of Song"
In the same order of ideas, the yodel is not a Swiss invention either. Actually it was originated by another Chinese man, who once put his finger in the invention of the former.


Entered at Sat Mar 5 06:49:10 CET 2011 from (99.115.147.236)

Posted by:

Pat B

Ben Pike, was that Morton Grove gig in the round with the Cates%Pr


Entered at Sat Mar 5 02:42:18 CET 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: Terra Firma NORTHEAST of any friggin ports

Subject: Don't leave port without whining

Norm- I always left port in a pissed off mood because I KNOW those bastards got together on the pier to play "Anchors Away" (Aweigh?) just to rub it in. Chances are if we pulled out we were going out to avoid being tied up during a storm and we always managed to hit it somewhere near Hatteras. A note from your mother didn't do you any good....your ass was GOING.

You should come over in November so you could harvest one of our deer and take some venison home with you. We have a plethora of whitetail deer and somebody's got to start taking them. Whenever you come, I'll loan you a rifle and a light and you can jack one at your convenience.

I remembered Richard with a toast at dinner tonight.


Entered at Sat Mar 5 01:51:03 CET 2011 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Location: The Coast

"Who robbed the cradle...?" Coincidence Ben but that's what's playing here right now.

Hey Braeden! When I was fifteen I was listening to Top 40. Not that there was anything wrong with Top 40 in 1972. My 'Band moment' came several years later, perhaps listening to 'Don't Do It' on Johnny M's headphones.


Entered at Sat Mar 5 01:46:45 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Sea Fever to the Rockin' Chair

Lars!...do you remember the most important sailor's superstition?????? You never leave the harbour on a Friday. I think I got to leave tomorrow tho'.

I'm in the rockin' chair listening to Richard sing that song of ours and watching him. Tough gawd damn day, so I'm hoisting one to you and Richard old friend. I hope this is the year I can get my ass across this land to your side in September. Susan and I are discussing ways the gps can help us take a good route to drive. This new truck is so comfortable. We thought we could enjoy that.

I'm gonna leave you with this last verse of "Sea Fever" my favourite part:

I must go down to the sea again, to the vagrant gypsy life

To the gulls way, and the whales way, where the winds like a whetted knife.

And all I ask is a merry yarn from a laughing fellow rover

And quiet sleep and a sweet dream when the long tricks over


Entered at Sat Mar 5 00:43:01 CET 2011 from (76.79.75.218)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland Tx

Subject: When Richard Manuel died

Richard Manuel's death was really awful. I remember seeing a place in Morton Grove Il the (4) Band Members were playing and I knew it was a real dump, they had saturated the area doing shows and I really remember thinking how far the mighty have fallen. About six months later Richard was dead, a really terrible, heart breaking death too. I guess there is some truth in the "Music From Big Pink" novella, and given the guy's talent it's pointless not to consider the waste. But, what he left us was a great deal. There were many years when Richard's contribution to the group's best work was habitually overlooked in what was written about them; the "Across The Great Divide" book seemed to start the process of rectifying that. As a personal favor, listen to "Last Of The Blacksmiths" for me today! =)


Entered at Fri Mar 4 22:58:18 CET 2011 from (173.183.162.116)

Posted by:

Braeden C.

Hi again

Thank you for the warm welcome! I have been lurking around this site for a while now, I spend hours browsing all the great articles,photos,song chords etc. made available here. Thank you to whomever made this great site :)

I've been listening to songs of Richard's all day so far, even the Whispering Pines CD, which I ordered off Amazon a few weeks ago. It's such a charming recording, and it's also heartbreaking, though I love it!

Thank you again, it's a pleasure to meet all of you.

-B.C.


Entered at Fri Mar 4 22:19:50 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Tears of Grief

Richard's was the first voice we heard when the needle dropped down on the opening cut of that strange & mysterious record "Music From Big Pink" in 1968. As the Capitol rainbow label swirled on the turntable, I can still recall my amazement over the sound of his haunting voice singing that slow, dirge-like song written in collaboration with Bob Dylan. Not only did Richard add music to Dylan's lyrics, he added a depth of soul to the words, conveying the emotion of a father with a broken heart singing to his wayward daughter. While the lyrics hide other meanings beneath the surface, none can compare with the raw hurt of that feeling. And sadly, who could have foreseen what deep emotion the song's chorus would take on that day in March, eighteen years later, when it was our hearts that were broken.

"Tears of rage, tears of grief
Why must I always be the thief?
Come to me now, you know we're so low
And life is brief"


Entered at Fri Mar 4 22:18:08 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Rompin & Stompin

Thank you for those thougts David. Y'know I had that album....some where back there. It seems to me also I remember seeing them do TNTDODD live one time.

I used to have this stupid habit I finally wised up to myself. I would get really enthusiastic about a song and give an album or a tape to guys I played with so they could learn it, and never see the gawd damn album again. I finally started buying a lot of blank tapes and just making copies. I'm sure that album went that way some where back there.

I have a book.....aw it's up in my head board, I don't rmember the name. It's Merle Haggard's life story. Now he even has the nerve, (probably with lots of laughs) to tell this tale. Him and another guy, I forget who are breaking in to this restaurant to rob it. They are trying to break in the back. Well the place was still open. A guy opens the door, not realizing their trying to rob the place, and he says to them "What in hells wrong with you guys? why don't you just come in the front door like every body else?

Braeden, it is refreshing to hear from a young person who has the opportunity to experience "still" what many of us did so long ago. The excitement and the passion for this music, to be epressed after so long a time. This confirms again the enduring quality of what we all share. Good for you young man, and good luck with your musical work. Work hard and enjoy all you can.

In my own time this evening, I lay back in this chair with mysound system set just right to spend my bit of time with Richard. It's a hard day still after all this time wishing there was something some one could have done, to help a man with his demons.


Entered at Fri Mar 4 21:15:32 CET 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: USA

Subject: Welcome

Welcome to the fellowship of the Band guestbook, Braeden. We always leave it to the new member to handle his own blood initiation. We have an honor code here.


Entered at Fri Mar 4 21:00:56 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Braeden, it sounds as if you are on a good musical path. Good luck to you.


Entered at Fri Mar 4 20:52:51 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Braeden C

There are many of us who came to The Band late. This is an interesting forum if you care to stick around, I think its great that another generation is "finding" The Band. Richard "spoke"to a lot of people.You remind me of Ari who posted below. Young with a passion for Richard.

RIP Richard. You are sorely missed.


Entered at Fri Mar 4 19:27:40 CET 2011 from (74.101.167.209)

Posted by:

Ari

25 Years since Richard died. Sad day.


Entered at Fri Mar 4 19:09:13 CET 2011 from (99.146.124.13)

Posted by:

Tracy

Web: My link

Subject: Robbie wouldn't object to playing with Levon and Garth again.

Interesting article that I just received in my e-mail box.

What's said about touring is a rehash though.


Entered at Fri Mar 4 19:07:25 CET 2011 from (170.158.10.116)

Posted by:

Dr Pepper

Subject: Cave Creek

Yes, Bill still planning on it.


Entered at Fri Mar 4 18:20:58 CET 2011 from (65.93.119.183)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

The last time I saw Richard perform was in his hometown, just over four months before he died. On stage with his old Rockin' Revols bandmates made it a special night for Richard, who was there with the Reformed Band. The house was packed. Everyone was jubilant, A wonderful night. Ironically for me, I was vacationing in Florida with my family when I heard the news on a local TV channel. A "whew" moment if there ever was one for me.


Entered at Fri Mar 4 18:19:28 CET 2011 from (134.174.21.2)

Posted by:

Tim

Location: Boston

Subject: Richard

Also thinking about Richard today. I got to meet him, shake his hand, even got an autograph. Last saw him at the Lone Star Café about 3 week before he left us. A sad day indeed. Glad I discovered them while he was around.


Entered at Fri Mar 4 18:02:02 CET 2011 from (64.105.104.209)

Posted by:

Pat B

25 years ago I bought my first Mac--a Mac Plus actually. I was in the parking lot admiring the box after the purchase and turned on the radio. "Shape I'm In" came blasting out and I thought what a nice coincidence. Then the jock got on afterward and said something to the effect that Richard was gone. I don't recall the exact words.

They were coming to town in a month and I was planning on seeing him and them. Instead, Blondie Chaplin and maybe Fred Carter joined the group for the show (Park West, Chicago, April 86). It wasn't a good night.


Entered at Fri Mar 4 17:06:07 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Don Rich and Merle Haggard

Norm: Don Rich was a big fan of The Band. He and The Buckaroos covered "TNTDODD" on their 1970 album "Rompin' and Stompin'". A live version of that song and "Up On Cripple Creek" were also recorded in Oslo, Norway that same year and included on Buck Owens "Live In Scandinavia" with The Buckaroos. That album was reissued on CD by Sundazed in 2008.

Dunc: Merle Haggard was serving time in San Quentin for armed robbery & escape when Johnny Cash first performed at the prison in 1958. Mr. Haggard drew inspiration from seeing the concert and soon after joined a prison band, where he learned to focus his energy on the positive endeavor of creating music.


Entered at Fri Mar 4 16:57:02 CET 2011 from (173.183.162.116)

Posted by:

Braeden C.

Location: Canada

Subject: My Personal Hero

Hello, I'm a relatively new fan of The Band, I only started listening to them less than a year ago (keep in mind I'm only 15), and today I am remembering (though I never knew the man) Richard Manuel, my true hero. His voice has lifted me through every situation for the past year, and he is the only voice that can bring me close to tears. I am truly glad I disovered The Band and Richard Manuel. As a 15 year old boy trying to get somwhere with my guitar and voice, nobody serves a better inspiration than these guys! R.I.P. Richard, you were gone before I was born, but your light certainly still shines. -B.C. Alberta, Canada


Entered at Fri Mar 4 15:59:04 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Toronto Blessed With Levon & Lucinda

"The one-time drummer and backup singer for The Band is not only an American icon but, at age 70, is still very much a working, creating musician."

Link above to entertainment reporter John Terauds' article from The Star.


Entered at Fri Mar 4 15:51:27 CET 2011 from (41.97.132.129)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: Salam Peace in the region for the next thousand years

She is a huge star from Damascus, strong vocal performance challenged to achieve perfection, choose your preferred version


Entered at Fri Mar 4 15:50:27 CET 2011 from (41.97.132.129)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: Please be patient, one more clip to come

She is a huge star from Haifa, seems in my ears that she says the same, kind of a common soul


Entered at Fri Mar 4 15:49:01 CET 2011 from (41.97.132.129)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: just a delayed clip

Richard on Georgia on My Mind is perfect for the vocation of this forum, thanks, I wish everybody appreciate
------ ----------- --------

Queen Elissa is a huge star from Beirut today, Beirut of peace, Beirut who lives, seems in my ears kind of identification with the neighboring country


Entered at Fri Mar 4 15:47:16 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Back Then

David, I'm glad you mentioned Merle Haggard. The Hag came out of Bakersfield right on the heels of Buck Owens in the 60's, at one ponit even made off with Buck's wife Bonnie.

Buck Owens ran his own show, and was one of the first to sidestep the beauracracy of coming thru Nashville, Chet Atkins & the WSM outfit so the stories went back then.

The early 70's saw Waylon & Willie and a few other Outlaws go Austin Texas way, as they too didn't want to go thru the Nashville stock pens.

There are interesting stories about Buck Owens how he really didn't like heavy bass behind his music. He would "test drive" a lot of music in his car to make sure the radio sound was what he wanted he was smart enough to know that radio sound was what made it for him back then. Buck & Don Rich really were the biggest promoters of Telecasters back then. Buck Owens really made the sound he wanted, which would never have happened in Nashville.

The Nashville "control" was shown in "The Buddy Holly Story". Gary Busey and his guys are in the studio ready to record when it was made clear to them that "we don't use no drums down heeah." Busey asnwers with a fist to the chops, which made it a short recording session.

Nashville after some time realized how much business they were missing and gradually all these people were welcomed to the "Grand ol' Uproar"


Entered at Fri Mar 4 14:38:38 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Web: My link


Entered at Fri Mar 4 14:12:47 CET 2011 from (67.84.207.113)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

It was a miserable, dank, cold wintery day when I heard the news that Richard had died. I was on my way to work that morning and when I heard the news, turned around and went home. A couple friends and myself held our own candle light vigil and listened to Band songs all night and talked about the few shows that we had seen with the reunited Band. Too Soon Gone indeed.


Entered at Fri Mar 4 13:55:40 CET 2011 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

Mike & Kim Hayward

Web: My link

Subject: Remembering Richard Manuel 25-yrs later...

Would have loved to have met the man...


Entered at Fri Mar 4 13:50:14 CET 2011 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

Mike & Kim Hayward

Web: My link

Subject: Levon's mandolin @ the Rock Hall.

We've been the the Rock Hall a few times & although this is not one of the exhibits, it's definitely one of the more legit artifacts there.


Entered at Fri Mar 4 12:37:58 CET 2011 from (86.165.78.209)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: C&W

I would generally agree with Peter re C&W.

Some of the singers he mentioned were huge stars, but I could never see why.

I think, however, there was a following for decent country and western, but it wasn't my age group. Glasgow has its 'Grand Ole Opry'.

And the exception for my age group was Johnny Cash at San Quentin, which was very popular and 'hip'.

Then the country influenced bands which Peter mentions.

Then the 'alternative country boom' of about 10 years ago.


Entered at Fri Mar 4 12:01:45 CET 2011 from (59.101.55.143)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: PEter V...

It's ok, like we said in 1957 - you can keep him... ;)


Entered at Fri Mar 4 11:57:55 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

bassmanlee, I sent you an email but it failed delivery. Hope to hear from you in the GB or via email. My address hasn't changed.


Entered at Fri Mar 4 11:04:35 CET 2011 from (41.97.130.150)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: belly dancer

Circle of Deceit (1981) poignant movie of Volker Schlondorff, filmed live with real scenes during the streets-war in Beirut by 1980.
On the musical side you can hear in the movie the passage [5:04-5:17] from the link above. If I heard in this film a definition of the belly dance which is still haunting me. There was a girl dancing on the scene in a cabaret, then Jean Carmet explained to Bruno Ganz:

“look out the move of the bellydancer girl, …she tries to draw with her navel the perfect figure of an horizontal eight, …which in other words from mathematics language signifies …the symbol of infinity”

dinarrab!!! [It’s a local exclamation, roll the “r” a maximum, equivalent to the American exclamation “Jesus Christ !!!” ]

footnote: I planned a more relevant clip to illustrate the present post, with many clever comments from youtube people arguing in function of their convictions and interests about the indispensability or the evilness of Arabian countries presidents.
However, I like to keep a sufficient time gap between the youtube references, such that readers can have the time to appreciate. At the last minute I preferred the above link to ensure the yodel harmonic transition without penalizing the relevancy

ya Gamil, ya Gamil, ya Gamil, carry me far away on the banks of the Nile


Entered at Fri Mar 4 09:57:58 CET 2011 from (82.72.124.75)

Posted by:

Tuco

Location: Holland

Subject: Santa Cruz 1976

Is there anybody who can tell me more about The Band concert in 1976 in Santa Cruz CA? What date, playlist, pictures etc.??


Entered at Fri Mar 4 08:46:59 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: She Taught Me To Yodel

As I'm sure many of you will never have experienced Frank Ifield's "She Taught Me To Yodel" I've added the obligatory YouTube link.


Entered at Fri Mar 4 08:42:14 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Frank Ifield to Cahoots (and back)

On C&W in the UK, I under-estimated what got covered. In 1962-4, Frank Ifield dominated with four number ones … I Remember You, Lovesick Blues, The Wayward Wind and I’m Confessin’ (That I Love You), and a #4 with Nobody’s Darlin’ But Mine. To kids in 1962, Frank was the “anti-music” or perhaps “auntie music”. This was country covers with a British orchestra. Frank was Australian (this is not Dlew’s fault!)

In the recent Howard Souness bio on Sir Paul McCartney, he recounts how Paul and Frank competed for the favours of a girl who danced in Frank’s variety show. I believe Frank won. When I was doing lights at the Winter Gardens in Bournemouth, Frank Ifield was the star of the show at the other municipal theatre in town. Due to illness, one of us had to go over there for a week and I pleaded (successfully) for it not to be me. Frank was known for his yodel, an affectation more irritating that Lefty Frizzell’s teeth slushing. For many years, I’ve maintained that the song I dislike most is Frank’s B-side “She Taught Me To Yodel.”

Then singing comedian Ken Dodd showed his serious side with high selling covers like 8 x 10. There were others, but the people who covered C&W in Britain were generally pretty awful, and there were a lot of them … Val Doonican, Roger Whittaker, Karl Denver. This may be why my generation never switched on to country until The Byrds and The Flying Burritos.

Ben, of course the Band’s lesser work is better than most bands ever do. That’s a given, but I think you have to compare any track with their best. I would say many people are highly critical of Let It Be (only three good tracks) and It’s Only Rock & Roll. Neither are at the top of The Beatles or Stones list. I prefer New Morning to Planet Waves. It’s not usually highly-rated, but it has something about it I like. Frank Ifield should have covered The Moon Struck One. It’s a combination made in heaven. Just imagine squeezing a yodel in …


Entered at Fri Mar 4 07:21:04 CET 2011 from (99.69.249.202)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland tx

Subject: Cahoots Is a Fine Album

Brian Sz, while I put "Cahoots" under the harsh clare that the makers of the first 3 albums must be exposed to, I do believe if "New Morning" "Songs Of Love and Hate" "It's Only Rock and Roll" and "Let it Be" can be called excellent albums, than Cahoots can as well. Surely, if we are talking about the lyrics to "Last Of The Blacksmiths", there is some distance between Dylan and the height of his power and 'abysmal." And why "4%" indeed does not make any sense, it's an irrelevant demerit is shares with "Surfing Bird" and "Jet." I can't imagine why any Band fan would want to deny themselves the pleasures of "Last Of The Blacksmiths" "Smoke Signal" and "Shoot Out In Chinatown" (all of which I rate above "When I Paint") but the album is basically better than anything by most groups.


Entered at Fri Mar 4 04:58:04 CET 2011 from (203.45.121.175)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Country...

I hated country as a teenager, except for the 60 country acts adn 100 country songs which counted among my favourites... had you asked me, 'aww, country - yuk.' And then I'd go and play Merle Haggard... ah, the contradictions of yoof...


Entered at Fri Mar 4 03:06:44 CET 2011 from (99.141.31.86)

Posted by:

Adam2

Subject: Live Bootlegs

It really is a myth that live recordings of The Band offer little variety.

Yes, the setlists from 1969-1976 were pretty much the same. They always played the standard songs from the first 3 albums. After that, they really were "treading water" (as someone else described it here) in terms of new original material. In 1971, only Life Is A Carnival was added to the setlists with any real consistency. Get Up Jake was added for the Rock Of Ages shows. Endless Highway was their only new song in 1974. Then we get to 1976, where Forbidden Fruit, Ophelia, It Makes No Difference, Acadian Driftwood, Ring Your Bell, and Twilight were all added. After that of course, they were done.

However, outside of the standard original songs that dominated the setlists, there was a good amount of live rarities, surprises and treasures from the original group:


1969:


Tears Of Rage

To Kingdom Come

In A Station

Caledonia Mission (w/ Levon on acoustic guitar)

Long Black Veil (w/ Levon on acoustic guitar)

Ain't No More Cane

Don't Ya Tell Henry

Little Birds


1970:


When You Awake

Jemima Surrender (w/ Levon on guitar)

Look Out Cleveland

Strawberry Wine (w/ Levon on guitar)

Just Another Whistle Stop

All La Glory

The Rumor


1971


Strawberry Wine (w/ Levon on mandolin)

Life Is A Carnival (only pre-1973 version without horns)


1973


Going Back To Memphis

Holy Cow

Share Your Love With Me

Saved

Watkins Glen:

Instrumental jams

A Change Is Gonna Come (Rick w/ Keith Godchaux)

Raining In My Heart (Rick w/ Keith Godchaux)

Five Long Years (Richard fronting a jam)

2 songs w/ Rick and Jerry Garcia


1974


The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down (w/ Garth organ introduction)

Time To Kill (w/ Richard & Levon on drums)

Hard Times (The Slop) / Just Another Whistle Stop

Mystery Train

Smoke Signal (w/ Eric Clapton)

Chest Fever (w/ Eric Clapton)


1976


Forbidden Fruit

Acadian Driftwood

Ring Your Bell

Twilight



Entered at Fri Mar 4 02:32:21 CET 2011 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

bill M

Location: Tronna

Subject: read 'em and weep ...

Forgot to add that one of the papers this morning - Star or Globe - had an article on Lucinda Williams, who's on the bill at Massey Hall in a day or so with Levon, who is described as "one-time drummer and backup singer for the Band"!! Would it be accurate to utter the word 'twat' here, Peter V?


Entered at Fri Mar 4 02:22:11 CET 2011 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Danel Lanois

Sadavid: in belated answer to your question re Lanois and Yonge Street - yes, he worked on Yonge as a youngster (16ish) in a showband. Am riding home on her majesty's train, reading his absolutely wonderful autobiog, "Soul Mining". Seek it out!


Entered at Fri Mar 4 00:59:15 CET 2011 from (99.236.13.43)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: ROBBIE

Saw Mavis Staple on Conan last night. That gal sure can sing. I would have posted it, if I would have known sooner.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

You guys most likely know this by now, but here's a snipit I got in my inbox and thought I'd pass it along...

Singer-songwriter and guitarist Robbie Robertson is among the latest inductees into the Canadian Songwriters Hall of Fame. Robbie Robertson's prowess at penning poignant, moving songs will be celebrated this spring when he is inducted into the Canadian Songwriters Hall of Fame.

The honour will be the latest such accolade for the Toronto-born musician and former member of The Band, who has previously been inducted into both the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and the Canadian Music Hall of Fame.

Robertson is known for such classic songs as The Weight, Somewhere Down the Crazy River, The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down and Broken Arrow.

He will be feted at a April 2 gala in Toronto as one of two modern-era songwriters, along with French-Canadian colleague Luc Plamondon, who has penned hits for artists such as Céline Dion and Robert Charlebois.

"I have a special place in my heart for Robbie Robertson," singer-songwriter Marc Jordan said after performing Broken Arrow at Tuesday's Hall of Fame announcement.

"He's a very proud Canadian and for Canadians who live abroad, I think it's very special when you're celebrated at home. It's your home, it's where you came from. I think it's important and I know it will be important to him," Jordan told CBC News.

Hall to honour songs, bodies of work For the first time, organizers decided to induct both influential tracks and the entire body of work of individual songwriters.

"We felt it was also important to acknowledge their entire portfolio of songs and their overall contributions as Canadian songwriters and storytellers," folk singer and hall of fame president Sylvia Tyson said in a statement.

For the 2011 ceremony, organizers will honour songs and songwriters of the pioneer era (up to 1938), the radio era (1939-1969) and the modern era (1975-1985).

CYA soon xoxoxo


Entered at Thu Mar 3 23:09:06 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The Soul

Your right Peter. Those early Sun record days. Johnny, Carl, Elvis and that bunch were pretty rockabilly. Johnny Cash just had a voice, and slow drawl and way of phrasing that pretty much dictated his country side.

Sadavid.......it was Simon Crumb, I'm not sure if I spelt the last name right, but he did some sort of comedy tunes under that name, "Your so Sweet".

On a night some where around 1986, in Gabby's Cabaret in Langley, was quite a little cerimony. Ferlin Husky had been pretty popular in the area many years before. With a particular lady I guess who had given him a daughter that he didn't know about. At this time, she was all growed up. I don't know how old late 20's, early 30's maybe.

He now knew about her, but apparently had never met her. My friend Fast Eddy Moyski and him had become pretty good friends years back. I guess Ferlin one night pretty drunk had given Eddy his guitar, and realizing later what he had done, let it be known to a select few, that he regretted that impulse.

So on this night, Ferlin had come up for a show case when we were playing in Gabby's, we had this sort of all planned, Eddy shows up with Ferlin's daughter and his guitar. He signed the guitar and gave it back to Ferlin, (by this time a pretty old guy). He was pretty overwhelmed with all this and didn't know what to say. So he gained a guitar and a daughter. It was all pretty cool.


Entered at Thu Mar 3 22:55:54 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

… boundaries are problematic. The Everly Brothers were proportionally more popular in the UK than at home.


Entered at Thu Mar 3 22:49:56 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Beaucoups of Blues

Ah, just remembered. Ringo Starr tickets go on sale tomorrow at 9 a.m.

I liked that album. I think that's what I was trying to say. "Fringe country" on the edges of rock and roll sold here. Straight stuff from people in buckskin Cadillacs with pearl hub caps didn't. I always felt Johnny Cash had rock and roll in his soul,


Entered at Thu Mar 3 22:37:02 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Turn Your Radio On

Peter V: Many country performers like Stonewall Jackson, Webb Pierce, Ernest Tubb, Red Foley, Little Jimmy Dickens, Ferlin Husky, et al., gained wider popularity through their appearances on the Grand Old Opry. Live broadcasts from the old Ryman Auditorium on Friday & Saturday nights, carried by 50,000 watt WSM (AM) radio in Nashville, could be heard in 38 states & parts of Canada when the atmospheric conditions were right.


Entered at Thu Mar 3 22:32:04 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: I'll bite

Firlen Husqvarna?


Entered at Thu Mar 3 22:14:47 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Reversible Jackets

Sadavid! I said "Sweetheart of the Rodeo was 68....lawd.

In the video I quoted Roger McGuinn from, Chris Hillman says,(and this was about the time of his sojourn with "The Desert Rose Band").....he said, "Well the way things have changed, if the Grateful Dead started now, they would be a country band."

What a lot of you guys here are seeing and calling country, is not "real" country music. You got to get back to Faron Young, Little Jimmy Dickens, Webb Pierce, Ray Price.........hell I could go on a long time here.

What your seeing is some fringe rockers, who dabbled a little on the country side. For example, what was Ferlin Husky's, suedonim????


Entered at Thu Mar 3 21:58:33 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: UKCW

Well, Elvis C. dabbles, but then he dabbles in 'classical' forms, too, and everything in between. "Stranger in the House" came out on the _Taking Liberties_ comp in 1980. I think EC said somewhere that he had Geo. Jones in mind when writing, or at least something possum-esque.


Entered at Thu Mar 3 21:50:44 CET 2011 from (99.236.13.43)

Posted by:

Serenity

Web: My link

Subject: C/Music

LINK: Red Ingle's version of "Cigarettes, Whiskey And Wild, Wild Women". Very funny, so beware!!

I have quite a few CD's of the artists that have been mentioned, as I am a huge C/M fan. My faves are, [to name a few], Marty Robbins, {saw him live and he was extremely funny],Eddy Arnold and Johnny Cash [saw him live, but was stoned,but performed well with the help of a chair to lean on]. Like all the others mentioned too.

I think George Jones' "He Stopped Loving Her Today" was one his best hits. Can bring tears to the eyes.

Lefty Frizzels' and the BANDs' "Long Black Veil" are gems.

DAVID: Johnny Hortons' CD has all his hits. If you're a fan of his, then you should have it.

JQ: I liked Charlie Rich up until the time he destroyed John Denvers' award for Best C/M artist awhile ago.He was very nasty.

Until next time PEACE AND LOVE xoxoxoxo


Entered at Thu Mar 3 21:17:59 CET 2011 from (32.177.62.45)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Brit C&W

Peter - I can't think of too many of you all that have gone off in a country direction. The Rolling Stones probably have 1 record's worth of that material. Ringo messed around a bit with Buck Owens.

Currently, Robert Plant is poking around in it, but more in Americana & country-soul. Albert Lee is still palying on a lot of C&W records. And Nick Lowe has moved quite well into that genre; his take of Charlie Feather's A Man In Love is the real deal. And in a tour here a few yeras back he was doing the Louvin's My Baby's Gone in duet with Ron Sexsmith -


Entered at Thu Mar 3 21:06:05 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

For me, C&W only came alive with LBV from MFBP, and Sweetheart of The Rodeo, Dr Byrds & Mr Hyde, and Nashville Skyline. Until then it had only registered as novelty; that was the stuff I liked … Wolverton Mountain, El Paso, Big Bad John etc. But we never had a chart here.


Entered at Thu Mar 3 21:03:18 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: New Sounds

sadavid: Going back further, Joan Baez recorded a live version of "Long Black Veil" in 1963, which was included on the album "In Concert Part 2". Two years later, the Byrds recorded their version of "Satisfied Mind", which had been a #1 C&W hit for Porter Waggoner a decade earlier.


Entered at Thu Mar 3 20:59:20 CET 2011 from (32.177.62.45)

Posted by:

JQ

Westcoaster - You won't get me to disagree with anything positive you say about Buck Owens, but the revival you speak of, although valid, didn't hit the hip mainstream much. Gram Parson's moved it in a bit, but Bakersfield music and Hee-Haw were still an acquired taste for most then -


Entered at Thu Mar 3 20:45:24 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: the new sound of country rock

_Sweetheart of the Rodeo_ was '68, _Festival Express_ (which, in retrospect, is pretty twangy) was '70. Woodstock '69 had Joanie doing "Drugstore Truck Drivin' Man."

Had you asked me in those days, I would have told you I hated country and western. C & W was fogy music. It had nothing to do with anything I liked. C & W was guys with short hair. Short hair bad, long hair good.


Entered at Thu Mar 3 20:41:00 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Cadillac Ranch

I ain't gonna die in A CADEELAC, the repo man done come and took it back.

So I'll get my revenge in this old Ford....... I just can't go on.

I got to looking at Horton's bio trying to figure where Honky Tonk Man stood, and just read all that stuff David. I'm thinking it was here locally that the song lasted so long on local stations. I recall it was played constantly for a long time.

That gawd damn JQ has made a glaring error. The biggest (by far) revival of country music in the 60's came from Buck Owens. In reading about the foresight of that man and his attention to air play and how he took over the radio stations. Here in the west he made country music. Some of the guys like Conway Twitty who started out more in the rockabilly, rock & roll vein, slid right over into country music.


Entered at Thu Mar 3 20:24:16 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: She walked these hills twice in a long black veil...

In a strange twist, worthy of a country song itself, Johnny Horton's widow, his second wife, was the former Billie Jean Jones. Previously, she'd been the young widow of Hank Williams, his second wife, whom he married when she was 19 after his break-up with Miss Audrey. Both country stars had played their last gig at the Skyline Club in Austin, Texas, and both died in a Cadillac, although under different circumstances. At this point, it would be approriate to hit a C chord and start pickin'.

Norm: "Honky Tonk Man", his debut single in 1956, only reached #9. It was re-released two years after his death and charted at #11.


Entered at Thu Mar 3 20:10:47 CET 2011 from (32.177.62.45)

Posted by:

JQ

PV - Country music took a dive here too in the mid-60's with the younger crowd. It was downright repellant to most then, except perhaps those in the South and the unhip.

Things changed a bit in country music tastes, in So Cal at least, with the arrival of Graham Parsons, etc around 1969. Commander Cody, Dan Hicks & JJ Cale opened some doors too. I think a record that introduced or reintroduced a lot of boomer's to classic country was Leon Russell's: Hank Williams Back cover LP, around 1973 I think. He had real credibility then with us.

I think that the young, casual listeners today still hate country & bluegrass unless it's presented in the ghastly pop form that comes from Nashville these days. Or for recalcitrant geezers in the form of the fucking Eagles.

With George Jones one needs to sometimes to get past his corny clunckers and some of Billy Sherrill's oppressive arrangements. If Garth Hudson was "Honey Boy", Sherrill was the "Heavy Crude Boy"; or maybe heavy & crude at times.


Entered at Thu Mar 3 19:45:48 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Panic Attacks

Aww Peter, bales of hay just puts your subconcious in mind of yer gawd damn mad cow stuff:)

If you watched the video of George Jones, (Who's Gonna Fill Their Shoes) I put up, the first few words of the song you need to pay attention to.

"Y'know the world is full of singers, but just a few are chosen.....to tear your heart out when they sing."

Regarding C&W in the early 60's as you mention. There is a conversation you should watch. On a video I have of "The Dirt Band" making Circle 2. Chris Hillman & Roger McGuinn are just about to play "You Ain't Going Nowhere." Randy Scruggs is questioning Roger about when they went to Nashville & recorded their country album in '68 "Sweethearts of the Rodeo".

Rogers comments, "We weren't really doing that well with the R&R audience any more, and we felt we could gain some of the country audience. It really back fired, country music was considered a political thing. The R&R audience saw us as turncoats, like we went over to the other side or something and abandoned us. The country audience never liked what we did. So for a minute there we lost both audiences."

I never thought of country music that way, but maybe down there it was seen as he said. You were either one or the other I guess. That "antiestablishment" crowd of the 60's were removed from the C&W.


Entered at Thu Mar 3 19:43:00 CET 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

wrote in a hurry before. Meant that usually past my demo, i don't have to have a lot to do with the vocal.the artist brings just about everything to it, and it is an intepretaion of the lyric and either the full music track or the live music being played. In terms of The Band. this becomes even more interesting because THEY worked the music up too.


Entered at Thu Mar 3 19:39:56 CET 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: the backwoods

Subject: Powderfinger

PETER: Just a suggestion: How about "Reeves means run, Son. Robbins add up to nuthin."

In the summer of 1970 I was in England when Mungo Gerry's "In the Summertime" became popular. Strangely, that song had already peaked and was on its way out when I left the US. Whenever I hear that song it reminds me of the college kids in Nottingham dancing to it in the local pub.

Another surprise was how popular the Beegees were in Europe. I don't think they ever had the same following here in the States, at least not before the dreaded disco fad. I liked them in the '60s when I was in the service. Thinking back, I listened to Electric Flag and Crosby Stills & Nash a lot.


Entered at Thu Mar 3 19:18:26 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: C&W in England

You’ve got me interested in why many C&W artists weren’t popular or exposed here. The ones who were popular … Marty Robbins, Johnny Cash, Johnny Horton, then also Jim Reeves and Burl Ives.

But loads like Stonewall Jackson, Lefty Frizell, Porter Wagoner didn’t mean a heap of beans in England. C&W was always vastly more popular in Ireland. Dunno about Scotland, but they always had local folk stuff. To me, Johnny Cash and Marty Robbins immediately sound a class above, but that may be familiarity. I never listened to George Jones till I was persuaded to here. I still don’t really like it, though I appreciate it. I have “Waterloo” on the Columbia Americana CD from 1991, but it’s a track I always skipped. Watching the video, I don’t like stuff with bales of hay in general.

By the early 60s … Beatles era … my generation were very wary of places with C&W on the jukebox. To paraphrase Neil Young in Powderfinger, “Reeves means run, boy.” It got very popular in the 70s, but not so much when I was younger.


Entered at Thu Mar 3 19:18:28 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Echos

Funny David....I was thinking that very thing as we got into this old stuff. My memory might be breaking down again, but didn't Johnny Horton's "Honky Tonk Man" set some kind of record at the time for being #1 the longest?


Entered at Thu Mar 3 18:57:01 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Johnny Horton

Johnny Horton had quite a run at the top of the charts in the last year or so before his untimely death in November 1960. "When It's Springtime in Alaska (It's Forty Below)" peaked at #1 in April 1959, followed by "The Battle of New Orleans", which sat at #1 from May-July 1959. Later that year, "Johnny Reb" reached #10 and "Sink the Bismarck" reached #3 in the spring of 1960. That was followed by "North to Alaska" (with another movie tie-in), which reached #1 after its release just before his death in November.


Entered at Thu Mar 3 18:51:58 CET 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

regarding Kooch, he has a new band, with Jonny Rosch, Shawn Pelton, and Neal Jason. Caught them in NY early Nov. First time the 4 of them played together, off the cuff.One fo the best nights of music i had in years.Now they oplay songs Kortchamr wrote, with guys like Don Henley, Jackson Browne, etc etc. They Played Iridium (the house Les Paul built)last week of february.


Entered at Thu Mar 3 18:47:41 CET 2011 from (207.200.116.74)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Web: My link

Subject: writers & singers

This article has an interesting section on the relationship between writers & singers, regarding demos and songs. Whilst I don't care to speculate regarding The Band past that statement this certainly has a direct relationship to the working relationship between Robbie & the The Three Vocalists, in fact the article has connection to relationship with the entire the rest of The Band, and hsimeslef as a Band member..No one view is full, no one explanation is complete or necessarily completely correct. This is just what this guy has to say from the aspect of a publisher writing a article about demos.

Regarding some of his views, as a songwriter who couldn't sing well if his life depended on it, I can tell you that usually past my singing for my demo ( which i give to the artist), and sometines explaining the mood, etc, usually my artist brings alot to the vocal. There have been times the artist could not get it at all, and I had to teach the phrasing to the artits. Once my phrasing was taken, then the artist went to town.But it's been very rare that the vocalist could not easily get the phrasing.

the last section of the article is sort of standard publisher b.s.,,,i say this because he is writing from the perspective of a publisher looking for commercial hits and ignores the fact that there is a wider market for other types of songs. So Many songs that are non commercial hits are often nore worthy of airplay than the commercial hits. The writer of the article woudl proabbly blow off my last statement.



Entered at Thu Mar 3 18:32:03 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Cigareets & Wuskey & Wild Women

Now this was big time music when I was 5! I can't get this link to work. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r5jarRec3go


Entered at Thu Mar 3 18:18:40 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Well ..........Maybe

Not a chance JQ. When I was 15 my old man said. You wear clothes like a man, and you eat like a man so you can get out and work like a man. Time I was 18 I was running heavy equipment in the bush. In truth I been working 51 years now. Isn't that enough gawd damn it!

My mother likes to tell the story when I was 5, I was singing this song, (I got to look this up, I don't remember who did it,) Cigareets & Whiskey & Wild Wild Women. I guess from an early age there was no hope for me.


Entered at Thu Mar 3 18:11:21 CET 2011 from (129.42.208.177)

Posted by:

Bob F

Location: Hudson Valley, NY
Web: My link

Subject: Natalie Merchant

Natalie Merchant is doing a live radio broadcast Friday, March 4, at Noon. It's at WKZE, 98.1, Red Hook NY and is part of their Parlour Sessions. Anyone interested can listen live on WKZE's website.


Entered at Thu Mar 3 17:48:46 CET 2011 from (32.177.62.45)

Posted by:

JQ

I think you might be losing it Westcoaster; you sure you weren't in your 20's when you were singing-out on your paper route? Just before the butterfly net guys got you?


Entered at Thu Mar 3 17:24:00 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: I ain't buyin' it!!

On the video I attached with David Frizell, he also says, 1957 or 58. Marijohn Wilkin says '57. We all must be old and crazy.

Thinking of the songs I used to sing then, brings me around to Van's "Pay The Devil" CD, on which he does many of these songs. When you think about it, it's kinda crazy. A 14 year old kid singing:

There Stands the Glass - Half As Much - Don't You Make Me High - My Buckets Got A Hole in it - Back Street Affair - More & More and all these others


Entered at Thu Mar 3 16:41:39 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Web: My link


Entered at Thu Mar 3 16:29:33 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Long Black Veil

Most sources indicate that Lefty Frizzell's "Long Black Veil" debuted in the Billboard charts in June 1959 at the same time as Stonewall Jackson's hit "Waterloo", which was co-written by Marijohn Wilkin and John D. Loudermilk. While "Long Black Veil" went on to peak at #6, "Waterloo" became a #1 hit.


Entered at Thu Mar 3 14:42:34 CET 2011 from (71.246.9.74)

Posted by:

bob w.

Web: My link

sadavid, thank you for the heads up regarding the PBS presentation "American Masters: Troubadours: Carole King / James Taylor & The Rise of the Singer-Songwriter". It was great.

For those who didn't catch it, keep an eye on your local PBS schedule and take the time if you can.


Entered at Thu Mar 3 13:36:49 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

One more … "Country Music USA" has a section on the rush of Americana hits in 1959 and mentions Battle of New Orleans by Johnny Horton (charted April 1959) being out at the same time as Long Black Veil. Goldmine Singles value guide (which I don't have) should have a date. David P?

But isn't this all the secret of LBV? It sounds as if it's been around since 1880.


Entered at Thu Mar 3 13:32:39 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Keeps happening to me, too, Norm. A friend was reminiscing about when we visited Colchester in 1970. I swore blind I'd never been there. Until I saw the photos.

The Rhino CD has complete session details. It's also on "Columbia Country Classics: Americana" and that also notes "recorded 03/03/1959". Mind you, in these things one "fact" gets repeated by other. My shelves groaning with reference books fail me here, basically because Billboard has never published the comprehensive week-by-week record books that Guinness have for the UK, and it was a C&W chart hit, not a pop one. I can tell you it was not released as a single in Britain. Columbia was issued on the Philips label here until 1962, and it's not listed. That would account for us knowing The Band version first!


Entered at Thu Mar 3 12:39:29 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: All of the below

This is bugging the hell outta me Peter. I remember reading in these piles of information back some where how Rick Danko had said, he'd been singing Long Black Veil since he was 9 or 10 which of course was impossible. In '57 he was 14, I was 13.

It doesn't seem to me that Marijohn Wilkin would be mistaken the way she runs her business. You can google quite a history of her life, (very tough with many things that happened to her.) I'd swear I was singing that song back then. Could it be that the publishing was done sometime later, because of the way she reports she took the song to him?

Empty Now.......it appears you think I was mocking you. That's not true at all. You have many interesting, beautiful things to say. I get lost in your translation sometimes. Frustrating when I'm trying to follow your line of thought. The man from the Nordic countries is a great guy. He attached himself to my name, (which I take as a compliment) but we jest and joust a lot. All in fun, (I hope).

I sincerely think you are mistaken with what Bayou Sam said. There is no way that man is laughing at the plight of any people in the middle east.

Your explanation of the traditions at football & rugby games is not lost on me. My son has always played rugby and I very much appreciate and understand the significance of their chants, (the greatest to watch are the Samoens.) I was trying to figure out what you were getting at?

It seems the time is coming that more and more people in the middle east are mustering the courage to bring down the dictatorship rule of their countries. From the times of Ghengis Khan, the form of "rule by force & power" of tribes is finally coming to an end. With the power of petroleum wealth, in the past 50 years things only seem to have gotten worse.

We are certainly not perfect in our country, but it seems much harder here to pass by people, and particularly children in poverty & hunger and not notice or care. I don't think there are many of us in the west who don't watch the plight of children in the middle east, and squirm in our chairs at the bad feeling it gives you. Don't judge us as uncaring.


Entered at Thu Mar 3 11:23:10 CET 2011 from (41.97.135.88)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Subject: Peter V

since i once thought you are for me a moral authority you will remain, i focalied , cut and pasted from Bayou Sam comment


Entered at Thu Mar 3 11:16:57 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Empty Now, we crossed in the ether, so my Burl Ives song reference was not connected to your point about "laughing."

It's difficult to know whether our total silence here on the situation in North Africa and the Gulf is good or bad. If Steve were still with us, we'd be discussing it. It's moving fast. I taught lots of Libyans in England in the 70s. Every group had one older guy. When he was there everyone was subdued and it was hard to get anyone talking. Once a week that "older guy" would go to London for the day to visit the embassy. As soon as he was gone, the whole class was cheerful, communicative and outgoing. Then he came back and they were all subdued. I know what you mean about "half-living." It's what happens when you know you're being watchd.


Entered at Thu Mar 3 11:11:06 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Funny Way of Laughing

Phew. Get on YouTube and there are a LOT of versions of Long Black Veil. Someone's tacked Long Black Veil on the end of a King Harvest video. See link. You could scroll through King Harvest, but I wouldn't. Watch both. Great live version, maybe the electric guitar is a bit strong for the song, but it's still brilliant.

Another recent vinyl find was O.C. Smith's "Long Black Limousine". It's a B-side but seems to predate the Elvis in Memphis version by a year.

The Burl Ives version of LBV is fun. The backing is a bit too jaunty in strong contrast to the heavenly choir.


Entered at Thu Mar 3 11:08:58 CET 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Ed Voci's buddy

Subject: Burl, Lefty, Westy, Easty, Long Black Veil and Wilkin Dill

Goddamm, if that don't beat all.

What that little vignette fails to mention is that before presenting the thing to Lefty, the two had tried all night to get hold of Burl but he'd already left for the ugly bug ball.

True story. :0)


Entered at Thu Mar 3 11:04:24 CET 2011 from (41.97.135.88)

Posted by:

Empty Now

webmaster : the least alteration of the integrity of my previous post is unfair, whereas Bayou Sam's post passed the night


Entered at Thu Mar 3 11:02:12 CET 2011 from (41.97.135.88)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: during the haka

you right Norm, I would ask you friendly, as soon as you will have 49 seconds to waste, please watch the linked above clip.

maybe it’s because I think in French and post in English; plus I try to post feelings, feelings are difficultly to conceive, indeed more difficult to understand.
it’s all about feelings, and impressions, I remember it was the phrase that grew spontaneously in my mind the first time I watched on TV a hake performed by the All Blacks. Alternative formulation of that moment could be [my all first perception of haka]

“it’s the most cleansed beauty which transduces through the loudest blasting almighty”

good, for the rest, what I meant it’s very clear : “the commentator stops talking during the haka”

maybe it’s because I wrote “the commentator doesn’t comment the haka” , wrong!, for sure before and after the haka, the commentator comments everything he wants, haka included,
It really concerns the commentator alone, the rest of the humans in all evidence do what they are used to do meanwhile
if it happens that the adversary are the Kangaroos, they respond singing Waltzing Matilda. here ”they” means the players, next follows all the public in the stadium
if the adversary are the Scot team, they respond with a silent Mexican wave lifting up the front of their kilts. here ”they” means the players only
Meanwhile the hake, the ordinary The Band GBers are continuing to post exclusively about music
the sympathetic gentleman from Nordic Countries is posting at the level of encouraging kindness he always proved toward Empty Now
Libyan leader and family are watching hundred Billions Dollars being frozen throughout the Western banks
Non protesting people throughout Arabian countries are half living
Protesting people throughout Arabian countries are being killed
Idiots of any rank from New York and the rest of the world hurt their myself laughing at this …(and goes away still alughing)


Entered at Thu Mar 3 08:55:20 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Fifty two years ago on a cold dark night …

Great source material, Norm. I clipped it onto the bottom of my original notes, and saw there were pages of extra notes when Nancy commented on the story once and it got discussed here. Maybe it’s time to revise the whole thing and add all the extra contributions.

Rhino’s “Best of Lefty Frizzel” puts the recording session as … March 3rd 1959. That is exactly 52 years ago to the day. The Columbia single was released in May 1959. Rhino, like Ace, are pretty fanatic about researching stuff. The session notes say he was born in Texas, but moved to El Dorado, Arkansas “shortly after his birth”. So another Arkansas one.

That “tooth slushing” or whistling is used by other singers, and I recall it in a couple of movies where they wanted to portray rural semi-comic characters. Aw, Shhhllhhucks). Perhaps it’s supposed to be a result of country dentistry. I assume Lefty’s deliberately doing it for the song.

I had another listen. Points still go to Rick, but I also prefer the way The Band took the backing.


Entered at Thu Mar 3 01:51:34 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The proof is in the Pudding???

Burl Ives????.......this man musta threw a piston! Or a "Little Bitty Tear Let him Down".

That sounds good JQ, now I gotta chase it down. That gawd damn Peter. He's always got to bring out his writings and ramblings, causing me to go to the source. I guess this hasn't happened in a couple years since I moved here. Now I got this little library of casette tapes. I had to go thru damn near the whole thing to find this tape again and check it.

This is a tape of Joe Sun..."The Best of Joe Sun" on electra ... 1982. On this tape in front of his version of "Long Black Veil" is a conversation between Danny Dill & Maryjohn Wilkin. MJW, "Danny just came in my office this one morning and threw this paper on my desk. He says here's something I wrote last night. If you think it's any good, put some music to it. If you don't throw it in the waste basket. Well....I read it and I loved it, and the music came so easy."

DD, "Well yeah, this had three components if you want to get in to that. First there was the account of this woman who came all the time to the grave of Rudolph Valentino in a Long Black Veil, (actually a long black limosine too). That's the first part. Then there was this priest who had been murdered in Trenton New Jersey, under a street lamp. There was no less than 30 witnesses, but no one came forward. He was the most beloved man, and no one knew why he was killed, and they never found who did it. Oh the walkin' these hills. My good friend Vic McCalpin wrote a song Red Foley had a big hit with called "God Walks these hills with me." So that's how the walkin the hills comes in.

Then I was stuck, and I spent a week on this. What did this guy do to get himself in such a fix. Then one night, in that twilight just as you're goin to sleep it hit me. I sat right up in bed and said to my wife, "I know what he did!......he was in the arms of his best friends wife."

MJW "Well I went over to the hotel where Lefty was gettin ready to go and cut this record. He was workin on all his material and I was listening and I just knew this was better than anything he was doin. I got up the nerve, and I took him in the kitchen and I sang it to him. No accompanyment, just sang it. Well he near fell out, he loved it and so he just went and recorded it."

Now on this tape, Maryjohn says this was 57. Peter & wikipedia say 59. In 58, I still lived in Cloverdale, and I'm sure that is where I started singing this song.

DAVID!!!! get in here and figure this out.....goes away muttering......gawd damn Peter.


Entered at Thu Mar 3 00:48:16 CET 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Ed Voci's buddy

Web: My link

Subject: Long Black Veil

Sorry Lefty son you may well have been the first but here's the only version that comes remotely close to Rick's killer take...

Burl...esque


Entered at Thu Mar 3 00:32:06 CET 2011 from (24.47.42.238)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: NY

QUOTE: Westcoaster:

"Well Empty.....you did it again......I didn't understand a damn thing you just said".

I almost hurt myself laughing at this for some reason. I needed a good laugh right then. Thank you.

(goes away still alughing)


Entered at Thu Mar 3 00:09:03 CET 2011 from (166.205.143.78)

Posted by:

JQ

I'll bet it does Westcoaster - Bill Frisell, like Charlie Haden, is a great player with modern jazz chops and an obvious affection for classic country music.

There's been a lot of these type of country cover records out recently, but this one seems to have the potential to take that idea someplace new - I hope so. The track list looks interesting too -


Entered at Wed Mar 2 23:52:43 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Well......hmmmmmm??

Is it gonna stand up to the "Bradley Barn sessions" ......Sadavid?????


Entered at Wed Mar 2 23:20:57 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: . . . and speaking of George Jones . . .

I'm all giddy with anticipation about this new release - _Buddy Miller's Majestic Silver Strings_, "Buddy’s re-imagination of classic country songs loaded with guitars, atmosphere and attitude." The band is just guys like Bill Frisell, Marc Ribot and Greg Leisz. Vocal assistance from the usual suspects: Patty Griffin, Lee Ann Womack, Emmylou Harris, Julie Miller, Shawn Colvin. Also someone(s?) called Cholcolate Genius.


Entered at Wed Mar 2 23:01:53 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: whistling in the dark, or somewheres

Peter V: interesting observation about Lefty's esses on "Long Black Veil," though I'd call it distinctly a whistle more than a slosh. Is it a fashion or a personal peccadillo? Maybe just a bad habit, because it seems to get worse as the song goes on. Two theories: 1) a technique developed to make sure the esses were audible through the crappy house PA of (and over the sound of breaking crania in) the honky tonk du jour; 2) a technique developed to identify the sound of genuine old-time music at a time when the genuine practitioners of genuine old-time music all had ill-fitting boughten dentures.

In general, his diction is gorgeous; we probably have Lefty to thank for R. Danko's excellence in this regard (although it's been noted that Rick leaned on it a little hard now and then). Be grateful, anyway, that Lefty didn't use the Clinch Mountain Boys' vernacular: "if you were somewheres else, you won't have to die."


Entered at Wed Mar 2 21:48:31 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: I'm not sure

Bill!!! I went for a haircut this morning. There in the salon, (I'm really cute now too) was a poster Mar 12 at the Moose Hall.....Gary Comeau & his voodoo band.

JQ, my version of "Behind Closed Doors" was quite popular around this country back in the 70's.

There have been a few vids of Rick singing Long Black Veil solo that I've enjoyed. More resent of course than the original Band did when they were younger. Also some he has done I thought were pretty sub par from what he has been capable of.

Norwester!! you crazy old buzzard. That don't make any sense either, "It don't matter if you don't understand it". Now I'm more confused than ever....leave me alone..


Entered at Wed Mar 2 21:01:08 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: And further more!!

Yeah JQ, I'm with you. Your picks are good. My favourite I did for years when I was young was, "She thinks I still care". To really get the feel of what counttry is, watch this video.

There were more inflections in the voices of country singers of the 50's, because it was country blues, the "heart & soul" of country.

You are absoulutely right Peter, about Johnny Cash, just listen to his youtube vid of "I still miss some one". Listen to Ray Benson sing, "Way down Texas way".

I gotta go make Susan something to eat, 'for I get beatup. I'll be back......hopefully.


Entered at Wed Mar 2 20:47:09 CET 2011 from (166.129.15.204)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Charlie Rich

David P - I'm a big Charlie Rich fan too and I'd put him right up there with other great country-soul singers like Solomon Burke & Arthur Alexander.

Dan Penn too, I think it was you that alerted this site to his: Moments From This Theatre (1999?); that's one I've haven't stopped playing since -


Entered at Wed Mar 2 20:46:29 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: 83-86 list

Thanks Tim. Rick & Levon also played down here during their acoustic tour in 1983. I can't remember the name of the small club, as it wasn't opened very long, but in was in Decatur, GA near the Wuxtry record store (made famous by R.E.M.).


Entered at Wed Mar 2 20:38:15 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

JQ: Another great country crooner was Eddy Arnold. His "You Don't Know Me", co-written with Cindy Walker, is an all-time classic. It's been covered by many over the years, most notably by Ray Charles, and a concert staple for Richard & The Band in the '80s (see link). Charlie Rich also recorded a haunting version.


Entered at Wed Mar 2 20:23:20 CET 2011 from (134.174.21.2)

Posted by:

Tim

Location: Boston

Subject: 83-86 list

Hi David P. Using your info The Dollmaker broadcast on ABC in May 1984 (according to Wikipedia) and that week they were on a southeast swing with some dates unaccounted for between North carolina on 5/12 and some Florida Shows on 5/18. I would guess you saw them In mid May 84.


Entered at Wed Mar 2 20:11:56 CET 2011 from (166.129.51.223)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: country singers

I'm with Westcoaster on LBV being Lefty Frizzell's song first & foremost. I've never liked the rock ensemble treatment on MFBP much, but when I saw Rick do it solo with his Gibson it was great. And his mixing in of Train of Love on the live recording was top notch & creatively successful too.

In spite of some terrible material and Peter's V's correct comment about country corn singing, many of those guys in the 50s & 60s, could really sing. Think of George Jones, Ray Price, Web Pierce & Vern Gosdin, etc, just in the quality of their technical singing. And then, if the song is any good, their ability to thoroughly emote as well.

I've always thought that if George Jones had been born in Hoboken instead of Beaumont and taken up more serious material that he would ultimately land in the highest level of all great American singers; right up there with that other Jersey crooner.

If you haven't listened to much of G Jones yet try: My Favorite Lies, Mr Fool or The Window Up Above .

You agree with all this Westcoaster?


Entered at Wed Mar 2 20:14:08 CET 2011 from (90.239.77.41)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: westcoaster: "Well Empty.....you did it again......I didn't understand a damn thing you just said."

The good news are: "You don't have to understand". It is like GARTH HUDSON's playing. Don't (necessarily) try to understand, just enjoy it. After all you have read his post!

About enjoying, especially for PETER V, I believe you'll enjoy this story. - In the 60s and 70s Finnish rallye car drivers were very succesful (they still are). One of them, Mr. Pentti Airikkala, moved to England and started his own business there. He had University degree in Economics. He really enjoyed his new life in England. I will always have in my mind his words: "After a race in Finland everyone asked if I did WON, here in Britain everyone asks if I did ENJOY the race."


Entered at Wed Mar 2 20:08:29 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: your TV guide

Tonite on PBS: American Masters: Troubadours: Carole King / James Taylor & The Rise of the Singer-Songwriter

"Contributors include David Crosby, Roger McGuinn, Jackson Browne, Bonnie Raitt, Chris Darrow, Kris Kristofferson, J.D. Souther, Elton John; Peter Asher; Lou Adler; Russ Kunkel, Leland Sklar, Craig Doerge and Danny Kortchmar, Barry Mann, Cynthia Weil, Toni Stern, Robert Hilburn, Barney Hoskyns, Robert Christgau, Cheech & Chong, Steve Martin, Henry Diltz; and King’s daughter Sherry Goffin Kondor."

And Conan O'B has Mavis Staples.


Entered at Wed Mar 2 19:31:03 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Son, what is your alibi?

blighter … I wasn’t sure whether P.G. Wodehouse invented it for Jeeves or not. But you’re right. It’s one who casts a blight and is “early 19th century.” I also thought it was a polite euphemism for “bugger” but I can think on because no one else thinks so.

You must know what I mean about how 50s country / novelty singers sloshed spit between their teeth which made them sound like hicks. When did it start? Why was it thought to sound “country”? I can’t think of any regional dialect where they do that. I like Lefty’s version, but if you want a deep voice, how about the Johnny Cash version? See the link to the article from 13 years ago when I used to be able to put two thoughts together. I like the way Rick acts out the judge’s voice.


Entered at Wed Mar 2 18:46:28 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Interpretations - Carved in Stone

Well Empty.....you did it again......I didn't understand a damn thing you just said.

It is true, that the original of a song isn't always the best. Some of the interpretations of that are always evident, and you guys usually explain that well.

Except.....HEY!......PETER! that was a lousy shot at David Frizell......he's a pretty good singer. A deep voice doing that song works better.....you gawd damn blighter! (what in hell is a blighter anyway Peter? Is that a guy who goes around spreading blight on things....I dunno).

There are however, songs, that we always used to say, "carved in stone". Some of them being John Fogerty's signature. Example..........the intro and riffs in "Green River". Some of Chuck Berry's intros. Johnny B Goode, Roll it Over Beethoven, etc, ect ,ect.



Entered at Wed Mar 2 18:44:44 CET 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: USA

Subject: Harmony, Melody, and Billy

I was in a bar gig with the Bush Brothers a couple of years ago and I was singing harmony while the band leader was doing "Long Black Veil." It was the second set and I was getting tired and I screwed up as he sang about the condemned being in the arms of "the.. judge's.. wife," I came out with "...my ..best.. friend's.. wife."

He had every right to be pissed off at me, but that's what came into my head, and I heard afterwards that it sounded like I was correcting him. God knows I'm sorry.

Which reminds me of Billy. He's been over in Tripoli for the last 3 months and he sent me a photo of him with Colonel Gadhafi, both grinning at the camera and with their arms around each other. It seems Billy wiggled his way up to "Official Libyan Public Relations Minister." I have copies of the photo and they are priced to move, from $200 to 59 cents, plus shipping costs (about $199.41). Anybody who is interested can contact the Discount House of Worship, Del Rio, TX. If you call in the next 15 minutes they will include an autographed photo of Billy with his childhood math tutor Bernie Madoff (just pay extra for shipping).


Entered at Wed Mar 2 18:35:38 CET 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Ed Voci's buddy

Subject: Young Blood

I didn't know about Young Blood til I got the album.

I chased the album the tribute down because it's the only recording of Shawn's Viva las vegas. For whatever reason it isn't on the soundtrack album of Big lebowski, although all the other gems from the film are on it. Presumably some copyright issue.


Entered at Wed Mar 2 18:31:16 CET 2011 from (41.97.192.176)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

while reading a recent thread discussed in the GB about idiosyncrasies and cliches of sports commentators, I recalled there is in Rugby an international unwritten rule intuitively respected by all commentators from any channels : whatever is the importance of what may them going to say, at the moment when the haka begins, when the Ka Mate haka begins, the commentator keeps silent, he stops commenting by humility towards this incredibly impressive war song, where the most refined beauty emerges from the loudest blasting power, and whatever is the language the commentator speaks you know he says
"Here is the haka"
as everybody knows Ka Mate has rather a symbolic sense in Rugby, a chant and dance traditionally performed by both the All Blacks, and the Kiwis, prior to actual matches. The All Blacks, and the Kiwis traditionally win the matches, and not at the symbolic sense. The chant was historically composed by Te Rauparaha as a celebration of life over death.

something I often feared, is that the sport commentator comments inadvertently the Ka Mate, this remains in the realm of possibility.


Entered at Wed Mar 2 16:55:54 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: A lynch Mob! If Steve were here.......

For some time now you guys have been very good, and stuck to the music. Now I'm gonna fuck it all up.

I can't help it! This stuff in the middle east, I've been trying to stay away from. I caught one blurb on the news, yesterday I think. This Mummar Gaddafi animal. They are freezing money and assets here in Canada & the USA. This news note said the US has froze 40 BILLION! dollars belonging to Gaddafi's family. While so many people in that country work in near slave conditions. It really shakes your faith in humanity. The son of a bitch should be gut shot.


Entered at Wed Mar 2 16:14:40 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Peter V: "Twine Time" was released here in the U.S. on Andre "Bacon Fat" Williams' Mar-V-Lus label.

In addition to his session work, guitarist Billy Strange is also famous for co-writing Elvis' "A Little Less Conversation" with Mac Davis. He also appeared in "Coal Miner's Daughter" with Levon, portraying the steel-guitarist Speedy West, who produced Loretta Lynn's first sessions. Mr. Strange was also the arranger/conductor for Nancy Sinatra's recordings sessions with producer Lee Hazelwood. His use of two bassists on "These Boots Are Made For Walking", Carol Kaye on electric and Chuck Berghofer on stand-up bass, helped create the song's signature riff.


Entered at Wed Mar 2 16:14:02 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: All valid points

Jerry, I have to agree. That is a very expressive critic for a song. However, I remember some where reading years back how Rick said he'd been singing that song since he was a kid. I too sang that song since the day it first aired in '58. I had a habit of singing my heart out while walking the 8 miles around my paper route then.

Sadavid, I watch that vid fairly often, (anything to do with Johnny Cash.)

Yesterday I noticed an Eddy Rabbit video of a song I used to do a lot in the bars. "Two Dollars in the Jukebox." On playing it, I then got into a few of his vids. Now there is one, and it's hard to tell if Eddy tries to sound like Elvis or vise versa on a song Eddy wrote for Elvis. "Kentucky Rain".


Entered at Wed Mar 2 15:51:07 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Viva Las Vegas

Agree entirely that Shawn Colvin's is a cover (and later-heard) version that beats the original.I guess like most I discovered it on "Till The Night Is Gone", the Doc Pomus Tribute Album, bought for The Band on "Young Blood".

David, I just opened the new "Record Collector." Alvin Cash's "Twine Time" is one of the new Ace / Kent reissue vinyl 45s released this month. These are beautiful quality, but at £5.99 to £6.99 astonishingly expensive for singles.


Entered at Wed Mar 2 15:34:00 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Vinyl Siding: Viva Las Vegas

I've got a copy of the 45 single of Elvis' high-octane rendition of "Viva Las Vegas" released in April 1964. Strangely, the Pomus/Schuman composition was the B-side to a cover version of Ray Charles' "What I'd Say". Two great guitarists played on the session, Scotty Moore & Billy Strange, along with another session guy whose name escapes me at the moment.


Entered at Wed Mar 2 15:16:13 CET 2011 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: Long Black Veil

Here's a version you don't hear every day. Too bad about the strings.


Entered at Wed Mar 2 12:23:33 CET 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Ed Voci's buddy

Subject: First hearing

I do tend to agree about first hearing. Though not 100% as it really does depend on all other things being kind of equal.

And there are exceptions. I'm sure quite a lot. And ultimately it surely depends on quality and interpretation by the artist, whether the original version or not.

My own personal favourite example of this is Doc pomus's Viva Las Vegas. I daresay many would plump for the Elvis version as it was likely the first. Most other versions i've ever heard follow the Elvis take.

But once I heard Shawn Colvin's slower burning darker version, Elvis's began to seem sort of a bit mickey mouse. Okay so not really micky mouse but if you've absorbed Shawn's killer version you may see what I mean. Shawn seemed to have grasped the reality that gambling addiction is not all about bright lights.

Then there's the converse of all this. Badfinger's original Without You.

I guess most of us heard the Harry Niilson version first. And years later Whitney. Most have likely never heard Badfinger's original version of their beautiful song.

And when you do hear it you sort of know why you hadn't. Tom Evans's [RIP] chorus is - shall we say - not the best. pete ham's [RIP] verses are as good as you'd expect from the guy but poor Tom's take means their version of their most famous song is only for those who love them. And even then ear plugs are advised during the choruses.

Interesting stuff tho since there's so many examples of killer versions - including our boys.


Entered at Wed Mar 2 12:09:26 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

That should be "Doctorates of Divinity" as I don't think the adverts were suggesting they send you actual Doctors of Divinity. Though one might be useful to keep around in case of urgent theological questions. Has Billy Sol Hargis an opinion on this? his DD certificates look superb, and it's only $50 more for the framed version.


Entered at Wed Mar 2 11:50:31 CET 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Ed Voci's buddy

Subject: LSE prevarication

Seems like the LSE are trying to draw a long black veil over the affair.

Still not a patch on Rick Danko tho.


Entered at Wed Mar 2 10:35:12 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Long Black Veil

So often it's the version you know first. For me it was The Band, and I have a problem with Lefty Frizzell's hokey sibillants (slushing through his teeth). Years later I bought a Lefty Frizzell Greatest Hits which was my first exposure. The song is in its intention a pastiche, so both work. Mick Jagger with The Chieftains doesn't. There are very very few times when the Rick Danko version of a song isn't the best.

On Mick Jagger, his alma mater, the London School of Economics, is much in the news here. They awarded a doctorate to Gaddafi Jnr in 2008, whereupon he gifted them £1.5 million. Well, universities all have alumni fundraising, but this was immediate, and there were protests that there were 16 long examples of plagiarism in his thesis. The student body is rightly protesting and the newspapers say "Ah, well, those responsible have apologised. There's nothing you can do about it." To me, they have devalued the reputation of their highly respected degrees, and those in charge should be sacked. The debate I heard yesterday said that was impossible. It's not. Minor UK universities would immediately be threatened with having their degree awarding status removed. The same should apply to prestige ones, when they behave like a bible college offering Doctors of Divinity in small ads in "Rolling Stone." But perhaps they all do.


Entered at Wed Mar 2 09:55:31 CET 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Ed Voci's buddy

Subject: JERRY - the Rick Danko Long Black Veil appreciation society

"Rick sounds like they're getting ready to slip the noose around his neck in The Bands version..."

Can there ever have been a more succinct and bang on the money review of a Band song ever? No matter how little or long you've followed them Jerry. You clearly just get "it".


Entered at Wed Mar 2 09:26:10 CET 2011 from (198.36.218.33)

Posted by:

Jerry

Nobody to blame but myself for not discovering The Band before TLW...Heck, how about not discovering them until a year or two after The Reformed Band were no longer a band, now that's bad..No excuses, I'm just glad I found these fellows..

Norm, nice version of a great song, but I have to disagree. Rick sounds like there getting ready to slip the noose around his neck in The Bands version...


Entered at Wed Mar 2 00:31:44 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: How dare they!

Westcoaster: Yes, and then they've gotta go blame somebody - generally the Band or some part thereof.


Entered at Wed Mar 2 00:09:54 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Sometimes the original can't be beat.

Much as I've been a fan of the Band, since before they were the Band, I never "that much" liked what they did with Long Black Veil.

I got to sing this song one time, with David Frizell,(just sitting around at the Bootlegger Cabaret between sets) and Frankie Rogers, who at one time played with Lefty did fiddle work on a song I recorded. That"s as close as I ever got to Lefty. His version, and the country stile of this song..........makes it.

Some times there is a thing on this Guest book that shows thru. People who came by "THE BAND" VIA The Last Waltz, seem......astonished and cheated.........like how did these guys go on this long and I never knew about it. And now they're done!....It's kinda funny.


Entered at Tue Mar 1 23:34:17 CET 2011 from (216.165.58.52)

Posted by:

Ari

Subject: Johnny Ace and the Vibraphone

Does anyone know music similar to that of Johnny Ace? I love the sound of that creepy vibraphone in his music and also common in other eery 50's recordings. The best examples I can think of at the moment are Ace's Pledging My Love and Shelley Duvall's "He Needs Me". I think there's also hints of this in the Twilight Zone, Day The Earth Stood Still and an Everly Brothers song that I can't remember the name of.


Entered at Tue Mar 1 21:14:39 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Telecaster

This month marks the 60th anniversary of the commercial production of the Fender Telecaster guitar, which evolved from the Esquire, Broadcaster & "NoCaster". Check out the cool video clips at link above.


Entered at Tue Mar 1 21:15:20 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Golden Age of American Rock & Roll

After several side outings to specialist areas, Ace's "Golden Age of American Rock & Roll" CD series has reached volume 12. Of particular interest might be "The Jam Pt 1" by Bobby Gregg & His Friends, a #29 US hit in 1962. Yes, this is the Bobby Gregg who briefly played with The Hawks, and The Jam Pt 1 featured another ex-Hawk, Roy Buchanan, on guitar.

The sleeve notes, as ever informative, reveal that as well as drumming on "Bringing It All Back Home", Bobby Gregg played drums on many Cameo-Parkway classics, including Let's Twist Again.


Entered at Tue Mar 1 21:12:58 CET 2011 from (71.43.66.106)

Posted by:

Dan

Subject: Orlando

The previous post marvelling at how great some of the songs on Cahoots are makes me think how some of the Band's work is outstanding when not being compared to their multiple masterpieces, BT, MFBP, The Band & Rock of Ages. Having hit my teen years in the '80s, I don't regret choosing the cassette of NLSC at Modell's music over what was popular at the time -- I had the cassette of The Band, the one that deleted When You Awake and King Harvest. The music drew me then, and still does now, perhaps even more now the crazier it gets out there.


Entered at Tue Mar 1 21:04:44 CET 2011 from (63.88.115.195)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: PA
Web: My link

Subject: Suze Rotolo RIP

Rotolo can be seen walking arm in arm with the singer on the cover of the 60s classic, "The Freewheelin Bob Dylan Read more: http://www.newstimes.com/news/article/Artist-Suze-Rotolo-Bob-Dylan-s-muse-dead-at-67-1036413.php#ixzz1FNdTpAU2


Entered at Tue Mar 1 20:18:14 CET 2011 from (83.49.11.235)

Posted by:

Norbert

hello from Gran Canaria, great here. time´s up


Entered at Tue Mar 1 19:55:14 CET 2011 from (74.108.27.233)

Posted by:

Joan

Web: My link

Subject: Vinyl

Another one bites the dust.


Entered at Tue Mar 1 19:09:19 CET 2011 from (41.97.130.90)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: NorthWestCoaster - Re: Jeremiah

i refered several times to the linked above song , containing the line:

Elle aimait sa poupée, elle aimait ses amis
Surtout Ruth et Anna et surtout Jérémie
Et ils se marieraient un jour peut-être à Varsovie

voila, you got everything Jeremiah i ever linked, everything to take a stand, thanks for fairly chalenging my pre-Alzheimer stage


Entered at Tue Mar 1 18:58:11 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronno

Westcoaster: 5 inches of ice? We downtown elites assume that you must be speaking of sorbet, which is available in many of our fine restaurants in a range of designer colours.


Entered at Tue Mar 1 18:41:29 CET 2011 from (67.250.113.92)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: NY

Subject: Gourds' link

That was a pretty good video of the Gourds, but without a cymbal player it's just not as good.


Entered at Tue Mar 1 18:38:33 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: I'm up!

Had a lot of sleep to catch up on.........everyone must be real busy. They ain't no fussin' & fightin' goin' on here. No history lessons.......oh well.

I thought for sure Bill Munson or one of 'em would have been wrapping my knuckles and correcting me by now.....I tried anyway.

Our ball stadium was built in 1951, named Capilano Staduim all my childhood. "Cap" Stadium we called it. Used to be home to the Vancouver "Mounties" first of all. In 1978 the name was changed to "Nat Bailey" Stadium to honour the old guy for his commitment and untiring work promoting baseball in Vancouver. Now with that bit of trivia, I'm gonna piss off........down and clean up my tug. It's a mess.

I wonder if any a youze back east kids ever been out on those big puddles back there, and experienced "freezing spray"? Well I'm gonna send some of yuz some pictures. Coming down Queen Charlotte Strait from Jeanette Islands to Malcolm Island the other night. By the time I got to Campbell River, I had about 5" of ice built up all across the front of my barge.

Lars! remember in Master & Commander getting down around the Horn how the ice built up on that ship? Well that's what my outfit looked like.


Entered at Tue Mar 1 17:06:51 CET 2011 from (41.97.223.210)

Posted by:

Empty Now

Web: My link

Subject: NorthWestCoaster

since i feel as confident in the strength of your memory as in in the strength of my own memory, there are 2 links in the entire History of my GB posts which have been ever removed
1 - one link, violent critic of bullfighting in Andalucia, removed by the moderator in Norbert's GB, and replaced by a link to a site related to peaceful cows of Savoie
2 - one link to the site above, as necessary illustration of an instant-reply post of me to an antisemitic comment against JRR posted by an unknown Robbie basher. (surely the only post where i ever defended JRR); then the webmaster removed at my demend the antisemitic comment, and as a logic consequence : my own reply-post and link no more necessary have been removed
in both cases i have no memory of any Jeremiah connection, maybe if you add clues, i will; otherwise surf the site you'll surely find a trace of Jeremiah
Thanks for the compliments, i am cultured

one of the best things that can happen in this forum is to open the GB and read the name Ed Voci,
those are memories of another kind, ...is that the bro of Kurt Russel in the link ? ...is that a Rickenbecker guitar ?


Entered at Tue Mar 1 16:42:04 CET 2011 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

I agree with Nick. I listened to half the album this morning, trying something a little different: I started with track 3, "Last Of The Blacksmiths". Cutting out LIAC and Masterpiece, as magical as each is on its own, somehow makes the quality and consistency of the rest more apparent. Even the first line of TMSO, which is as far as I got. "You're the hero, said the mute; you're bound to survive" popped out at me for the first time. And then there's lines like "How're you gonna replace human hands?" and "How can you get to sleep when the whistle don't moan?"


Entered at Tue Mar 1 16:33:21 CET 2011 from (90.239.128.184)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Saved / Prophet Jeremiah

There are some words from JEREMIAH on this LP album cover. I have the highest respect on BRIEN SZ and EMPTY NOW when it comes to culture, society and Bibble studies. I still remember BRIEN's wise post on Jeremiah - well, five(?) years ago.

EMPTY NOW: You posted a link to a web site connected to Jeremiah and/or his followers for many years ago. I assume that it was removed rapidly from your post and I never had a chance to visit it. Please send the link to me. My address is ilkka at spray dot se. Thank you.


Entered at Tue Mar 1 16:21:44 CET 2011 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Ed Voci? A greatly-missed poster. I still cherish The Gourd's version of Gin & Juice.


Entered at Tue Mar 1 15:51:34 CET 2011 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Concert List

Tim: I saw The Band (with the Cate Bros.) at the Moonshadow Saloon in Atlanta in 1984. Can't recall the exact date, but I believe it was in the fall. I do remember that it was after "The Dollmaker" had aired, as Levon mentioned that one of the young cast members was in the audience that night.


Entered at Tue Mar 1 11:19:44 CET 2011 from (82.42.175.156)

Posted by:

Ed Voci's buddy

Web: My link

Subject: The Weight Revisited?

Mister Voci's favourites with possibly the closest anybody's ever come to recreating our own boys peerless signature tune.

Recorded version not available on You Tube but this live performance from The Mint doesn't falter for a fleeting second.

There are differences of course notably the absence of any delicious chorus harmonies but the prevailing sound, mood and spirit of the song certainly evoke the memory of our boys signature tune more than anything I've ever heard since '68.

Lost love? or Lost community?

Who's counting?


Entered at Tue Mar 1 06:08:35 CET 2011 from (70.95.155.83)

Posted by:

Nick

Subject: Cahoots

Great CD! Especially the remastered version, Fantastic playing and amazing vocals. Used to not be a fan but have been coverted. Love "where do we go from here" and "Volcano". Levon's singing and Garth's playing on "River Hymn" are fantastic! i guess you have to dig deep.


Entered at Tue Mar 1 05:31:22 CET 2011 from (99.236.13.43)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: Jane Russell

Here's our [CTV] article on Jane Russell. RIP

Date: Monday Feb. 28, 2011 9:43 PM ET

LOS ANGELES — Jane Russell, the busty brunette who shot to fame as the sexy star of Howard Hughes' 1941 Western "The Outlaw," died Monday of respiratory failure, her family said. She was 89. Although Russell largely retired from Hollywood after her final film, 1970's "Darker Than Amber," she had remained active in her church, with charitable organizations and with a local singing group until her health began to decline just a couple weeks ago, said her daughter-in-law, Etta Waterfield. She died at her home in Santa Maria.

"She always said I'm going to die in the saddle, I'm not going to sit at home and become an old woman," Waterfield told The Associated Press. "And that's exactly what she did, she died in the saddle."

Hughes, the eccentric billionaire, put her onto the path to stardom when he cast her in "The Outlaw," a film he fought with censors for nearly a decade to get into wide release.

With her sultry look and glowing sexuality, Russell became a star before she was ever seen by a wide movie audience. The Hughes publicity mill ground out photos of the beauty in low-cut costumes and swim suits, and she became famous, especially as a pinup for World War II GIs.

Then in 1948 she starred opposite Bob Hope in the box-office hit, "The Paleface," a comedy-western in which Russell was tough-but-sexy Calamity Jane to Hope's cowardly dentist.

Although her look and her hourglass figure made her the subject of numerous nightclub jokes, unlike Marilyn Monroe, Rita Hayworth and other pinup queens of the era, Russell was untouched by scandal in her personal life. During her Hollywood career she was married to star UCLA and pro football quarterback Bob Waterfield.

"The Outlaw," although it established her reputation, was beset with trouble from the beginning. Director Howard Hawks, one of Hollywood's most eminent and autocratic filmmakers, rankled under producer Hughes' constant suggestions and finally walked out. "Hughes directed the whole picture -- for nine bloody months!" Russell said in 1999.

The film's rambling, fictional plot featured Russell as a friend of Billy the Kid as he tussles with Doc Holliday and Sheriff Pat Garrett.

It had scattered brief runs in the 1940s, earning scathing reviews. The Los Angeles Times called it "one of the weirdest Western pictures that ever unreeled before the public."

But Hughes made sure no one overlooked his No. 1 star. The designer of the famous "Spruce Goose" airplane used his engineering skills to make Russell a special bra (which she said she never wore) and he bought the ailing RKO film studio to turn it into a vehicle for her.

Wisely, he also loaned her to Paramount to make "The Paleface," because at RKO she starred in a series of potboilers such as "His Kind of Woman" (with Robert Mitchum), "Double Dynamite" (Frank Sinatra, Groucho Marx), "The Las Vegas Story" (Victor Mature) and "Macao" (Mitchum again).

Hughes had rewarded her with a unique 20-year contract paying $1,000 a week, then he sold RKO and quit making movies. Russell continued receiving the weekly fee, but never made another film for Hughes.

Her only other notable film was "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes," a 1953 musical based on the novel by Anita Loos. She and Monroe teamed up to sing "Two Little Girls From Little Rock" and seek romance in Paris.

At a 2001 film festival appearance, Russell noted that Monroe was five years younger, saying, "It was like working with a little sister."

She followed that up with the 1954 musical "The French Line," which like "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes" had her cavorting on an ocean liner. The film was shot in 3-D, and the promotional campaign for it proclaimed "J.R. in 3D. Need we say more?"

In 1955, she made the sequel "Gentlemen Marry Brunettes" (without Monroe) and starred in the Westerns "The Tall Men," with Clark Gable, and "Foxfire," with Jeff Chandler. But by the 1960s, her film career had faded.

"Why did I quit movies?" she remarked in 1999. "Because I was getting too old! You couldn't go on acting in those years if you were an actress over 30."

She continued to appear in nightclubs, television and musical theatre, including a stint on Broadway in Stephen Sondheim's "Company." She formed a singing group with Connie Haines and Beryl Davis, and they made records of gospel songs.

For many years she served as TV spokeswoman for Playtex bras, and in the 1980s she made a few guest appearances in the TV series "The Yellow Rose."

She was born Ernestine Jane Geraldine Russell on June 21, 1921, in Bemidji, Minnesota, and the family later moved to the San Fernando Valley in Los Angeles. Her mother was a lay preacher, and she encouraged the family to build a chapel in their back yard.

Despite her mother's Christian preachings, young Jane had a wild side. She wrote in her 1985 autobiography, "My Paths and Detours," that during high school she had a back-alley abortion, which may have rendered her unable to bear children.

Her early ambition was to design clothes and houses, but that was postponed until her later years. While working as a receptionist, she was spotted by a movie agent who submitted her photos to Hughes, and she was summoned for a test with Hawks, who was to direct "The Outlaw."

"There were a lot of other unknowns who were being tested that day," she recalled in a 1999 Associated Press interview. "I figured Jack Beutel was going to be chosen to play Billy the Kid, so I insisted on being tested with him."

Both were cast, and three months would pass before she met Hughes. The producer was famous for dating his discoveries as well as numerous Hollywood actresses, but his contract with Russell remained strictly business. Her engagement and 1943 marriage to Waterfield assured that.

She was the leader of the Hollywood Christian Group, a cluster of film people who gathered for Bible study and good works. After experiencing problems in adopting her three children, she founded World Adoption International Agency, which has helped facilitate adoptions of more than 40,000 children from overseas.

She made hundreds of appearances for WAIF and served on the board for 40 years.

As she related in "My Path and Detours," her life was marked by heartache. Her 24-year marriage to Waterfield ended in bitter divorce in 1968. They had adopted two boys and a girl.

That year she married actor Roger Barrett; three months later he died of a heart attack. In 1978 she married developer John Peoples, and they lived in Sedona, Arizona, and later, Santa Barbara. He died in 1999 of heart failure. Over the years Russell was also beset by alcoholism.n Always she was able to rebound from troubles by relying on lessons she learned from her Bible-preaching mother.

"Without faith, I never would have made it," she commented a few months after her third husband's death. "I don't know how people can survive all the disasters in their lives if they don't have any faith, if they don't know the Lord loves them and cares about them and has another plan."

Survivors include her children, Thomas K. Waterfield, Tracy Foundas and Robert "Buck" Waterfield, six grandchildren and 10 great-grandchildren.

A public funeral is scheduled March 12 at Pacific Christian Church in Santa Maria.

In lieu of flowers the family asks that donations be made in her name to either the Care Net Pregnancy and Resource Center of Santa Maria or the Court Appointed Special Advocates of Santa Barbara County.

CYA xoxoxoxo


Entered at Tue Mar 1 05:18:48 CET 2011 from (99.236.13.43)

Posted by:

Serenity

Web: My link

Subject: Jane Russell dead at 89 May she RIP

This is a tribute to this beautiful lady.

NORM: Of course we all care about you. Haven't we shown you somewhat? LUVYA xoxoxo

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE


Entered at Tue Mar 1 02:46:57 CET 2011 from (24.108.253.172)

Posted by:

westcoaster

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The 50'S & The best of the best

I just got back from 11 days at sea......a lot of real shitty heavy North-east one's. A few days ago, I was on my loader in the head of Rivers Inlet packing junk down aboard my barge. The northeast was howling out of the inlet, snow swirling all around......I thought of laying on Rosa's massage table under the palm trees in Puerto Vallarta.......I sobbed quite a bit. Don't you guys feel sorry for this poor old wreck of a man???????

In 1955, I lived in Cloverdale in the Fraser Valley. I rode my bike 6 miles to play Little League Ball. I had my heroes. - :

Duke Snider, Pee Wee Reese, Clem Labine, Johnny Podres, Gil Hodges, Jackie Robinson, Carl Furillo, Carl Erskine, Roy Campanella, and the rest of that Lineup.

One day in early October, 1955 the world was all right. I went to sleep with a smile on my face, and the sweet dreams, that finally the boys from Brooklyn took it away from those gawd damn Yankees. I think .....really in looking at the way things are these days, I'm glad my childhood was in the 50's. It was a great time to be a kid. We had more of an innocence, and great expectations in those days. I honestly don't think they exist anymore.

I look at my grand children......the greatest little guys, and I wish they could experience a lot of the things I did. In Vancouver, there is an old ball field. It was named after agreat guy out here, who started "White Spot" drive in restaurants. The best burgers you could ever find. Not A&W nor MacDonalds or any of 'em ever compared to "Nat Baileys", White Spot. So the ball field, "Nat Bailey Stadium", home to the Vancouver Canadians ball team, is the place to go in Vancouver. From the time I was in my teens I've loved to go there and watch a game.

So now Lars, you've done me a great favour. I have to remember this year to take those little fellas out there to a couple of games.

There's that song of Don Macleans, American Pie, (the day the music died). Well baseball died for me when I was a kid, and the Dodgers left Brooklyn.


Entered at Tue Mar 1 01:53:22 CET 2011 from (24.218.200.216)

Posted by:

Tim

Location: Boston

Subject: Concert list

If anyone has contributions, or corrections to the list Jan posted you can email Jan and he can send to me. The Dec 31, 83 show is one Im not sure where they played . I have multiple ads for Rick and Richard opening up for Hot Tuna at the Beacon, the same night The Band opened for the Grateful Dead in Sf (with audio on wolfgangs vault) Also I had an inquiry about The Band playing the Stone in SF in July 83. anyone know about that show, have a tix, attended or aware of this gig? They were in California that month. Thanks Tim

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