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The Band: Live at the Academy of Music 1971

Levon Helm: Ramble at the Ryman

The Band: Three of a Kind

Robbie Robertson: How to Become Clairvoyant

Garth Hudson Presents a Canadian Celebration of The Band

Levon Helm: Electric Dirt

Garth and Maud Hudson: Live at the Wolf

Pulse

Dirt Farmer

Elliot Landy's Woodstock Vision

The Band Guestbook, July 2016


Entered at Sun Jul 31 22:51:57 CEST 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: David P

Like everyone else, I always enjoyed reading David P's posts on music. I'm glad he came back. Very sad to hear of his passing. RIP


Entered at Sun Jul 31 21:32:40 CEST 2016 from (24.224.128.101)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: David Powell

So sorry to head of David Powell's death. Articulate and informative he was; I always appreciated his posts. A true gentleman. I would have loved to have a bourbon on his back porch while he would regale about the Georgia music scene back when.


Entered at Sun Jul 31 20:23:35 CEST 2016 from (74.108.28.103)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: David Powelll

I was so sad to hear of David's passing. I never knew him personally but I was always amazed at his knowledge of music and other things. I will miss his posts many of them always left me with my jaw hanging open for those so amazed by him rest in peace David


Entered at Sun Jul 31 19:59:45 CEST 2016 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

That's a rough one.


Entered at Sun Jul 31 19:37:49 CEST 2016 from (100.34.253.103)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love

Subject: David Powell

Totally stunned to get on here today and find out David Powell has passed. For a brief time early on, we corresponded by email and things were never quite the same during and after his boycott here. But by far he was one of he most knowledgeable people on the guestbook and it is an understatement to say he will be missed.


Entered at Sun Jul 31 19:28:40 CEST 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: In the Spirit of David Powell

As I mowed my lawn, I thought about all these years and the many people on this site, many who have gone before us starting as I recall with Paul Godfrey, Steve and the many others.

As Dunc has just shown from the post of David. Music brings people together as this site shows, and this Playing for Change movement is something David also was a great believer in. So this video of these people all over the world singing, "Imagine" is dedicated to David.


Entered at Sun Jul 31 19:18:39 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: David Powell

Thank you Bob.

It’s been a long, long road. Bumpy from time to time, but on the whole smooth. Nineteen years. Nineteen years when the Band GB has been my default web page. David will be sorely missed. We shared an interest in audiophile matters, and I like to think of David spending an evening sitting calmly, listening with acute attention and comparing two pressings of Big Pink with thorough enjoyment. I always thought if ever I was in Atlanta this was someone I wanted to look up and share a drink with. Sadly it’s never going to happen.

David’s musical breadth was extraordinary. It was amazing how many bands and singers he’d seen. There was rarely a band or artist from the late 60s and 70s that he didn’t have an album by. I’ve tried many artists I had previously ignored, and got persuaded to re-try The Allman Brothers. Isn’t it weird to think of all those conversations with someone you never met?

And like a select batch of us, he’s stuck by The Band all those years, through thick and thin.

Rest in peace, David.


Entered at Sun Jul 31 18:58:45 CEST 2016 from (31.50.120.196)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: David Post

When I joined the GB, I read old posts. This post among others stuck in my mind. I searched for it and found it this evening. I think it confirms what we know of David through his posts.

David Powell From: Georgia

Jan's guestbook is a testament to the power of BAND music.

So many people of differing backgrounds, nationalities and political beliefs sharing common ground in their appreciation of such fine music.

It's a shame that, for so many others in the world, they can't put aside their differences and listen.


Entered at Sun Jul 31 18:02:44 CEST 2016 from (24.114.68.161)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: David P

David once referenced The Band's song Ophelia to describe a loss......

"The old neighbourhood just ain't the same"

Almost 20 years of such wonderful musical posts and observations. I learned so much music from him.

Thank you, Bob for the family contact and details. The kind of dignified notice David would have approved of.


Entered at Sun Jul 31 17:59:30 CEST 2016 from (99.231.74.112)

Posted by:

GregD

Subject: David Powell

So sorry to hear of his passing. He will be greatly missed. His deep knowledge of music was inspiring and he always tried to keep the discussion on the music, as others have noted. R.I.P. and condolences to the family.


Entered at Sun Jul 31 17:58:40 CEST 2016 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Norbert

A very beautiful and touching post Norbert. Thank you. I found my VHS copy of Lou Reed from the West 54th Sessions that David sent me so very many years ago. I told him I wished I had a copy. He said, "no problem, I do I'll send you a copy." I offered to pay for shipping; but he said it wasn't necessary. We talked and emailed a lot over the years and I am truly filled with sadness today.

R.I.P David. I hope they have a record player with lots of vinyl waiting for you up there.


Entered at Sun Jul 31 17:46:34 CEST 2016 from (87.144.168.35)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: The Netherlands \ Germany

Subject: David Powell

----------------------------------------------------------

Thu Jul 31 17:13:31 MET DST 1997
David Powell
From: Stone Mountain, Ga.

Having just discovered this great web site I'd like to make the following comments. I saw the Band live with Dylan in 1966 & again in 1974, and on their own in 1970. To me what made the group stand out above the rest was the distinctive blend of Richard's, Levon's & Rick's voices singing great stories written by Robbie and wrapped in their finely honed musicianship . The sound was ancient & wooden in tone like songs handed-down from one generation to another. Without all these ingrediants, there is no Band. Sure Levon, Rick, Garth & whoever can still make great music, but without Robbie's songwriting stirred in the gumbo along with his concise guitar playing, the mix lacks the depth of Band sound. On the other hand, Robbie can still make interesting music on his own & with other players, but without the voices of Richard, Levon & Rick the music sounds hollow & thin. That said, let me recommend to anyone who has not heard it, John Hammond's SO MANY ROADS album released around 1965 on the Vanguard label & recently reissued on CD. This is a great blues album featuring Robbie on lead guitar, Levon on drums, Garth on organ, and Charlie Mussellwhite on harp. Robbie's stinging guitar leads are so awesome that the late great Mike Bloomfield was relegated to only piano playing on these sessions.

----------------------------------------------------------

Entered at Sun Jun 5 23:55:01 CEST 2016 from (206.57.79.199)
Posted by:
David P

Subject: Sonny Liston
For a gritty look at boxing check out Mark Knopfler's tale of Sonny Liston from Shangri-La.

----------------------------------------------------------

Looked up David’s first post (1997) and last post (2016), in between almost 20 years and a 10.000 posts. John D. is right we knew David and yet we didn’t. I read he was extremely private, hope he wasn’t extremely lonely. This WWW is great but at the same time it isn’t.

Perhaps it would have been better, and if it was for only once, to drink a beer together on his porch and watch the sun go down on a hot, moist, Atlanta summer evening. He would talk about Dylan and The Band he saw perform in 1966 and 1974, we would get drunk and promise to see another next year, which of course would never happen, but we would have emailed or phoned so every now and then and David wouldn’t have died alone.

If David reads this GB from above now I don’t know, but I do know that he will remain forever in our hearts. Thanks for sharing so many, smart Mr. David Powell, Rest In Peace my friend.


Entered at Sun Jul 31 17:25:26 CEST 2016 from (86.31.229.95)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham UK EU

Subject: Mr David Powell

SO sorry to hear of the death of David Powell. I checked back in the archives. David posted the first of many high quality contributions on July 31st 1997. Exactly nineteen years ago today. I always respected David's writing and almost always shared his opinions. I will miss him every time I look at the Guest Book.


Entered at Sun Jul 31 17:05:58 CEST 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Mr David Powell A True Country Gentleman

As well as his very impressive knowledge of music and musical instruments, David had a great sense of humor. He enjoyed a good joke and he and I had an enjoyable time thinking up any tool to use as a slide for guitar. His favourite being a tequila shot glass.

I count myself fortunate to have shared much of his knowledge as well as some of his stories of his gigs over many years. Funny how this internet has brought many of us so close together to people you would otherwise never know.

Rest in peace Mr. Powell, you have left a huge void in this place.


Entered at Sun Jul 31 16:19:55 CEST 2016 from (83.249.160.37)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: David Powell

My apologies to Mr. David _A_ Powell in Georgia. I posted his CV which seems to have been a mistake.


Entered at Sun Jul 31 16:19:42 CEST 2016 from (142.114.165.177)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: David

Very sorry to hear of David's death. His was a truly encyclopedic mind when it came to the music of the Band and much, much more. What I'll also remember is his polite use of the honorific "Mr." in second references to musicians and others. Who does that anymore? A true Southern gentleman obviously.


Entered at Sun Jul 31 14:32:33 CEST 2016 from (166.137.252.87)

Posted by:

Lil

Subject: David Powell

Thank you Bob. It's very difficult to have verification of this sad news. I know we were all hoping against hope that, after looking into things, this would have a better ending.

I always liked and respected David very much. His knowledge and fair mindedness was a constant, both here and in BFB and he will be so missed. This is just so sad and such a loss. I think he touched us all and left us with a small piece of himself that we'll always have. Rest in Peace David. And thank you.


Entered at Sun Jul 31 14:24:28 CEST 2016 from (86.169.103.246)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Thanks, Bob

Thank you for conveying information in your last post.


Entered at Sun Jul 31 14:02:22 CEST 2016 from (100.14.72.35)

Posted by:

bob

Subject: David Powell

I heard from David's brother last night. Garry told me that David passed on July 5, 2016 as a result of complications from skin cancer. He shared that David was an extremely private man and even his family was not made aware of the severity of his condition until he was very ill.

Garry was not aware of David's participation in this forum. I told him how much we all respected David and how grateful we all are for the knowledge he shared over his many years here and at BFB. Garry said he was not surprised...."Music was his life".

There will be a celebration of David's life in Atlanta on August 13. Garry shared his email address and said that if anyone would like to send along their thoughts he will be honored to read them at the service. He also extended an open invitation to anyone who might wish to attend. He will be happy to provide details via email.

I hope folks here will take a moment to send along their thoughts and condolences to David's family. This is truly a difficult loss.

Rest in peace, David. You will be missed.

Garry Powell's email address: powellgs at appstate.edu


Entered at Sun Jul 31 13:54:39 CEST 2016 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Bill M/ David Powell

Bill, David R Powell was indeed his real name; as is his brother; whom I wrote yesterday, Garry Powell. He worked for a very large law firm called Bryan Cave; although he told me he in fact was not an actual lawyer; but assisted them. Not 100% sure.

Bill I'm thinking in David's case of a song that you and I know well. From the earlier 70's, Domenic Troiano's "I Just Lost A Friend I Never Knew" which is a song he wrote for Jimi Hendrix. A man Donnie never knew; but loved and admired.


Entered at Sun Jul 31 13:03:00 CEST 2016 from (83.249.160.37)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: David Powell / Bil M

Very sorry to hear the sad news. Personally we - Mr. and Ms. NWC - will always remember him of his signing our 30th Anniversary gb in 1999.

David was the GB Star. Despite of the difficult period he came back as strong as ever.

Bill M, are we talking about the same person here: Admitted in 1979, Georgia, Georgia Court of Appeals, Supreme Court of Georgia, U.S. District Court, Northern District of Georgia and U.S. Court of Appeals, Eleventh Circuit Law School Attended Woodrow Wilson College of Law Class of 1979 J.D. University Attended Middle Georgia College Class of 1967 A.A. Georgia State University Class of 1971 B.B.A. Birth Information Born in 1947 Atlanta, Georgia, May 28, 1947 Military With U.S. Naval Air Reserve, 1968-1974 Associations & Memberships Northeastern Bar Association, Atlanta, Decatur-DeKalb and American (Past Member) Bar Associations State Bar of Georgia Georgia Trial Lawyers Association Georgia Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers.


Entered at Sun Jul 31 10:12:03 CEST 2016 from (86.169.103.246)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland
Web: My link

Subject: Roseann Fino

Thought I would finish on a positive note in contrast to my previous posts.

This is Roseann and two other talented young musicians playing an acoustic version of 'Night Rolls In'. I really like this song and the musicianship in the clip.


Entered at Sun Jul 31 09:48:00 CEST 2016 from (86.169.103.246)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Bowie

Glad there are six of us, Peter. Also, what I really didn't like about this concert was how self congratulatory the artists were about how well they were doing, many in the audience were not responding.

However I read through the reviews and the reviews were mixed, with some positive or part positive. I couldn't see how they could be.


Entered at Sun Jul 31 09:39:16 CEST 2016 from (86.169.103.246)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: David Powell

Very sorry to hear about David Powell's death.

As well as his incredible knowledge, which I benefited from, he also wrote very clearly.

Personally, I remember playing Searchers' and Byrds' albums after one of his posts relating how the Byrds had borrowed from the Searchers.


Entered at Sun Jul 31 04:24:40 CEST 2016 from (173.108.171.88)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland Tx

Subject: Best wishes

Terry Danko is experiencing some serious health issues. Stop by his Facebook Page with best wishes if you get a chance. Thanks, BP


Entered at Sat Jul 30 23:54:47 CEST 2016 from (24.114.48.83)

Posted by:

Bill M

Didn't someone from his law firm drop in years ago to say that David Powell was a pseudonym - with neither 'David' nor 'Powell' being right. I recall finding no David Powell on the list of lawyers on t firm's website. I sure hope that it's a case of mistaken identity.


Entered at Sat Jul 30 22:54:33 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Dunc, we are not alone. I was in an independent record store this afternoon, and it was busy. Someone mentioned the Bowie. Two others had seen it. Both thought it the worst thing they had seen on years. Two more joined in … the Marc Almond "Life on Mars" was on BBC Radio this morning and they also thought it indescribably bad. So that's 6 out of 6 so far!


Entered at Sat Jul 30 19:25:54 CEST 2016 from (88.20.16.79)

Posted by:

Richard

Location: Menorca
Web: My link

Subject: David Powell

Sorry to hear of the passing of David Powell. He was a gentleman and a scholar. Even when GB conversation devolved into squabbling he kept his cool. He reminded us what we have in common rather than what we disagree about.

The link above is to one of David's favorites. My deepest condolences go out to his friends and family.


Entered at Sat Jul 30 19:17:25 CEST 2016 from (166.137.252.87)

Posted by:

Lil

John. So if I'm understand there were 2 David Powells from GA. One died in June ( the shooting) and the other ("our" David Powell) in July. Is this correct. Please call me. Messaged you my new # on Facebook. Thanks.


Entered at Sat Jul 30 19:12:06 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Many thanks for clarifying that John.


Entered at Sat Jul 30 19:01:30 CEST 2016 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Peter V / David Powell

With all due respect that is not the same David R. Powell. David was 66 and lived in Stone Mountain Georgia.


Entered at Sat Jul 30 18:56:33 CEST 2016 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: David Powell's Obit

I found this online last night. I called the crematorium this morning and they can't give me any information; until Monday morning. His age. His middle initial and of course his beloved Stone Mountain are all mentioned. His brother's name is Garry S. Powell and I tried to locate him this morning; in another state to no avail. Seems to be an unlisted phone number. Here is the obituary I found last night. He died on July 5; but stopped posting here exactly one month earlier; on June 5th.

"David Powell, age 66, of Stone Mountain, passed away on July 5, 2016.

He is preceded in death by his parents, Robert and Mary Louise Powell. He is survived by his brother and sister-in-law, Garry and Denise Powell; sister and brother-in-law, Norma and Robert Barget and several nieces and nephews.

Private Memorial Services will be held at a future date."

David was like Switzerland on this site. Never got angry. Only wanted to talk about music and boy could he talk about music. His knowledge of instruments and music not only of The Band's was always in depth.


Entered at Sat Jul 30 18:45:40 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: David P

Thanks Lil and Bob. This would be deeply saddening news after all these years. I know it's a hard one to post. I Googled and no doubt came up with the same story as you (linked).

Let us really hope that it's all a coincidence of names. That is just such a tragic story.


Entered at Sat Jul 30 17:53:01 CEST 2016 from (166.137.252.87)

Posted by:

Lil

Thank you Bob. You said what I couldn't.


Entered at Sat Jul 30 17:41:06 CEST 2016 from (100.14.72.35)

Posted by:

bob w.

Subject: David Powell

This is a very difficult message. Several of us who have maintained contact with David over the years, through this site, BFB, Facebook and email have noted his absence for the past month and a half or so. We believe he may have passed in early June. John Donabie reached out by phone this morning to share what appears to be evidence of "our" David Powell's passing. We are hoping and praying that somehow the information is not correct but, sadly, everything is pointing towards David having passed in June. Obviously, we all hope this somehow doesn't add up to what will be a terrible loss. David's love of music, his spirit of generosity, his incredible integrity....all wrapped in his southern gentleman's grace and poise will be truly missed.

We will be overjoyed to find this information incorrect but we are fearing the reality. Very sorry to share such sad and difficult news. I know he had many valued friends and acquaintances here.


Entered at Sat Jul 30 17:36:41 CEST 2016 from (166.137.252.87)

Posted by:

Lil

Subject: David Powell

David Powell. Please check in if you're ok. Some of us are very concerned after news. Praying you are ok. Thanks.


Entered at Sat Jul 30 17:21:57 CEST 2016 from (173.3.50.24)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Rod, I hadn't heard it in ages, but it's a golden oldie. Ran into it the other day. I'm glad it made you smile.


Entered at Sat Jul 30 15:20:41 CEST 2016 from (87.144.168.35)

Posted by:

Norbert

Rod, also thanks for the Willie Watson.


Entered at Sat Jul 30 14:49:37 CEST 2016 from (87.144.168.35)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: Germany
Web: My link

Subject: Levon’s aunt Heidi

Years ago JT posted about Levon’s yodeling German aunt.

This story can be confirmed now, it was Heidi Helm. It is known that Heidi learned Levon the basics of yodeling. What is underexposed here is the importance of the German “Schlager”;

Aunt Heidi was a fan of the German Schlager and in between the yodel sessions Heidi would sing German Schlager songs. Often Levon sang along with Heidi with his typical German-English accent.

In The Hawks period, overnight, during long, doped, gig to gig drives, Levon would sing the Schlagers, he had learned from aunt Heidi, to keep the driver awake (this way enabling The Band to arise).

Those songs hail about love, vacation, beer, Mercedes and the Autobahn, although no one understand what Levon sang about, they only laught at him in the beginning, it was not for long that the whole Hawks family sang along. Between the German songs Levon would practice his yodeling while the others took a brake. No one in that car had a clue what they sang about, they picked it up phonetically.

Unconsciously Robbie’s brain registrated all these romantic 4 by 4 songs. Therefore it is hardly surprising that linguistic surgeons, lately, have found clear indications of German Schlager influences in almost every song of The Band....


Entered at Sat Jul 30 14:46:32 CEST 2016 from (184.66.35.201)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Joe Jackson in Victoria June 2016

From The Times Columnist: Review of Joe Jackson, June 2016.

Review What: Joe Jackson When: Saturday Where: Royal Theatre Rating: 5 (out of 5) by Michael Devlin. — "Joe Jackson walked quietly onto the Royal Theatre stage Saturday night, smiling ever-so-slyly at the audience before taking a seat behind his electric piano. For an unassuming performer who falls slightly outside the mainstream, despite having all the singing and songwriting talent in the world, it was an understated and fitting entrance. Jackson made no mention during his Royal Theatre appearance that this was his first local performance in several decades, nor did he need to; his headlining performance at the TD Victoria International Jazz Festival was an event unto itself, regardless of when he last played the market. Jackson, 61, a revered British singer-songwriter now based in New York, has a legend that looms large. During the late 1970s and early ’80s, he was part of a ragged new-wave brood. He treads in more austere company these days, but the bark and bite are still there. Despite his suit jacket and closely cropped white hair, Jackson played with vigour, rarely taking his eyes off the piano during his brief solo set that opened the show. It was in this segment that the Grammy Award winner often bent his vocal delivery well outside the range of his electric piano, adding another layer of texture. Material from all facets of his career — a swinging It’s Different for Girls and a lively Be My Number Two — was played with punch. Jackson really sent the energy level up a few levels during one of the night’s cover songs, however, a boogie-woogie version of Joni Mitchell’s Big Yellow Taxi. “Musical what if?” is how Jackson described his version of the song. “As in, what if, instead of being a guitar player from somewhere in Canada, she was a piano player from New Orleans?” His concert was highlighted by many flights of fancy, only one of which didn’t pan out entirely. Jackson was joined at the close of his opening piano set by powerhouse bassist Graham Maby, who supplied the famous bass line forIs She Really Going Out With Him? It was a nice moment, but could have used the heft of guitarist Teddy Kumpel and drummer Doug Yowell, more-than-capable musicians who shone repeatedly during the full-band set. It was a minor misstep. Jackson and his three bandmates were in unison on every note going forward, from an excellent Real Men to a similarly potent You Can’t Get What You Want (Till You Know What You Want), the latter song one of two on this night from his 1984 album, Body and Soul. His two-hour performance was tailor-made for those who appreciate fine craftsmanship, pacing and originality. Though it is the type of high-volume, “non-jazz” show some Jazzfest supporters have problems with, this was a performance of such quality there should be no complaints. It was as top-shelf as it gets. Even though he played an extensive amount of material from his 2015 album, Fast Forward, which few fans appeared to know, the music remained enjoyable. At points, such as during Steely Dan’s Night By Night — on which bassist Maby had his moment in the sun — and Sunday Papers, one of several Jackson hits from 1979’s Look Sharp!, the energy was electric. A dramatically slow-paced, light-accented Steppin’ Out closed his set and prompted the first of several standing ovations, the result of which brought Jackson and his band back for a fiery, triumphant, spit-in-your-face On Your Radio. The gem from 1979’s I’m the Man was arguably the song of the night. An audience of more than 1,110, whose vociferousness only grew as the concert went on, kept Jackson and Co. on the stage beyond what appeared to be their alloted time. That’s how you know something special went down. And few are more deserving of such applause than Jackson and his band."


Entered at Sat Jul 30 14:27:54 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Joe Jackson

Just yesterday I picked up a pristine copy of "Is She really going out with him" for 50p. "Look Sharp" was a great album.


Entered at Sat Jul 30 14:06:15 CEST 2016 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

One thing I forgot to mention last week when there was a mini discussion about 80s music (I thought I had posted it but apparently I ddn't, so I'll post it now),,,

80s music and no one mentioned Joe Jackson or XTC?!?

tsk tsk tsk

; )


Entered at Sat Jul 30 13:28:16 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Jason Bourne

Film review of the fourth in the trilogy … whoops … just added. Linked above. Matt Damon, Tommy Lee Jones, Alicia Vikander. But is it a good thing or a bad thing?


Entered at Sat Jul 30 12:20:54 CEST 2016 from (86.128.250.105)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Bowie

Couldn't agree more, Peter. Really dreadful, pretentious crap. I found Paul Buchanan poor also. There was one female singer, who had a great hit for herself, who was so pretentious.

What you missed is that John Cale came on and tried to get things going, but was disappointing too. And I really like John Cale's accessible material.

Really disappointing.


Entered at Sat Jul 30 12:08:45 CEST 2016 from (83.249.162.136)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Willie Watson (Rod)

Thanks Rod for the link! I enjoyed even more "Mexican Cowboy" with Willie playing 5-string banjo. BTW there are stll cowboys in Europe - good ol' Europe. You can find them in Camargue in the south of France. Big rough guys like Bandidos drinking rosé wine which is considered to be the most feminine wine in the rest of the world.


Entered at Sat Jul 30 10:15:47 CEST 2016 from (210.86.97.25)

Posted by:

Rod

Web: My link

Subject: Rock Salt and Nails

a great version from Willie Watson (formally from Old Crow Medicine Show)


Entered at Sat Jul 30 10:06:14 CEST 2016 from (210.86.97.25)

Posted by:

Rod

very funny Jeff


Entered at Sat Jul 30 00:57:06 CEST 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: Utah Phillips & Ani D Anarchy

Peter V mentioned Utah Phillips. Brought back memories of record Utah made with Ani DiFranco years ago. Wonderful story teller. Check this out.


Entered at Sat Jul 30 00:54:05 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

Subject: BBC Proms - Bowie

Finally switched off the BBC proms on Bowie at the Royal Albert Hall. We sat glumly through a succession of pretentious shite, the nadir being Marc Almond's abysmal attempt to sing Life on. Mars. The only one to come out with any credit was Paul Buchanan of The Blue Nile. Mostly it was a reminder that some of Bowie's output was pretentious twaddle, a fact highlighted by the classical po-faced arrangements and delivery. Awful.


Entered at Fri Jul 29 19:33:04 CEST 2016 from (173.3.50.24)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

One Sunday morning Michael burst into the living room and said, "Dad! Mom! I have some great news for you! I am getting married to the most beautiful girl in town. She lives a block away and her name is Susan.

After dinner, Michael's dad took him aside, "Son, I have to talk to you. Look at your mother, Michael. She and I have been married 30 years, she's a wonderful wife and mother, but, she has never offered much excitement in the bedroom, so I used to fool around with women a lot. I'm afraid Susan is the result of one such affair. She is actually your half sister, and I'm afraid you can't marry her."

Michael was brokenhearted. He broke up with Susan the next day.

After eight months he eventually started dating girls again. A year later he came home and very proudly announced, "Diane said yes! We're getting married in June." Again his father insisted on another private conversation and broke the sad news. "Diane is your half sister too, Michael. I'm awfully sorry about this."

Michael was livid! He broke up with Diane that same day, leaving her in tears. He finally decided to go to his mother with the news his father had shared and tell her about his father's secret.

"Dad has done so much harm. I guess I'm never going to get married," he complained. "Every time I fall in love, Dad tells me the girl is my half sister."

"Oh, " his mother shook her head, "What are you listening to him for? He's not even your real father."


Entered at Fri Jul 29 18:47:19 CEST 2016 from (24.114.65.194)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: the Night They Rode Old Rosebud Down (The Hill)

Citizen Kaine is my name
And they served me on the Danville train
...


Entered at Fri Jul 29 16:18:41 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Ah, when I've heard Clinton / Caine, my instinct is "Rosebud!"


Entered at Fri Jul 29 13:03:34 CEST 2016 from (88.20.16.79)

Posted by:

Richard

Location: Menorca

Subject: 'and I served on the Danville Train'

Peter V.: I have a similar instinct to finish the line any time anyone says 'Clinton / Kaine.' It's going to be a long campaign season!

Also, thanks to those in the GB promoting RosaAnn Fino. She's irresistible.


Entered at Fri Jul 29 12:33:07 CEST 2016 from (83.249.162.136)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Why Miss Richardson has right. (Politics)

As a - more or less - leftist I sympathized with Mr. Sanders (but not his style FORTE FORTISSIMO, a musical term which only Ragtime understands here.) Now I am for Mr. Trump but naturally for another reasons as my long-time GB antagonist.

Current NATO politics is to attack Russia by using Swedish territory in case Mr. Putin is acting in the Baltic countries. If this will happen the three air force bases near us will be destroyed by Russian cruising missiles. Consequently, needless to say. AFTER THAT I WOULD SING "LIFE IS A CARNIVAL" IN A NUCLEAR CLOUD AS A MOLECULE IF NOT AS AN ATOM!!!. Mr. Trump says: this would not happen, we won't attack.

My point is this: if people like Miss Richardson and NorthWestCoaster can see Mr. Trump as a solution for their problems so why not a mechanical engineer in Philadelphia or a teacher in Ohio who preferred Mr. Sanders because of his anti-globalism and anti-WallStreet politics?

And PETER V: it hurt me to see Paul Simon supporting Ms. Clinton in the Convent. What else can you expect of a man who is singing about Scarborough Fair when there was no country fair in Scarborough when were there. I doubt there is a Mission in Caledonia either.


Entered at Fri Jul 29 12:04:52 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: To be partial to …

The reference which British readers will get, is a common piece of football lore. It was said of a certain football manager that he was "partial to a bung" (i.e. bribe). This has become a wider use.


Entered at Fri Jul 29 10:39:30 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The Los Lobos / Paul Simon story has been going for years, and has credibility given Scarborough Fair (Martin Carthy's arrangement) plus El Condor Pasa and Graceland. He is however, a f*cking genius rather than an idiot, and it has to be said that he still has the bass player and guitarist from Graceland with him, and usually Steve Gadd. Like Dylan, Simon was perhaps "partial to a credit". On the other hand the middle bit of Scarborough Fair is an addition to the folk song, and was said to be Art Garfunkel who didn't get a credit either.

Whenever this comes up, I recount the tale of Scarborough Fair again. Why not? We did a comedy detective film (ESL) called "Double Identity" and we needed a busker singing a well-known song. As it was for Oxford University Press, our editor spent ages in their library seeking a well-known song they had copyrighted. They copyrighted their arrangement of Scarborough Fair in the 1920s and it's extremely similar to the later one. What was incredibly annoying for the actor playing the busker is at one point it's just one note different, flatter I think. He had to sing it exactly as on the copyrighted sheet music (for obvious reasons) on and off for two hours in a major tourist area of Oxford during filming, and people kept coming up and saying "You didn't get that quite right" and "You missed the middle bit."

The other song from the 1920s songbook in the library was "The Leaving of Liverpool" and we used that as well. Fortunately, that's exactly as we know it.


Entered at Fri Jul 29 10:28:17 CEST 2016 from (92.22.51.37)

Posted by:

Solomon

Web: My link

Subject: Rock Salt & Nails

The Buddy and Julie Miller version of Rock Salt & Nails. I must admit Levon and Martyn is still my favorite version.


Entered at Fri Jul 29 10:21:42 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Gender-blind singing

We've discussed this before. Real folk singers cross gender and sing the words as written. Both Bob and Joan are happy with that. See "it's been the ruin of many a poor girl" by Bob. Eric Burdon, not being a folk singer and being macho, had to change it to "the ruin of many a poor boy." There are many examples. As I say, it's like reading a story aloud. If I'm reading a first person Little Red Riding Hood to kids, I don't see any need to change her gender when she speaks. (Though I do have a version about Big Green Riding Hood and a Bear which my grandkids love correcting).


Entered at Fri Jul 29 10:16:34 CEST 2016 from (173.3.50.24)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Steve Berlin of Los Lobos on Paul Simon

See the link.

Consider that the title of the article does not even jive with the content, but the quote "Everybody I know who has ever worked with Paul Simon says he’s the biggest jerk in the world. Yeah – he’s a f—ing idiot.” It;s hard to imagine making that quote up. That's likely an accurate quote.


Entered at Fri Jul 29 10:15:00 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Rock, Salt & Gals

Funny, If you'd just said "Who did Rock Salt & Nails?' I'd have said Joan Baez. I looked it up and it was written by Utah Phillips in 1961, first recorded by Rosalie Sorrells. I'd thought it "Trad" and indeed it might be. Joan did it on" David's Album" in 1969 according to the internet, I'd imagined it as earlier.

Her 75th Birthday album of duets is very pleasant. The Boxer (with Paul Simon) is my favourite.

Joanie reminds me of the audiobook we have in the car "History of The Rain" by Niall Williams. We've just finished CD6 (of 10) and I am beginning to annoy Mrs V. The narrator's father is called Virgil Swaine. Virgil Swaine is mentioned with his full name many times. Mrs V says if I interrupt to add "and I served on the Danville Train" once more there will be serious trouble. But it's irresistible … I'm sure somewhere earlier he actually says Virgil Swaine's the name …" and that got me started. Then when he arrives on the Irish farm, there's a line from him about "working the land". My muttered "Like my brother before me, I took a rebel stand" did not go unnoticed. It's got to be a deliberate in-joke.


Entered at Thu Jul 28 20:17:34 CEST 2016 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Rock Salt & Nails

Oddly though there's a number of versions by women - go figure, eh?


Entered at Thu Jul 28 19:59:00 CEST 2016 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Rock Salt and Nails

I've always liked that one - try Steve Young's - there's loads of covers out there. However.. women aren't so keen on it: high bushy tails and a shotgun loaded to inflict maximum pain. I think they have a point.


Entered at Thu Jul 28 14:11:25 CEST 2016 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Web: My link

Subject: Some guys all the ladies...

Some guys, eh? : )


Entered at Thu Jul 28 13:01:39 CEST 2016 from (86.31.229.95)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Europe

Subject: Liverpool and Bournemouth

If you can't beat 'em - sign 'em!


Entered at Thu Jul 28 08:33:43 CEST 2016 from (173.3.249.47)

Posted by:

Ari

Rock Salt and Nails by John Martyn and Levon makes me cry, I think the duet is so sweet. A different kind than from when Levon sings with Rick and Rich but it's beautiful nonetheless.


Entered at Thu Jul 28 06:02:33 CEST 2016 from (76.66.115.178)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: jolly earworms

A particularly persistent earworm has been the Jolly Boys mento version of Iggy Pop's "Passenger". I love Iggy's version, but it doesn't have the 'stickiness' of this one - see link. I'm sure the Jolly Boys are old news to many here (all?), but I stumbled upon them last week when I decided to finally look into this mento music that I'd heard reference to. I knew that it was folky and pre-reggae and pre-ska, but that was it.


Entered at Wed Jul 27 21:29:26 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Don't worry, Al. We'll look after Brad … well, until Eddie takes over managing your lot. 2018? Reasonable guess?


Entered at Wed Jul 27 18:38:54 CEST 2016 from (74.108.28.103)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Clip of Rick

I think that clip was Rick Danko teaches Bass. Same background and same shirt. The rest is very good too


Entered at Wed Jul 27 15:35:12 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Pete/Roger

Er will you stop signin' all our fecking players please!!!

Who d'yer think you are?

...us!!!!

:-0)


Entered at Wed Jul 27 10:53:08 CEST 2016 from (86.171.128.249)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland
Web: My link

Subject: Levon and John Martyn. Jon

Thanks Jon, enjoyed that clip.

Here's Levon singing with John Martyn on 'Just Now' from John's 'No Little Boy' (Just the music). Played this album three times yesterday...as you do. Love this album. Levon also sings on another track, 'Rock, Salt and Nails'.


Entered at Tue Jul 26 22:18:52 CEST 2016 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC
Web: My link

Subject: Rick Danko

Rick here singing bits of You Don't Know Me and Ain't Got No Home (!), among others. Cool obscure clip from the 80s.


Entered at Tue Jul 26 06:35:05 CEST 2016 from (76.66.114.68)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: Delines to Ron Hynes to the Suedes

I liked the Delines' oil rig song too. Reminded me to play Ron Hynes' "Atlantic Blue", which was dedicated to an oil-rig tragedy (80 lives lost) off the coast of Newfoundland. And that led me to listen to other lovely Hynes songs over at YouTube, including "Godspeed" (at link), a requiem to the late Gene MacLellan, who in the late '50s was in two groups with Robbie Robertson - the Consuls and the Suedes. (He wrote two hit songs of 1970 - "Snowbird" and "Put Your Hand In The Hand" and recorded an album at Bearsville with people like Amos Garrett, Chris Parker and Trevor Veitch.


Entered at Tue Jul 26 05:17:27 CEST 2016 from (173.3.50.75)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Doug, my man. The GB's Four, count em four, Dunce's Corners are occupied, and there's a several year long reservation list. You don't qualify for the dunce's corner, only cause your kid saved your tucches.


Entered at Tue Jul 26 01:08:32 CEST 2016 from (203.10.111.130)

Posted by:

Doug

Subject: Spotify

Jeff, the only think I can say in my defence is that it was at my daughters house. I wouldn't touch the thing myself normally. I'm happy to stand in the dunces corner for even mentioning it though.


Entered at Tue Jul 26 01:08:04 CEST 2016 from (203.10.111.130)

Posted by:

Doug

Subject: Spotify

Jeff, the only think I can say in my defence is that it was at my daughters house. I wouldn't touch the thing myself normally. I'm happy to stand in the dunces corner for even mentioning it though.


Entered at Tue Jul 26 00:35:05 CEST 2016 from (173.3.50.75)

Posted by:

Jeff a.

Subject: Aces in the hole by virtue of Spotify.

Doug. Break down & buy their recordings. The Aces are great. Spotify is the fucking devil.


Entered at Mon Jul 25 23:51:02 CEST 2016 from (203.10.111.130)

Posted by:

Doug

Subject: Amazing Rhythm Aces

Just spent an hour or so listening to Amazing Rhythm Aces via spotify. A real pleasure.


Entered at Mon Jul 25 23:41:32 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

If you can get BBC4 iPlayer, find 24 July Arena on 1966 by Jon Savage. The cutting of extracts from Jonathan Miller's Alice In Wonderland, Morgan- A Suitable Case For Treatment, The War Game, The White Bus (Lindsay Anderson) and Cathy Comers Home is excellent. A must see for the film extracts.

However, opening with Strawberry Fields Forever (recorded late November & December 1966, released as a 45 in February 1967) is hardly a theme song for 1966. And (oh, dear) the band were not called Jefferson AEROPLANE.


Entered at Mon Jul 25 23:30:24 CEST 2016 from (108.44.194.41)

Posted by:

Charlie Y

Location: Down in Old Virginny

Subject: Amy Helm

I saw Amy Helm and her band here in Virginia at a "roots" music festival recently, and she was a huge hit. It was particularly wonderful to see her perform "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down" so beautifully in the heart of Civil War country. She also came to the merchandise area to sign CDs, pose for photos and chat with fans. She's delightful. What a treat!


Entered at Mon Jul 25 22:37:52 CEST 2016 from (24.224.128.101)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: Delines

Great music Al esp. 'Oil Rigs at Night'. I'm going to have to dig deeper. So much great music ; so little time. I'm going to close one of my enterprises this fall. First Fla. vacation already booked. I'm not into hot weather but I can stand a little heat. Make the missus happy anyway. Got a trip to St. Pierre to even things up.


Entered at Mon Jul 25 18:31:42 CEST 2016 from (207.6.82.81)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: 'the accident'

July 29 1966 was the date of the Dylan motorcycle accident. May 27, 1966 London Royal Albert Hall was the last concert and then it is said that Dylan went back home to Woodstock to 'chill'. A lot has been written about 'the accident'. How serious it was and how it impacted is a subject of many articles and comments. Suffice it to say, Dylan would not tour again seriously until Jan. 3, 1974. Having read much about this motorcycle event, I don't know what to think but clearly any accident (if you look at your own experiences in life) has to have a significant impact on one's life and how one comports oneself thereafter. Its not surprising that the same impacted Dylan.


Entered at Mon Jul 25 17:58:32 CEST 2016 from (194.239.236.62)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Subject: Two Dankos in The Band... almost

Rick's little brother Terry Danko just posted this on his Facebook page (quoted from link above):

"For the records ........

Not a lot of people know this but when Levon left The Band ( The Hawks ) Robbie ask me to be the drummer .Rick and Richard were trying to get Levon back and I guess Robbie might have felt betrayed when Levon quit the band because he tolded me not to listen to Rick or Richard that they would try to talk me out of it and they did B| but I to wanted Levon back in the group as well. So I told them that I was staying with my band The Deacons in Montreal and at the Toronto Airport switched my flight with Rick and Richard to Montreal instead of New York all in hopes that Levon would come back to The Hawks. Robbie and I never talked about that again but things were never the same talking to Robbie after that . There is a scoop never told a lot of people ,only some close friend and family but a ture story.

I never told Levon The that I was asked to play drums ... it just didn't seem right .... Terry Danko"


Entered at Mon Jul 25 17:41:30 CEST 2016 from (24.46.76.153)

Posted by:

Ari

Been 50 yrs since that motorcycle accident.


Entered at Mon Jul 25 15:48:40 CEST 2016 from (207.6.82.81)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: The TRAGICALLY Hip

Another great show for The Tragically Hip in Vancouver as audience sings with the band.

Norm: April Wine is legendary and Myles Goodwyn continues to record but apparently the touring has stopped after so many years. Its been said many times. For a country with a population of 30-40 million, Canada sure has made its mark in popular music. There are so many more.


Entered at Mon Jul 25 15:32:33 CEST 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Amelia Curran

Joe J, really enjoying Amelia Curran's music. I'd never heard of her. Thanks for posting about her.


Entered at Mon Jul 25 10:36:15 CEST 2016 from (87.144.161.153)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: The Berlin Wall

Peter, don’t tell that to the Mexican taxpayers.


Entered at Mon Jul 25 09:17:51 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: The Beautiful Old

Thanks for reminding me … it's too long since I've played "The Beautiful Old" (link to my original review). One of the great moments in Half A Sixpence was seeing a cast of around twenty-five doing an encore, all playing banjos. Have you ever seen 25 banjos played together?


Entered at Mon Jul 25 02:14:22 CEST 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Just between you and me

Thank you for that Bob. I've seen the odd show lately, but I've been away so much I missed a lot. Looking forward to buying the DVD's so perhaps this winter I can lay back, watch them all and enjoy them. Look forward to discussing it with you Bob. Bob please congratulate your daughter on her success for me. Wonderful to see her doing so well, (with the help and recognition of an old pro like John Donabe.) It's heart warming to see the folks here get behind her, but I'm sure she has earned it.

Getting back to "April Wine". If you watch this video of their "Just between you and me", it's not hard to see why it has had two and a half million viewings. These guys were and still are great.


Entered at Mon Jul 25 01:40:08 CEST 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Hell on Wheels

Did everyone see the final 3 shows of Hell on Wheels? So great.

Norm, you're going to love Cullen Bohannon's final mode of transportation.


Entered at Sun Jul 24 23:39:08 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

Norbert, if you put all the so called genuine bits of the Berlin Wall sold to gullible tourists, you'll have enough for a wall along the 49th parallel too.


Entered at Sun Jul 24 22:44:31 CEST 2016 from (87.144.161.153)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: The Wall

There are the plans to build a wall from Brownsville to San Diego to solve all problems. Maybe Germany can help out here, we offer you, for a sharp prize;

1) 1500 miles of fine German bob wire
2) 3000 watch towers
3) 700 mean German Shepard dogs
4) Thousands of mines
5) 400 green M.Benz Geländewagen (4 wheel drive)

And some little stuff, all what you need for fine fencing.


Entered at Sun Jul 24 20:39:24 CEST 2016 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: The Beautiful Old

PV - I'm not sure how far back you want to go but I found this one quite enjoyable in that way -


Entered at Sun Jul 24 20:22:27 CEST 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Tragically Hip are great.......but

Haven't been home for three weeks. Workin' my gawd damn ass off. Howze everyone??

Now I agree with you Jerry.....mostly......but from the east coast, and 1969 came "April Wine". Listen to the (straight ahead rock & roll) from these guys.

"Doin it right on the wrong side of town", (also done by the Powder Blues Band on this coast). This is straight ahead rock and roll with class. From all those years ago to today this is still R&R that gets your feet moving


Entered at Sun Jul 24 19:36:05 CEST 2016 from (99.199.181.83)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Gord Downie

The type of brain tumour that Gord Downie has is not curable. Canadians were stunned when the news came out earlier this year of this sad news. I could not bring myself to going to the concert. Its just too close to home with someone in my family dying of the same tumour. Much too close to home. The Tragically Hip is a family institution for us.


Entered at Sun Jul 24 18:26:55 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Tragically Hip

Funnily enough Jerry I was alerted to these only a few months back by someone who I'd alerted to RoseAnn.

You're right they're superb

I've only scratched the surface so I can't offer much insight but I love the one I've linked amongst more than a fair few more.


Entered at Sun Jul 24 18:02:20 CEST 2016 from (99.199.181.83)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: The TRAGICALLY Hip

I wasn't there for the opening show of this tour. Apparently, 9000 or so people were in Victoria and the reports are that this was a superb show. For those of you who don't know this Canadian band, there is a lot of music out there to allow you to hear what for many has become The Canadian band. Gord Downie has a serious illness and the band decided to hit the road for a series of concerts across Canada. Give The Tragically Hip a listen. You won't regret it. Straight ahead rock played well and a frontman with personality and benevolent forcefulness is an effective combination. The musicians are superb. Lots of albums since the 80s when they rose in Kingston Ontario and grew to be Canada's band for many.


Entered at Sun Jul 24 17:33:09 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Big Sam

Hey Pete - don't hold me to it mate. I did say "might" not "will".

As you say though if we're going to give it one more go with an Englishman then there's so few suitable candidates it kind of pushes Sam right to the front of the queue. The rest are either past their sell by date or too inexperienced like your guy.

At the very least I'm looking forward to seeing how he adapts to the challenge of working with a team that can boast some top players rather than a team purely of battlers/cloggers. I do think we saw a few signs of what might happen at West Ham but clearly something didn't quite gel there in the end.

One thing's for sure - he's got an awful lot of folks to try and prove wrong and very few to prove right. Plus us fence sitters of course!!

:-0)


Entered at Sun Jul 24 17:06:48 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Big Sam … I hope you're right, Al. We do have an issue … where are there managers who are (a) English and (b) have experience of European football? I think the "Resuscitate Glenn Hoddle" campaign was a loser, it's much too late for Harry Redknapp. I guess a foreigner who knows English football backwards like Arsene Wenger was a good idea, but I think you have to have an English manager.

I always smile at watching the pundits on TV. They've all got much too much sense to attempt it.


Entered at Sun Jul 24 15:52:31 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Looking for old music well done …

Link is to my lengthy review of Half A Sixpence yesterday. New version with new songs (and script by Julian Fellowes of Downton Abbey fame). They cherry-picked the best songs from the 1963 musical / 1967film which starred Tommy Steele. We never thought we'd enjoy it, but it was fabulous entertainment.


Entered at Sun Jul 24 15:46:30 CEST 2016 from (99.199.181.83)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Daniel Wesley Band

Looking for new music? From White Rock, BC comes Daniel Wesley with his reggae-infused original songs. He played in the Okanagan Valley yesterday evening., It was a party with dancing and clapping and all the elements of a festival. The music was reminiscent of early Police. A 4 piece band with Daniel as lead vocalist, his 2 sets under a warm sunny and then starlit sky made for a perfect evening.. Daniel has been on the scene for a number of years honing his craft. There are 4 or 5 cds and they are easily found. He put on an excellent show and pleased at the Tinhorn Winery.


Entered at Sat Jul 23 18:28:35 CEST 2016 from (87.144.161.153)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: The Tour

Subject: Forgotten cyclists, Beat Breu: A story Levon would tell Robbie about

Beat Breu (born 23 October 1957)

When he was a little boy, Beat Breu wanted to become a clown. The one with a red nose, and flap shoes.

He became a postman.

Every day he rode on his bike with two post bags on either side through the streets of his hometown of Sankt Gallen. Faster, always faster, looking for records that no one before him had established and no one after him would want to break.

Then, in 1979, when he gets the bags of his bicycle, he can suddenly become a professional cyclist, in a team that call themselves: Willora – Piz-Buin – Bonanza. Beat, nicknamed was nicknamed ‘The Mountain Flea', is deliriously happy. His heart is with bike, not with mail delivery.

There follows a professional cycling career of sixteen years.

Once sixth in the Tour, he wins two mountain stages in that same Tourr: a solid career, for a postman.

In 1995 he stops, 37 years, satisfied and fulfilled. The Moutain Flea is no more , it's time for new horizons. That he didn’t find in the team management, in management or in sponsorship, that’s not Beat Breu.

He fulfills his childhood dream and becomes – with delay – a clown.

As comedian he performs for seven years. In the beginning in small venues, which are full because he, Beat Breu, comes telling jokes. But with the lack of growth of Beats repertoire, the venues shrink and the spectators are more often completely gone. In the Swiss gig circuit the legendary climber melts to a hardly desired comedian of lower ranks.

Next to his joking company he misses the boat in a real estate deal. Costs: half a million. Beat don’t counts the times how often he needs to come trotting on jaded company parties to make up for that.

One day, probably a Sunday, Beat Breu plays once more. He has been asked by the management of a retirement home near to brighten up the afternoon activities.

His audience is made up of a handful of people over 80, who stare surprised to the small, round man on the little stage. Some don’t hear so good any more, a few others refuse to interrupt their card game for the conferences by Breu.

Two ladies in the front row doze slowly away.

When Beat gets off the stage, without closure, without a last witz, the silence in the room echoes in his ears. Only three nurses clap and thank him for the beautiful show, but for Beat Breu it’s enough by now. Not this way.

Long grieve is not really something for the always upmost cheerful Swiss.

A few months after his last appearance as comedian, the following message is to be read in the faits divers-columns of almost every Swiss newspapers: ex-cyclist Beat Breu and his wife Karin start an erotic wild west bar. Name: Longhorn City. The bar contains cowboy houses, typical Indian teepees, horses, lassos and willing women.

In front of the newly opened baiting is a proud man with a round belly and a cowboy hat on his head. Who looks closely, sees that it Beat Breu.

But near the Bodensee appears to be less appetite for wild west sex then Beat and Karin had assessed; the bar runs barely a full year. The investment firm that had made it all possible, has, consistently, written it’s red numbers with black ink.

All the stress and effort make a heart surgery necessary. Beat gets into a depression, Karin divorses him.

The Swiss see still see him occasionally pass by on a TV entertainment program, as clown of the nation. Without a red nose or flap shoes, but full of stories that no one really cares about.

It takes a few years for Breu to get himself back together and he has picked up a little business with spare parts for trucks. He marries Heidi, and seems happy. Luck shows up in the life of Beat Breu, however, never too long.

The cycling, that is what he does best and makes him the happiest ... He misses it. He misses it so terrible that he, now 49, begins to train like a beast. Lake Constance around every day. Cycling he wants, he just wants to belong somewhere.

In three months he loses 18kg.

On July 17, 2007 he announces his comeback. He wants to stay there for at least three seasons, he says.

The marriage with his second wife Heidi has also become a SOAP. Beat feels he is thirty and his sleepy midlife crisis marriage with Heidi doesn’t fit him anymore.

The boulevard press dedicates a page to Beat and Heidi every week, and gives them the space to paint, in turn, the other black.

According to Heidi Beat’s children Marc and Denise hate her, and the relationship with Beats mother is also bad. Beat and Heidi are married in silence, at Christmas, and that holds the family Breu now against them. Blick quoted, while licking their lips, that Beat left his newly woman already on new year's Eve to run to his mother to explain everything.

Now, after a marriage of more than one hundred days, Switzerland's favorite clown is single again. Barely a week later, it’s in the papers that Beat is seen together is with Sonja, a mysterious Czech vamp.

In interviews he is silent about Sonja, from whom the press has invented that they had joined a group that is called "Club of Muslim girls". That's news, in Switzerland.

Beat prefers to speaks about his comeback, in cycle cross and on the velodrome. The return is made possible by a magic drink that is called ‘H20Hoch3’ and is made by the company SunWay Water. Breu rides a few field trials, appears on the velodrome and even wins one a stayer game in the six days of Zurich. The three seasons he doesn’t make full. Beat Breu must again go looking for a new interpretation of his life.

Investigations shows that H20Hoch3 is a toxic cleaning product. The website of SunWay Water no longer exists.

As far as is known now, the relation between Sonja and Beat it is still on.

(author unknown, translation from a Dutch tour site)


Entered at Sat Jul 23 12:54:28 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Big Sam

You know what Pete, I think big Sam might surprise a few people.

Don't get me wrong I'm no Allardacolyte by any stretch - and I must emphasise that. I've cursed and swore at him and his teams more times than I care to recall as they've kicked lumps out of the Reds and built defensive walls more dense than Robbie Savages skull.

But I do recall a time some years back when Liverpool were considering their managerial options and I happened to be talking with Rick Parry [we were campaigning against moving from Anfield to a new stadium which Rick parry was trying frantically to push through]. He asked me who he thought Liverpool should bring in if Gerard Houllier was to leave [which happened shortly after]. Not knowing any foreign managers from Adam I said we could do worse than Sam Allardyce if we wanted to steady the ship.

Parry almost spontaneously combusted on the spot at my suggestion.

At that point I had no idea Big Sam's abilities were so widely disparaged. Of course over time the perception of Allardyce as a route one, kick and rush, one trick defence obsessed pony has mushroomed until he's now virtually a caricature of that sort of limited ability footballing 'animal' with his gruff Black Country/Lancastrian tinged monologues set to bore the arsehole of all and sundry.

Yet, despite all that, I still think there's an awful lot more to the guy. Sure he's spent most of the time down in the lower reaches of the premier division battling relegation and yeah most of the time the players in his teams don't exactly appear to be attempting to emulate a Mario Kempes or Zoltan Varga but with limited means he invariably manages to do okay.

With more lucrative resources I think the inner true footballing man - and let's not forget that's what he is from head to toe since aged 15 at Bolton Wanderers - might well be coaxed out and we might just see England teams with a a far more consistent and disciplined approach displaying far more attack minded approach than many think.

:-0)


Entered at Sat Jul 23 11:51:22 CEST 2016 from (86.171.128.249)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland
Web: My link

Subject: Case, Lang, Veirs

I'm normally receptive to your suggestions, Peter and by chance Ricky Ross has played Case, Lang and Veirs in his weekly show 'Another Country' where the show has a theme of trios so I'm about to give the show a listen.

I've posted a link.


Entered at Sat Jul 23 10:55:47 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Enjoyed The Delines on YouTube. I'll look out. I have quite a pile to play having had my main computer out for ten days.

Case, Lang, Veirs was stuck in it when it went in for repair, and I missed it so much I contemplated buying a second copy. Still, it came back last night.


Entered at Sat Jul 23 10:13:15 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

One for the Brits. Mrs V was looking at the BBC News on the iPad and said "Oh, no! That's a disaster!"

I foolishly replied, 'Yes, with Sam Allardyce as manager it's back to hoof it up the field." Apparently more international news was under discussion. But it is hard to have an England manager whose experience is skin of the teeth relegation battles. Down here, we were relieved they didn't grab Eddie Howe … but I think he needs a couple of Premier League seasons with us, a move to a Top Five club and a European campaign first. But with the lack of homegrown competition, he might get there earlier.


Entered at Sat Jul 23 00:16:11 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Pete V

Have you picked up on The Delines Colfax Avenue album Pete?

I've linked another track

Joe just reminded me talking about Amelia Curran.


Entered at Fri Jul 22 23:58:11 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

It's just taken me twenty minutes to locate my CDs of Amelie Curran … Hunter Hunter, and War Brides. There are too many CDs here and sensible order has gone out of the window … I was assuming they'd be in my main alphabetical section, but there they were in Folk sandwiched between The Clancy Brothers and The Demon Barbers. Will play both tomorrow, though The Mistress was already on a much-loved playlist.


Entered at Fri Jul 22 23:38:36 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Joe J - Amelia Curran - The Delfines

Have you come across these Joe? - I think the songs on their album Colfax Avenue [linked] are very reminiscent of Amelia. Especially the track Oil Rigs at Night. See what you think. They're another venture of Willy Vlautin.


Entered at Fri Jul 22 22:59:42 CEST 2016 from (24.114.67.195)

Posted by:

Bill M

Joe J: Totally agree about Amelia Curran. Top notch.


Entered at Fri Jul 22 21:19:34 CEST 2016 from (24.224.128.101)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: Amelia Curran

One of the best lycricists (sp) of this century is coming to our harbour town next week. Amelia Curran ranks up there with RoseAnn. Last time I saw her was in Rita McNeil's Tearoom a couple years ago; just her and a guitar player. Said player deferred to her music. Out of this world experience. Great tea and scones as well. I remember when Amelia was busking in front of Mile One. Tough young lady.


Entered at Fri Jul 22 20:31:10 CEST 2016 from (74.108.28.103)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Flock of segals

Some time in the 80's I got tickets yo see Squeeze at MSG.The opening act was Flock of Seagulls/My tickets were fairly close to the stage FOS was unbearably loud.By the time we left we were deaf for 2 days'


Entered at Fri Jul 22 15:29:19 CEST 2016 from (72.82.137.178)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: The Alarm

I saw one of the Dylan shows in '88 with the Alarm opening. I honestly don't remember much about the crowd's reaction. I probably haven't heard anything by the Alarm since that period. Based on my 28 year old recollection, I would classify them as a mini U2. I would probably put Big Country and Simple Minds in the same category.


Entered at Fri Jul 22 15:19:45 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: John Donabie's radio show and RoseAnn

John. I'm absolutely delighted you and your good lady derived some enjoyment from my enthusing about the excellence of your shows on here. I'll bet, however, it amounts to not even a modicum of the level of enjoyment those shows have given your many listeners down the years and myself and a few other Liverpudlians just recently!

That said, I think I do need to provide a brief clarification as to how I see it in case anybody misinterprets what I’ve been saying as any form of fawning. For no way at all is that the case. Rather it is anchored firmly in admiration for the glistening quality of the product. Much as my huge enthusiasm for RoseAnn and her music is similarly based.

Fact - the show you just did featuring RoseAnn was as pleasurable a radio listening experience as any I can ever recall.

The only bit that jarred - and I mean no offence to the man concerned when I say this - was the elderly retired guy who’d sent you a CD of his song, a lament about where everything is going wrong with the world. Whilst we can all empathise I’m sure with his sentiments, the quality of his song – as admirable, heartfelt and touching as it was – contrasted starkly with that of everything else you featured on the show.

As each song unfolded – many of which [or at least versions of which] I’d never previously heard – I was enthralled at how beautifully they all synchronized, revealing how they hadn’t simply been thrown together but thought out and arranged to achieve a balance. More so, how for each of them you relayed a little background tale about their origins, the musicians involved and a host of other pertinent insights. Indeed, for me the way the show panned out was almost a blueprint for how a radio show should be formulated and how I’ve wishedfor all my listening lifetime - invariably to no avail - that a disc jockey would present a show.

On the most visceral level, how many times have we all listened to a track played on the radio awaiting the jock to impart us with some information as to who has just delivered such a great song only to be greeted with some inane unfunny ad-lib about something entirely unconnected.

On a John Donabie radio show there’s about as much chance of that sort of thing happening as a RoseAnn Fino track of Out From Under or Airing of Grievances failing to blow your socks off with its quality.

So there you go John lad. May you rule the quality airwaves for many a year to come mate!

:-0) PS – I’ve stuck in above the link to the show featuring RoseAnn in case anybody hasn’t heard it yet.


Entered at Fri Jul 22 15:13:52 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: The '80's

Never really made that connection until my own post about Flock of Seagulls but your bracketing does bring it even more into focus. Surely tho Pete we must have had more than that?

When was all the Crucial Three and the Madchester stuff?

There must be some '80's experts on here. Surely?

:-0)


Entered at Fri Jul 22 14:48:20 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Al, as you rightly say, there were only three new bands in the 1980s.

The first went out as The Alarm, The Cure and A Flock of Seagulls.

Band Two (as they were known in the trade) posed variously as ABC, Duran Duran and Spandau Ballet.

The third lot were my favourites, and were seen on posters as Madness, The Specials, and UB40.

That was about it for the 80s, I think.


Entered at Fri Jul 22 14:27:28 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: JQ

Sorry mate. I misunderstood.

It's aledgeatblueyonderdotcodotuk

:-0)


Entered at Fri Jul 22 14:25:41 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Bob - Flock of Seagulls

I used to get mixed up between the Alarm, Flock of Seagulls and The Cure.

In fact I'm not even sure they weren't all the same!! Certainly the same haircuts!

:-0)


Entered at Fri Jul 22 09:32:20 CEST 2016 from (81.171.71.127)

Posted by:

Laila

Location: Sweden
Web: My link

So amazed to see not even a fanpage about my favourite band, The Bans, but also a guestbook with fellow minds! Will be checking in here regularly. I can also testify to the Mike Peters duet with Dylan as eing one of, if not, the best version of Knockin' :)


Entered at Fri Jul 22 08:42:06 CEST 2016 from (195.158.104.121)

Posted by:

Jonas

Location: Norway
Web: My link

Subject: Alarm

Oh my God i can1t believe you were there when The Alarm opened for Dylan! Mike Peters duet with Dylan from '88 is an all time favourite:)


Entered at Fri Jul 22 04:13:19 CEST 2016 from (184.66.35.201)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: The Alarm

I was there in Hamilton Ontario when The Alarm opened for Dylan. It was in a large arena and sound was not good. Except for a few fans, no one was listening to The Alarm. It is amazing how rude paying patrons can be when they come into a venue to hear the main act. That was my introduction to that phenomenon and it was beyond sad. And I don't know how good the Alarm was. The poor sound coupled with the noise around me as the seated ignored and talked and did everything but listen made it impossible to appreciate The Alarm. It was a negative memory for me and the sound for Dylan was no better. It was one of a series of Dylan concerts I attended in those years that left something to be desired because of inadequate sound. Exceptions were The O'Keefe Centre (Toronto) 3 concerts of the early 90s and The Masonic temple concert of 1994 in Toronto.


Entered at Fri Jul 22 02:58:57 CEST 2016 from (24.224.128.101)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Subject: Rain In The Summertime

Great song. Never associated the group (the Alarm?) with any Dylan tour though.


Entered at Thu Jul 21 18:29:51 CEST 2016 from (83.249.162.136)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Masters Of War

Jeff A, our latest conversation was a clear example (even if in miniature format) of war industry trying to rise two magnanimous gbers against eachother. They make a lot of money with this tactics in the real world.


Entered at Thu Jul 21 03:27:20 CEST 2016 from (107.77.97.86)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Al Edge

Al - Just looking for your address if that's ok -


Entered at Thu Jul 21 01:59:50 CEST 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: Rain In The Summertime

Dylan had some great opening acts in 88 with Toni Childs being my favorite. The Alarm put on some great shows early in the tour. They had about 100 kids who followed them everywhere. All of the super cool Dylan fans would wait in the lobby while The Alarm played. The Alarm's 100 fans were allowed to stand at the front of the stage every night while their hero's played. They really were a great band and they own one of the all time great summer songs Rain In The Summertime.


Entered at Wed Jul 20 23:54:31 CEST 2016 from (86.171.128.249)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: John D

Thanks John D.

Only thing John D is I wanted to enter the competition a couple of weeks back for Hugh's Room. Would be difficult for me to get to though.

On a serious note. Really enjoyed the Joni Mitchell live track on the latest show. Had never heard it before.

If I was a Toronto listener, I would contact you to suggest a theme of a show of live tracks. Have never heard a show consisting of only live tracks. Any chance?

Keep up the good work.


Entered at Wed Jul 20 23:32:38 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I enjoyed Bryan Ferry's "Dylanesque" album too. Even more, I thought his "Hard Rain's Gonna Fall" from "These Foolish Things" one of the best Dylan covers. For dunc (and me), the horns on that album are Roger Ball & Molly Duncan from the AWB.

I'm desperate to hear JD's whole show … I have had a week of intensive grand-parenting combined with major computer hassle … my main Mac died and I'm struggling to do much at all. I will get there!


Entered at Wed Jul 20 20:34:49 CEST 2016 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

bassmanlee

Location: DE/PA, USA

Subject: JD, Frank Turner

Listened to JD's latest, unfortunately in fits and starts at work, but how radio should be best enjoyed, on a decent pair of headphones. Took me back to my days of college radio when you could play whatever took your fancy, and string together complimentary songs in smooth segues, no commercials other than the occasional ID or PSA. I spent far more time in the radio station than the library. I used to do a program called Subjects In Vinyl where all the songs touched on a particular subject, working in readings on said subject culled from various sources. All done live. I considered a career in radio and even did some weekend overnight shift at a local "album rock" (Abrams) station. Decided I was not enough of a d*ckhead to work in commercial radio. Thanks for sticking with it, John. (Are there additional archives available somewhere?)

Not sure who first mentioned Frank Turner, but enjoying the samplings available on YouTube. I'd not heard of him. Interesting stuff.


Entered at Wed Jul 20 20:20:37 CEST 2016 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Al Edge

OK. I think it's time to hire Al Edge as my PR guy. I was reading some of the posts to my wife; in the backyard last night and she teared up. Not bad after 44 years of marriage this coming August. The power of the www amazed her. There was a time you could only be heard locally...now anywhere in the world. Thank you Al for everything. It's interesting that besides JT the recognition I am getting; which was a wonderful surprise is coming from the Hudson Valley in NY State, Georgia (where are you David P?) and across the pond.

Thanks to all again. I sincerely am humbled. I have always loved music and to present it again is a real treat. See if I can ride this out for awhile.


Entered at Wed Jul 20 11:59:30 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: JQ

Not sure what you mean by note/address mate?

JD's radio station or RoseAnn herself or Bob Fino?


Entered at Wed Jul 20 11:48:23 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Rod and Wallsend

Oops - forgot to put that last post for your specific attention guys so apologies to all but I'll just repeat the initial message. Only I know how these things can tend to get overlooked with so many important things being discussed and all that.

:-0)

Have you had a listen to JD's show featuring RoseAnn yet fellas?

I've linked it above in case you're not sure where it is. RoseAnn's segment starts about an hour in but to be honest the entire show is fabulous with some amazing selections - a must listen!!

Enjoy.

:-0)


Entered at Wed Jul 20 11:42:56 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Bill M

What d'you think of the RoseAnn segment that JD featured in his show Bill lad?

Pretty damn good eh mate? Let's hope it helps to get the RoseAnn bandwagon rolling eh Bill?

:-0)


Entered at Wed Jul 20 11:38:50 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Have you had a listen to JD's show featuring RoseAnn yet fellas?

I've linked it above in case you're not sure where it is. RoseAnn's segment starts about an hour in but to be honest the entire show is fabulous with some amazing selections - a must listen!!

Enjoy.

:-0)


Entered at Wed Jul 20 09:57:07 CEST 2016 from (114.75.192.10)

Posted by:

Wallsend

I saw some of Rick's stuff up for sale in an auction house catalogue including the bass and violin he used at TLW. The same auction house had his driver's license up for sale as well which I thought was pretty sad. I seem to recall reading an article about someone who had one of Richard's piano's. With regard to the so called 'leadership' issue, I think after Robbie left, the Band went back to being more like the pre-Dylan Hawks which would suggest Levon was the leader at the beginning and the end but not in the middle bit.


Entered at Wed Jul 20 08:59:36 CEST 2016 from (210.86.79.132)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: The Band ownership

All this talk about leadership and pay got me wondering who owned all the Bands gear. I imagine that Garth and Richards keyboards cost alot more than Robbie's guitars and amp - and Rick got given most of his stuff anyway. On top of that is all the shared equipment - PAs etc and maybe that big mother of a speaker that was probably for the organ.


Entered at Wed Jul 20 07:00:51 CEST 2016 from (24.114.71.219)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Bryan Ferry

Funny, I've mentioned Ferry's "Tom Thumbs Blues" here several times over the years and just recently in connection to a discussion we were having on him....a lot gets lost here, I guess....... I did like the show's specific focus on "Touch Me" - stunningly good....visceral in the way great rock n roll always is.


Entered at Wed Jul 20 05:55:06 CEST 2016 from (76.66.112.151)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

John D: Never seem to manage to tune in for much of your show - something to do with summertime Saturdays, I'm sure. But now I'm listening to the mp3 version. Right now Brian Ferry is being his usual outstanding self; I thank you for playing his "Tom Thumb's Blues", which I hadn't heard before.

Nice, and very surprising, to hear Wes Dakus and the Rebels (from Alberta). As you know, almost all of their many, many records were recorded with Buddy Holly's producer, Norman Petty, in Clovis, New Mexico. (Another is at the link; it was the theme song of a Radio Caroline radio show in the UK in the '60s.) Through Petty they got to know his studio house band, the Fireballs. George Tomsco's distinctive guitar sound turns up on some of their records (but not these, I believe) and Rebels drummer Stu Mitchell took over for Doug Roberts of the Fireballs for a time. Mitchell also almost became a '70/'71-vintage Hawk, as he was in one of the two groups playing upstairs/downstairs in a Edmonton club. Ronnie Hawkins was in town, desperate to recruit a new set of musicians. He mashed together bits of both - David Foster, BJ Cook, Dwayne Ford, Hugh Brockie, Steve Pugsley and Brian Hilton (over Mitchell). Ford, Brockie and Hilton, along with Terry Danko and Jim Atkinson, later left Hawkins to record, somewhat Bandishly, as Bearfoot.


Entered at Tue Jul 19 18:54:45 CEST 2016 from (86.171.25.76)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Ha Ha,Al

This is the St John joke I remember, Al. Now on the internet for posterity.

A man from Liverpool was touring the USA on holiday and stopped in a remote bar in the hills of Nevada. He was chatting to the bartender when he spied an old Native American man sitting in the corner. He had tribal gear on, long white plaits, wrinkled face. "Who's he?" asked the Liverpudlian. "That's the Memory Man." said the bartender. "He knows everything, remembers everything. He can remember every face he's ever seen. He can remember any fact he hears or reads. Go and try him out."

So the Liverpudlian goes over, and thinking he won't know about English football, asks "Who won the 1965 FA Cup Final?". "Liverpool" replies the Memory Man. "Who did they beat?" "Leeds" was the instant reply. "And the score?" "2-1." "Who scored the winning goal?" "Ian St. John" said the old man, without a hint of hesitation.

The Liverpudlian was knocked out by this and told everyone back home about the Memory Man when he got back.

A few years later he went back to the USA and tried to find the impressive Memory Man. Eventually he found the bar and sitting in the same seat was the old Native American, only this time he was older and even more wrinkled.

The Liverpudlian approached him with the greeting "How".

The Memory man looked up and said, "Diving header in the six yard box".


Entered at Tue Jul 19 18:28:11 CEST 2016 from (216.80.7.241)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: JDs show

Thanks Al, will do! Have you got an address/number where I can send a note?


Entered at Tue Jul 19 18:22:30 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: The Saint

Ha ha

Takes me back to that old gag Dunc

Back in the early '60's on the billboard outside the church in Liverpool a big notice proclaiming "WHAT WOULD YOU DO IF JESUS CAME DOWN TO EARTH TODAY?"

Underneath it someone had written 'Move St John to inside left!'

:-0)

For our non-footy New Worlders 'inside left' used to be a forward position on the footy pitch immediately next to the 'centre-forward' position which prior to Jesus descending to earth was the position of our Scottish international Ian St John.

:-0)


Entered at Tue Jul 19 18:09:37 CEST 2016 from (86.171.25.76)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: St John

Al, it's because of Ian St John.

LOL. Need to tell John D. Ha Ha.


Entered at Tue Jul 19 18:04:53 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: St Mirren

Dunc, not sure why but ever since I was a kid they've been my Scottish team. Could be the catholic/saint thing with me being an altar boy and all that.

:-0)

Just been playing the show to two of the grandkids [10 and 7] after picking them up from school. Not impressed. I think JD's gonna have to find some way of working Minecraft into his next show otherwise he's gonna lose a swathe of the next generation who just don't seem to dig Little Milton!!!

:-0)


Entered at Tue Jul 19 17:33:55 CEST 2016 from (86.171.25.76)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: John's Latest Show

Have just finished listening to John's latest show with the Roseann section. Couldn't agree with you more Al Edge and JT.

Great show with a great section on Roseann.

Played the show in the garden -30c here - a rare occurrence. Really enjoyed it. Thanks, John.

Now for St Mirren v Ayr United tonight. This is real football, Al...forget about your 20m signings.


Entered at Tue Jul 19 16:14:25 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: JT

Well said Jerry.

How fortunate you Torontonians have been to have such an insightful and knowledgeable music presenter. Yet what shines through above all else is an undiluted passion for music the likes of which has got to be so rare even within the zone that John operates.

:-0)


Entered at Tue Jul 19 16:06:01 CEST 2016 from (184.66.35.201)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: John Donabie rules the airwaves

Yes, John, on the west coast early early. Listened to the show and thanks for the shout out. I saw DCT at the Concord with the Shays. He was superb and his recent work on cd continues in his wonderful tradition with 'that voice' that can only be David. They are available at his website, I think.

As for Roseann Fino segment, it was superb. You nailed it with all the positive features of her work...the lyrics, the voice, the players and the music. Al an Dunc and all the others who appreciate Roseann.. John brought her out on radio in fine fashion and in the way that John does everything he does...first class.


Entered at Tue Jul 19 15:50:53 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: JQ

Have you had a listen to JD's show yet mate?

I've linked it in case you're not sure where it is. RoseAnn's segment starts about an hour in but to be honest the entire show is fabulous with some amazing selections - a must listen!!

Enjoy mate.

:-0)


Entered at Tue Jul 19 14:37:34 CEST 2016 from (216.80.7.241)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Local Hero

Peter V - This is one of my favorite movies and in it a Scottie character (maybe the visiting Ruskie) makes the same comment about lobster being too expensive for the fishers that caught them. They're out on a plane to somewhere else - straightaway.


Entered at Tue Jul 19 13:04:29 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: WHAT...A...FUCKING...SHOW

John - I'm really not sure where to start.

Okay, feck it, I'll start with your son. What a super and entirely unexpected little bonus that was. Brought tears to these eyes I can tell you with its impromptu and clearly sincere spontaneity. He's obviously inherited your incredible musical ears/appreciation. What a real thrill to hear him say "he's in love with RoseAnn" - okay so he's yet another we'll now all have to share her with but as that's the object of the exercise - who's counting!

:-0)

Your segment on RoseAnn?

Absolutely superb. If I just say that she's so good it's hard to find the right words to do justice to her and her band and their music. Yet you managed to do just that. Seemingly effortlessly but in reality the culmination of decades of a musical immersion that so few have acquired or ever will acquire. I salute you mate.

As for the show itself. I've now heard four of your shows right through [ all in arrears so it now seems!!! :-0)]. If I may say that this one was the pick so far and not simply because of the RoseAnn segment, although clearly that for me was the cherry on the top. From the hilarious Cheech and Chong opening which took me back to Boaler Street Liverpool, through the exquisite Joni and all those other delights it was comfortably the finest two hours radio listening I've ever encountered.

The range of previously unheard delights is almost too much to absorb. Brian Ferry and Tom Thumb indeed!!

If anyone ever asks me to define the term DJ then for me that definition is now as simple as shelling peas. Just reverse the letters. Long may you reign mate!

:-0)


Entered at Tue Jul 19 10:58:43 CEST 2016 from (86.171.25.76)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Various

I'm with you on chorizo, Peter...it's everywhere up here, but I love mussels(farmed in Orkney and the West Coast) and scallops, which are expensive.

When I went to a talk on the Basement Tapes by Sid Griffin at an Americana festival at Perth several years ago,(a really good afternoon, he illustrated points by playing songs), when dealing with controversial points he was tactful. But he spoke in terms of a band needing one person to get things done. He, himself, took on that role in his band because nobody else wanted to take on this role or was capable of taking on this role. He said that Mick Jagger took on that role in the Stones and Robbie in the Band. I took from this that The Band was not about some guys fighting to become a leader, but that Robbie getting things done just evolved. He was guarded in how he spoke.

JohnD:I enjoyed the show prior to the show now on the site very much. Liked the parts on the jazz guitarist and drumming on 'Like A Rolling Stone' very much. I remember when I was a boy, I thought it was so cool that there was a cigarette smoking away attached to the strings at the top of the guitar, the guitarist the height of cool. Like the themes very much. I don't feel we have a show with such catholic taste in the UK just now. Thanks, John.

Looking forward to the Roseann show. If you heve a time coming up where you have to buy somebody a present, keep in mind the Roseann Fino CDs. She's very good, and there is a link to this community.

Really enjoyed the previous posts. Thanks guys.


Entered at Tue Jul 19 10:31:14 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: More money …

I had to check out how good $162.50 a week was in 1964. A quick google shows $94 a week to be the US average. Was it good money? It depends whether that was the pay before or after accommodation expenses. If they were on $1300 a week, and 10% went to Colonel Kudlets, and $100 to Bill Avis, and their split was either 962.50 for the band + Robbie's car money, and possibly plus money to Levon's mom and dad, then it doesn't look as if there were any left over for accommodation from a pool BEFORE wages (about $70 left). So if they had to pick up hotels, it would be a living wage, but not fantastic.

In British terms they would have been doing rather better as it translates at over double the average wage.


Entered at Tue Jul 19 09:45:57 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Money

p 15/106 TWOF. First name was the Levon Helm Sextet (my name went on the band as a seniority thing).

“soon we turned into Levon & The Hawks, which sounded better to me. Sometimes it was The Hawks. We also got booked into places we’d recently played by calling ourselves The Canadian Squires.

Bill Avis on money. “I’d send $150 to Levon’s Mom and Dad.” The Colonel got 10%. Bill Avis got $100. Ish (Jerry Penfound) got $150. All the others but Robbie got $162.50, and Robbie got a little more because he was making half the payments on our company car.

It’s unclear from that whether Levon got less ($150 to his mum and dad) or more ($150 to mom and dad + $162.50).

He mentions later that they played a week for $1300.


Entered at Tue Jul 19 09:20:20 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: TWOF

Ah! All is clear about the name “The Hawks.”

TWOF, p103.

(Rick) … “You’re our official leader anyway, if you think about the union.

It was true. I had seniority in the band, and The Hawk had never joined the musicians’ union, so for all those years the contracts were in my name.

(i.e. In effect, Levon owned the name The Hawks, not Ronnie)

On leaving The Hawk, p100:

By then we were starting to squabble with The Hawk. By “we”, I mean Robbie and myself.

(Later) “Levon” (Robbie) said, “Do we really need Ronnie?”

So it looks as I thought that there were two “natural leaders” or spokesmen. During that near two year Levon absence, the junior one became ascendant.


Entered at Tue Jul 19 09:04:00 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Follow the leader

The Musicians Union in the UK asked for a designated "leader" and I think the USA was the same. Doesn't Levon mention this in his book … that he got paid more? When Ronnie came to do the UK TV show he brought just Levon, because you were allowed to bring an MD - musical director, though you had to use British musicians otherwise. Levon came as MD. I'm sure the TV powers in Britain were thinking of a chap in a DJ with a baton to conduct the British band, rather than a drummer to set the feel.

Even today, in theatre programmes, the backing musicians for the play will have one marked as "MD" even if it's a three piece.


Entered at Tue Jul 19 06:34:12 CEST 2016 from (76.66.112.151)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: leadership

I haven't thought this all the way through, but I'm thinking right now that 'leadership' with the Hawks and the Band was pretty fluid - mostly non-existent, situational, at times legalistic only. (Kinda like the way they sang, come to think of it.) Levon decided to go with the five Canadians instead of staying with Hawkins partly because he'd be the leader and have his name up front. But such a transactional arrangement is arguably not truly leadership, which ought to be more organic. As we've seen, without followers even a president or prime minister is not a leader. And none of the others followed Levon out the door when he left Dylan. On the other hand, live tapes of the Hawks have Levon doing the talking, meaning he was the spokesman - onstage at least; as JT just pointed out, onstage was all they had at that time, so it's likely that everyone not in the group would have inferred that Levon was the leader, and maybe he was in the eyes of the rest of the group too. But he wasn't with Dylan, and he wasn't when he came back into the fold in Woodstock. And Robbie quite possibly wasn't either (even if he was the spokesman generally), except in the late game when he was in a sense the last man standing. Even if his team-mates weren't enthusiastic, they also weren't sufficiently unenthusiastic to do anything to stop him from doing what he thought needed doing. The Hilary Clinton of his day, perhaps?


Entered at Tue Jul 19 05:18:33 CEST 2016 from (32.216.245.190)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Oodles of Noodles

Jeff, I think Ronnie Hawkins covered the topic of noodle slapping in his infamous Rolling Stone interview. I didn't feel that I could push that mixed metaphor any further. I was already on a slippery slope.

And like Levon said in that celluloid classic TLW. I thought we were supposed to pan away from that. ;-)


Entered at Tue Jul 19 04:40:44 CEST 2016 from (173.3.48.101)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Todd, you noticed The Band did not cook or slap with noodles.....

That image you provided earlier today- 3 dictionaries on the hood of a cadillac convertible in the background & Peter slapping you with a wet noodle cracked me up.


Entered at Tue Jul 19 03:24:15 CEST 2016 from (97.33.64.228)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: All together now

I ultimately think that the real problem is trying to look at what The Band created together through the lens of a capitalist meritocracy. They certainly all had their roles and jobs to do, but what they achieved on an artistic and human level refuses to be bound the rigidly defined model that one would apply to factory or assembly line work. It was much more organic & communal in nature, and trying to assign a varying degree of monetary compensation to that delicate balance ultimately results in instability and threatens the very chemistry of the foundation.

Many groups have talent, can sing, are good musicians, have good looks and ambition, but still never make it out of the garage or the local music scene. The Band had that X factor that is indefinable but undeniable. The spaces and places between the notes is where much of the magic happened. It was a living-breathing organism that only a higher power can explain or take credit for. That will always be there in the music, and despite any acrimony that may have occurred, can never be denied. It’s a gift that we’re all grateful for.

If Rick collected the water, Levon collected the firewood, Richard gathered the vegetables, Robbie cleaned the chicken, and Garth stirred the pot while sprinkling in mysterious and magical spices, then shouldn’t they all be sitting down at the table to enjoy a bowl of gumbo together? They each played an important role, but at the end of the day nobody else made quite the same gumbo…..even if they were using same the recipe book.


Entered at Tue Jul 19 03:13:08 CEST 2016 from (24.114.71.219)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Funny.....I have never fast-forwarded through a Joni song in my life ( ah, hold on, other than TLW ) and loved that opening number but I've only got about 20 mins tonight before going out and wanted to get to RoseAnn......damn that ciut link, I spent all of Joni and Honky Tonk Women trying to figure out how to get that little arrow to move forward....to no avail !

I'll have to listen tomorrow night.


Entered at Tue Jul 19 01:46:22 CEST 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: Link to Mixed Bag/ Frank Turner

Link is to John D's wonderful radio show. The entire show was great. RoseAnn's segment is at about the 1 hour mark. Thanks again John!

Joe J, RoseAnn is a big Frank Turner fan and is all in with that compliment! Thanks for sharing her music. We really appreciate it.


Entered at Tue Jul 19 01:11:58 CEST 2016 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Al Edge

Still Monday here Al and the show is up. Don't know what time they did it; but it will be there; when you rise and shine in Liverpool tomorrow morning.


Entered at Tue Jul 19 00:17:47 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Hey Joe...

Where you goin' with that...

:-0)

....you know you're son/daughter could well be onto something with the Frank Turner thing. I'd never heard of him but I just spent the last hour or so trawling You Tube and I can definitely see the parallel. Terrific stuff.

Truth be known, if his voice had sounded just a smidgeon more English I just know I wouldn't have managed that initial connection with him but the fact he's that tiny bit removed from full English sounding gives me the go ahead to have a bash at getting into him.

Delighted btw to see you're spreading RoseAnitis around!!!

John D - just off to beddy byes - still got the previous archive show on download - I'm assuming it'll be on archive tomorrow now! No problem.

:-0)


Entered at Tue Jul 19 00:06:59 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

On fish farming, Roger Daltrey was said to be an early trout farming entrepreneur, though trout farming dates back to Medieval monasteries.


Entered at Mon Jul 18 23:53:49 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The Observer magazine did a restaurant piece recently where they mention "The Brooklyn Bar Menu" generator online. It makes ludicrous combinations, the example being "market chorizo tartare." Here, I reckon a lot of scallops are farmed. Virtually all sea bass comes from Greek farms (so not exactly fresh by the time it gets to the UK). The vast majority of salmon is farmed. An allergy specialist said that scallops and mussels absorb toxins, so are fine if found in clean water, which I guess you have in Newfoundland. You might well not have such clean water on the British coasts.

Poole Bay used to produce wonderful flounder, but I haven't seen it much recently. Too much leisure boating, maybe … which also impacts on water quality in a fairly shallow harbour. We do get wild sea bass off the beaches near here, and the difference between farmed Mediterranean sea bass, and fresh wild English Channel sea bass is huge.

There's a strange thing about Britain and fish. We watched a huge catch of lobster being unloaded near here early one morning. We asked where you could buy it. You can't. It goes straight to the airport and flies to France where people pay much more for good fresh fish.


Entered at Mon Jul 18 23:14:43 CEST 2016 from (184.145.118.150)

Posted by:

Kevin J

When PBS needs viewers and money they hire local radio guys who wear bad sweaters and do pledge drives while showing – usually - great movies….The Band’s GB skips the pledge drives, sweaters and movies and goes straight to Robbie/Levon.

Leadership is a very tricky area. One of the most touching things ever written about the Robbie and Levon relationship was by Levon’s wife/ Amy's mother concerning the essential years of The Band – 1968 through 1974 and she describes two people during that entire period that “shared each other’s soul” each and every day and that no one ever got between them – the Robbie-Levon “double helix” is how she described it. Regardless of who took more or less of a leadership position in dealing with band business during this period, it really must have been a kick in the stomach to be called into a room and told The Band was effectively being ended. We all know the rest of the story and even though none of us would know each other had TLW never happened…I am deeply saddened that it has led to so much division in bandland.

Thank to Bob F and Little brother and others re: Planet Waves........time to listen to some things I've overlooked.


Entered at Mon Jul 18 22:06:06 CEST 2016 from (24.224.128.101)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: Chorizo

Chorizo doesn't seem to have made its way here yet. Probably a good thing.

Mussels and scallops however are essential to life. I've had fresh mussels and/or scallops a dozen times this summer. I know the mussel farmers and scallop divers. I catch my own cod. When we eat out we eat exclusively seafood. Usually we'll skip the main and load up on all the appetizers. Scallops, mussels, squid, bluefin tuna, trout, char. Helps to live in a fishing village with fresh product. I avoid the flatfishes like sole, flounder and turbot though these are OK if very fresh.

I've shared my RoseAnne Fino music with my kids. One of them is really enthused. A female Frank Turner he said. Now I have to catch up on Frank Turner with whom I'm vaguely familiar; someone on the GB gave me a heads up on him some years ago. Seriously, I'm depending on you guys for my musical direction. By the way , the first side of "Planet Waves" and "Dirge" is as good as it gets re Dylan.


Entered at Mon Jul 18 21:12:57 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

A sense of deja vu has come upon me and it’s not the CSNY album. There’s usually a “director” but a great movie will not work unless it also has great performers. Same with a band. “director” is a legitimate role (leader if you like) but I don’t see why that diminishes the others in the slightest. as I said, nearly every band has one media-friendly spokesperson.

On Levon & The Hawks, Levon was the MU accredited leader. He jumped ship for a long time. he came back. Inevitably, the dynamics had changed. I don’t think he ever accepted that. Basis of the problem.


Entered at Mon Jul 18 20:53:17 CEST 2016 from (184.145.118.150)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Todd.....In all the significant interviews over the years that we have both read....LA Times, Rolling Stone, Musician Magazine, etc.....he has always been very clear about explaining just what made the Band so special and also being extremely generous and even protective of his band mates........but, c'mon, a rock star in 1973 was likely dong 30 back to back 5 minute radio hits in a day to promote a new album and when he got to ''Radio Lux", I am sure he really couldn't have cared less about correcting a DJ on wording. The funny thing was the dj was not wrong as Robbie was the leader of the band. He decided exactly what direction they would take on MFBP according to John Simon......He wrote most of the songs......he masterminded their most famous and enduring legacy - The Last Waltz - even came up with the name, The Last Waltz. According to Bill Graham, there was only one guy in The Band to talk to if you wanted any decision made on anything. Modesty prevents him from talking about this but any band like any sports team has leaders. Just a fact.


Entered at Mon Jul 18 20:48:46 CEST 2016 from (24.108.163.242)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: New 'reality'?

In the 60s, with Levon and the Hawks (no Crackers or The Band yet), Levon was the leader of the group. There were however no interviews etc and no major media attention at that time. What happened thereafter, I think, had a lot to do with media focusing on Robbie Robertson as they looked for a spokesperson. That is what the media do and they create a reality that may not exist. Similarly, Mr. Scorsese had the need to focus for his 'film needs' and so a myth grows. Finally, we get all this BS regarding $$$ and feuds and royalties and negativity with villains created as the story gets told over and over again. Loyalties prevail and the reality of the five musicians as a unit becomes subverted and ultimately overwhelmed. This is why I ignore this BS and stick to the music. I was not there and I don't know the truths except for those early years when the boys were at the Concord and were growing as an entity. One thing is certain. One has to be very careful with what one says to media/interviews, since it can be misconstrued or worse, misused and before you know it, there is a new reality to foist on an unsuspecting public.


Entered at Mon Jul 18 19:52:35 CEST 2016 from (99.16.133.205)

Posted by:

Adam

Where is this 1973 radio interview with Robbie?


Entered at Mon Jul 18 19:30:09 CEST 2016 from (32.216.245.190)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Not A CCR Situation

Kevin J. I have no doubt that Robbie truly believed that The Band was composed of 5 equals. And it's true that he has said it many times in interviews over the years.....Which is why it's odd that he wouldn't have taken a few seconds to clarify that in the 1973 radio interview for the benefit of the DJ and his listeners. Not saying that he had to apologize, or go on a rant about it, but just provide a little clarification.

What's also true, is that in other interviews, Robbie has stated that he just worked harder than anyone else. I suppose he may have just been having a grumpy day, or was feeling a little bit more equal than the others at that particular moment.

But I still think, as I mentioned earlier, that it's a little curious that any reference to "Levon and the Hawks" is absent from the bio page, while "Canadian Squires" is specifically detailed. However I'm not losing sleep over it. Just noting the inconsistency.

Ian W, thanks for the excerpts from the 1966 Melody Maker. In that case I think there's no real issue. Could have easily said Rick's group, etc. depending on who they were referring to at the time. Kind of like being a member of a team. Everyone on the team would feel like it was their team. Or a family, as in: "Todd is going on vacation with his family". Doesn't mean it's my family exclusively. My wife and daughters have equal membership.
Although this is clear....I'm certainly not the leader. Everyone know that Mom is the boss!

Peter V. Now that you've slapped me with that wet noodle regarding the Cambridge vs. Oxford dictionary (which was really just the first thing that came up on google) I will go back to my trusty Merriam-Webster dictionary in the future. You know...the one where they spell "center" instead of "centre". Those cheeky Americans. ;-)
Thanks for the derivation of "helm" though. There was a rumor going around that it was another word for the steering wheel of an early 1960's Cadillac!


Entered at Mon Jul 18 15:11:37 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Pete's beef and JD's show

Ha ha

Got to say that was a fantabulous rant Pete lad!! And I speak as one who's never ever tasted chorizo. Nor do I ever intend to following your expert insight!! Ha ha.

Wonderful!

:-0)

Thanks for heads up John. Really looking forward to it.


Entered at Mon Jul 18 11:38:02 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

A rare culinary "rant" is up on my blog: Chorizo is Vile. (Linked for anyone interested).


Entered at Mon Jul 18 05:01:34 CEST 2016 from (76.66.112.151)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: TLW tribute - video and tour news

Happy news for Band fans in Canada's prairie provinces. Here's a promo note that I received by email today - along with a link to the attached video on the group that does the show (which includes Levon's godson, Jerome Avis). Jerome's father, long-time Band roadmanager Bill Avis, appears too.

*************************

We're coming to Winnipeg! …...and Regina, and Alberta.

The LAST WALTZ - A Musical Celebration of THE BAND - Live' is coming to the West End Cultural Centre on Wed Aug 24. 2016.
This critically acclaimed show will be marking the 40th Anniversary of THE BAND's last concert which was filmed by Martin Scorcese.
The Canadian Blues All Stars including Chuck Jackson (lead singer Downchild Blues Band), Johnny Max, and Kitchener On phenom Matt Weidinger will join the 9 piece band performing the Band and gust songs from this memorable concert.
On drums and vocals is, Jerome Levon Avis (Levon Helm's godson) and the group is led by Juno award winning producer Lance Anderson.

Get your tickets early, this show will sell out! ONE Nite ONLY!

http://www.wecc.ca/site09/indeprod.html

Check out our EPK on youtube:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vtOkJziAkAY

Other dates:

Thurs. Aug 25th - Casino Regina, Regina SK - https://casinoregina.com/entertainment/318
Friday Aug. 26th - Century Casino Edmonton AB - http://edmonton.cnty.com/showroom/showroom-events/upcoming-events/
Saturday Aug 27th - Lethbridge Fair Lethbridge AB - http://www.exhibitionpark.ca/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/Whoop-Up-Days-2016-Gas-King-Stage-Pioneer-Park-Concert-Line-Up.pdf
Sunday Aug. 28th - Festival Hall - CALGARY AB (tickets on sale soon)


Entered at Mon Jul 18 03:48:31 CEST 2016 from (24.114.72.241)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: Lunacy, heading for the brexit like that.


Entered at Sun Jul 17 23:54:26 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Norbert, reminds me of a story I heard in Japan circa 1980. One of the American publisher's reps told me he studied Chinese, and went to Vietnam in the war to monitor Chinese broadcasts. Let's say his name was Homer Simpson (it wasn't). He reported the first evening and sat down to monitor the Chinese broadcasts. The first thing he heard was "We would like to welcome (Homer Simpson) from (3165 Cherry Street, Detroit) who arrived this afternoon, and started listening to us at 7 pm. We hope you enjoyed the meat loaf and beans for dinner, Homer, and we send our best wishes to your dad, George, and mom, Winifred and your brother Tommy at Lincoln High School."

OK, I made up all the names and addresses, but the gist is what he told me. it was the scariest moment of his life … and they knew they were being watched right down to what they had for dinner.


Entered at Sun Jul 17 23:11:05 CEST 2016 from (82.18.230.252)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: The leader of the group ?????

Robbie Robertson was interviewed by MELODY MAKER in May 1966. The article starts by referring to Robbie as "the man whose group has been backing Bob Dylan on his .... tour" and, at the end, refers to "Robbie's group".

Of course, this may be slack journalism rather than Robbie being proprietorial but I thought it might add to the earlier discussion.


Entered at Sun Jul 17 22:50:16 CEST 2016 from (87.144.161.153)

Posted by:

Norbert

Location: Münchhausen

Subject: The Russian Message

Ragtime, altijd goed je weer te zien.

When I was younger they set me to work for Her Majesty. I had to serve in a bunker deep under West Berlin. They gave me a green headphone and told me watch a little red light and intercept Russians messages. I served my duty in that bunker for exactly one year. We did all kinds of stupid things there and listened to The Band a lot, but we never ever did catch one single Russian message.

On my last night in the bunker, the day I turned 25, in the middle of the night, suddenly the little red light began to flicker, for the first time …….
Carefully I laid a worn Playboy aside and put on my green headphones. Would they start to nuke on my last day of duty? ….. no, that couldn’t be true. …… but then again……. somehow it all became deadly serious.

The message had ended abrupt as it came, the marker had already marked the message on the reel to reel tape. “Play” I asked him … I listened through my phones….I couldn’t understand it. WWIII on my birthday? This was so weird it had to be true. I panicked: “Get the Russian AND the captain!” .... Not much late the Russian translator, the captain, the marker and me sat close together listening to the Russian code message over and over again......the red light still flickering .... Well, what does it say? ……..The captain got impatient. The translator wrote something on a piece of paper and then read it out loud, with a Russian alcohol accent;

“Ghappy Birthgday Norbert!”

I walked up the stairs and drove back to Holland that night for the last time, a 1000 miles smiling …. Fucking Russians.
I have never returned to Berlin again.


Entered at Sun Jul 17 19:26:17 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The CCR reference is very early … 1969? He described CCR as "John Fogerty & some guys" rather than a band.


Entered at Sun Jul 17 18:45:36 CEST 2016 from (24.114.71.219)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: The Strength of The Band - Just 50 words and perfect

From an LA Times interview mid-90's......see below....one of hundreds of interviews over the years where Robbie has gone out of his way to describe The Band as 5 equal pieces. In many cases, he would do this by pointing out how other bands - notably CCR - were far from this ideal. Also worth noting that the other members of the 90's Band did actually refer to Levon as the boss.

Q: What about Levon's criticism about you trying to be the boss in the Band?

A: I never wanted to be the boss, and, in fact, I never thought I was the boss. I was just trying to organize things so we could do things like make records and go out and play a show somewhere. It was not a big controlling thing on my part, but you know what happens in these situations.

In a group, one guy is really good at this and one guy is good at that, and it kind of all settles. I just kind of found myself in the position of: "If I don't do this, nobody's going to do it. We'll just be sitting here in a year saying, 'I don't know, what do you think?' " So you have to try to get things moving.

Q: What was the strength of the Band?

A: The fact that it was a real band . . . five parts. Garth was the most accomplished musician in rock 'n' roll, bar none. Rick reinvented bass playing. Levon had a sound on his drums that no one else had. Other drummers used to kiss his hands. Plus Rick and Richard and Levon were all such great voices.


Entered at Sun Jul 17 17:52:13 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: helmsman

tut tut, Todd. A Cambridge dictionary? Oxford is the authority. I think from the dates that "helm" for a tiller controlling a rudder, is the secondary meaning, derived from helm for head armour, or as we know it now, helmet. And helm can also mean the top of the head, so the "leading item" hence a control for boats.


Entered at Sun Jul 17 17:46:42 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Why I'm sore …

This is from my review of A Midsummer Night's Dream yesterday. As it has nothing to do with the play but explains why I'm feeling irascible, I'll cut and paste it here!

I had an accident-prone day in Stratford-upon-Avon. We drove from Norwich, an uneventful trip. However, while looking for cheap art supplies in The Works store, a beefy Korean lad stood on my big toe, said “Sorry” turned round and stamped on it again, even harder. I limped along Sheep Street. You’d think with its tourist trade, car parks alone would make Stratford-upon-Avon wealthy enough to maintain its streets. I trod on a paving stone, it pivoted, dropped at least a centimetre and propelled me face first onto the ground. I just managed to get my hand down, but am severely bruised along one side. For an elderly person, that could be a broken hip, go to hospital and never come out again. There were several rocking stones on the side going up from the Royal Shakespeare Theatre. Then I had a narrow escape in the narrow toilets next to the Swan Theatre … no, don’t worry. A man with a large blue backpack swung round, I jerked my head back and the backpack just missed me … and my glasses. Oddly, earlier this year, a similar bearded man with a blue rucksack took off someone’s spectacles in the same toilet with his backpack, and just walked away. Was it the same clumsy bastard? Who are these people? I assume cyclists, packing up their lurid lycra in a backpack. Then in the interval, moving back to the theatre my wife yelped just behind me, then two hands pushed me hard in the back. Two women next to us were saying “Look at him … he pushed us … did he push you too?” A man in his 70s (pinkish trousers, blue shirt) was pushing his way urgently through the crowd by pushing both hands out in front of him and just pushing people very hard in the back. Panic? Lunacy? Senility?


Entered at Sun Jul 17 17:39:18 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Odd. I'm editing a simplified story today which has "kites" (birds) in it. I suggested it was obscure vocabulary for learners, and that it should be changed to "eagle." The author asked if "hawk" was better and I said yes. Hawks are better than eagles. Then I opened the Guestbook …


Entered at Sun Jul 17 17:26:54 CEST 2016 from (24.114.76.182)

Posted by:

Bill M

JQ: Just realised it was the Eagles who did "Trying To Get To You", though there were doo-wopping Hawks. Sorry.


Entered at Sun Jul 17 14:46:20 CEST 2016 from (83.68.10.60)

Posted by:

Ragtime

Web: My link

Subject: The Band official website

Is this link not working anymore? Does anyone know?


Entered at Sun Jul 17 13:00:58 CEST 2016 from (79.176.135.252)

Posted by:

Cooper City Locksmith

Location: Cooper City FL
Web: My link

Subject: This Site

Appreciating the commitment you put into your website and detailed information you present. It's great to come across a blog every once in a while that isn't the same old rehashed material. Great read! I've bookmarked your site and I'm adding your RSS feeds to my Google account.


Entered at Sun Jul 17 12:59:51 CEST 2016 from (79.176.135.252)

Posted by:

Cooper City Locksmith

Location: Cooper City FL
Web: My link

Subject: the band

I have come to understand that service fees for on-line degree authorities tend to be an incredible value. Like a full 4-year college Degree in Communication in the University of Phoenix Online consists of Sixty credits from $515/credit or $30,900. Also American Intercontinental University Online offers a Bachelors of Business Administration with a total school requirement of 180 units and a price of $30,560. Online studying has made taking your certification been so detailed more than before because you can earn your degree in the comfort of your dwelling place and when you finish from office. Thanks for all the other tips I have certainly learned from your site.


Entered at Sun Jul 17 06:03:36 CEST 2016 from (32.216.245.190)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Ahoy Matey

Thanks Bill for filling in the picture a little more re: The Hawks.

It just occurred to me that since the Hawks name derived from Hawkins, the boys could have followed suit and called themselves "Levon and the Helmsmen". Of course then they'd all want turns piloting the ship.

According to the Cambridge dictionary, the definition of helm is: "the handle or wheel which controls the direction in which a ship or boat travels".

Slow down Willie Boy....


Entered at Sun Jul 17 05:31:58 CEST 2016 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Hawks

Thanks Bill, I had read of Ronnie's disappointment and the awkwardness of the whole break up. But I didn't know the name was treated so generically, like public domain.


Entered at Sun Jul 17 04:25:43 CEST 2016 from (24.114.76.182)

Posted by:

Bill M

Wallsend: Don't forget 'autonomous' - and would you please stop clacking those coconuts together.

JQ: I've never heard of anything that would count as 'agro' - just Ronnie's disappointment with Levon for deciding to go with the departing Canadians rather than staying with Ronnie to drum and help manage the new Hawks (aka the Disciples) and other artists in Ronnie's stable at Hawk Enterprises.

As for the use of the Hawks name, 1) nobody cared about that stuff back then, but if they did 2) there was the R&B vocal group the Hawk who'd recorded the original "Trying To Get To You" for Mercury, and 3) there was the fact that Levon et Al had as much claim to the name as Ronnie did. And perhaps more. (At one point in '66, "Ronnie Hawkins and the Hawks" were playing one Toronto bar, "Levon and the Hawks" were in another and "Robbie lane and the Disciples (formerly the Hawks)" were in a third.


Entered at Sun Jul 17 02:50:17 CEST 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: RoseAnn Fino at the Shrine, Harlem

Anyone in the NYC area RoseAnn and her band will be playing the Shrine World Music Venue in Harlem this Tuesday 7/19 at 8pm.


Entered at Sun Jul 17 02:45:07 CEST 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: RoseAnn On Mixed Bag

John D, thank you. Fabulous segment on RoseAnn. It was so kind of you. It's getting so hard to get anyone to listen to new music. For you to use your program to help an independent woman artist says so much about the kind of person you must be. Truly can't thank you enough.


Entered at Sun Jul 17 02:39:56 CEST 2016 from (122.104.15.54)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

I like to think of The Band was an anarcho-syndicalist commune.


Entered at Sun Jul 17 02:14:33 CEST 2016 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Levon and The Hawks

I suspect this has been answered many times but was there much agro from Ronnie H when they left and took the name The Hawks?


Entered at Sun Jul 17 01:52:20 CEST 2016 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Al

Hopefully you should get it Monday Al.


Entered at Sun Jul 17 00:59:18 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: RoseAnn on John Donabie's Mixed Bag

Ha ha! What an idiot.

After all my excitement over the show I only went and listened to the previous archived show by mistake and will now have to wait until Tuesday to catch the archive of today's show.

Fortunately Bob has e-mailed me to say it was a wonderful show with a marvelous feature on RoseAnn featuring three songs - one from each of her records.

As the show I was listening to progressed I sat there contentedly early on simply enjoying John's dulcet tones and that varied musical selection in which he excels but then as 8pm came and went I became gradually more and more apprehensive and forlorn as time seemed to be slipping away with no sign of the RoseAnn feature. By the end I found myself cursing the poor drummer of the Yardbirds who I was holding firmly responsible for taking RoseAnn's spot on the show!!

:-0)

What a relief when minutes later I got Bob's e-mail extolling JD's wonderful show and RoseAnn's feature!!

What a pillock I felt.

Anyroad, whilst I'll have to wait a few days to hear the show, I have to say here and now a huge thank you to John. You're an amazing disc jockey mate with a musical depth few can even come close to matching. But above all a great fella for taking the time and trouble to provide a virtually unknown talent with the sort of platform that so few are ever prepared to do no matter how merited it might be.

Roll on Tuesday!!

:-0)


Entered at Sat Jul 16 20:17:11 CEST 2016 from (32.216.245.190)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Leader of The Band / Levon and The Hawks

In that sort of interview situation, it' not necessary to apologize for the radio host's perception of the situation.......But it would have been easy enough to clarify that The Band was different from a lot of other groups, and that their strength derived from the collective nature of the group.

Somewhat interesting, is that on Robbie's Bio page of his website, the Hawks are only ever referred to as the Hawks. Although it's detailed that the record label used the name "The Canadian Squires" on the single 'Uh-Uh-Uh' as a way of differentiating the group from being Ronnie Hawkins backup band, it's stated that they never changed their name (from the Hawks) during this time period.

What's curious, is that there is no mention of the group being named "Levon and the Hawks" which is what they went by at the time, after leaving Ronnie Hawkins, and I believe they were even referred to at the time they started performing with Bob Dylan. Must have fallen into the memory hole of history.


Entered at Sat Jul 16 19:41:26 CEST 2016 from (83.68.10.60)

Posted by:

Ragtime

Location: Low countries

Subject: No leader

Kevin J

What he should have said is this:

And now Noel the Moron, just SIT and LISTEN... I am NOT the leader of The Band, we HAVE NO leader, it's all a group effort, as Levon will tell you over and over and over and over again...


Entered at Sat Jul 16 18:05:33 CEST 2016 from (173.3.48.251)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

NWC, i won't be around till tonight to see your possibly sooner response, but if you think that I did not indicate it strongly involves Israel, & is potentially centered on or mainly starts with anti Israel sentiment by extremist or most Arab Moslems, you are misquided. This is not to say that the extremists are not anti everyone who is non Muslim. But i don't see where you can disagree with me. Unless you think that Israel is at fault. Then we differ strongly. And other than to say I find Israel blameless, I'm not having the discussion online. But if that is your position i would like to know what you made of Muslim crusades in ancient times. Across several continents. Would you blame those on the state of Israel as well? I'm pretty liberal on most social issues but i find bleeding heart liberals disgusting & delusional when they condemn people defending their lives & homes honorably, & as humanely as possible, against terrorist & political terrorists who created the Palestinian refugee situation, perpetuate it , & use their own people as pawns for close to 60 years. & also use them as human shields. Wake up & learn yourself some facts NWC.


Entered at Sat Jul 16 15:45:40 CEST 2016 from (83.249.162.136)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Footballs (politics)

This time I strongly disagree with JEFF A. It is about the state of Israel.

A few years ago a Swedish/Finnish fishing boat loaded with children's footballs tried to sail to Gaza on the coastal region of Eastern Mediterranean sea. Children's footballs are not allowed to be imported to Gaza. Israeli authorities say that. I liked to play football as a kid. Everybody should own a football. That's why I donated a little money when they anchored for a couple of nights here. Then in the international water the ship was boarded by commando soldiers and the kids didn't get their footballs. I can't get over this unjustice!

To be balanced I post a link to an exhibition in Fishermen's Museum in our fishing hamlet on saving Jews in 1943.


Entered at Sat Jul 16 15:13:29 CEST 2016 from (24.114.71.219)

Posted by:

Kevin J

"And Good Morning Luxembourg, we are very pleased to be joined today by the leader of Led Zeppelin, Jimmy Page......how are you doing Jimmy?".........."Fine.....but please Mr. Big Voice, never ever ever refer to me as the leader, or principle songwriter or guitar player in the band......I will only answer to Spokesman as that's all I really am."


Entered at Sat Jul 16 14:57:58 CEST 2016 from (184.66.35.201)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: River Hymn

'River Hymn' is a fine song IMO. It falls into a traditional form with a gospel feel and is sung well and played well. I can understand why some may not like it as it sits uncomfortably in an album of varied songs, but I like it as I like Cahoots as an album. Like so many Dylan albums, the less effective Band albums are better than the best work of some.


Entered at Sat Jul 16 10:35:02 CEST 2016 from (83.68.10.60)

Posted by:

Ragtime

Location: Low countries

Subject: Spokesman

When Cahoots came out I was listening to Radio Luxemburg 208. The DJ on duty was Noel Edmunds, who obviously didn't know a thing about The Band. He had a phone conversation with "the leader of The Band", Robbie Robertson, who said some useful things about the songs in spite of Edmunds' silly questions. I was surprised. I never knew they had a leader. Robbie didn't deny he was the leader, he should have said: sorry, I'm only our spokesman.

btw Edmunds called The River Hymn the apotheosis of the album. One of their worst songs ever IMHO.


Entered at Sat Jul 16 07:37:49 CEST 2016 from (79.121.201.198)

Posted by:

Peter V

I marvelled at TLW, without coming out thinking about disharmony at all. That only emerged with the 90s books. I was aware that all the Rolling Stone and NME interviews seemed to be Robbie, right from the start. But that's normal for any band or creative group.

I think back and four or five kids would be called to the headmaster's office and he'd say "So what have you got to say for yourselves?" And there'd be silence and shuffling about, then I'd always find myself the first to actually speak. There are natural "spokespersons" in life, in trade unions, in bands.

For example, in the Moody Blues, it would always be Graeme Edge who ended up speaking to the press, and in Yes it would be Bill Bruford (early days). They were articulate and not embarrassed to speak. I always thought simply that was Robbie's natural role.

But when I first saw TLW, I was obtuse enough not to detect the tensions that I can see now armed with the information from the books.


Entered at Sat Jul 16 05:37:25 CEST 2016 from (70.121.40.130)

Posted by:

glenn t

Subject: olde time religion / planet waves

yes! love it when they play olde time religion in the last waltz; it's my favorite scene. love the expression on rick's face and the sparkle in his eyes as they play. another favorite moment is mavis staple's spoken "beautiful" as they finish singing the weight. grateful i got to see the band live twice: one time before the last waltz, and one time following the release of jericho.

and i have to say i'm a fan of planet waves. one of my favorite dylan albums. ralph gleason had high praise for it too.


Entered at Sat Jul 16 04:33:39 CEST 2016 from (173.3.48.251)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Actually Al, closer is- Played live, by musicians, or even in overdubs, maybe lesser or more so in situations, music is a language they speak to each other.. Like in conversations, communication works to various degrees, and fails to various degrees. It's rare musicians can speak the tongues those 5 guys were able to speak to each other, communicate, stimulate , & advance the conversation to that of stone cold singular genius & beauty.


Entered at Sat Jul 16 01:59:09 CEST 2016 from (173.3.48.251)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Al, the music is the thing. Of course. What musicians can accomplish is on a different plane. what the guys in the band accomplished, was on a plane that very few musicians ever visit.Yes, the friendship or length of level of closeness certainly helped........but it's the music first.Music is a language. communication works and fais to various degrees. It's rare musicians can speak the tongues those guys were able to speak to each other.


Entered at Sat Jul 16 01:10:24 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: JD's Mixed Bag Radio Show tomorrow [Saturday]

On an enticing comforting note, a gentle reminder for all GB'ers that John Donabie is hoping to feature RoseAnn tomorrow on his wonderful mixed bag musical meander

The show starts at 7pm UK time [that's 2pm Toronto time] and the feature on RoseAnn and her music is supposed to be at 8pm UK time [that's 3pm Toronto time]

Internet link is above and as follows:

http://www.ciut.fm/shows-2/music-shows/mixed-bag/

A must listen!!!

:-0)


Entered at Sat Jul 16 00:58:41 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: The Band and their religion

John, I'm really pleased you highlighted the bit you did because since my comments about the 'fools paradise' lens through which I view The Band and their music and the back door advice from NWC, Jeff and Pete about such a perception, I've been reflecting on it quite a bit.

I guess the easiest way of conveying my own perception of The Band is by using the obvious vehicle that has afforded The Band its largest catchment audience, namely The Last Waltz.

Like every other Band devotee, I enjoyed the Last Waltz immensely. I watched it on its initial late ‘70’s UK cinema release which came a decade after my late sixties Big Pink initiation. To finally get to see my heroes [almost] in the flesh for the very first time was a thrill to compare with any. And yet, truth be told, the only snatch of that movie that fully met with my own preconception of what The Band truly represented came with the fleeting Ole Time Religion cameo, one that most seem to regard as merely an incidental throwaway scene when compared to the movie's main thrust.

Don’t get me wrong, it’s not that I didn’t enjoy watching the main action and especially the group performing/talking collectively or individually. Rather, the opposite. I savoured every second of every shot.

It’s simply that the ‘Religion’ clip, brief as it was, will for me always stand as the movie’s very cornerstone. I realize that few would ever place it in such an elevated spot in the Last Waltz pantheon or that it was ever intended by Scorsese and Robbie to be so regarded. Clearly Robbie's comment, almost apologetic, that 'it's not like it used to be' reveals what is a great fondness for the clip and the spirit it represented. However, it also likely betrays the fact that whilst he dearly wanted such a snippet in the movie it is for him an aspect of the group that he'd very likely grown to take for granted over the years they'd been together yet was about to leave behind him.

In stark contrast, to those like myself - mere vicarious voyeurs from across the pond - who had followed the group in remote yet besotted deprivation over so many years of yearning it represented something far greater.

The very essence, in fact, of The Band.

What Robbie very possibly felt to be a mere added flavor to the movie; a ramshackle low key improvised segue to the momentous orchestrated perfection of Dixie, was to many of us the very affirmation of that charmed rustic uniqueness we’d always believed marked out our heroes yet had never dared to presume to actually be so emphatically the case. Yet there it was. In all its glory and ordinary down homeness - a unique bond and blend of musical instinct and rough arse musical genius beyond anything else around. Beyond anything you’d believed musically possible.

And the fact that they performed it in such a throwaway moment merely serves to underscore to the likes of myself how clearly pivotal it is to the very being of The Band. Apart from revealing Rick as a sort of magical glue that binds them all together it emphasizes also how the other two gel to serve the entity so effortlessly, so intuitively, so seamlessly no matter the lesser role they might play in this particular instance.

And so for me this tiny window of celluloid has stood ever since it first mesmerized me in Liverpool’s Futurist cinema back in 1978 as life affirming testimony to that very essence of 'The Band' that I loved; the very reason why so many years ago hearing the refrains of The Weight for the very first time on a Victoria pub’s golden juke box struck such a chord with me and invoked such a never to be shifted bond that ever since has remained with me and in me.

Of course, it'd have been even nicer if Levon and Garth could have been present for the snippet, too. But in the overall scheme of things that matters not. The fact is they were an omni-presence in any case and so the enveloping principle and indefinable 'Band' spirit remains intact no matter which of the five was or wasn’t present.

I guess the bottom line is if it’s good enough for grandma it’s good enough for me.

:-0)


Entered at Sat Jul 16 01:02:29 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Most certainly correct on that score Pete - our thoughts most definitely with all those poor souls slain or affected in France. What happened is inconceivable - and yet happen it did.


Entered at Sat Jul 16 00:25:49 CEST 2016 from (173.3.48.251)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

JQ.Dead serious. Let some one capable of dealing with it deal with it. And everyone who has had the benefit of Mossad assistance, & every country that has had Israel's decimation as their interest, would have to cooperate & abide by their calls as well. Oh, or would that require things that are impossible to happen happen. But you can bet your ass that without the Israeli intelligence community's aid, things would be worse than they are now in many countries. It's too late now, but part of my point is this would never have gotten this far if other countries listened to Israel in the past, & if Anti Semitic & Anti Israeli attitudes did not prevail in many countries. Preventing cooperation.Hatred of the west, hatred of Jews, & hatred of non Muslims, is the problem. Eradication of Muslim Extremism, or even the eradication of Muslim Extremism in western nations, is now something that escalates to the level of world war. Ifsome attempt is to made by the intelligemce community, it has to be backed by military might. It will have various levels, assassinations, small attacks, full scale attacks. and it will be something that could work, or lead to real danger, real full scale wars, or world war.


Entered at Fri Jul 15 23:38:33 CEST 2016 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Israel, Mossad

Jeff - Do you know why Israel didn't have troops on the ground in Iraq or Afghanistan? Or did they? Presumably though, you weren't really serious about putting Bebe in charge?


Entered at Fri Jul 15 23:10:45 CEST 2016 from (173.3.48.251)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Pete, you wrote:" Any solution has to be international and co-operative."

I agree, With one strong suggestion. Put Israel or the Mossad in complete charge. No digression from their orders.


Entered at Fri Jul 15 19:38:52 CEST 2016 from (79.121.201.198)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: vinyl

We have been in Norwich, Norfolk for a few days. I was at the University of East Anglia here many years ago. This city has SEVEN secondhand record shops. It has more than central London. Norfolk is very different to Dorset in that every charity shop has some vinyl. Maybe vinyl lasted longer here. The downside in the charity shops is that it's all awful stuff. The 1960s section will be The Bachelors and Englebert Humperdink. It could also be that with seven excellent vinyl stores just in Norwich, all the decent stuff has been filtered out before it gets to the charity shops (thrift stores). I also note yet again regional differences … far less soul here than on the South Coast, which I put down to the early adoption of discotheques in Southern seaside resorts.


Entered at Fri Jul 15 19:32:50 CEST 2016 from (79.121.201.198)

Posted by:

Peter V

Our thoughts must be on France today. This is why I was always so against Brexit. We really are all in this together, and trying to isolate your country is like Edgar Allen Poe's The Masque of The Red Death, where they shut themselves up in a castle to avoid the plague (I think), France has been our ally for 200 years … America's ally for 240 years. I can't get it out of my mind. My niece and her family live near Nice. Fortunately they were away, but it could be any town, any country, anywhere, any day. Any solution has to be international and co-operative.


Entered at Fri Jul 15 14:55:06 CEST 2016 from (131.137.34.214)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: subbing for serendipity

How folks discover music in these strange times . . . concierges, curators and the 50-song micro-target playlist.


Entered at Fri Jul 15 14:15:09 CEST 2016 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Al Edge

Al Edge writes. "And, needless to say of course, the feud never ever happened in my cosy rosy little Band world. I mean, how could it possibly have done so with such single minded devotion to each other and the music."

Amen Brother, Amen.


Entered at Fri Jul 15 13:19:46 CEST 2016 from (83.249.162.136)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: "Wise men say..." #2

4. BORIS: "We don't turn our back to _EUROPE_ when we turn our back to European Community (or something like that." Can't help but sympathize a politician who has the same haircut as I. It was called 'the-common-man's-peatles" (yes, I misspelled it correctly).


Entered at Fri Jul 15 13:03:49 CEST 2016 from (83.249.162.136)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: "Wise men say..."

1. ROD. I agree: "I think my rosy picture of the boys started to fade when I first found this site back in the 90s."

2. NORBERT. Back in the Middle Ages I e-mailed to Norbert: "I am getting old." He answered: "You are not getting old. You are just getting wiser." Now he is posting here the following words: "We are getting old." (No further comments are needed.)

3. RAGTIME, thanks for greetig me welcome to this gb back then... wise words, indeed ;-) I understand that you like 'Planet Waves'. Yes, it is chamber music! You introduced the term here in gb ... was it in the late 18th Century?- We listened to Italian Reneissance music in a Medieval church a few days ago and it had the same easy-going feeling.


Entered at Fri Jul 15 11:30:43 CEST 2016 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

What?!?! The Beatles never lived like that....why am I always the last to find out about these things?!?!

: )


Entered at Thu Jul 14 23:44:38 CEST 2016 from (79.121.201.198)

Posted by:

Peter V

I used to think Help" was a documentary and that The Beatles lived in a row of identical terrace houses, all joined together indoors. Since it was revealed that was untrue, I never felt I had to believe in any band (or The Band) as indivisible brothers.


Entered at Thu Jul 14 19:19:34 CEST 2016 from (67.84.79.177)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Being old enough to grow up with The Band (57-58) in my case, & i heard em from the beginning) is possibly a quaifier for this.And I would be one of the youngest to fit the bill. For those of you who fit, I would tend to think that if everyone is honest with themselves, unless they already knew The Band members personally, or been to enough shows, The Last Waltz film should have been enough to lift the blinders, really make a dent in the publicity & myth. Should have made anyone think. The music was so great, & the times being what they were, well, people could possibly not want to see past. If that didn';t do it, enough opportunities to see the guys up close in larger venues, or enough times in smaller ones, & maybe getting to know em, would have done it.......... The thing is, they each & everyone of em , the 4 i saw & with the exception of ?Richard ( only witnessed him up close "in action") were are so damn exceptionally nice, human, entertaining, usually considerate& charismatic....


Entered at Thu Jul 14 17:53:07 CEST 2016 from (100.34.253.103)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love
Web: My link

Subject: Small Town Talk

Once again (for John D) my review of Small Town Talk. I just noticed in an edit at the beginning of the 2nd paragraph one of the CounterPunch editors screwed up and spelled Hoskyns' name wrong which is it's always good to save your original copy.


Entered at Thu Jul 14 15:45:03 CEST 2016 from (131.137.34.214)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: Planet Waves

I play it pretty often. Honourable mention for the whole aesthetic of the first-draft art design and Kerouesque 'liner notes.'

"On a Night Like This" is by itself worth the price of admission. Swings like mad and sounds like the most fun the boys had since maybe "Odds and Ends." Is there another accordion-fronted piece in the canon?

"Dirge" is also very worthy, makes a nice pair with "Positively 4th Street":

Can't recall a useful thing you ever did for me
'Cept to pat me on the back one time, when I was on my knees


Entered at Thu Jul 14 15:46:00 CEST 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Small Town Talk/ Planet Waves

I read Small Town Talk early on. I enjoyed it. Loved seeing Martha Velez getting some mention. Her shows in the area during the early 70's are legendary. /n It's hard to believe Dylan put the rocking Forever Young on Planet Waves when he had Nobody 'Cept You. All and all I love Planet Waves. Great winter album. Robbie was most definitely the MVP of that record.


Entered at Thu Jul 14 14:44:59 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

And, needless to say of course, the feud never ever happened in my cosy rosy little Band world. I mean, how could it possibly have done so with such single minded devotion to each other and the music?

:-0)


Entered at Thu Jul 14 14:37:51 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: The End of the Innocence

John/Rod - I know exactly what you mean. We each to our own I guess.

:-0)

I'm unsure with regards to myself whether it's simply poor memory or a deliberate shutting down.

Whatever it is I still retain this unfettered image fed by what was planted in my mind's eye by the majestic beauty of those first two/three albums. The five of them sat smiling at each other as Robbie told us on the sleevenotes of Big Pink each and all utterly and slavishly devoted to the music they were creating to the exclusion of any of the earthly borne unsavoury distractions that so contaminated every other rock artist of the time.

Sigh...

:-0)


Entered at Thu Jul 14 14:00:58 CEST 2016 from (146.171.254.96)

Posted by:

Rod

I think my rosy picture of the boys started to fade when I first found this site back in the 90s.


Entered at Thu Jul 14 13:58:23 CEST 2016 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Al Edge

I see your point Al. I have always separated the musician from the person themselves. I personally didn't need to know some points about their weaknesses. We as human beings all have our little demons. Thanks for letting me know. By the way I don't read these books as a media person.


Entered at Thu Jul 14 12:03:31 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Life sentences - in so many words

Ha ha

I guess at a push it could be argued that 'ever' is also part of the same one - which would make it 113!!!

:-0)


Entered at Thu Jul 14 11:51:13 CEST 2016 from (83.249.162.136)

Posted by:

NorhestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Al E

One sentence with 112 words! Reminds me of my sadistic German teacher.


Entered at Thu Jul 14 11:04:04 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: JD and Small Town Talk

John. Got to admit the two main books on The Band both of which I read when they first came out ultimately alerted me to a fundamental aspect of my own make-up. Namely that I needed to steer clear of insider information and cling rather to the rosy image I have of all my heroes - both sporting and musical.

As time has passed since I read those books their content has thank goodness now entirely faded into a gilded obscurity such that in my own rose tinted world all five Band members have reverted to the default perception I initially had of them back in those wondrous late '60's halcyon days in Liverpool when I first discovered them entirely independent of even a tiny modicum of expert insight or influence from anybody or anything other than my own listening ears and imagination - namely five latterday saints with an unparalleled individual and collective untainted musical talent honed in rural North America the likes of which will never be seen or heard again. Ever.

So, no, Small Town Talk is not the book nor the environment for me! I know that doesn't help anyone least of all your goodself with your honourable calling within a communication industry often demanding you to flesh out the bones. But it does at least enable me to survive in my own little fool's paradise.

:-0)


Entered at Thu Jul 14 09:14:23 CEST 2016 from (219.89.12.80)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: Small Town Talk

I really enjoyed it. It's a warts and all write up so not everything said about the musicians is flattering.


Entered at Thu Jul 14 06:08:49 CEST 2016 from (76.66.112.151)

Posted by:

Bill M

Ragtime: Re "Planet Waves", I agree as well - though I could live happily without the rockin' 'rangement of "Forever Young". (Recording it is one thing, but including it?)


Entered at Thu Jul 14 03:45:05 CEST 2016 from (184.66.35.201)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Planet Waves/The book

Ragtime: I second your comments. 'Planet Waves' is an exceptional album from a Dylan/Band exceptional time. I love the songs on this album and listen to it often.

John D: I second your comments: I really enjoyed the book but focused on the parts you discuss. And those chapters were well done and very informative.


Entered at Thu Jul 14 00:20:57 CEST 2016 from (83.68.10.60)

Posted by:

Ragtime

Location: Low countries

Subject: Little Brothers' comment

My five cents on Planet Waves:

I really like George Harrison's magnificent "Something", but I love Planet Waves even more for the commitment of all six men, the chemistry between Bob and our guys, the wonderful songs and lyrics, the arrangements, the flawless playing, especially by Hudson and Robertson. I play it a lot. And I think "Something There Is About You", is the masterpiece on it. So Bob my friend, you wanted to write a passacaglia, didn't you... I can find only a vague resemblance to the Harrison song.

Hm... I've got a feeling I wrote this before. You'll find it in the Guestbook Archive 1998 or something.

Errr... something...?


Entered at Wed Jul 13 23:48:44 CEST 2016 from (79.121.201.198)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Small Town Talk

I read it early on John. Nothing caused me any offence, but I found there were large chunks on painters and minor artists I'd barely heard of that I had to speed read. I think it was carefully researched with lots of interviews, and he needed to cut some duller, more arcane stuff. I also thought he was good on Grossman and the major artists.


Entered at Wed Jul 13 19:37:18 CEST 2016 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Small Town Talk

OK. I know I was late to the game; but does anyone who read the book have an opinion about it? Just wondering.


Entered at Wed Jul 13 17:53:10 CEST 2016 from (92.22.70.118)

Posted by:

Solomon

Subject: Mavis!

The new documentary about Mavis Staples is called Mavis! She has a few good things to say about Levon.


Entered at Wed Jul 13 15:13:35 CEST 2016 from (173.3.51.90)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Kevin, to clarify what Bob F so obviously meant by all our jobs away, & to frame your response to him about jobs & unemployment rates correctly, was decent or good jobs that pay a good hard worker enough money & benefits to have a decent home, and raise a kid or two.And if the spouse worked also, even have enough money to take a vacation & send your kids to college. That's pretty much gone. To think otherwise is a symptom of being in the 1 %, or top 10% anyway. And as he responded, unempolyment rates are misleading. People working jobs that pay 10, 13, 14 bucks an hour, part time, when they used to make 25 or far more, get overtime, & full benfits, is not comparable. The lucky People working independently for 20 or 25 or more an hour, without any FICA deductions, & without benefits, when they used to get more, with benefits, & now struggling to find 25/ 30 hours a week, again, better, not comparable.


Entered at Wed Jul 13 14:16:20 CEST 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Unemployment

Kev, I think the US unemployment rates are misleading. Many companies using temporary work force, minimum wages. As soon as the schedule gets soft they lay people off. Growing up in my neighborhood houses were seldom for sale. Now, at least a third are always for sale. Many families are forced to work two jobs just to get by.


Entered at Wed Jul 13 13:40:26 CEST 2016 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Small Town Talk

I know there are many opinions; about this book. I overall enjoyed it. Especially the Dylan, Band, Morrison chapters. I especially learnt a lot about Albert Grossman. It explains why he and Robbie were so close. I've read about it here; but Hoskins walks us through the relationship. There is much we already knew; but to be honest we are all on different levels of knowing about all these characters

I will admit to jumping through a couple of chapters; which I was not really interested in. I think I learnt more about the town itself than ever before.


Entered at Wed Jul 13 08:55:45 CEST 2016 from (79.121.201.198)

Posted by:

Peter V

I like Little Brother's category of "albums I wanted to like more than I actually liked" very much. Cahoots is my main contender, but Planet Waves is not far behind. I played it non stop for days hoping it would take off for me, but it never did. I vastly prefer New Morning (carrying on Little Brother's Harrison thoughts), and I always liked Self Portrait. New Morning is still played here, but Planet Waves isn't.

It may seem odd now but "Help" was another I kept playing without growing to love it.


Entered at Wed Jul 13 08:47:42 CEST 2016 from (79.121.201.198)

Posted by:

Peter V

Location: Europe

Subject: Politics of the Lesser Evils

It's an awful year, but I suspect we're all into politics of the lesser evil. You've got to Stop Trump, and Bernie's helping do that. I wouldn't ever choose Teresa May here, but compared to Leadstrom (stop gay marriage, bring back fox hunting), Gove (no American literature in UK English exams) and Johnson (I get my school pal's enemies beaten up), or Fox (if I put my name on the ballot paper again and come last again, they'll have to give me a ministerial job), she shines out as well, comparatively normal. It's the same with our Labour party. I find Angela Eagle boring to a ridiculous degree, but anyone's better than Corbyn.

The concept of voting for someone you actually like is long gone. We're down to the one who will do less harm than the alternatives.


Entered at Wed Jul 13 08:30:09 CEST 2016 from (79.121.201.198)

Posted by:

Peter v

Location: Europe

Bill M, you forget that the 90s Band did Willie and The Hand Jive.


Entered at Wed Jul 13 07:22:35 CEST 2016 from (24.114.71.219)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: That would be Jib not Gib ! Slow down Willy


Entered at Wed Jul 13 07:03:41 CEST 2016 from (24.114.71.219)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Bob F: while many parts of Europe have been suffering through years of unemployment rates exceeding 20% ( plus 30% in places like Greece and Spain ) and several other countries in Africa and Asia have to deal with unemployment rates of 30% plus, it is hard to accept as serious that one lady's husband was responsible for "sending all of our jobs away" when the U.S. unemployment rate currently sits at 4.9% ! During the Reagan era, the unemployment rate was north of 10%. Free trade has been very good for the economies of the U.S. and Canada. Allowing knee- jerk protectionist trade policies favoured by the likes of Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump would cripple our economies........For what it's worth, I liked so much of what Bernie stood for and the overall cut of his gib.


Entered at Wed Jul 13 06:35:42 CEST 2016 from (173.3.49.222)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

This is all just my opinion........Bob, as you probably know, Eisenhower saw the last 60 years of history in play in his mind, saw it coming, & spoke about it. In the 50s. The assassination of JFK was the first strong spike, or first real nail in the coffin. Them MLK & RFK. Then the election of Nixon, then Reagan was the real moving force you know. Bill Clinton was an extension of Reagan, in Democrat's clothes, & different social views...I left Bernie months ago, but, This has all been decided before. & I don't believe Bernie really thought he could win.And even if he did win the Dem nomination, & the Presidency, he'd have gotten that visit / message all newly elected President's get. The President has been picked quite some time ago. It's a chess game, we're pawns.


Entered at Wed Jul 13 01:20:56 CEST 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: Give Me Some Truth

What a sad day for many of us. A man with a common sense vision is forced to endorse a woman whose husband was paramount in sending all our jobs away. We hardly build or grow anything in this country anymore thanks to these people. Now because the other party has a complete lunatic we're suppose to all get in line. On top of everything Springsteen gives her We Take Care of Our Own to use as the unifying campaign song. I wonder if he's talking about the extremely rich like him and the Clintons or the working class people.

Everyday I miss John Lennon more.


Entered at Tue Jul 12 18:16:29 CEST 2016 from (24.114.55.49)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: Good catch, but not at all straightforward. While the appearance of Willy may seem penile, the "slow down" directive suggests that Robbie may have started out with the intention of writing about car insurance (which must have been an issue given the group's driving record). Perhaps Robbie will clarify things for us in "Testimony".


Entered at Tue Jul 12 18:11:51 CEST 2016 from (24.69.16.215)

Posted by:

BONK

Location: Salt Spring Island

Subject: Amy

Just read that Amy Helm plays here on the island. on August 19.


Entered at Tue Jul 12 00:51:21 CEST 2016 from (100.11.151.162)

Posted by:

Little Brother

Location: the Guestbook Archives (and Philly PA suburbs)

Subject: "Something"'s Wrong ;)

I was just idly perusing last month's comments and happened upon Kevin J: "Just listened to the YouTube of Bob Dylan paying tribute to his good pal George doing "Something".....Beautiful !"

This reminded me of "Planet Waves", an album that I always "wanted" to like more than I actually liked, if you take my meaning.

I don't remember which critics said what when it was released, but I agree with the observation that in subsequent studio recording, Dylan & The Band never recreated the chemistry or magic of "The Basement Tapes". Their technical mastery remains beyond question, but the performances are more "workmanlike" and perfunctory. Perhaps the letdown was intensified because expectations were so high.

Also, many of the songs aren't Dylan's top-drawer work. Speaking of "Something", I always wondered if Dylan used it as a basis for the vastly inferior "Something There Is About You". I can't be the only one who noticed the similarity in concept, despite Dylan's autobiographical lyrics. I still cringe at "My hand's on the saber / You've picked up on the baton". WTF?


Entered at Tue Jul 12 00:45:52 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: jimothy

""""""""""""""""Just listened to Roseann Fino. I don't understand why people have to lower the bar just because there ain't nothing else out there. Have faith. Don't lower expectations."""""""""""""

To be honest I'm not even sure I should bother responding to such a snide and sneering post, especially one with such woefully confused reasoning and ill conceived premise. And yet since it's scarcely disguised venom is so clearly targetting my own boundless enthusiasm for RoseAnn's music I suppose it leaves me with little option.....

....Ah fuck it. I've already afforded it more than the nano-second of contempt the spite of its author merits.

:-0)


Entered at Tue Jul 12 00:08:50 CEST 2016 from (219.89.12.80)

Posted by:

Rod

nice version of TNTDODD


Entered at Mon Jul 11 22:55:58 CEST 2016 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

What may be the last time Rick performed this song.


Entered at Mon Jul 11 21:09:14 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Slow down, Willy boy …


Entered at Mon Jul 11 20:22:09 CEST 2016 from (174.88.216.50)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: First-name basis

An excellent reason, as I so distantly recall.


Entered at Mon Jul 11 15:35:13 CEST 2016 from (76.66.112.151)

Posted by:

Bill M

Ragtime: Dick, Roger, Long John, Percy, Jake .... As comedian Dave Broadfoot has noted, if something's going to be making 90% of your decisions, you want to be on a first-name basis.


Entered at Mon Jul 11 13:53:49 CEST 2016 from (86.171.27.122)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Agree

Totally agree, JT...and Roseann is very good.


Entered at Mon Jul 11 12:50:58 CEST 2016 from (184.66.35.201)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Continuing the tradition: RoseAnn Fino

The implication is that there is no good or worthwhile emerging music in 2016. IMO, there is a lot of good music being released by emerging talent (despite what others have said here). RoseAnn Fino is among those who are continuing the songwriter/singer tradition.


Entered at Mon Jul 11 11:56:52 CEST 2016 from (83.68.10.60)

Posted by:

Ragtime

Location: Low countries

I never knew that Get Up Jake was about erectile dysfunction. How naive can a Man be... ;-) It puts the song in an entirely new perspective... So "Jake" would be a metaphore for...

On another note: I think there is no need to wait for Peter's ultimate Band post. It's already here, when you eliminate all posts by others...


Entered at Mon Jul 11 07:16:14 CEST 2016 from (173.3.249.47)

Posted by:

Jimothy

Location: Fairfield, CN

Subject: Roseann?

Just listened to Roseann Fino. I don't understand why people have to lower the bar just because there ain't nothing else out there. Have faith. Don't lower expectations.


Entered at Mon Jul 11 04:25:49 CEST 2016 from (24.114.66.40)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: While our guys did turn in a pretty good song about erectile dysfunction, "Get Up Jake", the record company was too gutless to release it at the time. I suppose that's why they never got to the other topics to my knowledge.


Entered at Sun Jul 10 22:36:15 CEST 2016 from (74.70.106.22)

Posted by:

Danny Lopez

Location: upstate New York

Subject: why

Why keep coming back to the Band's music after all these years?

It's the quiet dignity; it's the restorative power of the images, memories, and passion that the music evokes; it's the rootedness of it -- to family, to friends, to community, to the earth itself (dig that thuddy drum); it's the connectedness the music has to LIFE itself. That's it. These are the reasons.

Peace& Love to all.


Entered at Sun Jul 10 22:14:34 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Got it down to 5 words from 1 million

The Band was the best.

Having said that, would anyone like buy medicine for erectile dysfunction, Nigerian government bonds, insurance, double glazing or a new Audi? Such statements usually link to those kind of adverts.


Entered at Sun Jul 10 19:38:44 CEST 2016 from (184.66.35.201)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: penultimate

The penultimate Band post: Great quintet.


Entered at Sun Jul 10 16:37:19 CEST 2016 from (87.144.161.153)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: The ultimate Band post

As some of you already know, for many years already now, Peter is working on the ultimate Band post (good it isn’t me). It may also take some years for him to finish it and post that post here, but we already know some now:

1) It will be the longest post ever posted in the history of The Band GB (more than 1.000.000 words).
2) It starts the day Ronnie Hawkins was born.
3) Every single Band member will get an extensive biography.
4) Every single song will gets his own biography.
5) Every single note be screened.
6) Every single feud will be detailed to the bottom.
7) And, and, and.

It will be the ultimate Band reference work. When it is there please print it out, all you ever wanted to know about this Band will be in that post. Band experts and critics, DJ’s and musicians from all over the world will quote from this very post in this very GB.

Stay tuned, don’t miss it.


Entered at Sun Jul 10 16:16:21 CEST 2016 from (184.66.35.201)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Andy Murray/Milos Raonic final

To watch the ascendency of Andy Murray to the pinnacle of tennis is to understand how a person can slowly but with determination gradually become that person who he/she sees in the mirror. With the self-doubt and the emotions and all the other negative and positive feelings, Andy Murray is a true champion. Good on Milos Raonic (Canadian and coming up himself) for giving him a fight but it will take something extraordinary of beat Andy Murray today.


Entered at Sun Jul 10 13:33:43 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: RoseAnn Fino - Dunc's review and RoseAnn's protest song

Dunc, that was not only a terrific endorsement of RoseAnn's recordings to date but more so a superbly crafted review. How lucky we are to have you on here with all your calm, considered rationale. What a welcome contrast to my own rash exhuberance.

And fair play to yourself too Mike. You latched onto RoseAnn some time back and your support has been much needed and appreciated I can tell you. And yeah mate I too would love to see her perform again - next time with her amazing Misfits!.

I particularly loved this bit of your review Dunc - """I feel what she is singing and really connect with some of her telling, heartfelt lyrics. Her voice is clear and full of feeling and responds to the needs of the song.""""

There are times when a comment really captures the essence of something and in that final sentence particularly you've defined what for me sets RoseAnn's offerings apart from most anything else I've heard for quite sometime. """Her voice....responds to the needs of the song"""

Exquisite insight that Dunc. Absolutely love it because it really does encapsulate what RoseAnn is bringing to the table on those two EP's but most particularly on the latter of the two where she's attaining a level of juxtaposing superb songwriting craft with song delivery that you very rarely ever encounter. That level of emotional craft is what first drew me to The Band. In a Station and Caledonia Mission forinstance have it in oodles. Roseann now seemingly carries the torch in a way I've heard from very few artists since.

As regards this latest protest song, I believe Pete is right. Its power lies in its simplicity. Not just the song's simple catchy format but in the simple message of rank hypocrisy it is conveying to anybody in the USA who attempts for a solitary nano second to espouse any genuine remorse for a victim whilst themselves possessing a gun. The two cannot be reconciled no matter what weasel justifications might be attempted.

If anyone - and I most emphatically include Sebastian and Robbie and Garth and Jan H and his lad in this request - has or knows of a vehicle for getting this song of RoseAnn's out there to the audience its clear message demands to reach then please make it known. This song and its message needs to be heard by more than a few folks on these message boards.


Entered at Sat Jul 9 22:08:54 CEST 2016 from (81.159.120.56)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Roseann Fino

Have had a listening day today. Received Roseann's material yesterday and played it all today, punctuated by an Italian lunch. No football or babysitting commitments - a rare Saturday.

A summer's day in Scotland. Driving rain and dark. Give me some of your sun, Bassmanlee.

I enjoyed the album very much with really good songs, both lyrically and melodically, beautifully played by Roseann and'The Crowmatrix' - great musicianship, and great arrangements. Some of the playing is brilliant.

The EP 'Little Girl Lost' is enjoyable and interesting and shows Roseann developing.

The EPs 'Out From Under' and 'Airing of Grievances' are outstanding. The songs are well crafted and tell stories, which I could relate to emotionally. (Hard for a dour Scot to admit this). Some really great lines.

Roseann's singing is great, both powerful and sensitive, and I think has grown. I feel what she is singing and really connect with some of her telling, heartfelt lyrics. Her voice is clear and full of feeling and responds to the needs of the song.

The musicianship is great again. The balance of instruments is spot on and I feel they have achieved that feeling that I'm listening to them playing at the back of my room.

Perhaps the viola player deserves a special mention as she weaves beautifully in and out of Roseann's voice, but I feel that this would be unfair to the other musicians. I thought the piano playing is great, Roseann can play well with some telling riffs and the bass player and drummers, (different drummers on each EP) are great.

What should get a special mention is the way the band come together, supporting the singer and the needs of the song sensitively, which is what it is all about. Not always an easy thing to achieve.

The songs are varied and different. My son and daughter-in-law popped in on my listening session and really enjoyed Roseann's music too. And he can be really critical.

So my advice is buy the lot.

I don't know Bob F, other than reading his posts for years, but I wish his talented daughter well.

And I think our Al has been correct to voice his enthusiasm. Well done, Al.


Entered at Sat Jul 9 19:50:55 CEST 2016 from (174.88.216.50)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: RoseAnn

I like what I hear from this young talented woman. Thanks again to Al Edge for his persuasiveness in getting us all to listen. My hope is to one day get to hear her live, perhaps at a small venue, before my skein runs out. (Skein? I hope I got that right. I'll check in a minute.)


Entered at Sat Jul 9 18:14:22 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Roseanne Fino

Great song, great simple raw video. Definitely the way to do it. Someone was asking where the songwriters were for 2016. We had Dylan and Baez and Sam Cooke then Marvin Gaye. Roseanne keeps up a vital tradition!


Entered at Sat Jul 9 17:22:25 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: RoseAnn nails the intrinsic hypocrisy that haunts the USA

Well said pet. Great song too.


Entered at Sat Jul 9 15:22:43 CEST 2016 from (184.66.35.201)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Case/Lang/Veirs

Case/Lang/Veirs: A superb trio with a wonderful album of songs combining the fusion of 3 excellent talents. Sold out at the Victoria Jazz Festival in late June but we were too late to get tickets. I've seen Neko Case with The New Pornographers and she is a force of nature. K.D. Lang is among the best voices in music and has been reborn (again) in this triumvirate. I did not know Veirs, but her contribution is major. What luck for us to be able to share the talent of these 3 together.


Entered at Sat Jul 9 12:07:38 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Location: Europe
Web: My link

Subject: Case/Lang/Veirs

My constant play this week has been Case/Lang/Veirs (Neko Case, k.d.lang and Laura Veirs). Lovely songs … link is to "Delirium" but if you want to sample one on iTunes, try I Want to Be Here.


Entered at Sat Jul 9 11:59:10 CEST 2016 from (87.144.161.153)

Posted by:

Norbert

We're getting old.


Entered at Sat Jul 9 09:03:57 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Smart phones rather than just the WWW, change brains. In the theatre last week, it was schools’ night. I’d say 14 to 18 age range. We were high up near the back Five minutes before the play started you could see literally a hundred plus lighted phone screens. As we observed the boys playing video games and not interacting, the girls texting at high speed. Then in London on Sunday, a guy walking across a street on a red light, headphones on and texting feverishly. Being London a car deliberately swerved to near miss him, and he was then standing in Trafalgar Square, finger raised screaming “C**t!” I notice now in supermarkets and the street people with headphones on, whether listening or texting, just walk right through other people. It’s as if the headphones render them immune from the polite dance we do around other people in busy places.

Politicians … I think we’re safer with dull professional, adult politicians … like them or not, Hilary Clinton and Teresa May are adults … than charismatic loonies like Trump or Johnson, or non-charasmatic buffoons like Farage and Gove. In Britain, if Angela Eagle replaces Corbyn, at least she appears an intelligent adult, though with the charisma and wit of a mollusc.

As an aside … both Teresa May and Angela Eagle are Oxford graduates, if not in the words of Jay Gatsby, “Oxford men.” In Britain, the Oxford- Prime Minister link is ludicrously strong. They used to say that Oxford provided the political leaders, while Cambridge produced the innovative scientists and alternative comedians, but also the buggers and spies. (The last two were often a shared quality).


Entered at Sat Jul 9 06:42:10 CEST 2016 from (24.114.71.219)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Look on the bright side of life

Bonk........stop watching cable news. The facts are that the world has never been better, healthier and more prosperous. The global rates of homicide, violence against women, genocide and war are at all time lows and so massively improved over the last several decades to be almost unbelievable statistically.........more media outlets available to transmit and repeat continuously bad news does not mean any one lunitic has won or that we should throw up our hands and off-handily equate a racist unhinged imbecile like D Trump to an accomplished, intelligent person like H Clinton. God help the world if a majority of voters in the US were ever to make that mistake......You are onto something about the WWW and the overload of information. Driving down Bayview today, a survey of other people in cars around me was around 70 % of drivers checking their devices for texts while driving......Frightenning and astonishing to think that such a high number of people are finding it necessary to "check in/ check up" on something.


Entered at Sat Jul 9 06:28:53 CEST 2016 from (67.87.216.242)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Bonk, I ain't so sure I believe in The Devil, but i have always said The Devil is digital. For all the benefits, computers & the internet have fucked up everything. I could spend a day going into detail, but you hint at a lot. For one thing, people need to accomplish things. do things, be active many ways. And people need space & separation........When you got bumper cars operating at high speed,people have become more complacent, more fucking dumb, less active.....more explosive or more explosive more quickly.................events need space between em too.....Goodnight folks


Entered at Sat Jul 9 04:34:13 CEST 2016 from (24.69.0.104)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: Scary Times

I remember coming out of a coffee shop on the morning of 9/11 and a guy saying to me 'the world will never be the same' A day or two later Bin Laden said his whole point was to upset and change the way most of us in a free world thought. I'm sorry but I think he won. For now. I can't believe that the next presidential election has two people in the running that are so lame, so not worthy. And it seems like the american people are accepting this. Up here in Canada we have baby Trudeau, who I actually like, but is so far out of his realm in world leadership that it's scary. Now, I know that a lot of the people that came before in running things were assholes. But at least you could sleep at night knowing that some one was in charge. Even if sadly, they talked out of both sides of their mouths. It now seems like no one is in charge. Any where in the world. It's all gone sideways. My personal opinion is that the world wide web has caused most of these problems. I'm gonna get shit on for this statement but in my mind it's true. Most people were not ready for this. It's become brain info overload. Too much info for younger people. And you know what? That bastard bin laden got the drift.


Entered at Fri Jul 8 15:56:02 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

When we were in the USA in 2014, the most moving and memorable visit was the Civil Rights Museum in Memphis. What struck me so strongly was the memory of all those descriptions of how Dr King was "shot on the balcony of his Memphis hotel." It sounded quite posh. Look up the Lorraine Motel. A better description would be "shot on the walkway of his budget motel." It's how words insidiously change perceptions.


Entered at Fri Jul 8 15:37:35 CEST 2016 from (184.66.35.201)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: 'The horror, the horror!'

Mike Nomad: I agree. Another tough time. How sad to see police and citizens losing their lives. It is frightening (again).


Entered at Fri Jul 8 14:29:42 CEST 2016 from (174.88.216.50)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: Scary times

Jeff: Too . . . many . . . effing . . . guns. . . . Throw racial attitudes into the mix and you have what you're seeing. It's gonna be a long hot summer.


Entered at Fri Jul 8 14:02:21 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Politics x 2

Maths: Norb, the only relevant song is "If 6 Were 9" … on the Easy Rider OST for a Band connection.

Mrs V points out that we could have female leaders in Germany, Britain AND the USA by next year. Britain is certain as both candidates are women, and even if they call an election, the chances are that Angela Eagle will have replaced Corbyn for Labour making that an all female contest too. She thinks this will bring more compromise and sensible discussion and peace. I unfortunately mentioned Margaret Thatcher at that point, and now wish I hadn’t. Muttering Indira Ghandi and Golda Meir as I left the room was also a mistake.

Does the USA not have a crime of “Inciting Racial Hatred” on the statute book? If so, why isn’t this Joe Walsh guy behind bars?


Entered at Fri Jul 8 13:55:14 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Simone Felice

Nothing on his website. I heard he was doing The Convent in Stroud – not too bad for you, and a 150 seat chapel venue. Trouble is afterwards it's virtually impossible to get the car through the gate onto the narrow lane without a five point turn with steep hill starts. I've just e-mailed The Convent … it's not on their "Forthcoming list." I've also asked Winchester,


Entered at Fri Jul 8 13:52:52 CEST 2016 from (86.171.77.136)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Thanks

Forgot about Frampton Comes Alive. Played it this morning.

Great stuff, Bob.

Look at You Tube for Karine Polwart. She also has had some impact down your way. But also look up the late Michael Marra, who wrote that song. Sometimes described as Scotland's greatest songwriter.

Enjoyed Trini Lopez and the Shadows. Never thought I would like the drum solo. Twenty minute drum solos put me off concerts.


Entered at Fri Jul 8 13:39:23 CEST 2016 from (87.144.161.153)

Posted by:

Norbert

Roger; For all those future Brexit referenda to come, please send them votes, in a sealed box, to Germany, we will let you know who won.


Entered at Fri Jul 8 12:55:53 CEST 2016 from (83.249.182.32)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoasters

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Peter's Brexit Blues

I entered the scene. I picked up my banjo. I tuned it. (Applauses!!!) I said: "If you liked the tuning so much you'll probably like the playing even more." (BTW I learned this from Ravi Shankari in the 70s.) "I play this to my Internet friend Peter (Stormy applauses!!!) who is not comfortable with Brexit. Consequently, it is called for "Peter's Brexit Blues". It goes like this: (Stormy applauses!!!)

(C7) Peter's typing and posting too,
(F7) Peter's posting another one too.
(G7) But has he ever build a Spit...
(C)...fire in scale 1 : 72 ?

(C7) Peter's typing and posting too,
(F7) Peter's posting another one too.
(G7) But has he ever tasted a Yorkshire...
(C)... pudding with a pint or two?

(C7) Peter's typing and posting too,
(F7) Peter's posting another one too.
(G7) But has he ever wrapped a haddock
(C) Inside The Times page two?

Then, trying to avoid the bras and panties flying in the air I walked straight to the Table Of The Stars.


Entered at Fri Jul 8 12:03:49 CEST 2016 from (86.31.229.95)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: EUrope

Subject: Oh, and Norbert...

... there's an error in line 5 - no wonder they won😊.


Entered at Fri Jul 8 11:43:10 CEST 2016 from (86.31.229.95)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Europe

Subject: Odds and ends

1. Jeff - the Dallas shootings were the lead story on UK news. Yesterday the Louisiana and Minneapolis shootings featured prominently. Awful times.

2. Dunc - thanks for the thought and the Karine Polwart track - she's now on my radar. I didn't know her before but the video was terrific. Might be another good reason to move to Scotland!

3. Peter - Simone Felice is at St Pancras Old Church on October 14th. I can't find other listings yet but I'll wait to see whether he comes to Birmingham as usual before travelling.


Entered at Fri Jul 8 11:30:44 CEST 2016 from (87.144.161.153)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: The Peter for the older and wiser

If 1% = 2%
Then: 3% = 4%
4% = 6% and so on, finally 0% will equal 100%
The possibilities are endless, that’s what I like most about the Peter.


Entered at Fri Jul 8 10:55:50 CEST 2016 from (87.144.161.153)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: Math: The Peter

a%=b%
a%2 = ab%
a%2 + a%2 = a%2 + ab%
2 a%2 = a%2 + ab%
2 a%2 - 2ab% = a%2 - ab%
2 a%2 - 2ab% = a%2 + ab% - ab%
2 a%2 - 2ab% = a%2 - ab%
2 (a%2 - ab%) = 1( a%2 - ab%)
2% = 1%
1% = 2%


Entered at Fri Jul 8 10:46:30 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Location: Europe

Subject: Live albums

Too Late To Stop now … Van Morrison, just reissued with volumes 2, 3, 4. Has to be Top ten.

Live Rhymin' by Paul Simon, has already been mentioned, and is great because things are different, not just nearly but not quite faithful renditions.

Last week my local secondhand shop was playing "Real Live Roadrunning" by Mark Knopfler & Emmylou Harris, an album that had totally passed me by. I'd never seen it even. Anyway, I parted with £3 and it's very good.


Entered at Fri Jul 8 09:13:30 CEST 2016 from (66.68.56.15)

Posted by:

Crazy Chester

Location: Austin, TX
Web: My link

Subject: Top 50 Live Albums...The Last Waltz at #33

That is by far too low.


Entered at Fri Jul 8 07:22:08 CEST 2016 from (67.87.216.242)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

It's a scary in the U.S. of A. again. We went from killing politicians and social leaders during 1960s political campaigns, to... well..... Cops are killing innocent people here again, at a high rate, Three recently,One white guy in Fresno, two black men, one in Louisiana, one in Minnesota. and now, at a protest in Dallas, snipers killed 4 cops and wounded a pile more. There are no great leaders to make speeches, and the potent artists to make great songs that got heard, both helped restore balance, well, it;s all a thing of the past... Today, we only feel numb, hopeless, fucked, and on a runaway train.

Killing cops, setting em up and killing em, well,it doesn't justify cops killing innocent people but it gives more creedence to their claims that they kill by mistake cause they have reason to fear for their lives.

It sure seems like things are at boiling point here, and there's no telling what happens nect in the U. S. A.

Scary fucking time.


Entered at Fri Jul 8 04:41:07 CEST 2016 from (67.87.216.242)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Lee, I loved Night After Night. Had it on cassette. still do somewhere.... Website, think cousin moe.


Entered at Fri Jul 8 00:27:29 CEST 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob

Web: My link

Subject: RoseAnn on LocalMotion WVKR Vassar

RoseAnn received airplay for her new song The Drinking Song on Rita Ryan's Hudson Valley show LocalMotion (WVKR Vassar College)yesterday. RoseAnn is the lead song.

The Band connection is Rita interviews Weider during the hour broadcast. I guess technically I should say Reformed Band connection.


Entered at Thu Jul 7 21:05:03 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Rock & Roll Animal

Agreed, I saw that band live. Definitely one for the list. For The Byrds, the second disc of Untitled with the live Eight Miles High occupying a side.


Entered at Thu Jul 7 20:47:59 CEST 2016 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

bassmanlee

Subject: Just one more thing, Maam...

Live records: Lou Reed - Rock N' Roll Animal! Steve Hunter and Dick Wagner (who would later support Alice Cooper) were fee-effin-nominal.

Nils Lofgren had a pretty good run with Night By Night and has released several others over the years. My fave is Code of the Road (1986), which I bought from him at a show.

No address, Jeff. What website?


Entered at Thu Jul 7 19:54:14 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Live … early on

Trini Lopez … the drum sound is different to the single, and in spite of the bass player's non-matching mouth movements, this might be live. What do you think?

Johnny Rivers was another who made a big deal out of recording live.

The Motortown Revue, Paris is a good one from 1965.


Entered at Thu Jul 7 19:26:03 CEST 2016 from (67.87.216.242)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Lee,somewhere i have your email,but have no recollection of what it is. If you have mine, or can find it on my website, holler at me.


Entered at Thu Jul 7 17:57:32 CEST 2016 from (24.114.71.219)

Posted by:

Kevin J

"Frampton Comes Alive" - such great memories. "Lines on my Face"...."Do you Feel Like We Do"....."Baby, I Love your Way"...."Show me the Way".....one of THE albums of the 70's and a truly great live album as all the songs sounded so much better live than on the studio albums.....thank you, bassmanlee.


Entered at Thu Jul 7 17:50:42 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Live sound of 1962

Try "Little B" by The Shadows from 1962's Live at the ABC Kingston. Two points … drum sound for the era, and engineers have assured it really is live, and the fact that it's a template with all the moves that became a cliché for later Brit drum solos. Brian Bennett on drums.


Entered at Thu Jul 7 17:30:42 CEST 2016 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

bassmanlee

Location: PA/DE, USA

Subject: NME List Omissions

Europe '72 by The Grateful Dead, Johnny Winter And Live, Frampton Comes Alive, to name a few...

Passed on The Weight. Could not handle waiting several hours in the sun and heat for the show to start. Yeah, what a wimp. (But the sun and I do not get along well.)


Entered at Thu Jul 7 15:33:58 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: NME 'live' album list

You know me Fred - any list, along with any publication compiling said list, which fails to include at the very head of its selected nominees the names of Bruce, Bob Seger, Gene Clark, The Gourds, The Saw Doctors, Creedence, The Fannies together with a rider acknowledging the uniquely awesome talent of RoseAnn Fino is by definition a pile of fucking crap!

:-0)


Entered at Thu Jul 7 15:13:13 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Si and Brexit

Si, I'm still waiting with baited breath for Part 2 before I can formulate a considered response that doesn't simply pay lip service to the earnestness of what you wrote in Part 1. I'm presuming amongst other things Part 2 brings into focus the immigration issue, particularly its impact on arl arses, which is clearly so integral to how the entire thing panned out. By all means send it to my e-mail [aledgeatblueyonederdotcodotuk] if you feel you've taken it as far as you feel comfortable in doing in here.

:-0)


Entered at Thu Jul 7 15:11:15 CEST 2016 from (86.171.77.136)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland
Web: My link

Subject: EU version of Springsteen

Here's the EU version of 'Dancing in the Dark'. At least a Scottish-German version.

My son and wife saw Bruce's recent Glasgow show and thought it was brilliant...as usual.


Entered at Thu Jul 7 14:15:48 CEST 2016 from (86.171.77.136)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland
Web: My link

Subject: Cheer up, Roger

Things could be worse, Roger. Enjoy this brilliant song you old folkie.


Entered at Thu Jul 7 12:23:55 CEST 2016 from (86.31.229.95)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Europe

Subject: Poles apart

Bill - it's '...those poles...' which scared the s**t out of so many who voted leave! Well presented Simon - but as so much in politics - and in life - we have different perspectives. The palpable lies pushed out as promises by Gove, Johnson, Leadsom and Farage (and Gisele Stuart from my own party) considerably damaged our democracy.


Entered at Thu Jul 7 11:40:15 CEST 2016 from (86.171.77.136)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Thanks, Fred

From the list, I play 7 of the albums regularly, but would be pleased to own another four of them. (These are by artists I play regularly).

Live albums I value:

'Rock of Ages';

John Martyn, Danny Thompson with Arran Ahmun - 'The Brewery Arts Centre, Kendal 1986';

Michael Marra, McFalls Chamber 2010;

Dan Penn and Spooner Oldham 'Moments From This Theatre';

NeilYoung - 'Massey Hall 1971';

Stimela - 'Live';

Paul Simon - 'Live Rhymin';

The Byrds - 'Live at the Fillmore 1969';

Carole King and James Taylor - 'Live at the Troubadour';

Joe Cocker - 'Mad Dogs and Englishmen';

Rick Danko - 'Live On Breeze Hill';

Van Morrison - 'Live at Austin City Limits Festival';

Leonard Cohen - 'Live in London';

Isn't this a great list guys? And what catholic taste.

Thanks Fred.

Back to the politics.


Entered at Thu Jul 7 11:24:19 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Live Albums

I’m a keen collector of early live material. Some, like Eddie Cochran on early TV and radio is astonishing on performance. Some, like Trini Lopez Live At PJs is very well recorded (Mickey Jones!!!) and given its date and atmosphere, I'd list it in a Top 20. Some, like Joey Dee & The Starliters at the Peppermint Lounge is badly recorded but huge on atmosphere.

An oddity I always praise in the context is the CD-only “The Cliff Richard Show: Live at the ABC Kingston 1962” which was intended to be a live album and it got shelved, probably because they were selling so well then they couldn't squeeze another album in. The drum sound and bass sound of The Shadows is well ahead of the expected at the time and a tribute to the engineers.


Entered at Thu Jul 7 08:12:57 CEST 2016 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Kevin: Yes, the comments about each album were dismal. Some more than others.


Entered at Thu Jul 7 07:15:14 CEST 2016 from (24.114.71.219)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Fred & Simon

Fred........I admit to liking most lists - just because there is usually one or two nuggets amongst the rubble.......The NME list was shoddy ( look no further than the listing of Ringo and Neil Diamond in the "What's to like" part about TLW or the absurd comment that "The Song Remains the Same" found the Zep Four "each at their peak".......say what ! The nugget? For me.....The White Stripes album.....I had no knowledge of this.

Simon: a brilliant post on Brexit. Bravo ! The wafting through the screen bit was as good as this sort of disgust conveyance writing gets.


Entered at Thu Jul 7 06:20:35 CEST 2016 from (64.229.12.12)

Posted by:

Bill M

Found myself in a bookstore that had "Small Town Talk" on the shelves. Naturally I turned to the "Shape I'm In" chapter for a quick scan. What caught my eye right away was a Michael Friedman (sp?) talking about Albert and Robbie making everything so hush-hush and precious (my words) and that "Everybody was like that, except Levon, Rick and Richard". Hmm, that would leave who, Garth, who is famous anyway for not talking all that much anyway. I think that Hoskyns, as an "acclaimed author" (as it says right on the jacket) should do more than just arrange quotes. Maybe he does so elsewhere in the book, but I couldn't be bothered.

sadavid: I think we're moving from a 1% world to 0.1% - and beyond, with or without the EU. I'm confident, though certainly not happy, that Britain's proletariat will find itself facing neo-Thatcherism rather than a welcoming workers' paradise.


Entered at Thu Jul 7 06:15:20 CEST 2016 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Peter V

I wondered about that omission too.


Entered at Thu Jul 7 00:06:01 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Live albums

Fred, any list of great live albums which doesn't have Bob Marley & The Wailers Live At The Lyceum in the Top Five isn't worth looking at.


Entered at Wed Jul 6 16:52:16 CEST 2016 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

bassmanlee

Location: PA/DE, USA
Web: My link

Subject: Is The Weight worth it?

Contemplating (weather permitting) going to see The Weight this evening at an outdoor venue. It gives me several hours to kill after work and before it starts and makes a reasonably late night (an hour or more from home). Has anyone seen this lineup? Is it worth the effort? Bob W, you in?


Entered at Wed Jul 6 10:51:27 CEST 2016 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Web: My link

Subject: Top 50 Live Albums...according to the NME

The Last Waltz at #33 and Before The Flood at #29.

Rock of Ages.....not on the list.

Most baffling (for me at least): The Song Remains The Same at #12. Really? While it does have a moment or two, on the whole it stinks. And I say this as a Led Zep fan.


Entered at Wed Jul 6 01:59:52 CEST 2016 from (97.33.65.104)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: My 2 Cents

Not a lot of time to comment in depth at the moment, except to say I can generally stomach the fact that someone who hires me and pays me probably is wealthier than me. I have a harder time with the contradiction of our elected representatives (public servants) invariably becoming multi-millionaires while claiming to understand the struggles of the working class. I guess it's all about having the right connections.

On short, I expect a capitalist titan of industry to be a greedy bastard....that's seems to go with the territory. But when the peole who are supposed to be looking out for the little guy turn into greedy bastards, then something is out of whack.


Entered at Tue Jul 5 22:58:54 CEST 2016 from (86.171.77.136)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Reviews

Enjoyed the reviews, Peter. Would really have liked to have seen Carole King. I still play Tapestry, Writer and the live album with James Taylor frequently. Thanks.


Entered at Tue Jul 5 22:35:21 CEST 2016 from (131.137.34.214)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: hint: more toward the right bookend . . .

Bill M: This is from the W'pedia entry on "World Communism":

"Marxist philosophy held that because capitalism had become global (and thus capitalists could be expected to cooperate internationally to maintain dominance in class conflict), the proletariat would need to cooperate internationally as well, via proletarian internationalism, to avoid continued subjugation via divide and rule (thus the rallying cry of workers of the world, unite!)"

It's been well demonstrated that the rich _are_ getting richer, which tells me which way the plot's thickening. More than one pundit has proposed that the Brexit vote was due to the proletariat's similar perception.


Entered at Tue Jul 5 21:34:14 CEST 2016 from (24.114.67.247)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: plotting bookends

Peter V: Today's the first I've heard that the EU is a Marxist plot. But then, it's also the first I've heard of it being a 1%-er plot. I'm confident that the truth lies somewhere between those poles.


Entered at Tue Jul 5 17:53:33 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Location: Europe
Web: My link

Subject: Michael Kiwanuka

Fourth and final Hyde Park review, Michael Kiwanuka, who surprisingly lists "The Band" when asked about his influences! Very good he is, too.


Entered at Tue Jul 5 17:44:39 CEST 2016 from (174.88.216.50)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: Henley-King-Goffin

Extremely readable reviews, Mr. Viney. You possess a casual yet encyclopedic style that attempts to capture the essence of a song, singer's mood and the performance itself, with a lot of informative goodies thrown in. Nice! (Watch those danglers, though . . . okay, just one.)


Entered at Tue Jul 5 16:03:25 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Si, thanks for the 37.4% calculation which I can now repeat. Laziness with the calculator got me there. The US Senate requires a two thirds majority for treaties and impeachments. That makes sense to me for major constitutional issues.

My younger son writes to me from China in much the same terms as you (though not as articulately) and also sees the EU as a huge Marxist plot. I’d say the reverse and that Vlad The Impaler with Poisoned Umbrellas (aka Putin) is the one enjoying the potential breakup most keenly.

I don’t know where this Marxist plot behind the EU comes from … is it some Brexit rewrite of the Protocols of the Elders of Zion?

I travelled to Hungary in 1988 before The Berlin Wall fell, and again in 1990 when I also went to Poland and I’ve been to both a few times since. I was talking to teachers and doing teacher training, and of course everyone was a member of the Communist party then … they wouldn’t have got a job in a school otherwise. They were desperate to get out and tear up those membership cards, and did so with glee. It probably wasn’t all bad … I heard happy memories of Young Pioneer camps, and I will say several of the high schools even in 1988 put ours to shame in terms of equipment, class size and facilities.


Entered at Tue Jul 5 15:42:38 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Jeff: The Carole King website lists the other people at the show … there were two or three minor stages around the food court area. I reckon it's all there now except the second backing vocalist … Michelle John is a well-known singer here. I'd guess therefore the other was British too.


Entered at Tue Jul 5 15:38:15 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Location: Europe
Web: My link

Subject: Louise Goffin

Third review up, one to go. This is Louise Goffin, Carole King's daughter, the one Little Eva was employed to babysit.

Thank, Jeff - that all makes sense. I'll amend.


Entered at Tue Jul 5 15:31:36 CEST 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Reviews by Peter V

Thank you, Peter. These reviews of Hyde Park were so good and complete that...well I'm sorry I wasn't there (and I am no longer a fan of outdoor events). I just listened to 'Tapestry' again and the melodies are all infectious. The songs evoke a time of innocence and human sensitivity.I wonder if today's kids 'get it'.


Entered at Tue Jul 5 12:04:02 CEST 2016 from (173.3.48.109)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Pete, thanks for the reviews & I'm glad you so thoroughly enjoyed yourself.. There are some oddities between the actual lineup, & what is listed on her website. I don't know the correct full lineup. But

It certainly was Kortchmar on guitar. Robbie Kondor , previously married to King's daughter Sherry, was on keys. Photos looked like Sean Pelton on drums, and very possibly ( added to your educated partially heard guess) that coulda been been Zev Katz on bass. Dillon Kondor is Carole's grandson, the son of Robbie & Sherry, & likely was along on guitar.Louise for sure.

King's website oddly lists the band as Michael Kiwanuka, Louise Goffin, Ed Harcourt, Rae Morris, RY X, Ward Thomas, Billie Marten, Flyte,Clare Maguire, Isaac Gracie and Meadowlark. Very peculiar.


Entered at Tue Jul 5 11:37:03 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: PV

Only joking btw P - I am getting there! It's two paragraphs!!

Nah - it's really good - really enjoying it.

:-0)


Entered at Tue Jul 5 11:34:51 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Yet another scouse polemicist on the GB!!!

Si

I've printed it out to read later. I won't make the same mistake as I'm doing with Pete's book which is to take it to bed and nod off after a paragraph!!

I'm assuming part 2 is following so I'll leave it til then. Initial scan through reveals real genuine passion for the subject in hand - which is always a box ticked in my book. So I look forward to devouring it.

Did you decipher my e-mail addy?


Entered at Tue Jul 5 11:29:37 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Location: Europe
Web: My link

Subject: Carole King in Hyde Park

Link to my full review of the headliner at Hyde Park, Carole King doing Tapestry in full for the first time ever. When I worried about ticket prices and standing up all day, Jeff A told me it was an unrepeatable life time event. Many thanks, Jeff. You were 100% right. Danny Kortchmar was there … I think I only vaguely heard the names of the rest of the band. Corrections welcome. Two more Hyde Park reviews to follow.


Entered at Tue Jul 5 09:31:17 CEST 2016 from (68.196.222.188)

Posted by:

Ari

Subject: pushin age 73

I'm guessing Robbie's listening to Jupiter Hollow tonight. Happy 72 ...next year he buy a custom Ontario-made Rockin Chair. I now realize that as it's turned out, Ragtime Willy was always Garth Hudson.


Entered at Tue Jul 5 04:40:34 CEST 2016 from (24.114.71.206)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: sore winners

And the gold medal goes to ... Simon at the GB!!


Entered at Tue Jul 5 03:57:55 CEST 2016 from (86.152.159.80)

Posted by:

Simon

Location: Islington towers where the view is often obscured by thick mists
Web: My link

Subject: Part 1 of 2

Prelude: Having Your Future Stolen Away From You

"And I'm pushin' age seventy-three ..."
"Hey, up yours, Gramps, you're gonna be dead soon, you old fart. Pushin' up daisies, more like. Tee hee hee"

[Pushes wheelchair down staircase à la Richard Widmark]

***************************************************************
Chapter One: Why I've Been a Very Naughty Boy

Hello again, Al. I wanted to give you a more considered response. This might be a long one but as I've never felt the need to apologize for excessive length before I'm not going to start now. I've always found it's appreciated. Besides, I'm in good company.

Voting was probably the hardest decision I've ever had to make. After all, as you point out the potential ramifications regarding funding being cut in the most deprived areas of the country are worrying. We simply do not know how it'll play out in the long run. A lot of people on various forums seemed to have turned into experts on trade and finance overnight. These are the doom mongers and catastrophists I talked of last week. But these folks seem to have an almost blind faith in the superstate that is the EU. It's like a law of inverse proportion. The more they spout their monetary speculations the less they have to say about the very real democracy and sovereignty issues that were -- and still are -- at stake. You read stuff like "Yeah, it does need some reform but, hey, we need to stay in. We can worry about that later. We'll get together with like-minded members, put pressure on the EU and we'll get change." That sort of thing.

That change would never happen. It's just the nature of the beast. A lot has been made of the political leanings of various bigwigs and commissioners and it might be overstating things somewhat to claim that it's riddled with communists and far leftists but it's undoubtedly true that many of the more powerful members are communists. It's undeniable. "Ex-communist" is bollocks. I think back to the short lived EU symbol from 2011. You might remember it. A large yellow star comprised of a seemingly random arrangement of religious symbols (not dissimilar to the "Coexist" symbol and just as barf-inducing), featuring a higher count of the crescent moon/star combo than the cross. Yet Europe is still largely a Christian continent as far as I'm concerned and hopefully always will be. Curiously the uppermost symbol on the star was, you guessed it, the hammer and sickle. Now, I don't consider that a religious symbol. But the placement was very telling all the same.

I'm not even going to elaborate on why I find that "problematic" (to use a word so beloved by SJWs and campus lefties) because it should be obvious. Jose Manuel Barroso was President of the EU Commission for what, nine or ten years? He's a communist. Not only that but he was a Maoist in his younger days. Now that's communism on steroids. Angela Merkel is commie ex-Stasi. A truly repulsive specimen if ever there was one.

What do people in the US and Canada make of all this? Surely they can't just soft-pedal this stuff? I can imagine some questioning the sanity of those who voted to Leave. "Are they nuts? Where are their hearts? Don't they want to be part of something bigger? Are they just insular low IQ Little Englanders? Don't they want to be continental and sophisticated?" Maybe they think the EU is comparable to a US-style federation. It's not. The best comparison would be to a Soviet-style bloc. You need a Philadelphia lawyer to scratch the surface and to understand even a minuscule fraction of how the EU works and how its gears grind. There's a reason why it's often described as "Kafkaesque". It's deliberately set up that way. I mean "trilogues", for God's sake. It's impossible to make head nor tail of this stuff.

When the 1975 referendum took place the British people were assured that the EEC (as it was then) was all about facilitating trade and it was made abundantly clear to the voters that political union was NOT on the agenda. So they voted to stay in. They didn't vote for what we have now. Perhaps John Major should have ensured that we had a referendum over Maastricht. Had that been the case it's instructive to note that the older people then would have been the WW2 generation. Sadly most of them are no longer with us but I can only speculate what the response would have been had the result and voting patterns been the same as ten days ago. Would they have received the same opprobrium? Mercifully that heroic generation have largely been spared the indignity of having to breathe the same air as certain pissy, spoiled Millennials. Which brings me to ...

**********************************************************
Chapter Two: Generation Snowflake and the Big Bad Rebellious Rock Stars of 2016

So as not to appear too curmudgeonly I'd like to talk about Holly. This young person was featured in a YouTube video filmed in Downing Street or its environs the day after the referendum. I won't link to the video but it's easy enough to find if you so desire. Holly was alright and I did feel a twinge of compassion for her that was almost fatherly. She was holding a (yawn) Socialist Worker placard -- strange because the SWP were pro-Leave -- and she gave her reasons for being on the Remain side. I won't elaborate because I do feel bad for her; suffice to say she wasn't the sharpest knife in the drawer.

She seemed like a decent person with a good heart though. You can just tell with some people. Type of girl you'd approve of if your son brought her home to introduce as his girlfriend, despite the weird clothes and get-up. There was a refreshing lack of bitterness and rancour in her, even when the interviewer revealed himself as a Leaver. Sadly it became apparent she hadn't availed herself of any information whatsoever regarding the EU.

Contrast her with the shower of gobshites -- honourable exceptions being Mr Farage and supporters -- in the above video (see link). This lot were the main catalyst for me writ(h)ing this screed. The blue-haired uptalker who can't seem to utter a sentence without it sounding like a question was pretty annoying. And there's not a lot I can say about Tiny Tears; she's more than eloquent in her whininess. Judge for yourself. She's probably the most offensive of all. As for the Glastonbury crusties, well, you can almost smell the clothing mould and yeast infections wafting through the screen.

Isn't it edifying to know that half (I'm being generous here) of those festival goers just couldn't be bothered to vote but that didn't stop them spending the evening on MDMA twirling around in a field while swinging a light sabre? Hugs all around, dahlings. Mwah, mwah.

But the musicians aren't getting off scot free. How did we ever get to the point where these bad boys -- just look at all that black leather -- can come out firmly FOR corporations and multinationals, big government and a meddlesome nanny superstate, maintaining the status quo at all costs, and billionaire insider trader and all around evil bastard George Soros?

Same goes for Bono, Bob Geldof, Jarvis Cocker et al.

So bold, so radical, so edgy.

What a bunch of pussies.

*************************************************************************
Chapter Three: Taking an 89th Minute Dive in the Penalty Area

The poor losers who are so vocal in the mainstream media are determined to get their way. Some seem to think Parliament will somehow not follow through, that those MPs will find a way to renege. And they may well be right about that. Some pundits throw around the not too surprising fact that the majority of MPs were in favour of staying in the EU.

No shit, Sherlock? Quite a few MPs -- not all because a handful have some integrity -- already have one beady eye on their post-Parliamentary careers in Brussels. A very generous six figure salary and a whole heaping helping of allowances, perks and expenses await. A sweet, sweet deal if ever there was one. You don't even have to do that much work. Call it the "Neil Kinnock effect."

Even if the losers get their way the victory will be hollow. Cheats never prosper and that knowledge will slowly gnaw at their souls. Had the Brexiteers lost by 65 to 35 or something in that neighbourhood then it's safe to say they would have taken it on the chin for the most part and accepted the will of the people, regardless of the overall turnout. But if they'd lost 51 to 49 it could've been seen as a win-win. The genie would have been partly out of the bottle. If the losers connive and contrive to get their way then how will the rest of the world see them? Likewise if their extended collective footstamping and holding their breath until they pass out manages to force a second referendum -- I doubt that'll happen but you never know -- then it reflects equally as badly on them. The whole world will be watching. But we'll have to wait and see what happens.

[As an aside I have to ask Peter why he keeps repeating the old "51.9% of 72% which comes out as 36%" line. (It's actually 37.4% ... if you round it to the nearest whole number then it's 37%) If the result had gone the other way -- 51.9% Remain against 48.1% Leave on a 72% turnout -- would he countenance for a picosecond a Leave supporter making the same argument? Like he wouldn't say "the people have spoken, it was a democratic process, and although the margin wasn't huge it wasn't negligible either so you need to get over it. What's done is done." On second thoughts the chances of him answering this question honestly are about 0.00000000000134675%]

[crickets]


Entered at Tue Jul 5 03:04:56 CEST 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: Mixed Bag and Elmore Magazine

Yes, Al is correct. We're super delighted! Can't thank John D enough.

Also, check out the great feature RoseAnn just got in Elmore Magazine.


Entered at Tue Jul 5 01:07:05 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: That should be JD's show on Saturday July 16th of course [not July 17th]

Must stop getting over-excited and losing track of days!!!

:-0)


Entered at Tue Jul 5 01:00:17 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: John Donabie's Mixed Bag Show Saturday July 17th featuring RoseAnn Fino

So delighted with this news John as I know Bob and RoseAnn and family are and your Liverpool listeners will also be.

I'll say it again mate - you're a star!!!

Thanks so much.

:-0)


Entered at Mon Jul 4 21:25:39 CEST 2016 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Apologies if this has already been posted

You might already be aware. New Mojo’s cover story is about going inside Blonde On Blonde.

It comes with a CD called Blonde On Blonde Revisited; with groups covering the album.


Entered at Mon Jul 4 17:51:15 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Location: Europe
Web: My link

Subject: Don Henley in Hyde Park

Link to my review of Don Henley in Hyde Park, as support to Carole King yesterday. Carole King review will follow soon!


Entered at Mon Jul 4 12:11:02 CEST 2016 from (173.3.48.109)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: US Justice Dept Consent decree hurts songwriters

read at the link


Entered at Mon Jul 4 10:59:44 CEST 2016 from (82.18.230.252)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Blimey!

Peter V mentions "Cor blimey!". You sometimes used to hear this as "Gor blimey!" which is even closer to "God blind me!".


Entered at Mon Jul 4 08:54:09 CEST 2016 from (5.148.89.130)

Posted by:

Peter V

Location: europe

Subject: statistics

Well, Norbert. Our fabled 51.9% for Brexit works out as 51.9% of 72% which comes out as 36%. All our politicians chant "the people have spoken." Where we're screwed is that the opposition, Labour, has just wanderered off and gone away. They should be standing up and re-iterating the sovereignty of parliament. They all lined up to get rid of Corbyn last week, then did nothing.


Entered at Mon Jul 4 04:15:51 CEST 2016 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Roseann Fino & Al Edge

Al, I'm off next week. Show has been pre-empted for Afro Fest here in Toronto. I will be featuring your favourite girl on July 16 just after 3:00 pm Eastern Time, 8:00-9:00 pm your time.


Entered at Sun Jul 3 22:55:12 CEST 2016 from (87.144.161.153)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: my pan flute

This afternoon the Brexit got me emotional so I grabbed my pan flute, walked up the hill, turned west, took a deep breath and flute my lungs out on Dixie. The fresh air helped me thinking and as I blew the high notes into the short left pipes, this week’s Dutch poll came into my mind:

1) Will the EU collapse within 10 years ? yes: 46% (2011: 32%)
2) The Netherlands out of the EU? Yes: 37% (2011: 25%)
3) Out of the Euro? Yes:40% (2011: 25%)
4) We should never have given the Gilder away? Yes: 50%
5) Are you concerned about the outbreak of a new world war? Yes: 44% (2011: 17%)

Are we on the eve of war? (if Jeff’s Pizza’s doesn’t kill us first).

Whilst blowing the mid-section; Maybe this unexpected Brexit made some of us smile behind our hand, but that smile will perish. Watching this Brexit mess unroll one must be aware that this ‘Machiavellian’ soap could become a threat for all of us.

A weak democracy and recession added with some demagogy can become a deadly poison with catastrophically consequences, both literally and figuratively. About time to leave the Brexit playground.

Maybe Merkel, who also knows Weimar, will stay calm and do the right thing. So this time Germany could, after setting the world on fire twice (and after beating France next Sunday), help to save it now.

I took a deep breath again and as I blew the long low thundering bas section, I just wondered;

Precisely 100 years after the Somme this would make England the new Germany and Germany the new England (roll over Beethoven and Shakespeare).

I dried my flute by turning it upside down, bowed my head and walked home.


Entered at Sun Jul 3 20:01:06 CEST 2016 from (24.114.65.31)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: From Robbie Robertson's Facebook page.....

"Scotty Moore's guitar sound and style on those Sun recordings with Elvis slayed me. His rhythm and solos were as full as a whole orchestra. He changed the life of guitar players all over the world. Sam Philips was a genius for putting him together with Elvis-- a perfect fit ! I was helpful in getting Scotty inducted into the Rock n Roll Hall Of Fame. A moment I am deeply proud of. Bless his soul" - RR


Entered at Sun Jul 3 16:07:17 CEST 2016 from (67.84.77.236)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: NYC Pizza Deaths

Figuratively literal. The whole world is dying. It's only a question of how quickly the business leaders & political leaders kill us. If we're gonna get blown up, maimed to pieces, or suffocated slowly. While great pizza still exists in Brooklyn, I still prefer the leader that will choke us for 9 or 10 bars, give us a few gasps of breath on the last few.


Entered at Sun Jul 3 15:41:31 CEST 2016 from (67.84.77.236)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

The real gems are the select one eared & one nut GBers. (When both deficits are same sided they list to one side)


Entered at Sun Jul 3 15:17:30 CEST 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Explanations

Ian, a very comprehensive explanation thank you. I was just funning with youze guys.

Thank you Peter, and Al. Carl! good to hear from you and that sounds like great fun. Wish I was there. If you have the chance, give my best regards to Lorne.

I'm away to Port Hardy this morning. Just installed a new exhaust system in Westcoaster. Some tidying up to do today to finish it as I have to leave on a long job tomorrow. Stay on the Rockin Chair tonight as Susan has to go down the island to help her sister for a couple of days. The Rockin Chair is looking a little sad. I've been so busy I haven't had time to get her bright work cleaned up.

A big helicopter logging company I do a lot of work for are making serious noises about buying my outfit now. I'm doing every thing in my power to make it happen so I can begin to enjoy some freedom..........


Entered at Sun Jul 3 13:43:49 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: One-eared GBers

Ha ha

Made me howl!

:-0)


Entered at Sun Jul 3 12:22:07 CEST 2016 from (83.249.182.32)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Peter V/ Van Gogh

Although we have a long history of one-eared gbers I was thinking of Vincent's correspondence with the friend Theodorius. (Most likely Norbert's competence.)


Entered at Sun Jul 3 12:07:46 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Hey Norm

I was gonna say Jumpin' Jehosapha or even Blimey O'Riley but thought I'd stick with plain Blimey!!

ha ha

:-0)


Entered at Sun Jul 3 09:44:07 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

"wretch" is right,


Entered at Sun Jul 3 09:42:34 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Cor Blimey!

As Ian says, it's "God blind me." It's often said as "Cor, Blimey!" which makes that clearer. You can just say "Blimey!" or just say "Cor!" though "Cor" on its own is usually appreciation as well as a surprise. If uncouth, one might say it when a shapely female walked past. "Cor!"

I'd say you hear it much less nowadays because the stronger swearwords have become more acceptable.


Entered at Sun Jul 3 06:12:27 CEST 2016 from (24.69.0.104)

Posted by:

BONK

Location: Salt Spring Island

Subject: Good Times

Hey Norm. Just caught the first set of a band they threw together to-nite with your old buddy Lorne Burns. Lorne/drums, Auntie Kate/vocals, Dave Rolland/bass, Brent Shindel/lead, Matt Steffich/rhythm, and Dave Rouse/sax. The place is just a jumping. You should be down here buddy. Oh yea. They're calling themselves 'Donnie Brook and the Haymakers'


Entered at Sun Jul 3 02:49:56 CEST 2016 from (82.18.230.252)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Blimey!

"Blimey!" expresses surprise, shock even, maybe disbelief and, sometimes, also a touch of annoyance.

It is believed to be a contraction of "God blind me!", an exclamation from centuries back, presumably said by someone who could not believe what they were seeing.


Entered at Sun Jul 3 02:18:54 CEST 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: I gotta KNOW! in my heart........

What in hell does Blimey! mean?? You gawd damn Limeys have been saying that forever........... My Grandma was born in London. She said it all the time......now come clean!

My favourite was coming in the kitchen, sneaking up behind Grandma and yelling GRANDMA!.......she would shriek.... Oh my God! and then call me a little wretch! How in hell do you spell wretch? is that right? I dunno......


Entered at Sat Jul 2 21:14:20 CEST 2016 from (173.3.51.56)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

NWC, since you intuit that pizza & life are intertwined, you must also know the dimensions extend. You will appreciate something i've had in the works too long. It may hit the radar in a week, or in a month. Or ...I'm just hoping I can pull it off.


Entered at Sat Jul 2 19:55:41 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: JD's superb Mixed Bag Show Saturdays 2pm -4pm [7pm - 9pm UK time]

Just about to tune in.

Fingers crossed RoseAnn's feature is this week tho I'm guessing it might be a tad early. Still, John's smooth Grenache tones and his eclectic musical offerings will suffice if not!

:-0)


Entered at Sat Jul 2 19:51:22 CEST 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: More EU shite

Blimey Si - I did wonder for a moment about your stance on this when you mentioned the RAWK thread but sort of thought that you simply felt the outrage and indignation was way OTT. I never had you down as so opposed yourself to the EU. You must have had a dicky fit reading some of the over simplified bile on there.

My own inclinations were to stay - mainly to ensure as much as possible financial ringfencing of funding allocated for the welfare of deprived areas under Tory rule and because like with anything like this the actuality of what happens when you quit something so deeply embedded into a nation's fabric 40 odd years down the line - however open to justifiable criticism it may be - is just so unpredictable that often the devil you know turns out to be preferable to one you don't know.

I'm assuming the e-mail translation didn't work so I'll risk even more gremlins than I already attract and repeat it more coherently - aledgeatblueyonderdotcodotuk

:-0)


Entered at Sat Jul 2 19:08:42 CEST 2016 from (86.141.117.221)

Posted by:

Simon

I agree with what you say about people working here, Peter, and you'll get no argument from me on that score. As you probably have guessed from my surname I'm the son of an immigrant myself, my father fought at Monte Cassino and came over here after WW2. I'll be the first to admit that in depth economics and politics are not my forte but I'm probably not alone in that respect. I think I've got a reasonable grasp of the basics. But I'm sure you can see that people coming over here to work wasn't my point at all. I believe the EU to be on borrowed time now. Its days are numbered and I hope the collapse is rapid. It's buzzard meat now. Tough times are ahead but that was always going to be the case.

I also have to say that the way older people were criticized (to put it mildly) in the days following the referendum was really disheartening. Only 4 out of 10 of people in the 18-24 age bracket bothered to vote. I could be cynical and wonder why they couldn't put down the X-Box/spliff/smartphone for an hour and find the local polling station. Then you read about people going to Glastonbury and wondering why there wasn't a voting booth there. Those people could've a) voted by post b) voted on the Thursday morning and traveled to Glastonbury afterwards.

I have to ask though, Peter, why do you think the EU has preserved the peace for the last 70 years? Why is Angela Merkel not on your list of people with a place reserved in hell.


Entered at Sat Jul 2 18:44:44 CEST 2016 from (79.158.172.127)

Posted by:

Richard

Web: My link

Subject: Piano Players

Well spotted Tom. Will order.

In the meantime, have found a complete episode of Soundstage from 1974 on YouTube with Dr. John, Professor Longhair, The Meters, and Earl King.

Irresistible stuff.


Entered at Sat Jul 2 16:30:15 CEST 2016 from (67.167.98.19)

Posted by:

Tom

Location: NOLA/Chicago

Subject: Piano Players...

Richard, you can get "Piano Players Rarely Ever Play Together" here: http://www.louisianamusicfactory.com/shop/dvd/piano-players-rarely-ever-play-together/

This is well worth seeking out to see the lineage of New Orleans piano through three greats who are no longer with us, and the LMF is a great source for NOLA-related music, posters and DVDs. Enjoy!


Entered at Sat Jul 2 16:13:54 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Location: Europe

The Telegraph have been as pro-Brexit as Murdoch's Sun, the Mail or the rabid Express. This heralded “democratic majority” consists of 51.9% of a 72.16% turnout. So this “democratic mandate” to totally screw up the country is around 36.5%.

Basically, and I'm sure this is what Johnson knew full well, we leave, then we need a trade deal. The price, as for others outside, is free movement of labour and European regulations on goods and services. That will not be negotiable. Result: we are back exactly where we started on both immigration and laws, the difference being that we have thrown away both our vote and our right to veto.

Notice how the places which actually trade, manufacture and educate voted "Remain." The Southern shires where I live were largely "Leave," which is an older population profile, and a local attitude which my grandad described as the Dorset motto: "There be a stranger. Heave half a brick at he."

I was thinking about this on Thursday, in a restaurant in London. lovely young Spanish waitress with excellent English. A very nice Greek table captain with excellent English. These young people have (a) learned a foreign language to a high level (b) had the courage to leave their homes and families, and move to seek work. I hate to say it, but that could be a lesson to their British peers in areas with no work. We are very fortunate to have these intelligent, well-educated, hard-working and enthusiastic young people choosing to live and work in our country. I can only see benefit. As has been pointed out, immigrants pay far more in tax than they take in benefits.

As A.A. Gill said, that EU "red tape" is why workers have rights, you can't beat your children, and we can eat in most restaurants without fearing salmonella. In the last year, only 4 out of 120 bills in Parliament were EU originated.

The British foam at the mouth at the silly bits of Brussels bureaucracy like the size of apples or the shape of potatoes. As a French colleague said, "Why don't you do what the other 27 countries do and ignore them?"

Britain could be at the forefront of a move … popular in many European countries … to pull back the Brussels fat cats from within. Instead, we'll be outside.


Entered at Sat Jul 2 15:27:41 CEST 2016 from (86.141.117.225)

Posted by:

Simon

Web: My link

I'm always astonished by the claims that the EU has ensured peace in Europe for the last seventy years. Link is to piece by Nigel Jones of the Telegraph. Relevant excerpts below:

[Quote] It is, of course, Nato, not the EU, that has kept the peace since World War Two, and the EU which has already worsened – if it did not not directly cause – two armed conflicts on European soil in the former Yugoslavia and the Ukraine. 

The history of EU-style multinational federations imposed by an elite from above in Europe is not a happy one. From the frayed patchworks of the  Holy Roman and Hapsburg Austrian Empires, down to the collapse of Yugoslavia and the Soviet Union, they have invariably ended in bloody chaos, and then the peace and quiet of the graveyard.

Not for nothing did a bemused Mikhail Gorbachev – and as the man who presided over the dissolution of Russia's "evil empire" he should surely know – say that the most puzzling development in Europe over the past decade was the determination of the EU's leaders to reconstruct the Soviet Union, a failed state if there ever was one, on the soil of western Europe. Gorbachev was speaking before the long arm of EU meddling reached as far as Ukraine, causing that vast country to split in two and threaten  war with Vladimir Putin's Russia – a slow-burn crisis that may yet erupt once more into open conflict.

Back in the 1990s, the total failure of EU diplomacy helped speed former Yugoslavia into a brutal ethnic civil war. A fragile peace was finally imposed on those troubled lands not by the EU, but by Nato bombs and arm twisting backed by the Atlantic alliance's  military muscle. 

So the EU's record at actually keeping the peace is fairly shabby. And in fact it is not the bureaucratic and dictatorial edicts of the EU that have kept the peace in Europe, but the forces of trade, travel and globalisation. Meanwhile, it is the imposition of a top-down dictat from Brussels  that is breeding resistance from an increasingly resentful European body politic. [Unquote]


Entered at Sat Jul 2 15:13:11 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Location: Europe

Subject: Back to Mono

What with having only one ear, wouldn't Vincent Van Gogh be better placed on a Brian Wilson or Beach Boys GB? Or perhaps Phil Spector?


Entered at Sat Jul 2 13:50:29 CEST 2016 from (83.249.182.32)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Pizza related (Jeff A)

Jeff, I lost my focus and posted something music related and forgot what is _the meaning_ of life: a pizza. (So you see, I have found the thruth anyway!). You may have seen my pic of a pizza car http://cdn.simplesite.com/i/01/27/282600882142914305/i282600889623775273._rsw360h270_szw360h270_.jpg (also my link). The "clue" of this pic is that VINCENT VAN GOGH lived in the house to the left. The Allied air forces bombed the house during the WW2 and this house is therefore not the original one. I believe they bombed it by accident because the bridge over the Rhone River is still there near this house. - Vincent could have made a good gber and a profitable customer at Pizza Jo!


Entered at Sat Jul 2 12:31:48 CEST 2016 from (83.249.182.32)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania northwest

Subject: Norbert, The Blues (to Jeff A)

Thanks Norbert for your clarification. I am still as stupid as yesterday but on a higher philosophical and intellectual level now. Like Boris.

Jeff, you posted that bles does not sell today. Yes. It certainly did sell in 1967 in Finland. Our leading rock band called themselves for 'BLUES SECTION', even if they didn't pay a single blues song. More likely psychedelic rock, political song movement, jazz rock.


Entered at Sat Jul 2 12:31:12 CEST 2016 from (79.158.172.127)

Posted by:

Richard

Location: St Catharines
Web: My link

Subject: New Orleans Piano

Currently seeking out a copy of the documentary, 'Piano Players Rarely Ever Play Together' (1982), which might appeal to Band fans.

It documents the historic meeting of the three finest New Orleans piano players: Professor Longhair, Tuts Washington and Allen Toussaint.

So far, I've only been able to find a short clip on YouTube (see link), but it looks fascinating.


Entered at Sat Jul 2 12:29:26 CEST 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: First Light

Link to my review of the new play "First Light" about tHe Battle of The Somme. Of all the pals battalions, as Joe says, Newfoundland took the worst loss of all on the day, though there were several in the same sort of area. The play is about two deserters, shot at dawn.Very moving.

And the anniversary of The Somme reminds me why Brexit, organised by buffoons and wildly ambitious arseholes, is such a tragedy. That's why a Western europe with 71 years of peace, facing unprecedented challenges from migration from war zones, should be acting in concert. As one Conservative MP said, there is a place in hell reserved for Gove. I'd add Johnson and Fargage.

Worse the analysis today on radio agrees they have absolutely not a clue what to do next, because they were certain they would lose, but narrowly, and so could use it for jockeying for internal party positions.

The Guardian reports sales are up 70,000 per day. This has not happened to a newspaper in years. this morning I tried the supermarket and two newsagents. All sold out, as more and more of us avoiding putting more money in the hands of the filth (aka press barons) that control the media.


Entered at Sat Jul 2 02:30:31 CEST 2016 from (24.224.128.101)

Posted by:

joe j

Location: Newfoundland
Web: My link

Subject: Memorial Day

See link. One hundred years ago. Battle of the Somme. Beaumont Hamel. The slaughter was the defining moment in our history. The numbers seared in our memory. 801 went 'over the top' that morning; 68 answered the roll call the next day.

I always think of Steve Heggison on this day. Steve was knowledgeable on unexpected things and we had several discussions on this tragic and ultimately useless battle. Catch a Fire my friend..


Entered at Fri Jul 1 22:24:53 CEST 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: RoseAnn Fino at Hifi Records

RoseAnn is opening tonight for one of Woody Guthrie's grandkids at Hifi Records in Astoria Queens.


Entered at Fri Jul 1 22:10:44 CEST 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: All Dolled Up

Kev, absolutely agree about the Dolls Doc. Fantastic.


Entered at Fri Jul 1 21:46:57 CEST 2016 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC
Web: My link

Subject: Van the man...

Looks like Van Morrison's next studio album out this fall will include a cover of Share Your Love With Me.


Entered at Fri Jul 1 21:33:30 CEST 2016 from (67.87.216.10)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Pizza is serious business in Brooklyn

L& B spumoni Gardens is hailed as one of the great pizzerias in the U. S. Fact is, it hasn't been good in well over a decade. However, the place is always a mob scene. Take that any way you want. But it is a large property, with plenty of in & outdoor eating or dining area.

In this article the reporter cites the motive as robbery... http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/slain-brooklyn-pizzeria-owner-10g-cash-article-1.2695872

several years ago the L & B sauce recipe almost sparked a mob war.

extortion case article : http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/mob-sauce-summit-colombos-bonannos-sitdown-suspected-family-recipe-theft-b-spumoni-gardens-article-1.1095311

Main website http://www.spumonigardens.com/our-story

I spent most of yesterday afternoon in that neighborhood, left around 6 Pm i think. A good friend lives on 69yh & 13th ave. Used to be murders there regularly, today it is unusual. It's even unusual for some one to get their head cracked open over there today. Even twenty years ago it was common. Thirty & Forty years ago it was a daily occurrence.


Entered at Fri Jul 1 21:08:02 CEST 2016 from (67.87.216.10)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Don't fence me in........gator jumps fence, on video.


Entered at Fri Jul 1 20:24:21 CEST 2016 from (24.114.65.31)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: New York Doll

On the subject of music documentaries, I've mentioned this before here but among my all time top 5 docs is "New York Doll".........doesn't matter in the least if you were a fan of the Dolls or not........."New York Doll" is the story of Arthur killer Kane, bass player, librarian....and it is flat out brilliant......do see it...you will thank me for this.


Entered at Fri Jul 1 20:24:31 CEST 2016 from (100.2.21.114)

Posted by:

Joan

Happy Canada Day and July 4th to all. Have a safe holiday!


Entered at Fri Jul 1 19:30:06 CEST 2016 from (87.144.161.153)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: Hiking Trails

Ilkka, don’t worry, it was only an excuse to keep my other friend Bill going.

Jed, in front of our house in France there was a little sign saying GR-4 and I noticed a lot of backpackers passing there in the summer. One day I Googled GR 4: means Grande Radonnee 4, that's a network of long-distance footpath in Europe.

The GR-4 trail is about 1000 miles long and connects Royan, at the Atlantic coast, with Grasse in the Provence at the Mediterranean Sea (link).


Entered at Fri Jul 1 18:46:17 CEST 2016 from (24.114.65.31)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Jaco - The documentary

For those that do pick it up, do watch the 2nd disc as well......a ton of extended interviews...notably Herbie Hancock, Joni Mitchell.


Entered at Fri Jul 1 17:55:04 CEST 2016 from (114.4.79.18)

Posted by:

Paarcash

Location: Pasarcash.Com Agen Bola Sbobet Euro 2016 Terpercaya
Web: My link

Subject: Pasarcash.Com Agen Bola Sbobet Euro 2016 Terpercaya

visited me link


Entered at Fri Jul 1 16:28:57 CEST 2016 from (92.22.21.52)

Posted by:

Solomon

Subject: Docs

I would recommend these recent music documentaries - The Case of The Three Sided Dream and Bayou Maharajah. One about Jazz multi-instrumentalist Roland Kirk and the other is about New Orleans pianist James Booker. Les Blank's film A Poem Is Naked Person about Leon Russell is another great one. I've got to find Jacko as I love a good music documentary.


Entered at Fri Jul 1 16:27:42 CEST 2016 from (109.66.18.5)

Posted by:

shiran

Location: Plantation FL
Web: My link

Subject: the band

Thanks for another informative site. Where else could I get that type of info written in such a perfect way? I have a project that I am just now working on, and I've been on the look out for such info.


Entered at Fri Jul 1 12:20:55 CEST 2016 from (83.249.182.32)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Mustard / Ketchup

Sorry Norbert, I didn't get it. New email can be found on the car site. (On the other hand, if you don't get it in the first place, you are not worth of guiding.)


Entered at Fri Jul 1 12:17:58 CEST 2016 from (87.144.161.153)

Posted by:

Norbert

Lisa, indeed, thanks.

Bill, yet another masterpiece to answer my post, thanks for the effort. Concerning the upcoming HBO Brexit series, I agree, you’d make a fine young Gove.


Entered at Fri Jul 1 10:54:28 CEST 2016 from (108.30.208.242)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Jaco Movie

Just saw it-a first rate documentary about a unique talent.Sad life.I was pleased to see that a close colleague was his doc who tried to the last day to keep Jaco safe.


Entered at Fri Jul 1 07:45:20 CEST 2016 from (79.158.172.127)

Posted by:

Richard

Location: St Catharines

Subject: Happy Canada Day

Celebrating by watching The Band at the New Orleans Jazz Festival.

First time I've seen this. Holy sh*t. They were sure firing on all cylinders!


Entered at Fri Jul 1 04:47:23 CEST 2016 from (64.229.12.12)

Posted by:

Birr M

Subject: the weight of the blockchain ...

Nolb: Remember me mentioning Tapscott's "Blockchain Revolution" a couple weeks ago? In one of several chapters of use-cases there is a section about how Analie, a young immigrant from the Philippines, sends regular remittances from Toronto home to her mother in Manila, a generally tedious and expensive process that is vastly improved by using blockchain technology. Tapscott, who'd dabbled in pop-rock as I mentioned before, titles the section "Well, Luke, my friend, what about young Analie?" Not bad for such a serious book. (Also, thanks for the link to the interesting maps.)


Entered at Fri Jul 1 00:56:01 CEST 2016 from (174.1.58.122)

Posted by:

Lisa

Norbert, that was really fascinating!


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