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The Band: Live at the Academy of Music 1971

Levon Helm: Ramble at the Ryman

The Band: Three of a Kind

Robbie Robertson: How to Become Clairvoyant

Garth Hudson Presents a Canadian Celebration of The Band

Levon Helm: Electric Dirt

Garth and Maud Hudson: Live at the Wolf

Pulse

Dirt Farmer

Elliot Landy's Woodstock Vision

The Band Guestbook


Entered at Fri Nov 30 21:48:59 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Montreal - Leonard Cohen song … his home town … most of the audience didn't know it? Sorry, Bob, that doesn't compute. Also, just listen to the bands behind k.d. lang and Leonard Cohen, and then Cale's piano plus string quartet. If I'd been in Dylan's band that night I'd be crawling under the nearest rock in deep shame. It doesn't matter how good the players are on a good day, on a bad day, shite is shite.


Entered at Fri Nov 30 20:57:55 CET 2012 from (216.165.95.64)

Posted by:

Ari

What happened to the Midnight Ramble Sessions Volume 3? It was supposed to come out a week ago and I can't get it anywhere!


Entered at Fri Nov 30 20:11:33 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Mickey Baker

Bill M: Here is a link to a 1956 recording by the Cajun rockbilly singer Joe Clay (ne Claiborne Joseph Cheramie). Mickey Baker led the session and played some wild lead guitar on the song, "Get On The Right Track", and you can hear that influence on Robbie's early sound that you mentioned.


Entered at Fri Nov 30 19:59:53 CET 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY
Web: My link

Subject: Bob Dylan in 1988

Bob Dylan's version of Leonard Cohen's song in 1988 was 3 years before John Cale's version on the Cohen tribute record. Since the Cohen record Various Positions wasn't really a hit record, most of the audience in Montreal the night Dylan did Hallelujah had never heard the song. It was simply Dylan recognizing a great song and giving a nod to his friend. The Dylan band in 1988 was killer with GE Smith on guitar and Christopher Parker on drums. These guys are great players and 1988 was a great year for Dylan live music. The bass player was Kenny Aaronson who ended up later losing his job to Tony Garnier when he came down with a serious illness and needed treatments. Dylan was on fire on that tour. Check out his covers of Trail of the Buffalo or Lakes of Pontchartrain. He also did beautiful versions of Silvio, To Ramona, With God on Our Side and Boots of Spanish Leather during that time. Check out the Boblinks set lists from the October 1988 shows from The Tower Theater and Radio City. Great memories. His vocals back then were amazing.


Entered at Fri Nov 30 19:34:02 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: "Hallelujah" / Mickey Baker

Peter V: Imagine how many times Leonard Cohen had sung "Hallelujah" onstage prior to the time at the link you provided - and still he was able to put some much energy and emotion into the first 45 seconds that it's unimaginable that someone could come along and do a better job of it.

Not that other versions are unworthy. I like all that I've heard, though not living in the UK or watching much TV or listening to much radio, I haven't heard all that many. The Cale is good, and not nearly as dispassionate as dlew had me expecting. (Band link: Cale was backed up on his "Vintage Violins" album by Ronnie Hawkins' Buffalo farm team - Sandy Konikoff, Stan Szelest ...) The Buckley's very good too. The only other thing I've heard by him that I know of is "Lilac Wine"; good too, especially according to the record store owner who was playing it, but doesn't hold a candle to the one recorded by William 'Smitty' Smith and Motherlode in '70. That one's worth checking out on YouTube.

There's also a very nice reggae version of "Hallelujah" by Jay Douglas. Also on YouTube - but it's best to play it with your eyes closed. But speaking of reggae, aren't the interjections in the Cohen version very much like the organ interjections in Bob Marley's classic (live) version of "No Woman, No Cry"?

The link is to none of the above. It's to an article about the very recent passing of the exceptional guitarist, Mickey Baker. As I've noted here several times over the year, his style was, it seems to me, a big part of Robbie Robertson's early sound.


Entered at Fri Nov 30 18:23:16 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Location: Bathing on the roof

Agreed, none can ever destroy the originals … and I think Len has improved on it steadily as the years have gone by. The trouble was with that British talent show is they all had to sing it.


Entered at Fri Nov 30 15:21:49 CET 2012 from (74.198.9.174)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: Dlew

Another earlier walk-through of the song by L. Cohen. I always go by how something made me feel when I first heard it. "The Weight" will always be great for me even if it is regularly slaughtered night after night by those that should know better. Same with "Hallelejuh"


Entered at Fri Nov 30 12:14:26 CET 2012 from (24.44.101.12)

Posted by:

Brien Sz

Web: My link

Subject: Ginger Baker movie

Hello ol Band friends. It's been a while. I was reading this mornings paper and saw this movie review on a documentary on Ginger Baker I thought some of you might be interested in.


Entered at Fri Nov 30 10:03:58 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Hymns of the 49th Parallel

It's time for k.d. lang to get busy and do a Volume II of this (Hallelujah was on Volume 1). The biggest omission on Volume 1 was It Makes No Difference which would have suited her powerful voice, but add in a couple of Leonard, a Joni or two, more Neil Young, another Robbie or Richard … Whispering Pines, please, then someone younger like Rufus Wainwright (who explained three times when I saw him that he's Canadian). Why she did no Band songs in the first place is a mystery.


Entered at Fri Nov 30 06:55:26 CET 2012 from (101.164.6.125)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Subject: Hallelujah

Objectively, it's a great song. Excellent lyrics. Nice melody. Subtle harmonies. John Cale's diffident, cold version is the best, followed by the original.

If I never heard the b***y thing again, though, it would be too soon... So many crappy, inappropriate versions. When a 19 year old girl sings it, given its subject matter, it's game over for me. Sorry...


Entered at Thu Nov 29 23:22:18 CET 2012 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Next month I'll be seeing Leonard in concert for the first time. Beyond excited. Can't wait!


Entered at Thu Nov 29 22:22:06 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Let's take it home …

And so to Leonard. I was there. I think this proves if you're not Canadian or Welsh on this song, f**k off!


Entered at Thu Nov 29 22:14:19 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Not to harp on, but I guess John Cale was the only one of those covering the song who was technically proficient enough to score the string quartet.


Entered at Thu Nov 29 22:02:29 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: John Cale

Let's bury the Dylan version … John Cale linked


Entered at Thu Nov 29 22:00:05 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Missed the link …

I missed the link.


Entered at Thu Nov 29 21:59:16 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: k.d.lang

… so from the ridiculous (Dylan) to the sublime (k.d. lang)


Entered at Thu Nov 29 21:56:31 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Hallelujah

I found Bob's live version. Linked. Excruciatingly weak… I think some of the people on "Britain's Got Talent" or whatever it was did it better. I don't mind the vocal actually, it's the band that's piss poor!


Entered at Thu Nov 29 21:41:29 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Interesting point, David … The Weight and Hallelujah on soundtracks and albums. It hadn't struck me.


Entered at Thu Nov 29 21:39:22 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Blondest Blonde

As Dylan sang in "Absolutely Sweet Marie" from "Blonde On Blonde", "to live outside the law you must be honest". This is just one of countless examples of his lyrics that have become part of the vernacular of his generation and others that followed. It comes as no surprise that he would be quoted by learned judges. An opinion issued today by a three-judge panel here in Atlanta by The United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit, in the case of Amber Nicole Wright v. Farouk Systems, Inc. (No. 12-10378), authored by Judge Ed Barnes, begins as follows:

"Bob Dylan's recognition that '[b]ehind every beautiful thing there's been some kind of pain' (1) might seem painfully ironic to Amber Wright. Her quest for what she deemed to be more beautiful hair allegedly led not just to pain but also to emotional 'scars that the sun didn't heal,' all of which led to this lawsuit. Wright filed this products liability action under Georgia law alleging that a hair bleaching product manufactured by Farouk Systems burned her scalp, causing her to suffer physical, mental, and emotional pain. She claims that the product -- colorfully named 'Blondest Blonde' -- is defective because it contains isolated areas of high reactivity, called 'hot spots,' that can lead to burning of the scalp. She also claims that Farouk failed to adequately warn users of the product of the risk that burns cans result if the product touches the scalp. The district court granted Farouk's motion for summary judgment on all of Wright's claims, and this is her appeal."

footnote (1) Bob Dylan, "Not Dark Yet," on Time Out of Mind (Sony Records 1997).

As Judge Carnes was familiar with that line from "Not Dark Yet", he no doubt made the connection of the product name at issue, "Blondest Blonde", with the title of Dylan's iconic 1966 album.


Entered at Thu Nov 29 19:55:24 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Hallelujah Montreal and LA Dylan 1988

1988 - Dylan performed Hallelujah twice, the first time July 8, 1988 in Montreal (most appropriately - was Leonard there?)and then next month in LA as Kevin points out. These are good performances of a great song. It should not be confused with 'Hallelujah, I'm Ready To Go", performed multiple times by Dylan a few years later as an opener of his shows. Those were not great years for CD output and Wilbury's were perhaps happening or on the horizon. The vocals in concert are very good (IMO). The well seemed somewhat drier for new songs in those years, but the live shows continued and were often well-received for the most part.


Entered at Thu Nov 29 19:53:11 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Not So Easy Contract Over-Rider

Peter V: Are you sure it wasn't the record label's decision not to license John Cale's version to DreamWorks for use on the CD soundtrack? Mr. Cale's version was originally included on the 1991 Leonard Cohen tribute album "I'm Your Fan" released by Atlantic.

Ironically, Robbie, as executive producer, was quite familiar with this licensing dilemma through the similar experience involving the use of "The Weight" in the 1969 soundtrack for "Easy Rider".


Entered at Thu Nov 29 19:43:13 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Dylan Hallelujah

Dylan Hallelujah is heartfelt and came as you know, Kevin, near the end of 'that ' period. He did some of his best singing since Nashville Skyline during that inspired period of time. He recognized a great song early and I wouldn't be surprised to hear it again on stage someday. As anyone knows who follows his live shows, over the years, surprises continue to occur for any of a number of reasons. Its always interesting.


Entered at Thu Nov 29 19:28:36 CET 2012 from (74.198.9.174)

Posted by:

Kevin J

......and not to forget that Bob Dylan did L. Cohen's "Halleejuh" live in the late 80's - years before the hipsters took it up. Also, kd's take is the best I have ever heard.


Entered at Thu Nov 29 19:27:16 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Hallelujah

Yes, I know how highly-rated the Jeff Buckley is, but i find it just a tad over-blown. Having said that I have seen Leonard Cohen. k.d. lang and Rufus Wainwright performing it live, which does change things. John Cale's refusal to allow his version on the Shrek OST after allowing it in the movie was an odd one, but Rufus Wainwright benefitted. You were spared all the awful talent show people singing it on TV, which nearly ruined it here.


Entered at Thu Nov 29 18:54:41 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Hallelujah

There are a couple of Band connections. While at DreamWorks, Robbie was executive producer for the "Shrek" soundtrack. John Cale's version was used in the film itself and the version by Rufus Wainwright, who was also recording for DreamWorks at time, was included on the soundrack CD. Jeff Buckley's "Grace" album, which included his version, was recorded at Bearsville Studio.


Entered at Thu Nov 29 17:29:38 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Hallelujah again

David: You probably know about this but if you don't, you might find it interesting.

"If Leonard Cohen was the author of “Hallelujah” and John Cale was its editor, Jeff Buckley was the song’s ultimate performer. A decade after its original recording, the song had found its defining voice, and the Grace recording would essentially become the version against which future versions would be measured. To this new generation of cool kids, “Hallelujah” belonged to Jeff Buckley. Having honed his performance of the song in tiny Manhattan clubs, he was ready to take it out to the world with complete confidence. Often even a famous artist will offer deference or defensiveness when covering someone else’s composition, but not Jeff Buckley. (“Jeff was never intimidated by a song,” said Glen Hansard. “That’s kind of what made him great.”) He was delivering “Hallelujah” with an intensity that was almost mystic, and a very different manifestation of the ecstatic, “holy hallelujah” in Cohen’s original. Just how much he had taken on a new and specific meaning for his “Hallelujah” was evident in the razor-edged, street-romantic way Buckley introduced the song onstage in Germany in 1995. “It’s not the bottle,” he said. “It’s not the pills. It’s not the face of strangers who will offer you their lines and hot needles. It’s not the time you were together in their place—so perfect, like a second home. And it’s not from the Bible. It’s not from angels. Not from preachers who are chaste and understanding of nothing that is human in this world. It’s for people who are lovers. It’s for people who have been lovers. You are at last somewhere. Until then it’s hallelujah.”"

Excerpted from “The Holy or the Broken: Leonard Cohen, Jeff Buckley, and the Unlikely Ascent of ‘Hallelujah’” by Alan Light. Copyright C 2012 by Alan Light, published by Atria, an imprint of Simon & Schuster, December 2012. Reprinted with the permission of the Author, all rights reserved


Entered at Thu Nov 29 17:12:11 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Film soundtracks marrying in

As you say Jerry, there are so many incredible movie examples. The Terence Davies one is a documentary which clearly has a different dynamic to what we know and love in the movies but it works sublimely. For me, if I had to pick just one movie where it comes together I'm pretty sure it would be Leone and Morricone with Once Upon A Time in America.


Entered at Thu Nov 29 17:10:12 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: 'Talent' shows on TV

John: Talent shows on TV and in fact all (I mean all) reality shows are not on my radar. I despise the manipulation and the scripting. I understand that this is what must be done to satisfy the viewers and 'keep it clean' etc but I have no patience for that kind of thing. The result is that I likely miss some talented individuals such as the people you just wrote about. I will see if I can find this 'Dylan cover'.


Entered at Thu Nov 29 16:59:02 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Hallelujah

Sounds like a Rhino Back-To-Back, David. Hallelujah and The Weight are tracks where I have a CD of various versions, and to me Leonard live comes first, Leonard studio second, then John Cale, then k.d.lang, then Rufus Wainwright … and only then Jeff Buckley. I know that it's a highly-rated version, but both k.d. and John Cale do something special.


Entered at Thu Nov 29 16:53:58 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Grace

I was a later come to Jeff Buckley, David. He was a rocket and had 'good genes'. His tragic end was a great loss. 'Grace' was a fixture on my play list. I'll seek out 'Hallelujah'. I also admire very much K.D.Lang's version and also Rufus Wainright's version. They are all so different. Time to return to 'Grace'. Thanks.


Entered at Thu Nov 29 16:42:10 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: The Secret Chord

JT: One of the releases I picked up on Record Store Day on Black Friday was a 45-single of Leonard Cohen's "Hallelujah" with the late Jeff Buckley's moving cover version on the B-side (link above). That song is a perfect example of that emotional power you mentioned, as both performances on that 45 illustrate. Mr. Buckley's sparse rendition in particular, with just his vocal & guitar, proves that the right combination of lyrics & music doesn't require addditional embellishment to convey an emotional response to the listener.


Entered at Thu Nov 29 16:18:32 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: The fusion of 3 impacts

Yes Al: I have enjoyed those previous posts. The visual accompanied by music often with lyrics intensifies the impact of the visual and is the most provocative use of these arts. Directors have figured this out and often the best films are those wherein such songs punctuate the visual effectively. The soundtrack becomes interesting then because when we listen to it independently, the visions of the film are renewed without watching the film. The one that always springs to mind for me is' Garden State' (Braff, Portman) wherein Shins and others gave that film major emotional impact and sensitivity. There are many others.


Entered at Thu Nov 29 14:03:19 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: JT

Good post Jerry.

Not sure if it was prompted by the posts between JQ, PV and myself regarding a corresponding heightening of emotional connection with the sort of visual poetry I referred to in that Terence Davies film.

In that instance it's the images themselves that are powerful enough but when they're accompanied by poetry or music that is so wonderfully empathetic with the image then the strength of the emotion felt is taken to another level entirely and you feel this intensity you would not otherwise experience.

One particular passage in the Ternce Davies film has folks from the slum clearance being housed in tower blocks on the outskirts of the city. On a human level, the images of people living amidst slum clearance and new high rise are powerful in themselves as anyone with any form of insight or involvement will know. Davies accompanies these images with fitting classical music then gently ladles on it Peggy Lee with her incomparable 'The Folks who Live on the Hill'.

The effect is just all consuming in an emotional sense. Peoples entire lives encompassed by the brevity of Peggy Lee's beautiful 'lifetime' song set against the wistfulness of those stark images.


Entered at Thu Nov 29 14:02:21 CET 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Web: My link

Subject: Mostly Dylan

This may have come up before; but I would like to HIGHLY recommend, "Mostly Dylan" by Tim Hockenberry & Tom Corwin. Tim was recently on "America's Got Talent" and I think he should have won it all

If your a Dylan fan you have to check this album out. Tim's got a gravely voice. The "Talent" show said they thought he sounded too much like Cocker. I disagree. Love the arrangements.


Entered at Thu Nov 29 13:05:09 CET 2012 from (65.94.154.125)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Striking a universal chord

I just read an article in New York Review of Books regarding Leonard Cohen. It was in praise of Cohen and his lyrics and music and it got me thinking about why so many people relate particularly to the marriage of music and lyrics in an emotional way that is different from the feelings evoked when a purely musical piece (classical, jazz) without lyrics is heard. There is something special and unique that happens when an instrumental piece evokes tears or laughter. Something different happens when the words and the music fuse together in the brain of the listener and stimulate ideas and emotions simultaneously. Its like wonderfully prepared food with spices which augment that food and make it somehow different. "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down" has that flavour with sadness and respect and who knows what else in it as it mournfully delivers. "Positively Fourth Street" spews venom and anger in both the lyrics and the music. "Dance Me To The End of Love" lends itself generously to anyone who has known what that song evokes. The blues artists from Robert Johnson to John Hammond all understand the power of the lyric superimposed on the guitar. The examples are endless. I think we are privileged to be a part of this age of lyrical music.


Entered at Thu Nov 29 03:57:27 CET 2012 from (146.171.254.97)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: accordions - a true story

John D - a similiar thing happened to me. I got dropped off late one night after a gig and a few too many wines. I got most of my gear safely inside the house but left the accordion outside on the front door step. When I got up it the morning it was still there (though it is only a cheap chinese thing).


Entered at Thu Nov 29 03:56:26 CET 2012 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Web: My link

Subject: BAND tribute

My link: Thought you would like to see a pic of the performers and read the article again too..

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

DAVID P: Thanx for the link to Ry Cooder.

Love reading all the posts..

CYA soon xoxoxo


Entered at Thu Nov 29 02:31:50 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Puddles!!!!

Ha ha. Gotta love you Norm

Each of them puddles are bigger than England!

:-0)


Entered at Wed Nov 28 22:30:09 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: YUP!

That was it Al. It had to be a maple tree, that's about all they got back there around those puddles like in tranna. There's just a bit of brush and here and there a maple tree. That's how come they worship them.


Entered at Wed Nov 28 22:19:20 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: His Real Name Was Mr. Earl

For Serenity -- Link to Ry Cooder's version of "Speedo".


Entered at Wed Nov 28 19:34:48 CET 2012 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: Lenny Kravitz to Play Marvin Gaye in Biopic

And...

Lenny Kravitz to Play Marvin Gaye in Biopic..

Singer takes first lead role in film set to start shooting next year.

November 27, 2012 12:05 PM ET

Lenny Kravitz has signed on to play Marvin Gaye in the upcoming Julien Temple-directed biopic of the R&B great, a rep for Kravitz confirms to Rolling Stone.

The film is set to start filming next year and will focus on Gaye's time in Europe in the early 1980s when the singer was trying to curb his addictions and restart his career with the help of British promoter Freddy Cousaert. While there have been previous attempts at Gaye biopics, insiders report that this one has secured music rights.

The role will mark Kravitz's first leading turn, though he's previously played supporting parts in The Hunger Games and Lee Daniels' Precious. Kravitz is also set to appear in the The Hunger Games: Catching Fire, as well as The Butler, a new White House drama from Daniels.

CYA soon xoxoxo


Entered at Wed Nov 28 19:26:10 CET 2012 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: "The Doctors" & Earl Carroll Dead at 75

Hi, guys!! Good reading as usual.

Don't know if any of you watched "The Doctors" on TV today, but it was a fantastic show. SUBJECT: musicians and their deaths info. I didn't know that Bob Marley died from melanoma. Then they explained how some of the deaths could have been avoided. You maybe able to see this show on their website, thedoctorstv.com...I get it in my e-mails once a week, Too bad I didn't check it out or I would have posted it here.

Cadillacs Singer Earl Carroll Dead at 75 Doo-wop group was best known for hits 'Gloria' and 'Speedoo'

November 27, 2012

The lead singer and one of the founding members of the Fifties doo-wop group the Cadillacs, died Sunday from complications of diabetes and a recent stroke, The New York Times reports. He was 75.

The Cadillacs, originally dubbed the Carnations, formed in 1953 and consisted of Carroll, longtime friend Bobby Phillips (whose family helped raise Carroll after his mother passed away), Lavern Drake and Gus Willingham. Their first hit, "Gloria," came a year later, and the foursome soon became known for their eye-popping outfits and dance routines.

The Cadillac's second big hit was 1955's "Speedoo," a variant on Carroll's nickname "Speedo," which stemmed from the same incident: After a show at a Massachussets armory, Phillips saw a torpedo on display and told Carroll, who sported a somewhat pointy head: "Hey Speedo, there's your torpedo!"

"My name is Earl," responded Carroll. When the group recorded "Speedoo" the next day, that exchange became the song's opening lines.

Carroll also sang with the Coasters for about two decades before reuniting with a new incarnation of the Cadillacs, who toured the U.S. and abroad. Their shows were often scheduled on weekends to accommodate Carroll's day job as a custodian at an elementary school in Manhattan, a position he took soon after he started taking adult education classes in literacy there. Known for singing while he worked and regaling the kids – who he called "the teeny-weenies" – with stories about his life in music, Carroll retired from the post in 2005.

"You really felt good about keeping the school clean, and then the teeny-weenies, they love you so much,” he told The San Diego Union-Tribune in 1988. "When they found out I was a rock ’n’ roller – I was on the 50th anniversary of the Apollo with Bill Cosby – the kids couldn’t believe it . . . Now they call me the star of the school."

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxo


Entered at Wed Nov 28 17:44:27 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Norm...

Goddamm...I think you've only gone and nailed it mate...

Was it a maple tree by any chance?

:-0)


Entered at Wed Nov 28 16:59:49 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Complete Frustration!

OH YEAH!! Well listen to this. A guy has a pair of season tickets to the Toronto Maple Leafs great seats.

Well he's so frustrated with them he thinks.......the hell with it. I'm not goin' thru' that this year. He takes the tickets and nails 'em to a tree in a park by a very popular jogging trail. He comes back later and some one had stole the nails.


Entered at Wed Nov 28 15:58:30 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: All these tales of theft etc...

At the end of the day you never know if they're true or not. I guess it's all accordion to who you believe...

Sorry.

:-0)


Entered at Wed Nov 28 15:24:25 CET 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Dlew's Joke

I love that joke Dlew. As someone who played accordion in their youth and was even part of an all accordion band, I have another story. Dlew's was a true joke. Mine is serious; but with a funny twist. True story. One of Toronto's top session players had parked his car. He played guitar, bass and keyboards. In his car and trunk was an amp. A guitar and bass. Portable electronic keyboard and accordion.

He gets back to his car and it had been broken into. The guitar, bass, amp and portable keyboard were stolen. The thieves left behind the accordion. True story.


Entered at Wed Nov 28 14:09:41 CET 2012 from (101.164.6.125)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Subject: Joe J...

I'm evil and hell-bound no doubt, but the story reminds me of an accordion player who tries to sell his accordion. After eBay, newspapers, no interest. He decides to drive the car down town and leave the accordion on the back seat with the doors unlocked. /n When he returns, there are four accordions on the back seat.


Entered at Wed Nov 28 13:41:04 CET 2012 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

mike h

Web: My link

Another The Band photographer has passed away - Ken Regan.


Entered at Wed Nov 28 12:37:31 CET 2012 from (96.30.173.135)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Subject: Accordion crime

See link. Article speaks for itself. May God have mercy.


Entered at Wed Nov 28 04:46:52 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Web: My link

Subject: Internet Fairness Act is a blow to songwriters, artists, sound recording owners, / labels, ALso see the link too

From SoundExchange: "As you may know, a bill is circulating in Congress called the "Internet Radio Fairness Act" (H.R. 6480/S. 3609). We strongly believe that this bill would be anything but fair - particularly for tens of thousands of recording artists and record labels that we represent. It is our mission to protect, propel and support the digital music industry moving forward. For this reason, SoundExchange President Michael Huppe will testify tomorrow, Wednesday, November 28, before Congress in opposition to the "Internet Radio Fairness Act." This bill could dramatically cut the royalties that Internet radio services pay to music creators. It also does nothing to address the fact that AM/FM broadcasters still pay nothing in performance royalties to recording artists and record labels. As representatives of both recording artists and record labels alike, we believe creators deserve more for their contributions to the digital music space, not less. Creators should receive fair compensation for their work, and we will deliver that message directly to Congress. You may watch the webcast of the hearing tomorrow at 11:30 am ET at: http://judiciary.house.gov. You are also encouraged to visit www.fairpayforartists.com to learn more and write your member of Congress. Let them know that musicians should not be deprived of the income they deserve."


Entered at Wed Nov 28 03:02:50 CET 2012 from (96.30.173.135)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: Just A Little Too Much

Bill, a local bar band used to have that number in their repertoire. I forwarded the link to one of the boys. Clary said he learned the song in TO in the 60s. He remembers Larry Lee but didn't know Red Shea played in the band. He's not surprised; says Shea was all over the place.

On another note, Clary's nephew was at a R&R 'Fantasy Camp' 7-8 years ago and got to meet Mr Levon Helm. The 'boy' was a thirty year old guitar picker but meeting Levon was the highlight of his 'camp'. Said Levon "oozed music".


Entered at Wed Nov 28 00:22:22 CET 2012 from (136.167.102.118)

Posted by:

Dave H

Just wanted to check in and say that I caught (native Torontonian and noted Last Waltz participant) Neil Young last night tear the roof off the Boston Garden with Crazy Horse. Don't pass up a chance to see these guys if you can. NY is playing better than he has in a long time, and I think the Horse deserves the credit. He looks like he's having a lot of fun up there too--lots more joking around than usual.


Entered at Tue Nov 27 23:32:47 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: second attempt at posting URL for Bentroots on YouTube


Entered at Tue Nov 27 23:29:32 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Pat B: I see that somebodies have posted two or three Great White Cane tracks on YouTube. Here's one that's more commercial, though I prefer the 8-minute "Mother Earth" - also on YouTube.


Entered at Tue Nov 27 23:18:17 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronno

Pat B: Here's a 2012 vintage Ed Roth playing accordion (as on Daniel Lanois' 'Acadie') rather than angry organ (as with Merryweather). On 'real' keyboards is Michael Fonfara from Rhinoceros; on guitar and vocals is Nick Balkou, who, with Roth, was part of Rick James's fantastic Great White Cane band, whose 1972 LP with Jimmy Ienner on MGM died a undeserved commercial death.


Entered at Tue Nov 27 22:22:14 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

David P: Sorry, it was JT who mentioned Curly Smith, not you. Re Scheff, I checked my notes from a '79 conversation with Hugh Brockie, who said that in late '64 he move to LA (from Edmonton) and wound up touring with the Shindogs (incl. Jerry Cole and Billy Preston). Back to Canada, then back to LA. Met Clarence White, Jerry Scheff and Mike Canon (? - handwriting), and joined them in recording budget LPs for Paxton. The Alshire deal was a separate thing: no Paxton, but still White, Brockie and Scheff.


Entered at Tue Nov 27 21:41:54 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Bill M: Curly Smith?

One of Jerry Scheff's earliest gigs before hooking up with Gary Paxton was working with sixteen year old Billy Preston (see link).


Entered at Tue Nov 27 21:23:28 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

David P: Curly Smith's name rang a bell, and sure enough, Google confirms that he was in the briefly worthy offshoot of Spirit that was Jo Jo Gunne. As for Jerry Scheff, since we were talking about Clarence White a couple weeks ago, I'll mention that Scheff was the bassist and White the guitarist (along with future Hawk Hugh Brockie) on a series of budget LPs that Gary Paxton recorded for Alshire in the mid '60s.


Entered at Tue Nov 27 21:13:15 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: JP Jewellery (jewelry)

Sorry PSB: From the 'Jewellery' website of JP. If we are going to 'close the book' and 'end the story' on this individual, here is the end of the story, from that 'jewellery website'. I am still not sure if she did the 'Dylan cover album' but I think NOT since it is never mentioned herein.

----When Janet parted ways from Van in 1973, she briefly returned to modeling, then formed or was part of several three and four woman vocal groups in the Bay Area of San Francisco. The various members all wrote songs and at length Janet was persuaded to make the move to Los Angeles with her new husband, engineer/producer Chris Minto. Taking the plunge into ‘The Big Pond’ at the same time was her singer/songwriting partner Pam Barlow. The two set off together on a concerted course to master the art and craft of writing the definitive AOR Melodic Rock song. They had several staff writing positions at major publishing houses recording over 30 covers of their work. Shortly after, Barlow/Minto began work with the Swedish band Alien on their US album as well as producing a CD of their own recordings entitled “Dreaming Ezekiel” under the name ‘Fake ID’. More recently, her song ‘Didn’t Mean To Fall In Love’ written with Curly Smith and Tom Sholz appeared on Boston’s ‘Corporate America’ CD. “Songwriting came to an end for me in the early ‘90’s when grunge and rap were really taking off, and that was positively all the record companies and publishers wanted. I just could not find in my heart a reason to write one more song that, seemingly, no one wanted to hear.” Janet said.----

Now we can close the book on this topic (maybe).


Entered at Tue Nov 27 20:57:54 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Ramble Vol. 3

Joe: Several sites are now listing Dec. 4 as the release date.


Entered at Tue Nov 27 20:38:55 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: PV's penchant for leading me astray with gorgeous young women!!

First Joy Williams. Now this beautiful threesome. Not that I'm complaining P.

:-0)

I think you'll find some real enjoyment in that Terence davies film P.

Really fascinating that blog on the Unthanks especially in the light of reading up on the Terence davies approach to his film. Davies keeps referring to visual poetry/music and watching Time and City, that juxtaposition really was what captivated. You feel the whole thing rather than follow it in any linear way.

On the shipbuilding thing, I remember vividly that Tyneside hulk at the bottom of the street. Imagine the impact that must have had on the minds of the kids growing up in that neigbourhood. Amazing.

I've linked the white hull of the Ark Royal in Birkenhead, the one with all the cranes which is also pretty stunning. It actually looks more like a painting than a photograph. Think it was taken early 1950's.


Entered at Tue Nov 27 20:17:25 CET 2012 from (64.113.177.61)

Posted by:

Joe Frey

Subject: Ramble Vol 3

I must have missed the announcenment about the delay in Vol 3. Is their a new date? Joe


Entered at Tue Nov 27 20:05:53 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Peter V: I noticed that the new Staves album was co-produced by esteemed Glyn Johns and his son Ethan.

Thanks Pat B for the RoA link.


Entered at Tue Nov 27 19:14:36 CET 2012 from (68.164.6.50)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

The RoA rehearsals, available for download.


Entered at Tue Nov 27 18:58:20 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: The Staves

Their album "Dead & Born & Grown" angered me by switching on unwanted downloads and freezing my Mac last week, and I was going to toss it back to HMV, but I relented long enough to listen once, and have been playing it obsessively ever since. They're on the new Mojo cover CD (Tribute to "Rumors") doing Songbird too. Try the link if you like The Unthanks sort of thing (folky girls with nice harmonies). They look as if they're going to be huge with 5 star reviews all over the place.

The link is to the "Mexico" video, but i'd try "Dead & Born & Grown" and "Wisely & Slow" and the way it leads into "Gone tomorrow" if you can access them on iTunes.


Entered at Tue Nov 27 18:20:33 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

I have never seen it, but will remedy that.

For the nostalgia bit, I think you would enjoy "Songs of The Shipyards" as toured by The Unthanks playing live in the cinema to the film (link to my review). It has wonderful images of Newcastle right through the 20th century, and interviews, and strikers and pubs and so on. They were touring cities with a maritime heritage … I saw it in Southampton. The images of Newcastle streets reminded me of Hull in the 60s, and I assume Liverpool was much the same, except the end of the street wouldn't have been filled by a huge half-built hull of a ship.


Entered at Tue Nov 27 16:16:41 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: JQ - Terence Davies - Of Time and City - Revisited

You got me at it JQ. And I'm eternally indebted for you doing so.

:-0)

I guess it was all my latent Catholic guilt that had me frantically searching out the DVD to watch the thing again. To no avail. I guess I must have lent it out. Or perhaps I'd never had it and had watched it on the telly. Dunno. But whatever the case it's now clear to me that I must have snatched at it at the time I saw it because it was so much more than I'd recalled in my previous post.

Anyroad, I got the missus to treat me to a premature Chrissie pressie. The complete works of Terence Davies. And what a treasure trove of film delights.

So I watched 'Of Time and The City' again last night. Late. In quiet seclusion. Relaxed with the latest batch of my recent grinding workload completed. Fully focussed. It was as sublime as such things can get.

The Cannes Film critics were right. Of Time and The City is a masterpiece. Flawless. To be watched time and again. In a way that so few things can ever seem to be. Big Pink? The Brown Album? Yeah, that sort of level. Without a doubt - in its own way of course - it reaches those sort of heights.

I have to admit I'd kind of had it filed away as a film purely for Liverpudlians. Its core protaganist and subject matter being the city of Liverpool. Of interest only to those from the city or with a keen interest therein.

Nothing of the sort. This is quintessential viewing. For anybody who craves superlative offerings.

For it is so much more than a parochial lament. Sure Liverpool and its natives provide an inevitably vivid and often stunning visual backdrop and conduit but the theme is universal and the manner in which that theme is crafted spellbinding. A unique artist's paean to an age gone by.

Seguing against this visual collage is a musical soundtrack as enchanting in its own way as Morricone's Once Upon A Time in America interspersed with a forthright dialogue of cutting honesty and humour [that I'd entirely forgotten about].

Davies is positively enthralled with what he's been charged with presenting to his audience and gets it all absolutely spot on. So much so you even find yourself nodding to his old fashioned dissing of The Beatles, his kindred scousers, and rock 'n' roll per se. Honest to God. The entire thing is a triumph.

For ancient Brits like PV and Roger and even young upstarts like Dunc and Si [especially Si of course] it is a must see.

PS JQ. I found it nicely ironic that the liner sailing out of port right near the end was the old Empress of Canada [again ironically the same colour as this guestbook page :-0)]. It was possibly - albeit extremely unlikely I guess, that it was the very same late 50's voyage that as a young boy I'd stood and watched from the Princess landing Stage as the great ship carried a great aunty of mine on her emigration towards the St Lawrence.

Thanks again JQ for the heads up.

:-0)


Entered at Tue Nov 27 15:57:14 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Elvis' TCB Band

In 1974, while working for Warner Bros., The Band's old friend Mary Martin signed Emmylou Harris to a solo recording contract and introduced her to producer Brian Ahern. Various members of Elvis Presley's TCB Band, who had also previously worked with Ms. Harris on Gram Parsons recordings, would work with her in the early days when the schedules didn't conflict with that of Elvis.

Following The Last Waltz, Rick and Garth appeared on Ms. Harris' 1978 album "Quarter Moon In A Ten Cent Town", which also featured James Burton, Glen D. Hardin, and Emory Gordy Jr. from the TCB Band. (Mr. Gordy, who is from Atlanta, briefly replaced bassist Jerry Scheff in TCB, after working with Neil Diamond, along with fellow Atlantan, drummer Dennis St. John.) Specifically on "Quarter Moon...", Ms. Harris' wonderful version of Rodney Crowell's "Leaving Louisiana In The Broad Daylight" featured Rick on harmony vocals & fiddle, Garth on accordion, Glen D. Hardin on piano, Emory Gordy Jr. on bass, Albert Lee on guitar & mandolin, John Ware on drums and Hank Devito on steel guitar.


Entered at Tue Nov 27 14:18:30 CET 2012 from (158.39.165.138)

Posted by:

jh

Subject: Ultrasonic RoA rehearsal tapes?

There are good-quality bootlegs out there of a rehearsal that our boys did in preparation for Rock Of Ages, recorded at a studio in NYC called Ultrasonic. Does anyone have any knowledge of the whereabouts of the original tapes, or if they even exist?


Entered at Tue Nov 27 10:54:48 CET 2012 from (101.164.6.125)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Subject: Jeff, bill and peter

Thanks for your comments re my whimsy. Peters were before and it was his idea to sync Dixie with American trilogy.

And bil, I figure either you, pat, David p or Peter v have the tapes!


Entered at Tue Nov 27 09:49:37 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: set lists

I assume that Richard just got less reliable on stage … if you look at the list, many of the great songs that got dropped featured Richard heavily. They were too conservative and limited in the catalogue they played. NLSC in 1976 did inject some strong new songs into the act … and Ophelia and It Makes No Difference became permanent features to the end. It is one of the things, as I often say, that makes them less collectable as a live band. Tom Petty mentioned a list of 140 songs that Dylan “might play”. One of Van Morrison’s backing guys mentioned 80 possibles … for one tour. You’d be pretty safe with The Band at most periods with under twenty.


Entered at Tue Nov 27 07:07:30 CET 2012 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: OQ set lists

Their set lists certainly were more interesting back in the early 70's. At some point they seemed to settle on a safer but less interesting group of songs. Maybe less interesting because every live album had them. Some of those 76 shows do sound pretty good though. Rick's bass sounded especically good around that time (once he stopped using the fretless). I do love the look of the Ampeg though - Eastman has a copy of it avaliable for around $US900 which is pretty good - but they went for a simpler headstock.


Entered at Tue Nov 27 04:07:28 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Close Quarters

Thanks Joe, good to hear all is well on Da' Rock, hope yer havin' a lobster fest.

See Bill! he knows, he knows what it is. Were you celebrating CFL victory too much last night Bill?


Entered at Tue Nov 27 02:49:06 CET 2012 from (174.252.57.207)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Orange County Band

Tim from Boston, thanks again for the link about the Orange County Fair concerts.

I definitely remember seeing the Joe Walsh / Foreigner gig, and the listing confirms that that was 1985.

So now I’m almost positive that The Band show that I saw, must have been 1984, or possibly 1983 although I’m leaning towards Summertime 1984. The only other act I remember from that venue was the Charlie Daniels Band, and I think that The Band must have been the opening act for Charlie Daniels. Neither is listed on the Wiki link, so the list must not be complete. It’s possible that The Band might have been an unbilled guest, or a last minute addition.

The line-up was definitely with the Cate Brothers, and I remember Rick playing mostly acoustic guitar, and Levon playing quite a bit of mandolin and harmonica, with Richard on drums, and Garth on keyboards.

In retrospect, I do wish that I could remember the date, as it was my first time seeing the Band in any configuration (and I didn’t even know they were going to be there). It was my only time seeing Richard, and I’m thankful that I had the opportunity.

The funny thing is, that I remember many of the other details about the day. It was my first date with a girl who I had met that summer. She played classical piano, but also had a Fender acoustic guitar with a headstock like the one Bob Dylan plays in some of the ‘Eat The Document’ scenes. I also distinctly remember the car I was driving that summer. A late 1970’s Oldsmobile Starfire coupe that had a non-functioning driver’s side door (you had to climb in from the passenger side – very impressive on a first date!) Also, you had to always try to park it on a hill so you could pop the clutch to get it started.

So I suppose I need to see what gigs Charlie Daniels had in late July or early August 1984 at the Orange County Fair in Middletown, NY, and then may be able to figure out The Band date from that point. I sent an email to the Orange County fair to see if they have a record of their 1984 summer shows.


Entered at Tue Nov 27 01:59:55 CET 2012 from (71.184.199.161)

Posted by:

Tim

Location: Boston

Subject: Todd

I think process of elimination (reunion era show with Richard) would mean it would have been summer of 84 (83 summer they did Canada and west coast, summer of 85 they opened for CSN) I know they opened, or played with Marshall Tucker in SUNY Plattsbugh in May 84, could that be ?(I think Todd Rundgren played too)


Entered at Tue Nov 27 01:26:24 CET 2012 from (208.120.39.229)

Posted by:

Jon L

Location: NYC

A killer setlist, with Richard's deep cuts particularly well represented. I hope the tribute show makes it to NYC as I would sure love to attend.


Entered at Tue Nov 27 00:38:46 CET 2012 from (96.30.173.135)

Posted by:

Joe J

Location: Da Rock

Ol' Joe J ain't never far away. Don't post so much these days but I always keep up on the GB news. Actually the weather is unseasonably warm and my neighbour did mow his lawn last week. No snow yet though there's some in the forecast. Life is good. Very good. Keep well all.


Entered at Tue Nov 27 00:32:25 CET 2012 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Peter V, sorry, I misread your date.

Although the performance quality varied, the songlists from 1976--with as many as five new songs featured--were awfully good.


Entered at Tue Nov 27 00:10:07 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Rockin Chair: You sure that Joe knows what a lawn is, never mind a mower? They don't call it 'the Rock' fer nuthin'.


Entered at Mon Nov 26 23:49:45 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: In another quarter

Glad to hear you and yours are well Todd.

I wish ol' Joe Jennings was aroun'. The weathere here is like May. Yesterday Joe, my neigbour was out here on his ridin' mower, mowin' his lawn!


Entered at Mon Nov 26 23:44:09 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I agree, Pat. The OQ did … but as I said, there hasn't been a set list like that since 1971.


Entered at Mon Nov 26 22:29:57 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: A man from Kentucky sure is lucky ...

David P: Thanks for your note about Kentucky. Good think Robbie spotted that particular road sign rather than the one for Bowling Green. The Everly's had already staked a claim to that particular bit of real estate in '68.

dlew: Belated thanks for your additional info on Elvis and our guys. Too bad there's no tapes.

Kevin J: Maybe the CBC list of guitarists has changed since I look, but at that time, three of the top 10 had been backed on record by the Rick-and-Levon rhythm section - Robbie, Neil and Lenny. Says something about something. Also, thought I don't know exactly when it was, or even what, I do know that my nomination, Ed Patterson, won a previous CBC contest/poll as the country's best guitarist. Totally unknown (and googling doesn't help much) but totally deserving.


Entered at Mon Nov 26 21:35:05 CET 2012 from (68.164.6.50)

Posted by:

Pat B

I don't know, Peter V. Check out the songlist from Royal Albert Rags. From 69 to 71, the OQ used to deliver that kind of show every night.


Entered at Mon Nov 26 19:59:16 CET 2012 from (98.14.146.130)

Posted by:

Ari

Subject: Eric Clapton's Crossroads

Eric Clapton's Crossroads Guitar Festival 2013 Madison Square Garden Friday, April 12, 2013 Saturday, April 13, 2013 Eric Clapton brings the world's greatest guitarists to the World's Most Famous Arena for the Crossroads Guitar Festival! Featuring: Albert Lee Allan Holdsworth Allman Brothers Band Andy Fairweather Low BB King Blake Mills Booker T Brad Paisley Buddy Guy Citizen Cope Dave Biller Doyle Bramhall II Earl Klugh Eric Clapton Gary Clark Jr. Jeff Beck Jimmie Vaughan John Mayer John Scofield Jonny Lang Keb Mo Keith Urban Kurt Rosenwinkel Los Lobos Robbie Robertson Robert Cray Robert Randolph Sonny Landreth Taj Mahal Vince Gill


Entered at Mon Nov 26 19:57:51 CET 2012 from (174.252.53.96)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Orange County Fair

Thanks for that link Tim. I'm going to look through it and see if it jogs my memory.

Rocking' Chair, thanks for asking about me after the hurricane. I live inland these days, and we only had minor damage this time. My parents still live about 1/2 mile from the shore, but are high enough do that they didn't get any flooding at their house. They lost power for a week, but were very lucky compared to the folks on the Jersey shore, Staten Island and Long Island.


Entered at Mon Nov 26 19:52:43 CET 2012 from (74.108.32.67)

Posted by:

Joan

Web: My link

Subject: Janet Planet

A little more info.


Entered at Mon Nov 26 19:38:33 CET 2012 from (68.116.44.170)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Of Time And City

Thanks loads Al for that answer; as poetical & lovely in its way as Davies'dialog.

Was his POV distinctly R Catholic?


Entered at Mon Nov 26 18:18:54 CET 2012 from (72.78.45.94)

Posted by:

PSB

Subject: Janet Planet

Janet Morrison Minto is a jewelry maker. End of story.


Entered at Mon Nov 26 17:50:05 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Go Down, Miss Moses

While traveling between Toronto & Arkansas & points South with the Hawks perhaps Robbie may have seen a road sign for Nazareth, KY and taken note. On that route Kentucky certainly could by considered the dividing line between North and South. Technically that state was a Border State during the Civil War, with divided sympathies. Kentucky, however, was not only a slave-holding state, but also a key center of slave trading due to its location on the Ohio and Mississippi rivers. It was where the expression "sold down the river" took on its tragic origin.

With that in mind, one could make a case that Nazareth in Kentucky, across the great divide between North & South, takes on meaning as a reference to the South in "The Weight". This is reinforced with the "Go down, Miss Moses" line, with its ties to the African-American spiritual song and the great Southern writer William Faulkner. And through Faulkner we also have the character of Lucas Beauchamp, translated from French to Luke Goodfield, who faced his own judgment day as a black farmer accused on murdering a white man.


Entered at Mon Nov 26 16:54:06 CET 2012 from (130.64.18.51)

Posted by:

Tim

Web: My link

Subject: Todd from Connecticut

Todd, you asked about The Band playing at the Orange County Fair in Middletown NY a year (or maybe 2 years) ago. I haven't forgot but haven't been able to find anything on this. you mentioned Foreigner and Joe Walsh might have been on the bill. They did play together in 85 (see the wikipedia page) but The Band were in Cuyahoga Falls OH opening for CSN on that date. The search continues.


Entered at Mon Nov 26 14:47:12 CET 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Dammit Janet

I looked for any evidence that the Janet of Dylan songbook cover fame is the Van Janet (Rigsbee Morrison Minto). There is no evidence. I can only conclude that these are 2 different people. Van Janet apparently is a songwriter and recording as part of a group called 'Fake I.D;' (cd called 'Dreaming Ezekiel'). Look it up. From photos one can't tell. Timing (as noted) is 'off' for the Dylan cover Janet to be Van Janet. So, are there at least 2 Janet Planets. Maybe.


Entered at Mon Nov 26 14:25:23 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Let alone Rockin' Chair, Look Out Cleveland, Jawbone … it's a way better set list than The Band ever managed to do!


Entered at Mon Nov 26 14:22:42 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Great setlist … and full of things The Band hadn't done since 1971 too. I would have loved to hear We Can Talk, King Harvest, Time To Kill … and Goin' to Acapulco is a basement one they never did.


Entered at Mon Nov 26 13:45:10 CET 2012 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

mike h

Subject: Nov 24th Keswick set list (from Randy Ciarlante).

1.Down in the Flood / Shape I'm In

2. We Can Talk About It Now

3. Strawberry Wine

4. King Harvest

5. Wheels On fire

6. Jawbone

7. Whispering Pines

8. Lookout Cleveland

9. Caledonia Mission

10. Cripple Creek

11. Unfaithful Servant

12. Pipe Organ Genetic Method / Chest Fever

Part Two

1. Tear of Rage ( Maud / Garth)

2. Don't Do It ( Sister Maud) with band

3. Masterpiece

4. Rockin Chair

5. Acapulco

6. Life is a Carnival

7. Rag Mama Rag

8. Moonstruck One

9. Time To kill

10. Night They Drove Old Dixie Down

11. Across the Great divide

12. Stage Fright

encore

Makes No Difference ( Sister Maud with band )

The Weight (everybody had a piece of this one)


Entered at Mon Nov 26 12:15:08 CET 2012 from (121.209.168.49)

Posted by:

John Stirrat

Location: Sydney

Subject: Janet (are we on the correct) Planet

I checked that Janet Planet website also. I didn't realise it was circa 1998. The timeline is still not adding up due to the fact they mention her musical debut emanating out of a High School Concert (circa 83?).....I guess this is Van's former miss Planet but I wasn't 100%? js


Entered at Mon Nov 26 12:06:28 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Peter M review

Cheers for that PM. We can but pine over this side of the pond with green tinged gills.

:-0)


Entered at Mon Nov 26 11:56:42 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: JQ - Terence Davies - Of Time and City

Yeah. I saw it when it came out J. Superb documentary in an artistic sense. In other senses..hmmm

Thing is, I have a love/indifference relationship with Davies work.

Love in the sense that his films, including this one, beautifully portray chunks of the slum existence and working class dockland of Liverpool in which I grew up and within which era/nostalgia I am hopelessly steeped and by which I am eternally besotted. Only as you look back do you become aware that you lived amidst what are now termed slums. At the time it seemed like heaven here on earth. And the real sense of community was to die for. Which many did, of course.

Indifference in the sense that the lens through which Davies himself sees that same Liverpool is marinated in a genuine fondness yet, simultaneously, also a sense of isolation and detachment that I think only a 1950's repressed gay man gazing back could have represented. Which is perfectly fine by me but means that part of me loves his work to bits. Part of me shrugs my shoulders with a sort of 'yeah, but....!'

What is of no doubt whatsoever is that Davies is an artist. A man steeped far more in a deep and intense passion for the art of cinema and how it can juxtapose with other art forms than he is with anything else. His films ooze that love and passion for film as a genre. It is something within his very being that goes far beyond any undoubted fondness he retains for the protaganists of his films - ie Liverpool and Liverpudlians - and dare I say no doubt his own family and loved ones too.

I could, of course, go on forever about the subject matter and protaganists of his movies but I will have bored enough of the good folks on here senseless enough already.

:-0)

I'd be interested to hear how you found the film J? It tends to divide opinion. Most folk seem to either love it or hate it.

If you did happen to like it then I'd guess you'd possibly find the others even more so.


Entered at Mon Nov 26 10:20:05 CET 2012 from (76.111.161.75)

Posted by:

Peter M.

It was The Band, as we are privy to, in 2012-2013.


Entered at Mon Nov 26 10:03:25 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Thanks, Peter M. This must be the top "Band-related" show this year.

I looked up Janet Planet's Dylan CD on amazon (one rather half-hearted review) but then all these other CDs of Dylan covers started popping up … the "One Song Edition" is a series I'd never heard of, but there's "20 Versions of Blowin' In The Wind" on one release and "20 Versions of Mr Tambourine Man" on another. My Inbox will be filled with "amazon suggestions" for months now, though I was already getting a lot from having bought the Barb Jungr Dylan CDs.


Entered at Mon Nov 26 09:56:49 CET 2012 from (76.111.161.75)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: the pond

Subject: Keswick show

Jimmy played about almost 45% piano and 60% plus guitar, including beautiful steel, acoustic & electric guitars.


Entered at Mon Nov 26 09:45:36 CET 2012 from (76.111.161.75)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: the Turtle Pond

Subject: Band songs

The guys & Maud played a most unexpected 26 songs recorded prior to '76, with the exception of "It Makes No Difference". First four albums, plus the Basement Tapes. Whooah! And this crew pulled it off!


Entered at Mon Nov 26 04:50:11 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacifc Northwest

Subject: History

Congratulations to Toronto. I've never been a Toronto fan. However it seems very fiting that the Toronto Argonauts who won the first ever Grey Cup in 1909 should win the cup 100 years later. (there was a few years the cup wasn't presented because of wars).

The Toronto Aurgonauts are the longest time team of organized sport. The Chicago Cubs, and Atlanta braves were longer by a couple of years, but changed cities or names. The "Aurgos" have been the same team, same name in Toronto, since 1873.

Canadian Football has been around since quite awhile before American football. To this day many american football players, even drafted #1 in the states come here to play football for love of the excitement of the game and the love of Canada.

In the USA, of course the "Superbowl hype" seems to be the big deal, but in reality the game isn't the same as the grey cup game.

Congrats to The big "T'. I am happy for Ricky Ray, and a lot of the team, that are home town boys.


Entered at Mon Nov 26 04:21:38 CET 2012 from (128.104.61.219)

Posted by:

Ginger Stevens

Location: 333 W. Dayton St., Madison, Wisconsin

Subject: to appreciate this website

I think this is a very interesting website and I will return to check through it.


Entered at Mon Nov 26 01:29:25 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Band Connection

It's always there. Just now while entering a little trivia about heros past during the grey cup game, Angelo Moska, Ronnie Lancaster etc..........the background music was......Up On Cripple Creek.


Entered at Mon Nov 26 00:11:22 CET 2012 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter M: Thanks for the review. Funny line about the GB favourites.


Entered at Mon Nov 26 00:05:10 CET 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: orbital janet

Maybe this is her? If so, she has a cd of Dylan covers out in 2010. Can't find anything since. I did not know about this cover album.

"The spirited and vivacious Janet Planet has been self-produced and managed for the majority of her 25-year career. A productive recording artist, performer, teacher and clinician – her concert schedule takes her to performance halls, universities, jazz festivals and clubs across the USA and internationally"


Entered at Sun Nov 25 23:51:39 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Dlew

Dlew, neither from your demeanor over years of posting here, a few emails, and your recent FB activity, or in the writing style reflected in that blog entry, is there a damn thing to suggest the content that only a good raving madman would write in that blog entry of yours. I salute you.

By all means, please continue to be crazed.


Entered at Sun Nov 25 21:51:23 CET 2012 from (101.164.6.125)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Subject: Janet planet

That article is from 1998... I wonder what's happened since?


Entered at Sun Nov 25 21:49:41 CET 2012 from (101.164.6.125)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Web: My link

Subject: New blog entry

Moing on.


Entered at Sun Nov 25 21:30:35 CET 2012 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Janet Planet

Thanks John D - I totally bought into her as the ultimate earth mother; sexy and beautiful. I'd reckon Van's hard work - did his marriage to "Miss somewhere" hold up?


Entered at Sun Nov 25 21:17:02 CET 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

That would be JANET not my misspelling.


Entered at Sun Nov 25 21:15:48 CET 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Web: My link

Subject: JQ Janey Planet

The article in the above web page section may shed some light. She is currently on her third marriage.


Entered at Sun Nov 25 17:55:07 CET 2012 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Of Time And The City

Hi Al Edge - I just finished watching this 2008 doc by Terence Davies about 1950/60's Liverpool. Any thoughts if you've seen it?


Entered at Sun Nov 25 17:14:21 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Thank you,Peter. I was glad to read your report. Did Vivino play any guitar, or stick to piano all night?


Entered at Sun Nov 25 09:44:58 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Big hearted folks and caterwauling

PV and Kev. Good stuff fellas. Much appreciated.

As we say up here "nice swan"

As for the caterwauling Kev - that's John Power of 'La's' and 'Cast' notoriety doing his finest impression of the stone under the door leaf. I can assure you, having heard the entire thing, it doesn't jar quite so much in its full context.

:-0)


Entered at Sun Nov 25 07:26:54 CET 2012 from (76.111.161.75)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: the Turtle Pond

Subject: Jimmy Vivino leads another charge!

Rando and Jim Weider, Byron Isaacs, Garth and Maud, with Jimmy V in almost 2013. Spectacular! Sure conjured up some departed friends tonight. All stuff from the first four albums and the Basement Tapes, plus "It makes No Difference". They started with "Crash On the Levee/The Shape I'm". Guestbook favorites like "Strawberry Wine" & "The Moon Struck One" were played, as well as "King Harvest", "Look Out, Cleveland", "Whispering Pines". Garth played a gorgeous accordion intro to "This Wheel's On Fire" and the rest of the song rocked like a runaway jalopy. After "Caledonia Mission", "Cripple Creek" & "Unfaithful Servant", Garth ambled over to the Keswick's 1920's pipe organ and played many beautiful pieces and phrases that slid into "Genetic Method...Chest Fever". Then they took a break and came back with another 14 songs. Accordion intro to "When I Paint My Masterpiece" transported the audience into other worlds. And on, and on... I can't hurl enough superlatives to describe this transcendental event. And this is the short version of this report. 26 songs in all, and the theater waived its curfew to allow them to play well after 11.


Entered at Sun Nov 25 05:52:25 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Web: My link

Subject: Last line in link

It didn't cross my mind, but just in case it crossed some one elses.


Entered at Sun Nov 25 01:03:30 CET 2012 from (50.137.250.32)

Posted by:

Zzzz

Have fun Peter M, should be an awesome show!


Entered at Sat Nov 24 20:14:44 CET 2012 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Janet Planet

Anybody here know what ever became of her?


Entered at Sat Nov 24 18:05:34 CET 2012 from (76.111.161.75)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: by the Turtle Pond (Drexel Hill, Pa.)

Subject: Brother Garth

I'm quite excited about going to tonight's show at the Keswick Theatre in Glenside Pa. Garth & Maud, Jimmy Vivino, Jim Wieder, Randy Ciarlante & Byron Isaacs doing songs of The Band. I already had a ticket to see Dave Mason in NJ tonight, purchased months ago. When they announced this event with Garth and all of these Band/Dirt Farmer/Levon Helm Band folks, it was a no-brainer. eat the Dave Mason ticket and get the best seat I could for this historic event. And speaking of "best seat", I checked The Keswick Theatre site and good seats are still available! Cost is $40-50. Box office is open from now till 6PM at 215-572-7650 or you can go to TicketBastard's (Ticketmaster's) web site.


Entered at Sat Nov 24 17:24:31 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Gawd Damn Englishmen

Peter! I posted on here a long way back. Michael Buble's Dad, Lewis is a friend of mine. Lewis is a fishermen, and owns a gilnet boat called, "Winning Edge",

Lewis bought Michael a boat the same as his......Michael never got around to using his, (wonder why) so it was sold. Another friend of mine owns it.

Michael comes from Vancouver, where he nows owns a massive Pent house.


Entered at Sat Nov 24 15:53:04 CET 2012 from (76.98.218.136)

Posted by:

carmen

Location: pa
Web: My link

Subject: As Close to The Band as were likley to get

This is from my local newspaper


Entered at Sat Nov 24 10:28:58 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Morning Story (retold)

Apologies to the British who may have seen it, but there was a story from an audience member on the Graham Norton Show last night you might enjoy. Apologies for garbling it in retelling too.

Anyway, the guy was in Dublin in a restaurant and saw Bono at another table having dinner with a friend. He was a huge U2 fan and didn’t want to disturb them, so waited till Bono went out to the toilets, and went over asked Bono’s friend if it would be OK to ask for an autograph. The friend said he’d ask when Bono got back. The guy went back to his table and when Bono came out, the friend beckoned them over. They went over and got autographs, and asked Bono’s pal if he would take a photo, which the friend did.

So, when they asked for the bill (check) the waiter said it had already been taken care of.

The guy was amazed, and said ‘You mean Bono paid our bill?’

The waiter said, ‘No, not Bono … the guy he was with. Bruce Springsteen.’

By the way, Norm, a guest on the show was Michael Buble, who congratulated fellow-guest Michael Palin on writing “The Canadian National Anthem.” Palin looked puzzled, and Buble sang “I’m a lumberjack and I’m OK …”. Apparently Mr Boob-lay comes from BC. How come you guys can’t pronounce “Bubble” properly? Mind you he probably doesn't want to be confused with George Michael, who was furious on tour that the crew referred to him as "Bubble" which is cockney rhyming slang… "Bubble & Squeak" = Greek.


Entered at Fri Nov 23 22:42:56 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: A Buck is a Buck!

Yer gawd damn crazy Peter. We're even doing away with pennies in this country. The damn things are just a nuisance.


Entered at Fri Nov 23 22:41:29 CET 2012 from (70.53.46.231)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Bill M: Thank you for the Hawkins link….and well said on the guitarist list……..an example where being on the reserves list was much more prestigious.. There was a show on TSN last night – a documentary - that featured the 1971 Argos and scenes from 1960’s Yonge Street……I had thought I heard some Hawks but was out of the room so can’t be certain.

Al E: Having read much about that situation as a result of adopting Liverpool as my team…..I will most definitely make a contribution - a most worthy fund and simple to do – that’s a key to these efforts really…..……..On the other hand, it is a “nail on chalkboard” take on the song and that is too bad because much of Geldof’s success all those years ago in raising not just awareness but money was the quality of “Do They Know Its Christmas”. A more understated celebrity free reading would have been the better way to go in my opinion. It won't deter me as I already have thousands of songs I no longer listen to and I believe in the cause but it might deter casual others and that would be a shame.


Entered at Fri Nov 23 21:27:04 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: A guinea

Bill, I've explained this before. It's four half crowns, five florins, a tanner, a threepenny bit, two pennies, a ha'penny and two farthings. This stuff is easy!


Entered at Fri Nov 23 21:00:40 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Rackin my brain

Thanks for that Bill. y'know the thing was, when we went to see Lightfoot that time, was after Red Shea & John Stockfish had left him, but they were both with him I'm remembering.

At the begining of his show I remember him talking about it and why they were there, but I can't remember why. I had this girl friend Joanne then. She had just come back from spending 5 years in Perth, Aust. she got the tickets for us, (I was out fishing). We sat 3 or 4 rows right in front of those guys. One of the best shows I've ever seen. Afterward I rewarded Joanne in the only way I know.......


Entered at Fri Nov 23 20:04:53 CET 2012 from (74.108.32.67)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Whistle Stop

Welcome! The music of The Band is a great addiction.


Entered at Fri Nov 23 19:54:23 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V / Al E: 1962/01/01-2013/01/01 is 51 years. Is that like four pounds, one guinea?


Entered at Fri Nov 23 19:27:38 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The penny has dropped …

John D - I just realized why there'd be a sudden fuss about "finding" this Decca audition stuff which is on Anthology in part, and bootlegged otherwise. In Europe, a recording made on January 1st 1962 drops out of copyright on January 1st 2013 … just five weeks away. Now, I'm not sure whether it's recording date or release date … in which case the Anthology five will have restarted the clock in 1995.


Entered at Fri Nov 23 18:56:53 CET 2012 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: Hillsborough, Cincinnati . . . etc.

It seems there'll never be a shortage of liars in blue, and insurance is always easier than planning . . . looking for a bright side, there is some serious science being done, and some smatterings of advocacy


Entered at Fri Nov 23 18:37:53 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: Red Shea / Larry Lee and the Leesures

Rockin Chair: Here's a link to Larry Lee and the Leesure biggest song, from '62, complete with lead guitar by Red Shea. I've always taken the fact that the LP that followed includes "Come Love" as a sign that they'd heard a tape of the Hawks' session with Henry Glover that was done in '61 but remained in the can until '64 or '65 (when Roulette released Hawkins' best-of LP in Canada). You'd probably also like Red's solo instrumental record (backed by the rest of the Leesures), "Moon Boogie Twist". Country boogie, but breaking out Robbie-like in a couple places - see youtube.com/watch?v=4wZZzjs15Ig


Entered at Fri Nov 23 18:10:17 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Guitar groups … sorry,

Of course Telstar and Wonderful Land were AFTER the audition, but The Shadows had been a major force for two years.


Entered at Fri Nov 23 18:06:31 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Al, I’ll put my bit towards a Christmas number one. The police’s proven lies were spread efficiently and systematically over a wide area. I remember just afterwards, a taxi-driver whose son-in-law was in Dorset Police told me that the word had been passed through the police forces … and he repeated all the lies that you already know were being bandied around, with them being stated as the truth and “inside knowledge”. I had enough experience of liars in blue in the late sixties not to take it seriously.


Entered at Fri Nov 23 18:00:37 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I was sure the Decca stuff was out there too. It is … and officially. It's on "Anthology Volume 1" on Apple. Well, five of the fifteen tracks are on Anthology, recorded on New Year's Day 1962. I'm sure i've seen the lot bootlegged too.

The fact that they raced through FIFTEEN songs in a day sounds bizarre, until you factor in that they lost out to Brian Poole & The Tremeloes, who got the Decca contract. Decca rejected The Beatles so Brien Epstein said, because A&R chief Dick Rowe decided that guitar groups were finished. This doesn’t ring true for a company which had just topped both the British and American charts with The Tornados Telstar, and in a year, 1962, when The Shadows Wonderful Land (on direct rival Columbia) had just broken the record for number of consecutive weeks at number one. It’s been suggested that it was simply a polite let-down. Tony Meehan had produced the session, but attracts none of the notoriety that Dick Rowe had to live with.

On “Anthology 1” on Apple, five of the fifteen they recorded in a single day appear, and Mike Smith, the engineer gets the credit. Decca rejected The Beatles and promptly signed Brian Poole & The Tremeloes. Their first release was an LP called Big, Big Hits of 62 consisting of rapid medleys of twenty-two cover versions. As both bands auditioned at the same time, and on their ability to perform lots of cover versions, no doubt Brian Poole & The Tremeloes’ ability to swing from Speedy Gonzales send-up to a rocking Let’s Dance, and a yodelling Swiss Maid, won them the contract. They were also from the London area, requiring lower travel expenses. I figure that's what Decca were after in the first place … a good band to compete with cover versions with Woolworths Embassy covers label, who were stealing lots of sales.


Entered at Fri Nov 23 17:09:00 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Hillsborough justice campaign song - He Ain't heavy

Further to my post lower down re this, I've linked a You Tube snatch of the recording.

The previous full link has understandably been suspended - I guess so as not to quell any appetite for the official release in December. The objective being the Christmas number one, thereby maximising coverage for the campaign and ensuing funds for the upcoming legal costs.

Again I'd implore everyone of the good folk who visit this site to do their small but collectively invaluable bit to ensure long awaited justice is achieved for those 96 innocents who lost their lives at Hillsborough.


Entered at Fri Nov 23 16:07:00 CET 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT and LvdB

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Beatles Decca

John: When I read this this morning, I also thought this material was 'out there'. Now maybe there was more than one copy of this material and perhaps this is the original tape that was handed over. If so, a collector of Beatles memorabilia might want it but if the music is the same music, then an official release (on a bigger label) is what is likely implied (to give this material wider exposure). Just speculating, John.


Entered at Fri Nov 23 15:43:50 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: "The West" is a relative concept, as is "The South", even if we're talking about just the US. I think of Kentucky as being in the South, but David P might find that ridiculous - and maybe offensive. And in Daniel Boone's day, Kentucky was pretty far west. Across the Great Divide, I believe.


Entered at Fri Nov 23 15:40:56 CET 2012 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: the nazareth of the imaginary geography

Greil Marcus talks about a Mark Twain frontier, which doesn't help a lot. (My immediate Clemens association is "south" thanks to _Life on the Mississippi_, but I think he was more associated with the west overall. For Tom and Huck, the frontier was just over the horizon - to the west, for sure.)

"GREIL MARCUS: The Band was so surprising. So shocking. Music from Big Pink, before anybody had seen them play, or knew who they were... I had seen them as the Hawks, but they didn't sound anything like the Hawks on the Band's debut album. There was this tremendous sense that they were opening a door to your own country and your own history. And it was a door that you had labored so hard to erect and nail shut. To have that door open was more like entering into a dream than it was like waking up from one. That historical tinge, that sense of the past, was there. But I think the Band's music sounded absolutely present. It sounded like a new way to understand who you were and where you were. The fact that you were a product of not only of your own willfulness and your own specialness, but a product of the past. The past was something that in some way imprisoned you, but in some way was a field of opportunity — you could use the past to be your anchor, and to be the wind at your back. While there's a way in which "The Weight" seems to be taking place in some frontier town, to come right out of some Mark Twain story, I think that song and songs like "Chest Fever" and "We Can Talk About It Now" sound absolutely of their moment, too. So I don't think people took to the Band's first couple of albums out of nostalgia."


Entered at Fri Nov 23 15:31:44 CET 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Peter V / The Beatles Decca Recordings

This morning in The Telegraph, there is an article on how the Beatles Decca recordings audition have now been found. Recorded back in '62. One of the most famous stories; in music history of how the Fab 4 were turned down by Decca and of course the rest is history.

The problem with this is that I went to my vinyl collection this morning and found my copy of The Beatles "The Decca Years." Now maybe this was a bootleg; when I bought it. It certainly sounds like a "studio" recording. Not on any label I would recognize. Any thoughts?


Entered at Fri Nov 23 14:44:05 CET 2012 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: The Band and Jewishnes; on the serious side

Marshall McLuhan said: "The media is the message".

Consequently, on The Band: "The lock is the key." I said that.


Entered at Fri Nov 23 12:09:50 CET 2012 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Nazareth

The only Jew I know is Jesus from Nazareth.


Entered at Fri Nov 23 08:34:45 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Weight

The opening verse is one of the greatest lyrics (as Time pointed out). As Bill M says, "Why not Bethlehem?" for the biblical reference, but Nazareth just sounds better and still gives that immediate flash across to "No room at the inn" without being in-your-face obvious as Bethlehem would be. As for the Martin story, it might have given him the germ of the idea, but it's not about buying guitars. It's interesting that Garth thought "south" which is what Hoskyns thought about the whole of the brown album, while I see "west" … but Texas fits both.


Entered at Fri Nov 23 06:45:15 CET 2012 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: Nazareth

it just sounds nice to say (or sing)


Entered at Fri Nov 23 06:35:15 CET 2012 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

From Adam's interview with Garth:

For 'This Wheel's On Fire', I picked up a telegraph key. There was a bar with a weight that you could slide back and forth, to vary the rate or number of oscillations. With the telegraph key, you have an on/off signal. What could you call that, machine gun? Yeah, you could call it that. A reiterative effect, and it was great. That keyboard was an RMI Rock-Si-Chord."


Entered at Fri Nov 23 05:16:40 CET 2012 from (174.91.125.187)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Whistle Stop: Welcome. Thanks for diving in like that, not that I can be of any help.

Re why Nazareth, it makes sense to say that the inspiration was the location of the Martin factory, even as a face-saver if, say, a question from somebody made Robbie realise that in writing his biblical first verse he'd confused Jesus el-Nazari's presumed hometown with the location of his birth-manger.

I also suspect that Garth is onto something when he thinks South - though not because of that opening line. I see the opening two lines as being way older than the rest, predating Dylan's "Lo And Behold" (with it's mirror opening lines), and so predating the return of Levon to the fold. Robbie has said that he wrote the vast majority of his Band songs for a specific voice. "The Weight" is Levon's only lead vocal on Big Pink; if it feels South, it seems natural to attribute that to Robbie writing the bulk of it with Levon's voice in mind.

By the way, Julian Fauth's stunning new album (see link) has a very powerful version of early bluesman Willie Johnson's "Everybody Ought To Treat A Stranger Right", which also uses the arrival of Jesus (as a stranger, relying on the goodwill of accidental hosts) as a setup. I've had it a month and don't think I've ever played an album as often - even back when I had just two or three.


Entered at Fri Nov 23 04:56:33 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Russo on Levon

Removed from Serenity's post.
"He just had this air about him that he was elevated," says Russo. "More elevated than the rest of us."


Entered at Fri Nov 23 04:26:13 CET 2012 from (64.148.9.12)

Posted by:

Whistle Stop

Location: CT

Subject: Garth's Big Pink Keyboards

I've been listening to some of the songs from Big Pink recently, and was wondering about the keyboards used on "In a Station" and "This Wheel's on Fire". Some sources say clavinet while others say Rocksichord for "In a Station", while I've heard clavinet with fuzz, electric piano, Lowrey Organ, Rocksichord through a telegraph key, and a mixture of all four mentioned for "This Wheel's on Fire". To me, both "Station" and "Wheel's" sound like they use a Rocksichord (or some other type of electric harpsichord), with the possible addition of electric piano through fuzz on "Wheel's". Nobody I've talked to seems to agree, and some insist they hear clavinet on both songs. Any thoughts?


Entered at Fri Nov 23 04:18:54 CET 2012 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: THE BAND,etc...

Thought this interesting. Just came across this in my inbox.

Wilco's Nels Cline to Play Eric Clapton's Role at 'Last Waltz' Tribute Show

Recreation of the Band's farewell concert set for San Francisco this weekend By Benjy Eisen

November 21, 2012 11:25 AM ET

Nels Cline of Wilco

On Saturday, an all-star lineup of mostly indie musicians will come together at San Francisco's Warfield Theater to perform "The Complete Last Waltz," a tribute to the Band's marathon farewell concert. The players will include Nels Cline of Wilco, Dave Dreiwitz of Ween, Joe Russo of Furthur, Erick Slick and Scott McMicken of Dr. Dog, Ira Elliot of Nada Surf, Jason Abraham Roberts of Norah Jones' band, Cass McCombs, Trixie Whitley and Marco Benevento.

The original Last Waltz was held just across town at the now-defunct Winterland Ballroom on Thanksgiving night, 1976. That affair began in the late afternoon with a turkey dinner and ended well past 2 a.m., some 41 songs later. By the end of the night, the Band had welcomed more than a dozen special guests to help them go out with a bang, among them Eric Clapton, Van Morrison, Neil Diamond, Bob Dylan and Neil Young. Director Martin Scorsese documented the night on film, creating one of the great rock & roll movies of all time.

From the Archives: Rolling Stone's 1978 Feature on 'The Last Waltz'

"The movie is pretty ingrained in me," the Yellowbirds' Sam Cohen tells Rolling Stone. "I've watched it probably 100 times." Cohen, who will serve as musical director, says the night will honor the spirit of the original concert by keeping things loose and open-ended, with some room for spontaneity – even though the set list will stick to all 41 songs from the historic show. Turkey dinner will not be served.

For Furthur drummer Joe Russo, the evening will be a chance to perform in the role of his hero, Levon Helm. Before Helm passed away earlier this year, Russo had the pleasure of meeting and performing with him, at one of the Rambles that Helm held at his barn in Woodstock, New York. That experience, Russo tells Rolling Stone, was life-changing. "He just had this air about him that he was elevated," says Russo. "More elevated than the rest of us." Russo says producer Ramie Egan of Golden Gate Presents had the idea for "The Complete Last Waltz" before Helm passed, and the event was designed to be a tribute to the original concert – not just the film and not just the drummer.

Still, Russo says, "I think anything anybody does is a tribute to Levon at this point, regardless of if it's even a Band song. I think everybody offers up a little something to Levon every night."

Another of Russo's top musical heroes, Wilco's Nels Cline, will be on hand performing in the role of Eric Clapton. Cline tells Rolling Stone that taking on such a part is not something he would usually even consider, but something about the show just felt right to him.

"A lot of these people are in bands that have either played with Wilco or that I've heard – a lot of really good players," says Cline. "I think that's when I realized that I made a good decision. Because it's not like a lot of super obvious, dinosaur people; it's a lot of really great younger players who really know how to play this music. I feel like I am the dinosaur on the list, coming in here as the old man, as it were, and trying to rip it up on the guitar."

Cline and the aforementioned musicians will also be joined by members of the Fruit Bats, the Low Anthem, Antibalas, Gomez, Vetiver, the Long Winters, the Warren Haynes Band, Wolf!, the Lonely Forest and others. Additionally, actors Michael Gladis (Mad Men), Beth Behrs (Two Broke Girls), and Mike Kelly (House of Cards) will perform spoken word. All the musicians who spoke to Rolling Stone during a recent rehearsal day emphasized that the show will be a tribute – but not an exact replica – of the original Last Waltz. "This is not going to be some totally archival thing," Cline says. "It's going to actually be a living thing."

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxo


Entered at Fri Nov 23 04:04:27 CET 2012 from (64.148.9.12)

Posted by:

Whistle Stop

Location: CT

Subject: First Post

Hi, I'm new to the Band Guestbook, but I've been reading it for a while, and it seems like a neat place for hard-core Band fans, so I finally decided to post. I'm relatively new to The Band, since I only discovered them about a year or so ago, but they've quickly become my favorite band, by far. I went from having zero to eighty of their songs on my iPod over the course of about a month, and I've read every book/article and watched every video on them that I could find. I've been listening to them essentially nonstop (I've got the Last Waltz version of "Rag Mama Rag" with awesome piano work by Garth playing now), and I wake up every morning with a different Band song stuck in my head (today it was "It Makes No Difference", yesterday was "Just Another Whistle Stop", and the day before was "We Can Talk"). I'm excited about joining this Band fan community, and just I'd thought I'd post a bit about myself. Thanks.


Entered at Fri Nov 23 03:09:48 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Web: My link

Garth on Robbie's choice of Nazareth in The Weight


Entered at Fri Nov 23 02:58:33 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Aquaintances

Well thank you for that Bill. I thought his name sounded familiar. I met Red Shea in 1977, when I saw Ligfhtfoot for the first time at the Queen Elizabeth Theater in Van.

Damn my mind is failing me right now that great guitar playing girl opened for Lightfoot..........hell what's her name she is the greatest classical guitarist...and beautiful............yeah!, Leona Boyd. What a show that was. Anyway Red Shea was a great and humble guy, and what a talent. I beleive he is one of those few who quietly spends his life making others sound good.


Entered at Fri Nov 23 02:00:04 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Rockin' Chair: Very nice. The artist, Bill Dalziel, was the pianist in Larry Lee and the Leesures, a group I've mentioned here many times because they were great chums of the Hawks when they all carroused together as residents of a cheap hotel in Toronto in the early '60s. The Leesures' guitarist, the great Red Shea, went on to Lightfoot's accompanist for many years and is on, I'm pretty sure, Gord's original of "Christian Island". Dalziel still plays around southern Ontario, often appearing as Jerry Lee Lewis in oldies tribute shows.

Kevin J / Peter V: The link is to what I think is the scariest example of the extreme Robertson style ever formally released on vinyl. The guitarist in this case is Bobby Starr, with James Cotton on harmonica and probably Stan Szelest on piano. (I've heard Robbie doing this sort of thing himself, but only on live tapes.) It was released in '65 or '66 as the b-side of Hawkins' "Goin' To The River", which is also on YouTube, and easier to find there. Szelest is very impressive on that one. Considering the playing, it is not surprising that both were mis-attributed to our guys in the second edition of Greil Marcus's "Mystery Train" and on Marcus's source, a UK semi-legal comp called something like "Rock and Roll Transfusion".


Entered at Fri Nov 23 01:41:14 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Christian Island

Yeah.....OK, Bill. The man is great, very humble & laid back. I'm sure you know who his father was as well.

I was just messing around on youtube. One of my all time favourite Lightfoot songs. Hope this works, I forget the fellows name who is doing this, and the images are done by a young lady. But this fellow's singing is great, and I appreciate the work she has done here. Take a look, I enjoy it. I've always wanted to see James Bay..well....one day.


Entered at Fri Nov 23 01:27:24 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Rockin' Chair: My bubblegum cards always spelled it "Gerry", but yes, a great Manitoban.


Entered at Fri Nov 23 01:17:58 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Positive thinking

Well......yeah Sadavid. You gave me a belly laugh. I guess that old saying, "If you don't do nothin', you can't do nothin wrong" may apply.

Now you book worm, "suits" that wear your white shirts and can't get yer hands dirty, (like Billy Bad Ass Munson). Well I know yer not into sports.....but! I wanted to know what any of youze knew about "Kid Dynamite? He's from out in your country. Now lives around where Doc Jerry T is always comin' out to.

His name is Jerry James. Ring a bell? He's the only man in any professional sports EVER.....to do it. He played for the Grey Cup, and the Stanley Cup both in the same year. YEAH! He played for the Leafs, and Windowpeg. You shoulda knew that Sadavid.


Entered at Fri Nov 23 00:31:01 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Kevin J: Some kind soul has posted my favourite Sonny Greenwich track - see link.


Entered at Thu Nov 22 21:55:06 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

sadavid: Thanks for posting the guitarist list. Kevin J: I'm impressed that Breau made it to number 8, considering the evident lack of historical (never mind musical) sense among most of the voters. Breau, though having four Canadian-born grandparents and one Canadian-born parent, and having spent most of his childhood and teenage years in Canada - not to mention long spells of his 20s and 30s - was never a citizen. But he saw himself as Canadian, and that's good enough for me. A bunch of the guys on the list I've never heard of, and in some cases I've never heard even their band, but I can't help but think that few, if any would top any of the also-rans listed down the left margin: Colin Linden, Greg Leskiw, Red Shea, Bill Henderson, Sonny Greenwich, Nelson Symonds, Amos Garrett, Domenic Troiano and Bill Dillon. Or my one write-in ballot, Ed Patterson. Easy Band links exist for most, but not Leskiw, Greenwich, Henderson or Symonds that I can think of offhand.


Entered at Thu Nov 22 21:43:04 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Simone Felice, and prior to that The Duke & The King always get placed in British lists, which they might not do in America. In fact I think half my Top Ten albums this year will be British.


Entered at Thu Nov 22 20:33:11 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT and LvdB

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Grizzly Bear

Of the ones you listed, I know only Grizzly Bear... worth listening. I'll be interested to see the rest of the list.


Entered at Thu Nov 22 20:26:12 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Brahms & Lizsts

Uncut’s Top 10 will be pleasing to most of us: Leonard Cohen #1, Bob Dylan #2, Dr John #4, Neil Young #9 and #43, Paul Buchanan #14, Ry Cooder #30 (Americana #4). All Band connectiond there. Plus Bruce Sprinsgsteen #10, Simone Felice #70 (Americana #8).

I think the issue is the amount of stuff you’ve never heard, nor heard of. Take Frank Ocean at #5, Bill Fay at #6. Ty Seagall at #7, Grizzly Bear at #8. Never heard of any of it. Three are on the covermount CD though, so fair enough.


Entered at Thu Nov 22 20:16:44 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Another point regarding lists

Kevin J: Yes, subjectivity and other factors are influential when lists are compiled. (Canada, USA, Europe, Australia as one source of such variability). Objectivity is hard to come by.

Like you said, its hard to turn away. But they should be criticized for what 'best of' lists are. Subjective based on so many variables. The only good thing I can see about 'best of lists' is that #1-20 will likely be there in anyone's list. If we then take 10 such lists, we get a pretty good idea of what cd one should seek out.


Entered at Thu Nov 22 19:29:52 CET 2012 from (70.53.46.231)

Posted by:

Kevin J

...not sure Lenny Breau was Canadian but if he qualified...not having him number 1 is laughable....as is most of the rest of that list. At least RR gets his due.


Entered at Thu Nov 22 19:00:57 CET 2012 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: the 25 greatest ever

(I didn't want to put "list" in the title; had enough sea stories for one day.)

Radio 2's list of Canuckistanian guitaristi. Could have been worse, but I woulda liked to see C. Linden there . . . .

For those who don't like lists but would find inspiration in a new guitar, Radio 2 is also doing a 5-guitar Fender giveaway. Easy to enter on line, but for Canuckistanians only, I'm afraid.

WC: say what you like about Toronto, but the Leafs haven't lost a game all season . . . .


Entered at Thu Nov 22 18:36:27 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

The ol' sailor

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Safe Distance

Bill if your insinuating.........I wish I had you aboard about 3 nights ago off Cape Caution. For some idea of "conditions". the deck of my barge is 9 feet above the water. When the loading ramp is up while towing, the ramp is 20 ft long, so the top of the ramp is about 28 ft above the water. When the tug goes into the trough of a swell and the barge does at the same time, the ramp is completely out of sight, 30 ft swells at least ..yer real brave at a safe distance of several thous miles.

You'd be on your knees snivelling like a little boy......one of these days.

Now down to the nitty gritty......who's gonna bet on the Grey Cup?? I won a Snickers Bar off Lars on the world series.......I'm on a roll. I guess non of you sissy boys in Tranna even bother to go.


Entered at Thu Nov 22 18:30:43 CET 2012 from (70.53.46.231)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Lists

……another thing about lists is how easily orders can be reversed depending on audience…..take the 5 mega stars of the Canadian music scene over the last 40 years………..at this site, I have no doubts that order of preference would be The Band, Leonard Cohen, Neil Young, Joni Mitchell, and Guess Who………In Canada – allowing the great unwashed into the tent, the order would likely be Neil Young , The Guess Who, Joni Mitchell, Leonard Cohen and The Band…………….Internationally, it would almost certainly be Joni Mitchell, Neil Young, Leonard Cohen, The Band and then The Guess Who……………………….British rock mags always have Queen as one of the top 5 rock bands of all time……Internationally, this also makes sense but I doubt a single US publication would ever have Queen anywhere near Top 10.


Entered at Thu Nov 22 18:31:15 CET 2012 from (108.15.15.247)

Posted by:

Jonathan Katz

Location: Columbia, MD

Happy Thanksgiving.


Entered at Thu Nov 22 18:06:07 CET 2012 from (70.53.46.231)

Posted by:

Kevin J

“I'm not here for your amusement. You're here for mine.” – Johnny Rotten

JT: I confess, I like lists – a lot…almost always frustrating but hard to look away really. I would know that everyone here has TNTDODD as one of their favorite Band songs, but it interests me to know where they have it ranked in terms of favour. I don’t have "Acadian Driftwood” in my top 10 Band songs, though others like Al Edge, Bob W, Barney Hoskyns have it number 1 - if memory serves.

Peter: Bravo. Not sure why but I’ve always loved the lyric to “The Groom’s Still Waiting At The Altar”. I think the Claudette part puts it over the top for me.

For those looking for dvd recommendations……the first season of HBO’s “Game of Thrones” is out and it is excellent. Also, picked up the prequel to Inspector Morse called “Endeavour”. I enjoyed it as I have the “Inspector Lewis” series which is at or near the quality of the Morse series.


Entered at Thu Nov 22 17:42:59 CET 2012 from (71.184.199.161)

Posted by:

Tim

Location: Boston

Happy Thanksgiving from Boston everyone.


Entered at Thu Nov 22 17:29:15 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: The Night You Downed Shots Of Old Dixie

sadavid: I hope you're not suggesting that it's time to put down the old sailor, however tempting that thought may be at times.


Entered at Thu Nov 22 17:17:46 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: So many Alans... so little time

Al Edge: Sorry: I was addressing Alan Jones of editorial fame (UNCUT). But thanks for paying attention to me. So few do and maybe for good reason.


Entered at Thu Nov 22 17:16:23 CET 2012 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: the night we did shots of Old Dixie

. . . you know it's old when it's from BC . . . .


Entered at Thu Nov 22 16:30:30 CET 2012 from (24.189.208.76)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: NY

"Happy Thansgiving" - Rick Danko (and Tom)


Entered at Thu Nov 22 15:57:46 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: back on the chain letter gang

Peter V: That Dixie was a man came as a bit of a surprise, because I grew up on a Dixie Road (hence NB titling one of his posts The Night They Drove Down Old Dixie) and my uncle's favourite dog was Dixie, a female bull mastiff. But, as you've gotten the ball rolling, I've done my best to fall in line ...

[....]
Ol’ Dixie was a mean old man
who wore a shirt of orange linen
Always with a rabbit fur collar
'cause he liked to do the skinnin'


Entered at Thu Nov 22 15:54:46 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Jerry T

Yeah JT. I'll find time sometime soon to try and digest all that's been posted.


Entered at Thu Nov 22 15:52:16 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Oops the Link to He Aint Heavy below temporarily removed

I'll post it again when it's restored.

In the meantime I can assure everybody it's an impressive effort.


Entered at Thu Nov 22 15:43:37 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: A favour to ask all on the GB re the ongoing pusuit of justice in respect of the Hillsborough tragedy

You may or may not be aware from my postings over time regarding the outrageous criminal injustice concerning Hillsborough.

Again you may or may not be aware that having fought what for much of the time was a seemingly hopeless 23 year long fight against a prevailing worldwide misrepresentation of the truth fed by ignorance and prejudice wickedly instigated on the day and stoked ever since by authority lies, cover-ups and stonewalling, this Autumn the 96 Hillsborough families finally achieved their goal of seeing the official acknowledgement by their own Government in Parliament of the unprecedented injustice that had taken place.

To assist the families financially achieve their full justice with the long sought after re-opened inquests and any appropriate criminal proceedings a Christmas single has been launched.

It is a re-working of The Hollies classic 'He Ain't Heavy' featuring a host of artists.

This track was chosen as it was featured as a very moving pre-match tribute by Everton Football Club [Liverpool FC's neighbouring football club] to acknowledge the clinching of justice by the Hillsborough families.

I've linked the song. It's out on December 17th when I believe it will be available on all recognized internet downloading channels.

I'd respectfully implore everybody on here to buy a copy

Cheers.


Entered at Thu Nov 22 15:43:17 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: I dislike 'the order'

As usual, apples, oranges and bananas are compared in a list that somehow defines what 'the best is'. If I ran the world of lists, I'd list all the music that made a cut and have a short commentary as to why that album is there. I would do it in random order with the artist first, the name of the album next, the release date next, and the reason(s) that album/cd made the list. This obsessive need to 'order' things is in my view inappropriate for artistic expression. Sure, it has become a tradition but we are in the age of enlightenment and I think we should move forward and abandon the list. You can list '$sales' because maybe those are hard facts. But, the abstract art of musical success should not be ordered IMO. Alan, are you reading this?


Entered at Thu Nov 22 15:35:26 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Chain lyric

Good idea, Landmark. How about a chain lyric for “The Night They Shot Old Dixie down?” Add one or more lines which make sense.

Ol’ Dixie was a gamblin’ man

Down in Buenos Aries

He’d go down there to catch the sun

In Decembers and Januarys

Ol’ Dixie was a mean old man

who wore a shirt of orange …


Entered at Thu Nov 22 15:28:41 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Uncut's Best of the year

These "Best of the Year" are always hard because no one has heard their 75 albums of the year in full. There's a lot I don't know … but Bob Dylan's "Tempest" comes in at #2 this year (though #1 in "Americana" sub-section). Bob is beaten to #1 spot by … "Old Ideas" by Leonard Cohen! I call that a result because i'd put Len ahead too. But I think Simone Felice would be my #1 anyway.


Entered at Thu Nov 22 13:50:25 CET 2012 from (70.28.32.74)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

No need to apologize, I like "The Night They Shot Old Dixie Down". Since it will be quieter for the next couple of days, shall we indulge in writing lyrics to this opus?


Entered at Thu Nov 22 13:08:47 CET 2012 from (117.219.7.115)

Posted by:

Sanjay

Yours is a very useful site. We at www.chennaiblossoms.com want to get affiliated to you.


Entered at Thu Nov 22 12:17:44 CET 2012 from (65.94.154.125)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Drove, not shot. My apologies

'...Drove Old Dixie Down' . Even when you read and edit, errors occur. Sorry folks.


Entered at Thu Nov 22 12:12:39 CET 2012 from (65.94.154.125)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Neil Young and the young up and coming

Neil Young's Psychedlic Pill continues in the traditional Crazy Horse genre. Its a solid album of relatively straightforward Young songs delivered with the expected commitment of Neil Young. It succeeds like Tempest succeeds for Dylan and like Song To Sing/No Plan B succeeds for Morrison. If you like what Neil Young does, you will like this one. There are long songs but I found them intriguing.. Ramada Inn' and " Walk Like A Giant' are standouts on this album. All of these artists, as I have said before, continue to produce in the studio for sure. Neil Young was apparently very good at the Air Canada Centre with Crazy Horse a few nights ago.

I think we need to have perspective when we look at the creativity of these 40-50 years-in-the-business artists. Very few artists do their best work at then end of their career. Leonard Cohen may be an exception on stage at least, though his stage work has always been very good. Some of his albums have been spotty, like Dylan's in the middle of his career.

When I look at the work of the newer artists out there, its clear to me that the tradition continues. The National, Death Cab For Cutie, Dandy Warhols, Bon Iver, Shins, Arcade Fire (those who have been around for a few years now ) explode onto the scene, usually with a lead singer who has some charisma and something distinct and more or less continue in their own tradition with that characteristic that made the impact originally. Only Dylan and Young have dared to vary from their tradition. Dylan has done this a number of times and has been pilloried often for his need to follow his artistic lead. If you look at Neil Young, he started in Yorkville with the Mynah Birds, became a folkie after his first two albums and put out some excellent acoustic-laden albums that were highly regarded, went to Blues with 'On The Beach', did some country "Old Ways", some tech stuff, some R&B, then the grunge, more acoustic, and Crazy Horse interspersed throughout coming and going but always hovering. His adherents, like Dylan's, certainly had their moments. 'ArcWeld' was tough but there it is, on a cd for all to hear. What a 50 years it has been... with no denigration of any music form, we have gone from 'Who Wears Short Shorts' to "Pay In Blood" with "Like A Rolling Stone" , "The Night They Shot Old Dixie Down" and "Dance Me To the End of Love" gracing us with their presence.


Entered at Thu Nov 22 09:57:28 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Changing voices

Interesting point about Neil Young's voice. Normally voices drop in register with age. If you listen to early Van Morrison it’s way higher than current versions of the same songs. Perhaps if you start off very high you have further to drop!

When Johnny Rogan’s Van Morrison biography came out, I did a long review in Wavelength, which resulted in correspondence with the author. I complained about the number of disparaging (and irrelevant) references to Van’s height, facial appearance and large stomach. I pointed out that a large stomach was simply a sign of using his full lungs and therefore good breathing technique and singing technique. Opera singers have large tummies for the same reason. Breathing exercises teach you to expand your stomach, not your chest. A big tum is the powerhouse behind a big voice. And Van can still give it full throttle.

Actors keep their voices by doing regular breathing exercises. I’d bet Leonard Cohen after his years in a Buddhist monastery knows a thing or two about breathing techniques … and they definitely lower the voice, which is why public speakers and actors are encouraged to do them. I watched Sir Ian McKellen, then 72, hold a theatre at full voice without microphone last year. I know people who sing in symphony choirs at seventy. I don’t know how many rock singers do regular breathing exercises. With some people it just comes naturally. But normally singing high is more constricting and more strain.

I know singers who say the smoking ban in venues has added ten years to their “singing lives”. And also smoking … anything … is extremely bad.

Has anyone tried Neil Young's latest? I read reviews about the extremely long first track and decided to pass … I haven't heard any.


Entered at Thu Nov 22 09:23:57 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

Thanks Kevin, you just helped out with the book I'm doing on varieties of English. No one has noted a tiny point. Americans often talk about both throwing stones - a Hawks song there - and throwing rocks. For most British English speakers it changes from a stone to a rock around the point it is too big to pick up.


Entered at Thu Nov 22 04:12:45 CET 2012 from (74.198.9.174)

Posted by:

Kevin J

.......year 2044......The Jimi Hendrix estate announces a new LP to be released containing 12 previously unreleased songs.......Rolling Stone magazine believes it........in other news, a 90 something year old British citizen ( reportedly named Peter ) is arrested in the southern part of England for throwing rocks at Bob Dylan's tour bus. Being led away in handcuffs he was overheard ranting "it wasn't just that "Like a Rolling Stone" was off....damn it he made us stand in the bloody arena when surely he could have played a smaller venue with seats.....I know Len would have!"..........Mr. Cohen, 110, could not be reached for comment......apparently still smarting over how over how Mr. Dylan had rhymed "January" with "Buenos Aires" some 50 years earlier.


Entered at Thu Nov 22 03:44:06 CET 2012 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: HAPPY THANKSGIVING to all you Americans xoxoxo

Twas the night before Thanksgiving I just couldn't sleep,

I tried counting backwards, I tried counting sheep.

The food beckoned - the dark meat and white,

but I fought the temptations with all of my might.

Tossing and turning with anticipation, the thought of a snack was infatuation.

So, I raced to the kitchen, flung open the door,

and gazed at the fridge, full of goodies galore.

I gobbled up turkey and buttered potatoes, pickles and carrots, beans and tomatoes.

I felt myself swelling so plump and so round, "til all of a sudden, I rose off the ground.

I crashed through the ceiling, floating into the sky,

with a mouthful of pudding and handful of pie.

But, I managed to yell as I soared past the trees...

Happy eating to all - pass the cranberries, please.

May your stuffing be tasty, may your turkey be plump,

may your 'tater 'n gravy have narry a lump.

May your yams be delicious, may your pies take the prize,

may your holiday dinner stay off of your thighs.

HAPPY THANKSGIVING TO YA ALL!!!

LUVYA xoxoxoxo


Entered at Thu Nov 22 03:21:28 CET 2012 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: Jimi Hendriks

Hi guys. Great reading.. CRACKERS? Ate a few tonight!!

Here is something some of you may be interested in..

LOS ANGELES — A new Jimi Hendrix album is coming March 5.

The musician's website says "People, Hell and Angels" contains 12 previously unreleased tracks recorded in 1968 and '69.

Rolling Stone revealed the album cover on its website Wednesday.

Hendrix recorded the songs apart from the Jimi Hendrix Experience as he considered new, experimental directions for his follow-up to "Electric Ladyland." He plays keyboards, percussion and a second guitar on the album.

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxo


Entered at Thu Nov 22 01:50:59 CET 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Changing voices of our rock heroes

I subscribe to Offbeat Magazine out of New Orleans and there was an interview with Poncho the lead guitarist of Neil Young's Crazy Horse; who were here on Monday night.

He has a theory that; because Neil has always sung in that high falsetto voice, is the reason that he has indeed kept his voice. Interesting observation.


Entered at Thu Nov 22 01:42:58 CET 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Van The Man

I spent time this afternoon listening to Mr. Morrison's new album. I loved the instrumentation and the writing is superb. Didn't care much for the one instrumental piece. A little too safe for Van. 3 out of 4 stars.


Entered at Thu Nov 22 01:39:26 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUpFfriend0

"anyhow, the best of us here are like good columnists, we write what we feel and move on. "

still laughing. Steve would be trying to find a dovetail for billing at 25 cents a word.


Entered at Thu Nov 22 01:32:04 CET 2012 from (74.198.9.174)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Bob......A mighty fine complement. Thank you.


Entered at Thu Nov 22 00:42:51 CET 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Kevin J

Kev, if you were writing a column in my daily newspaper it would be the first page I'd go to every morning.


Entered at Wed Nov 21 22:38:03 CET 2012 from (70.53.46.231)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Bob F: I have not been shy about criticizing Bob Dylan when it was warranted. His live television performances in particular over the last 25 years or so – really since the shambles that was Live Aid – have been truly abysmal. An important distinction though is that I have never – not once – been disappointed in seeing him live. I have maintained for a long time at this GB that I would be much happier if he focused only on songs since Love & Theft live but he doesn’t want to do this and so ok……..we take the great like “Visions of J” and “Tangled Up in Blue” with the not so great………His choice…..Easier for guys like Knopfler to separate a band career from a solo career but I wish Bob would notice how accepting fans are of this and realize that the people with him now – in his band and his audience – would rejoice in such a move…………………as to “Temptest”, all the beer in the world couldn’t change my mind…. I am ok with it as I am with almost everything he has ever released but if given a choice of 25 Dylan albums to take with me to a desert island, Temptest would not make the cut…..I have a feeling Dylan feels the same way himself as his shunning of it live is telling.

Thank you for that Graham Parker article, by the way. Most enjoyable. I always had him and Joe Jackson ahead of Elvis C but careers have a funny way of putting some on top and others elsewhere…………..and NO THANK YOU for reminding me of that night watching the Grammys with friends….I love Bob Dylan as there were times in my life when he meant more to me that just about anybody alive and seeing people ( including a couple that were bragging about seeing a reformed Chicago as being a highlight in their lives! - a truly “kill the neighbours kind of night it was ) laugh out loud at him was hurtful. I was reacting to that I guess…….anyhow, the best of us here are like good columnists, we write what we feel and move on.


Entered at Wed Nov 21 21:16:18 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Good Night - Bad Night

Yuh need to watch Guy Terrifico........BAD NIGHT....now that! is something to see.


Entered at Wed Nov 21 21:10:56 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow

Forgive them their trespasses. We've all been there. We've all had doubts at one time or another. My lapse was in 1980 and it lasted about a year. It was personal. Its often personal. I got over it. Embarrassment is a tough one too. The thing I've learned (as have we all) is that if you see a performer enough times, sometimes its going to be great and sometimes less so. I can't imagine what it must be like to get up there 100 times a year. We all have our bad days, whether its on stage, in the office, on the assembly line or loading garbage onto the sanitation truck.


Entered at Wed Nov 21 21:04:15 CET 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Subject: Things We Said Yesterday

Hey Kevin, good thing Dylan didn't hear you a couple years ago when you were demanding he retire from concert performances at once. Wasn't it something about his performance at The Grammy's embarrasing you in front of your friends? Just think you would have missed out on seeing these great performances and having what sounds like a real good time. Maybe now is the time to revisit Tempest. Get a vinyl copy, sit down with a good pair of earphones, a pint of that fine Canadian beer and give it another listen.


Entered at Wed Nov 21 20:47:02 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Robbie on the Group's Name

Here is an extended comment on naming The Band from Robbie (excerpt from "Robbie Robertson -- In His Own Words" link above):

"Being out with Dylan put us much more in touch with what was going on in the world. We had come out of the swamps, and these back-road clubs, and suddenly we're stuck out on the world with this attitude we brought with us, and now people want us to come back in and find a cute name for this group. The whole thing seemed very childish to us. Names were really goofy at that time. Everybody was thinking up very psychedelic names, and just to go against that we said, 'We are not going to name the group.'"

"The record company went crazy. They said, 'You have to have a name. Call it Number Seven, anything, but you have to think of something.'"

"We said, OK, we will call ourselves The Crackers"

"And they said, 'That's a cute name.' They were thinking of soda crackers, or biscuits. Then they came back and said, 'No. You Can't call yourselves the Crackers. That means something else altogether.'"

"From playing with Dylan, and this little neighborhood we lived in called Woodstock, everybody called us The Band. That was about as anonymous as we could get."

"We had the record company over the rails. They were printing up our first album, 'Music From Big Pink', and we came in that afternoon and said, 'Well, we're The Band.'"

"They said, 'That's not a name.'"

"And we said, 'Right.'"


Entered at Wed Nov 21 20:40:27 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The local skinny.....

Just being a local kid tho', and not well traveled, to give the explanation of "cracker" when I was a teen was a little different.

If you ever watched the movie, "The Last Picture Show", well things weren't a lot different around here. I'm pretty sure the expression came from "fire crackers".......explosive, quick. A guy who was a real cracker, was quick, explosive, a crack pitcher. A group of guys who were on top of it all were a gang of crackers.


Entered at Wed Nov 21 20:35:25 CET 2012 from (74.108.32.67)

Posted by:

Joan

Happy Thanksgiving to all!


Entered at Wed Nov 21 19:43:52 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: No guitar yet Kevin. Shelton Jan 22 1968 Guthrie Tribute

For my $3.95 +tax, here is an excerpt from the Robert Shelton review from the NYTimes of the Guthrie Tribute of Jan. 20, 1968.

" Bob Dylan, seemingly unable to avoid dramatic excitement, did 3 songs in electric rockabilly arrangements of disarming originality with his five-man band. The concerts had been among the most eagerly anticipated in folk circles in years. Partly, this was because they marked the return to the stage of Mr. Dylan, who had been in seclusion since the summer of 1966. The close-harmony country-and-western vocal work of Mr. Dylan and his band, his own singing and his charismatic presence won superheated applause in a day of hot applause for his 13 minute segment."

So, no mention of a name for this 5-man band.


Entered at Wed Nov 21 19:43:27 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: What's the craich like in there?

Now I think, like Bill M, the first time I heard an Irish guy ask "What's the craich like in there?" as we were entering a club, I misinterpreted it as a coarse remark, understandably, as this was in my folk club days and these were Irish musicians. I hope the musicians here will forgive the slur, but I have come to associate such coarse remarks about women with their profession. I may have said something terribly British like, "I say, sir! Please moderate your language! There are ladies present!" or perhaps I just said "Um. Er. I dunno." Anyway, this led to an explanation of the innocent and cheerful meaning in Irish.


Entered at Wed Nov 21 19:31:53 CET 2012 from (70.53.46.231)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

...and of course the great Camper Van Beethoven became the almost great Cracker......above link to one of their better ones.....funny now for how much money must have been spent on those little things called videos...remember those


Entered at Wed Nov 21 19:17:10 CET 2012 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: hell on wheels

David P: Gov. Wallace's remark reminds me of a rant from Andy Griffith as Lonesome Rhodes in _A Face in the Crowd_ (1957):

"This whole country's just like my flock of sheep . . . rednecks, crackers, hillbillies, hausfraus, shut-ins, pea-pickers . . . everybody that's got to jump when somebody else blows the whistle."


Entered at Wed Nov 21 19:14:32 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Sorry!

Norm had already given us the Wiki link! Sorry, Norm.


Entered at Wed Nov 21 19:13:36 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Crackers

In fact looking it up on Wiki (see link), the Irish craic / craich is one of the several possible origins of the American cracker. It says that "crackers" described slave overseers and it could come from the cracking of whips (a Blind Willie McTell reference!). I'd add that many slave overseers were recruited from recent Irish immigrants according to some sources, so there could be a double reference in there.


Entered at Wed Nov 21 19:12:40 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Uncovered

In the link I provided explaining "crackers" there is a picture of a pair of "Georgia Crackers". I reckon the one on the horse looks a lot like David Powell.


Entered at Wed Nov 21 19:00:48 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Crackers

John D: Before the major league baseball team known as the Braves moved to Atlanta from Milwaukee in 1966 we had a successful minor league team called the Atlanta Crackers. Earlier during the days of segregation in the South, the city also had a team that became known as the Black Crackers that played in the Negro League. That team was originally called the Cubs, but since so many fans had begun referring to them as the Black Crackers, they officially adopted that name.

When The Band released "Music From Big Pink" in the summer of 1968, one should look at the connotation of the name "cracker" in the context of that time. Following the assassinations of Martin Luther King Jr and Robert Kennedy, amidst the Vietnam anti-war protests and a heated presidential campaign in the U.S., arch-segregationist Gov. George Wallace of Alabama was running for president as an independent, with the right wing former Air Force Gen. Curtis LeMay as his running-mate. Gov. Wallace once characterized his supporters as "peapickers, peckerwoods, crackers and rednecks".


Entered at Wed Nov 21 18:49:33 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Oh......awright

I was just kinda bored Bill.


Entered at Wed Nov 21 18:43:34 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Rockin Chair: In this sea of bullshit, you're the one with the boat. So stop your belly-aching will ya!


Entered at Wed Nov 21 18:24:44 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: Maybe they could've gone to Capitol with "The Safe Crackers"? Benign to some, double-entendre to others. Thanks for the correction and extra info re "craich". I can't remember if the guy I first heard use the word was English or Irish. I do remember him noting that he has to watch it because Americans (by which he meant me) think it's a reference to crack cocaine. I didn't admit that I'd thought he'd meant something else entirely.


Entered at Wed Nov 21 18:21:06 CET 2012 from (70.53.46.231)

Posted by:

Kevin J

* Dylan Shows: Having never followed a tour before – I now see what the attraction is……especially in the case of a performer like Dylan that changes his set list in such a big way…….almost a 50% change from Toronto to Montreal made for a most enjoyable evening………….a couple of other observations……….some remarkable, some trivial………the Toronto crowd was by my estimate 75% people over 50 years of age with heavy tilt towards those over 60…….some young people to be sure but heavy on the oldies……….Montreal was 75% people under 30….amazing that there would be such a difference in that both shows attracted the same size crowds – all seats full 8500 or so in modified arena seating…………………….Dylan had his hat with him in Toronto but left it on the piano stool all night…….in Montreal he wore it all night long……………….and perhaps not surprising because Montreal crowds have always been much louder than Toronto ones ( especially at Hockey games ) but the difference was startling….especially during Knopfler’s set………..Knopfler was identical in every way to Toronto except he didn’t have to inform the crowd – as he did in Toronto – that “all those songs your hollering for – well we’re not doing any of them tonight”……..funny thing with Knopfler was just how flat and weak his encore of “So Far Away” sounded against the superb songs and presentation that preceded it……………..The sound both nights was perfect……..and for those that care…..Knopfler started at 7:30pm on the dot both nights and Dylan 9:15pm on the dot.

* RR interview: Thanks Dunc and agree Bill M. No question how the mind sharpens when deep in research. Excellent interview.

* Jeff & Northwestcoaster: Thank you and glad you enjoyed the Dylan show comments……and Northwestcoaster in particular with your eye for the contrary would have enjoyed Bob having Knopfler joining him on stage both nights with no acknowledgement of it entering or exiting.

*JT: Love having you here but do pick up that instrument………as healing as meditation.


Entered at Wed Nov 21 18:20:48 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Web: My link

Subject: Ellen Shipley, hit songwriter, on streaming paychecks.

3.1 million Pandora streams equaled 39 bucks.


Entered at Wed Nov 21 18:19:23 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Come writers and critics …

Just a bit on critics … I’ve often been introduced to good music, theatre, literature and film by critics. In 1971, Richard Williams said “Link Wray” LP was akin to “The Band” and I bought it and have had pleasure from it for forty years. If critics only ever praise stuff, then it’s just advertising. They have to do negative reviews too when that’s their (subjective) impression. You learn which reviewers have similar taste to you … back in the 70s, I knew I liked most of what Richard Williams liked, but my taste differed strongly from(say) Chris Welch. But criticism has a place, and I’m sure Dylan neither reads it nor cares.

I review a lot of theatre on my blog, and that started because I looked back at old theatre programmes and thought, "I remember I loved that play, but not much more" but when I'd written reviews for interested friends, I could then revive it and see the play again in my mind's eye. To a lesser degree, it's the same with concerts and records.


Entered at Wed Nov 21 18:15:37 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Crackers......take your pick

You guys are all a buncha crackers......good gawd awmighty. If you sons a bitches worked for me....I'D FIRE THE WHOLE LOTTA YUZ!

It's no wonder there is no productivity any more. Y'all just sit around here an' bullshit all day long! Now read this and then shut up about it!


Entered at Wed Nov 21 17:48:49 CET 2012 from (68.164.6.50)

Posted by:

Pat B

I can also imagine them thinking that having only one authentic cracker in the group may have made the name presumptuous, even though the name they eventually did use had an element of that.


Entered at Wed Nov 21 17:47:43 CET 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F

Location: Hudson Valley, NY
Web: My link

Subject: Graham Parker and The Rumour

Nice article/interview with Graham Parker about the reunion with the Rumor and their part in the new Judd Apatow film coming out in December. GP and The Rumour will be playing The Bradavon in Poughkeepsie this Sunday. The last time I saw this show was in 1979 at the Copacabana in NYC. They were so good back then. When the Rumour and Parker broke up The Rumour backed Garland Jeffreys on The Escape Artist record and tour. There are not many English bands with two rock and roll guitar players equal to Brinsley Shwarz and Martin Belmont. I'm enjoying the new cd and really looking forward to this show.


Entered at Wed Nov 21 17:46:52 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: My 2 cents: Belfast Cowboy does it again!

For what its worth, 'Born To Sing / No Plan B' is an excellent and consistent group of songs musically delivered with a laid back comfortable sense of self-confidence. It makes me feel good. It stands up well in a continually solid body of work. Van Morrison seems to be comfortable in his shoes. Like Dylan, he answers to no one and should 'keep on keepin' on'. 'Going Down To Monte Carlo' informs me of his blues side and an album full of blues would be welcomed.


Entered at Wed Nov 21 17:35:32 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

"There's good crack" isn't English … it's Irish and should be spelled "It's good craich", but it's pretty known in areas with lots of irish people within England. The Craichers (though a Gaelic start and English ending) would have been a good name!


Entered at Wed Nov 21 17:32:41 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Born To Sing - No Plan B

I haven't reviewed it, John. In fact I bought it but it has slipped slightly below the radar … I played it non-stop for a couple of days then other stuff arrived. It's an excellent, solid Van album. Open The Door (To Your Heart) got a lot of airplay, though I think they jumped the gun because it was on radio a lot two or three weeks before it was available as an album, though I got the download at the time. We had a brief discussion on "Educating Archie" … it was a radio programme featuring a ventriloquist. Often people asked what the point of a ventriloquist was on the radio, but that was 1950s Britain and the BBC Light Programme. He is tending to tilt at the same windmills a bit too often in the lyrics (you're controlled by the media … etc) But I'm going back to it for the rest of the day.


Entered at Wed Nov 21 17:16:25 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Crackers

In Britain (and Capitol were owned by EMI) the connotation would be Cream Crackers (water biscuits) or "Christmas Crackers" (that you pull on Christmas Day) or "They're Crackers" meaning "They're crazy in a silly, cheerful sort of way," so "The Crackers" would have sounded like a comedy novelty group in 1968, like The Barron Knights or The Grumbleweeds. If it had ever got as far as EMI's head office, I'm sure they would have said no without knowing or caring about the "hillbilly" connotation. And they'd have been right.


Entered at Wed Nov 21 17:04:33 CET 2012 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: JT's story

Thanks JT for sharing.


Entered at Wed Nov 21 16:35:56 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT

In about 1963 or 1964, this 14 year old matinee attendee at the Concord Tavern expressed an interest in playing electric guitar (saw them; my first exposure to live music). My dad, who was an owner of the tavern at that time, spoke to JR and told him about me and Robbie suggested a starting guitar. My dad came home with that guitar and a small amp. I can't remember where he bought it but it was a Stratocaster. I never did learn how to play well and can only play limited cords on my Martin these days (rarely; too busy writing to this site. Maybe I should play more and write less). My dad remembered Robbie always as a friendly soft spoken and kind person who (he said) was well behaved. I have always remembered that perspective and thought it was worth sharing.


Entered at Wed Nov 21 16:24:00 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Good point Bill. I guess "cracker" doesn't have that association with the South or country music in other parts of the U.S. or the world. While you Canadians were familiar with The Hawks, I do remember becoming aware of Robbie, Levon & Garth through their work on John Hammond's "So Many Roads" in 1965 and later when the guys backed Dylan. My older cousin, who lived near Philadelphia and played drums in local bands, knew of Levon & The Hawks through their appearances at Tony Mart's at the Jersey shore. For most, I imagine, first became aware of the guys through their association with Dylan and when "Music From Big Pink" was released in the summer of 1968, the name The Band had an almost mythical connotation for that link as Dylan's band. This was further reinforced by the inclusion of the Dylan-related songs and the album's cover painting.


Entered at Wed Nov 21 16:05:40 CET 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: David P

That would be Georgia of course...........not George.


Entered at Wed Nov 21 16:04:08 CET 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Cracker

I knew what it roughly meant; but here is what Wikipedia has to say. David P may want to chime in; as George is mentiond

"Cracker" has been used as a proud or jocular self-description. With the huge influx of new residents from the North, "cracker" is used informally by some white residents of Florida and Georgia ("Florida cracker" or "Georgia cracker") to indicate that their family has lived there for many generations. However, the term "white cracker" is seldom used self-referentially and remains an offensive racial slur used to demean Caucasians.

You often see the word used in movies about the south in poor white rural areas.


Entered at Wed Nov 21 15:54:00 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

David P: Do you have a sense of how widely the 'hillbilly' connotation of the word 'cracker' was/is shared beyond the SE US? I don't know that I've ever heard it used in that sense outside discussions of the Band, and if they had adopted the name, I would have thought it was, at best, just another pseudo-clever name. (Sorry Norm, but I can't help imagining Arte Johnson sitting on a park bench next to Ruth Buzzi, saying "Want a bite of my cracker?") I do remember being a bit puzzled the first time an Englishman said something like "There's good crack over there." All he/they mean is fun times in general, but I thought it must mean sex or drugs specifically.


Entered at Wed Nov 21 15:23:59 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The Crackers

As evidenced by the Groscourt/Capitol agreement, the group had also signed a contract with Albert Grossman's management company. It's obivious that they'd been woodshedding, concentrating on writing original material and focusing on recording demos, rather than performing. This might explain why there doesn't seem to be any posters or ads with The Crackers billing. Even when they did return to the concert hall with Dylan at the Woody Guthrie tribute, they apparently appeared as Dylan's backup group without separate billing. From an artistic standpoint, it does seem to make sense at the time that they'd want to establish a new identity to match their new approach to music by discontinuing the use of The Hawks name. While randoming adopting name The Crackers only proved to be temporary, we do know from interviews with the guys that they sought simplicity, going against the trend at the time, where groups seemed intent on who could come up with the craziest name. Merely listing the individual members' names alphabetically, as they weren't at all familiar names in the general public, wasn't too practical from a commercial perspective, especially for Capitol Records at the time. So, I imagine adopting the name The Band, as they were known around Woodstock, made more sense than The Crackers, with its less commercial hillbilly connotations.


Entered at Wed Nov 21 15:03:48 CET 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Peter V / Van

Peter, I may have missed it; but have you reviewed the new Van? Just got my copy yesterday. Looking forward to it; but sometimes it can be a hit and miss.


Entered at Wed Nov 21 14:09:55 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Zabadak meets Nazareth

Peter V: Interesting that the fivesomes intersect in a couple places. But who would be best suited for the roles of Dave Dee, Mick and Tich?


Entered at Wed Nov 21 13:05:13 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Cable Tv commercials advertsing AllMusic.com popped up today. Apparently it has been acquired by some company named Rovi and it has been overhauled. I'm not impressed by the new site. But it sure seems like someone at this Rovi company plans on spending a pile to get the advertising funds sent their way. ---Music has been completely commodified. and the poor bastards making it getting cut out to a large degree. more and more common, We'lll get 4/10 to 9/10 of a cent for a stream, that is done on a site that is raking in advertising dough. You Tube is another big example.Eve iTunes sold out, with that itunes match being something that costs the artist, publishers, and labels dearly.



Entered at Wed Nov 21 12:22:20 CET 2012 from (65.94.154.125)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Tempest live and a single

Bob Dylan and his Band performed 'Soon After Midnight' and "Early Roman Kings" in Washington DC last night. That makes 4 from Tempest ('Scarlet Town;, ;Pay In Blood;, and these 2, with 'Early Roman Kings' played a number of times already. 'Duquesne Whistle' is to be sold as a single with an alternate 'Meet Me In The Morning" on Nov. 23 as a single (Record Day in the stores).


Entered at Wed Nov 21 12:11:48 CET 2012 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Bill M

Annoyed they make money? No,not at all.People make money doing all sorts of things.Why would it matter?


Entered at Wed Nov 21 09:43:45 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Unreleased tracks

Just read an interview with Dave Stewart who says the Eurythmics don't have a pile of them because they decided which twelve to do for an album and just did those twelve. The Beatles and The Band are both similar. The few "rejects" like Get Up Jake and Don't Do It got used elsewhere, and the 1975 Basement Tapes hoovered up others (like Bessie Smith … a better track than many that got released). Judging from the bonus tracks on CDs and A Musical History the rest is sketches at most.

There are ways of working … Springsteen, Neil Young, Dylan all finished a lot of stuff they didn't use. And Springsteen and Van Morrison will throw in cover versions on live shows leaving another stack of possibles. The Band's live shows were pretty fixed all the way through. They didn't suddenly throw in a song as the mood took them.

I suspect The Band is mainly "What we've got is all there is."


Entered at Wed Nov 21 09:04:35 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

Robbie said, "the name of the group is jut our Christian names " so that means in alphabetical order Garth, Levon, Richard, Rick and Robbie? Or more precisely on baptized names, "Eric, Jaime, Mark, Richard and Richard." It wasn't a good idea and anyway Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick and Tich got there first.


Entered at Wed Nov 21 08:13:51 CET 2012 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: the contract

"commencing on the date hereof to record during each year a minimum of twenty-four masters or more upon mutual agreement" - thats alot of recordings. Does that mean there could be more unreleased tracks out there?


Entered at Wed Nov 21 04:50:12 CET 2012 from (68.171.231.82)

Posted by:

Bill M

Jed: You are right that we are all bozos, so it must be really annoying for you to think that some bozos get paid for setting down their opinions while the rest of us have to come to places like this.

JT: Our guys, with Jerry Penfound, were first booked on Yonge Street as the Levon Helm Sextet after leaving Hawkins. I've seen ads. Classy eh?


Entered at Wed Nov 21 04:29:54 CET 2012 from (184.145.69.245)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: Mea culpa

Watching American Masters on PBS tonight (tues) jolted my repressed memory, making it clear I had unwittingly dropped in on Clive Davis's Hollywood Star ceremony some years back (1997?) while wandering about, not David Geffen's. Apologies to fact-checkers everywhere. (At the time, I didn't know who Clive Davis was, either.)


Entered at Wed Nov 21 01:50:10 CET 2012 from (99.231.77.230)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Louder!!

Jed: Well said! Say it again and LOUDER!


Entered at Wed Nov 21 01:41:57 CET 2012 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Bill M--Young Review

The negative comments about Dylan prove the point Dylan makes over and over about what ignorant assholes critics are.And,academics who are attempting to intellectualize and interpret his poetry or intent in general,are simply like the rest of us--all bozos on the same bus.Meaning and opinion are personally subjective,yet critics and academics tend to think their crap doesn't stink and therefore their opinions are fact.In the end Dylan keeps rolling on,and as any legitimate artist does,he follows his own inner voice.Good for him,lucky for those of us who enjoy his art.Finally the suggestion that he should hang it up is absurd.If one dislikes his work ,don't go see/hear him.


Entered at Wed Nov 21 01:04:38 CET 2012 from (99.231.77.230)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Sextet

Bill M: Excuse my ignorance: Who were the 6? When was that?


Entered at Tue Nov 20 23:58:08 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

JT: And let us not forget the Levon Helm Sextet.


Entered at Tue Nov 20 23:57:18 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Pat B: Whenever it was, wouldn't even a musician want to have at least a signed piece of paper in hand before promising an estranged buddy on an oil derrick a fifth of the take?


Entered at Tue Nov 20 23:49:43 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

By 2/1/68, David P is using the US date order, not the international one … February 1st as stated elsewhere, not 2nd January!


Entered at Tue Nov 20 23:47:30 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Robbie says exactly the same as Levon … they produced the name “off the top of their heads.” And it was on the contract of 1st February, but then Levon says very clearly that he said it “off the top of his head” to the doorman at Carnegie Hall, so, on the spur of the moment, on January 20th. It fits. They had 10 / 11 days to mull it over before they signed the contract. As I said earlier, the reference to billing for Carnegie Hall is just “Bob Dylan.” Which is what it was in 1965 / 1966.


Entered at Tue Nov 20 23:11:10 CET 2012 from (68.164.6.50)

Posted by:

Pat B

From the Tony Glover article, November 1968:

Robbie Robertson, "By the way, one thing I'd like to clear up - we have no name for the group. We're not interested in doing record promotion or going on the Johnny Carson show to plug the LP. Capitol said they had to have a name, so off the top of our heads we said `the Crackers.' They said, `great'-until a few months later when they thought about it a bit. But the name of the group is our Christian names. The only reason the LP is by 'the band' is so that they can file it in record stores. And also, that's the way we're known to our friends and neighbors.


Entered at Tue Nov 20 23:00:31 CET 2012 from (65.94.154.125)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: More questions than answers

David P: Thanks again for your efforts in providing us with the clauses from the contract that for the first time (for me, anyway) shows me that 'The Crackers' were an entity legally (and so more than a comment made in jest by Levon Helm on Jan. 20, 1968 before the Guthrie tribute at Carnegie.) The question: Why is there no document anywhere published (poster, name in newsprint, etc) with the name 'The Crackers' on it? Was it just that the boys were not doing anything else during that period and that this name was never shared at the time with the media or entertainment industry. I would ask anyone who has anything official with the name 'The Crackers' on it from 1967 or 1968 to let this site know. This has become very interesting to a number of us. We have 'The Canadian Squires' along with Levon and the Hawks, The Hawks, and the Band along with 'The Crackers' all within 6 - 7 years. Perhaps Garth Hudson or Robbie Robertson could help in this regard. That certainly would be welcome. Though not earth-shattering information, I am a big believer that history should be complete and accurate. When accurate truth is not front and centre, the result is misinformation repeated again and again until the truth of fact is unknown.


Entered at Tue Nov 20 22:53:09 CET 2012 from (68.164.6.50)

Posted by:

Pat B

Bill M, as you know, that offer would have been made in the very late summer/early fall of 1967.


Entered at Tue Nov 20 22:31:36 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

David P: Thanks for the wording from the contract. Working backward from the Feb 1 '68 date, even in those innocent times there must have been some earlier Levon-less contract attached to the sizeable advance that the others decided to offer to share with Levon.


Entered at Tue Nov 20 21:59:46 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The Dylan Clause

Excerpts from the 2/1/68 agreement between Groscourt and Capitol Records:

"1. Company [Groscourt Productions, Inc.] has entered into a written agreement for the exclusive personal endeavors of Levon Helm, Robbie Robertson, Richard Manuel, Rick Danko and Garth Hudson, performing as 'The Crackers' (herein sometimes called the 'Artists'] in connection with the production of records [herein called the 'Artists' Employment Contract'], a fully executed copy of which Company will furnish to Capitol upon request. Said contract has been or will be approved by the International Executive Board of the American Federation of Musicians."

"2. Company agrees top furnish Capitol, during the term of this agreement, the exclusive personal endeavors of Artists in connection with the production of records as vocalists and instrumental musicians for an initial period of two years as the same may be extended or renewed, commencing on the date hereof to record during each year a minimum of twenty-four masters or more upon mutual agreement. Twelve masters shall be recorded during the first six months of this agreement. Company agrees to cause Artists to render performances to the best of their ability at recording sessions."

"6. "...Notwithstanding anything to the contrary contained herein Artists shall have the right to perform and record as side men and/or as joint artists with Bob Dylan for any recording company, television program, motion picture or legitimate stage production for which Bob Dylan is then rendering services. Such activities shall be deemed excluded from this agreement and particularly Paragraph 6. With respect to such activities Artists may receive credit and participate in the normal advertising incidental thereto."


Entered at Tue Nov 20 21:42:25 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronto
Web: My link

See link for nice review of Neil Young's show here last night. Note comparisons with Dylan's appearance a few days ago.


Entered at Tue Nov 20 19:47:41 CET 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Subject: David Marsh

David P, your right about that. Plus, I think it was Marsh who brought Jon Landau to his first Springsteen show. Talk about changing someones life.


Entered at Tue Nov 20 19:32:28 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Dave Marsh

Bob F: One wouldn't expect Dave Marsh to paint the Boss in a bad light, as he is married to Springsteen's co-manager Barbara Carr.


Entered at Tue Nov 20 19:27:27 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Bob F

Cheers Bob - just demanded it from my daughter as her sole contribution to my continued well being.

:-0)

Also forgot to thank you for that BRUCE CLINCHES ELECTION FOR OBAMA article. Enjoyed that. Ta muchly.


Entered at Tue Nov 20 19:14:04 CET 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Bruce

If anyone has even a passing interest in Bruce Springsteen and enjoys reading biographies, check out this new book called Bruce by Peter Ames Carlin. Almost every book about Springsteen before this reads like a fanzine with Dave Marsh's books being the worst. This new book shows the human side of Bruce, the good and the bad. The author interviewed everyone who had something to do with Bruce going back to his early childhood. The only biography I can compare it to is Anthony Scaduto's biography of Bob Dylan from the early 70's.


Entered at Tue Nov 20 18:09:37 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Flash, Bang, Wallop … What a Picture!

I’ve been playing the Guthrie Tribute today (obviously) and I had the same thought as Pat … wonderful piano work from Richard throughout. The thing with the few photos is that it’s hard to know what they were actually doing … there are the two final everybody on stage songs, which could be the acoustic. As we know from Elliot Landy they were limiting cameras. Also, in the three shot singing, you can see Odetta sitting at the side. I reckon everyone stayed on and politely listened to everybody else.

The other thing … for years I skipped the spoken voice bits, but today I enjoyed them.

Anyway other than Al, Dunc and Roger, who can tell us what the title to this post refers to?


Entered at Tue Nov 20 18:05:55 CET 2012 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

mike h

Web: My link

Culmination of '70s The Band concert pics from Houston.


Entered at Tue Nov 20 17:31:55 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Thank you David P. for confirmation.

David P: That is superb information. Thank you. Crackers they were for at least a short time, at least in the law books.


Entered at Tue Nov 20 17:28:46 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: A Liverpudlian out for a ride

You gotta laugh!!


Entered at Tue Nov 20 17:20:44 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Capitol Contract

J.T.: A copy of the Capitol Contract (#4325) was filed in connection with Levon's lawsuit against BBDO Worldwide (Supreme Court of the State of New York, County of New York, case# 604420-2004). Specifically, it was attached to an exhibit to the Affidavit of John Ray (Sr. V.P. Legal & Business Affairs, Capitol Records LLC) filed on 2/10/09. Many of the documents, including this, can be accessed through the court's online website.


Entered at Tue Nov 20 17:19:55 CET 2012 from (68.164.6.50)

Posted by:

Pat B

Grand Coulee Dam was released on a Japanese Columbia comp of Live Dylan in 1990. It sounds better than the record.

Richard was an absolute force back then--the piano drove all three songs. It is also weird that most of the photos show RR playing an acoustic with a pickup but it sure sounds like an electric Fender.


Entered at Tue Nov 20 16:41:08 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: The guy with the acoustic is Ray Manzarek. I think that's where he and Pete first met, so an historic moment. As for Dylan in the photo, isn't he seated like some oriental potentate, or more specifically the son of some oriental potentate. My guess is that it's pre-wedding cultural festival; presumably the woman in white to his right is the princess-bride-to-be, with the chair between them kept empty to reduce the chance of any touching going on before the main event.

In other news, that "Vintage Guitar" interview with Robbie that was posted recently seems remarkable in several ways. One is that Robbie talks about early stuff that he hasn't talked about in other interviews (e.g., the Rhythm Chords and that Steve and not just Pete Traynor were in the group; mention of his parents - plural! - and his young interest in 'boogie-woogie', perhaps meaning jump blues), confirming that he's been rifling through his archives and his memory banks in preparation for the writing of his autobiography. He's also been chatting with family on Six Nations, which is why he's (finally) correctly called it a 'Reserve' (the Canadian term) rather than a 'Reservation' (the US term). Nice to see "Can I Please Crawl Out Your Window" spring readily to mind - further evidence of a recent walk through the past, I believe. Also, the little bit on Hendrix is very interesting, as is the assertion that 90% of his songs were written with specific voices in mind; this is not a surprise, but it's nice to have it stated. Among other things, this says that Levon's return changed his songwriting - which is not to say that Levon helped write them, but that the arrival of Levon's voice and range called for (or even inspired) a different approach. So while Big Pink would have been written for the most part without Levon in mind (or in proximity), Big Brown was a different kettle of fish.


Entered at Tue Nov 20 16:25:08 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Grossman, Landy and Shelton

David P: I've read about this documentation also. Where can I find it. So far, it is only heresy. (repetition of what is said to be 'fact'is the best way to make 'what maybe is'' what is' . Please point me towards that documentation. Thanks.

I have read Elliot Landy as well. Very interesting. Unfortunately, as far as I can see, he does not review the concert himself but speaks only to his experience. On the other hand, Robert Shelton reviewed the concert in the New York Times on Jan. 22, 1968. It is in the archives and later on I 'll see if I can get a copy (may have to spend $3.95).


Entered at Tue Nov 20 15:57:25 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The Crackers

Documentation shows that on or about February 1, 1968, Albert Grossman's management company, Grosscourt Productions, Inc., entered into a contract with Capitol Records, Inc. for the exclusive personal services of the members of a group then called "The Crackers". By the time of the release of "Music From Big Pink" it's clear that they had abandoned the use of that name, as the individual names were listed as artists on the first single and euphemistically under the name "The Band" on the inside gatefold cover of the LP.


Entered at Tue Nov 20 15:45:35 CET 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F

Location: Hudson Valley, NY
Web: My link

Subject: Elliot Landy on Woody Guthrie Memorial

I've always enjoyed reading this rememberance by Elliot Landy of the concert.


Entered at Tue Nov 20 15:30:44 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Persist, John. Insist on speaking to his manager, then his manager. Anyone can make a fair error like that. I mean, they could insist that you put in your password for purchases over (say) $10. That seems reasonable to me, even if you have "Remember me" set. Certainly at $149, I think they owe you due care to make sure it wasn't a slip by insisting on a password. I've never had trouble with amazon when I've screwed up an order (as I have done several times) … they just cancel it without hassle.


Entered at Tue Nov 20 15:30:13 CET 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Great idea JT. Thank you!!!


Entered at Tue Nov 20 15:28:53 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Customer service

John D: At the Support section of i Tunes, there are customer service phone numbers etc. I would call and go through the mayhem of recorded advice and finally get to a human being and then ask for a manager who can help you correct the error. I think there is a chance that might help.


Entered at Tue Nov 20 15:22:30 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: The quest for correcting errors. We're only human.

John D: Sorry this happened to you. My advice for what its worth... Ask to speak to a manager at I-Tunes. Don't give up. Given your continued purchases, I believe that if you continue to pursue this, you might succeed. That is what I would do.


Entered at Tue Nov 20 15:14:00 CET 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

p.s. my wife is not a happy camper; this happening a few weeks; before Christmas.


Entered at Tue Nov 20 15:11:28 CET 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: APPLE

Please forgive me for a moment to blow off some steam.

Yesterday I was in iTunes; on my computer. I am a big iTunes person and have spent far too much money there; over the years. I noticed they had the entire AC DC collection for sale. $149.99. I started to move my mouse to click on the album cover to see what tracks were on it. The buy button is right next to it. The phone rang and my hand jerked. I just spent $149.99

I figured I would write support. They actually have a heading; on why your writing called, I inadvertently download a playlist. I did so and this morning I got en email back from a guy named Masood.

He informed me that in February of 2010 I made the same error. However it was for an album costing $19.99. He said they Forgave me and refunded that money. Therefore my one mistake; with Apple is done. He told me that he couldn't grant me a refund. It's here I would love to tell you how many songs I have downloaded; over the years; but it was not taken into consideration.

Thank you for letting me blow off steam. In the end I guess I have learnt a life lesson; but I will be honest. My feeling about Apple is really tarnished. Yes it was my human error; but come on. I don't believe you can take it higher. When they say all sales are final they mean it. I thought there was a dialogue box that asked you if you were sure you wanted to make the purchase. 291 tracks I don't want. Why couldn't it have been the entire Bob Dylan collection? Back to music. Thank you.


Entered at Tue Nov 20 15:04:40 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

It's probably only you and me chasing this one down, JT, but a long Google indicates that in the NY Times, they were billed as "Bob Dylan." Period.


Entered at Tue Nov 20 15:02:24 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Hoskyns book was published several months before Levon's book … I bought it the day it came out. Hoskyns has said that he spent about a year researching and writing it in Woodstock, and when Levon heard, he told people not to speak to Hoskyns. Whether Hoskyns' research inspired Levon to start with Stephen Davis, or whether that was already underway isn't known … yet, at least. The implication was that he was inspired to start by the imminent publication of Hoskyns. I wonder where Hoskyns got The Crackers billing from? It had been mentioned that it was under consideration … like The Honkies. Is it in the TLW sequence where they discuss silly names? Hoskyns did get to interview Robbie for the book, though from his comments at the end, he didn't get on too well with him. And vice versa.


Entered at Tue Nov 20 14:53:16 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Hoskyns 'Crackers'

I wonder, Peter, if Hoskyns is just using information gleaned from Levon's book in saying they played as "The Crackers" or if he has another source or document to make that assertion? As of now, and I read that also and decided that it was gleaned from Levon's book, I think it was the former.


Entered at Tue Nov 20 14:36:51 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Hey, Hey Woody Guthrie …

Hoskyns says “They played as “The Crackers” and also that’s the night they met Jonathan Taplin. Levon mentions having never played a “drama” show like that before. Looking at the photo, I wonder whether everyone stayed on stage for everything? i.e. Even when you weren’t playing, you stayed where you were and watched whoever walked forward?


Entered at Tue Nov 20 14:30:26 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Grand Carnegie Hall

Thanks, JT. I looked. What Levon said was:

“We’re crashing through the back doors of the hall with our gear, and an old man guarding backstage says, “Hey, what group is this?”

“The Crackers,” I told him off the top of my head.

That indicates they definitely weren’t billed as The Crackers as Levon had thought of it as they were arriving. He also says Pete Seeger wasn’t too thrilled to see them, and that the show was good for their impending record deal. He says the contract they signed ten days later on 1st February 1968 was for “Group performing as The Crackers.”


Entered at Tue Nov 20 13:44:22 CET 2012 from (65.94.154.125)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Levon's book and The Woody Guthrie Tribute 1968

Peter: Levon writes about the Tribute to Woody Guthrie show in his book. It is he who mentions 'Crackers' as you will read. Neither of my entries from either Shelton nor Williams mentions the name of a group of musicians backing Dylan. (those comments are mine only prior to the quoted material) and I cannot find any reference at all to Hawks for this show. So far I cannot find a bill that advertises this show. That would be of great interest.


Entered at Tue Nov 20 12:49:26 CET 2012 from (178.15.196.194)

Posted by:

LivebandCovermusiker

Location: Germany
Web: My link

We still apreciate, what they've done and achieved. Trying hard to keep the spirit alive and Keep On Rockin !


Entered at Tue Nov 20 12:22:17 CET 2012 from (65.94.154.125)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Dylan in Philly last night

Please read PSB's review of Dylan in the Philly last night (at the Expecting Rain review page/ Bill Pagel) and then you will understand what he is doing on stage today and why it is relevant and vital and continues the evolution of Dylan's art. Thank you Peter. It sounds a lot like what I witnessed in Toronto.


Entered at Tue Nov 20 11:07:36 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Thank goodness for Google Images

See the link … Arlo Guthrie with The Band and several others, including Dylan seated, in a photo from the Carnegie Hall show. Who's playing acoustic guitar, and are The Band playing or just stuck there on the stage?


Entered at Tue Nov 20 11:00:22 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: This Band Is Your Band

So … the Dylan set at the Woody Guthrie tribute was done twice, afternoon and evening, and as is logical all three songs were played together. So why did the LP compilers of the 1968 show, then the CD compilers who put both shows together, break them up? See the page on this site (linked). Also, they ended with Grand Coulee Dam on the LP which Paul Williams says they started with? It could have been an attempt to get people to listen to the whole show, not like me, head straight to the Dylan tracks and ignore the rest. But most compilers would have made some attempt to sequence the concert as it was.

All the reviews are written with hindsight. They could not have been billed as “The Band” and I’m pretty sure “The Crackers” is hindsight too, unless someone has an original programme or poster to show otherwise. This was January 20th 1968. Levon had only returned “just before Thanksgiving” 1967, so a couple of months earlier. That’s why they sound like the later studio bits released later on the Basement Tapes, and have not yet found that sense of space between instruments that became their trademark from Big Pink onward – I think that’s what must have disconcerted me hearing it originally (several years before the official 1975 Basement tapes). They sound like The Hawks rather than The Band. If Ry Cooder was obscure, they would have been too. The most knowing in the audience would have said “It’s The Hawks” and others would have said “It’s the guys that backed him in 1965, but there’s a different drummer to 1966.”

Any opinion on Do-Re-Mi? Was it The Hawks + Ry?

Actually with all those quotes we are beginning to get one of the longest pieces around on this show. It might be worth cutting and pasting it all together to put on the site. So keep the opinions and research coming!


Entered at Tue Nov 20 05:29:57 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

As I ccassionally do, i watched The Voice tonight, and was absoluetly blown away by some of these kids. As always,I'm dead serious.There at least 5 killer performances, i missed the first 2 or 3 performers.

I think the gal's name was AManda something, did an amzing version of a Grace Potter tune named Stars,A guy anmed DezDuron, was fantastic. A white guy from Minnesota did Lean On Me, and really did it , spine shivering, joyous, beautiful, powerful, from hsio toes,version, this guy was a goofy oddball, badass , cross between LeonRussell,Bill Withers, Leon Wilkerson, Ronnie Van Zant, Joe Cocker,Ray Charles and who the fuck knows who else, one badass pianist singer, A 18 YEAR OLD KID NAMED tREVIN SOEMTHING also was unreal , and there were one or two more amazing performances. It;s a vote to keep each week, narrows it down weekly, and there are teams with coaches.Blake Shelton, Christine Aguilera, Adam LEvine, and Celo Green. So these kids get developed by pros, over a bit of time. Celo had jennifer hudson as an assistant coach just now. Good concept to the show, good show, great performances tonight.


Entered at Tue Nov 20 03:16:56 CET 2012 from (65.94.154.125)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Paul Williams: Bob Dylan Performing Artist: 1960-1973

And from Paul Williams Peforming Artist: 1960-1973 comes the affirmation of the excellent contributions from members of the Band (Crackers): "Seven weeks later, the album out (JWH) and already a huge success, Dylan made his first public appearance since Royal Albert Hall twenty months earlier. Woody Guthrie had died (after fifteen years of illness)on October 3, 1967 and, apparently at Dylan's suggestion, plans were made to hold a benefit concert in his honor. The concert took place January 20, 1968, at Carnegie Hall; Dylan appeared backed by the Band (other performers included Odetta, Pete Singer, Jack Elliot, and Judy Collins), and played three Woody Guthrie songs: "Grand Coulee Dam", "Dear Mrs. Roosevelt", "I Ain't Got No Home". These performances were later released on a Columbia album called 'A Tribute to Woody Guthrie, Part I."

Dylan and the Band are in fine form here- their performances are inventive, exuberant, and sublimely musical. Dylan seems to twit the audience by starting with a loud, joyous, rockability performance of "Grand Coulee Dam", a highly patriotic ditty ("always a flying fortress, that flies for Uncle Sam') at a time when anti-government and anti-war activism were at their height, and Dylan was still regarded as the patron saint of protest. Turning Guthrie's topical folk song into rock and roll was outrageous but entirely appropriate, a tribute to the timelessness and energy of Woody's work. It's a fine arrangement. The Band is ragged at times, but Robertson's guitar work is as delightful as it was on the '66 tour, and Dylan sings with great gusto, totally projecting himself into the song, spitting out Guthrie's 16-syllable lines as if they were watermelon seeds.

Dylan's second song is another unlikely and inspired choice, Guthrie's tribute to FDR on the occasion of his death, written like a letter to his widow. The arrangement is swing rockabilly, wonderfully honky-tonk (Richard Manuel's piano-playing is spot on) and Dylan sings his heart out, his genius for phrasing and for getting inside the dynamics of each musical moment much in evidence. What comes through is his genuine love for Woody Guthrie--'this world was lucky to see him born." Very moving.

A third example of Dylan's brilliance as a singer and song re-creator closes this set, an new arrangement of "I Ain't Got No Home (in This World Anymore)" which Dylan performed quite differently on the Minnesota hotel tape in 1961. Dylan makes good songs as well, but the harmonic refrain Dylan and Danko invent for this one is pure triumph (and a precursor of Dylan's employment of back-up singers in his shows from 1978 on). Great piano. Great music.

The crowd (I was one of them) screamed for more, but it was not to be. The next public performance by Bob Dylan and the Band was in July of 1969."


Entered at Tue Nov 20 02:48:35 CET 2012 from (65.94.154.125)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: A Song For Woody ...Robert Shelton writes and Michael Gray documents

From Robert Shelton: "No Direction Home". "The lights rose and a country jamboree ensued. Dylan and the Band jolted out one of Woody's best dam songs "Grand Coulee Dam". Real hillbilly, strong, shouting, crackling with tumult. Dylan picking his acoustic guitar one minute, then raising it up high to the mike, or raising his right arm to 'conduct' the Band with decisive ax chops. Listeners were either on their feet cheering or were smiling. A Rolling Stone reported beside me was laughing out loud. With the first song still roaring away, the audience settled down. Seeger sat, chin on fist, like 'The Thinker' . Odetta smiled broadly, like another spotlight onstage. Dylan and the Band sailed into "Mrs. Roosevelt". Bob shifted keys like a racing driver shifting gears. The organ and the drums filled out the pattern. Who says folk music can't be done with a beat? Who says Guthrie can't be sung by a rockabilly band? After the applause subsided, Dylan steered his drifters into 'I Ain't Got No Home'. It was startling to hear Woody's songs done this way. Seeger, apparently recovered from his electric shock, was drumming the back of his guitar. Dylan's voice soared over the ensemble. How unlike John Wesley Harding! Now his singing had become astringent. Vocal harmonies with the Band brought it all back home down in the contemporary country. At intermission, everyone was chattering about Dylan. Only thirteen minutes onstage, and he'd upstaged everyone but Woody.

From Michael Gray's Encyclopedia: Dylan's first public appearance after the motocycle crash of 1966 was the January 1968 Woody Guthrie Memorial Concert at Carnegie Hall. Ath the afternoon show he and The Band performed vibrant fresh versions of Guthrie's "I Ain't Got No Home', 'Dear Mrs. Roosevelt" and 'Grant Coulee Dam" and, with the ensemble of other performers, joint in 'This Land Is Your Land." At the evening show Dylan and The Band performed the same three songs and ensemble joined in 'This Train Is Bound For Glory'.


Entered at Tue Nov 20 01:27:23 CET 2012 from (71.184.199.161)

Posted by:

Tim

Location: Boston
Web: My link

Subject: Carnegie Hall

Patients, as of late the doctors and nursemaids here at the asylum have been on them granite steps of the madhouse with them mule skinner blues... tryin' to find Dylan's Woody Guthrie memorial concert tapes back from January 20, 1968. We've been looking high... we've been looking low. It wasn't until a few ticks back that we found an album called A Tribute To Woody Guthrie Volume I that had three Woody Guthrie tracks performed live by Dylan & The Crackers (The Crackers were soon to be The Band). The concerts took place roughly 20 months after Dylan's motorcycle mix-up in Woodstock, New York. Dylan had heard that Woody Guthrie had passed on October 3, 1967; shortly after he called Guthrie’s mananger Harold Leventhal and said that he wanted to participate in anything that he was planning. Three months later on January 20, 1968 Dylan & The Crackers were a part of the two show that made up the Woody Guthrie Memorial Concert at New York City's Carnegie Hall. During both the matinee & evening sets they played some obscure Guthrie Songs in the style of what we like to call 'rockadylan': "I Ain’t Got No Home," "Dear Mrs. Roosevelt," & "The Grand Coulee Dam". Rumor has it that the crowd gasped when they saw Dylan & The Crackers walk on stage. Robertson said this about the show, "Everybody else was taking a different plane musically, you know, it was a very folk-oriented show. But we just played what we were doing at the time. I can't help but think Woody Guthrie would have approved. I mean, if a song is going to live, it must live in its contemporary surrounding." Patients, Did yer rock 'n roll stethoscopes have any idea Woody Guthrie songs could sound like this?!


Entered at Mon Nov 19 23:45:01 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: I Ain't Got No Home

Reading the tiny print on “A Musical History” it credits I Ain’t Got No Home as “afternoon show” which implies there wre two shows in the day. The sound quality difference is stunning between A Musical History and the original CBS LP (and CD). I haven’t done a direct comparison. Is it the same show?


Entered at Mon Nov 19 23:09:18 CET 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Subject: Dear Mrs. Roosevelt

When the record first came out I played nothing but those 3 songs for weeks. Dylan's phrasing on Dear Mrs. Roosevelt is beautiful and Robbie's guitar so on fire. If you think that they hadn't performed in public for a couple of years and to come out and give a one off performance of that magnitude is unbelievable.


Entered at Mon Nov 19 21:57:55 CET 2012 from (86.173.115.84)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland
Web: My link

Subject: Vintage Guitar interview with Robbie

Very interesting Robbie interview in Vintage Guitar. Good illustrations.

Thanks Westcoaster


Entered at Mon Nov 19 21:52:59 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Like Robbie, Ry Cooder also found a creative outlet through film soundtracks. His work with directors such as Wim Wenders and Walter Hill is quite extensive.


Entered at Mon Nov 19 19:32:54 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Extra crap

Just bought The Staves "Dead & Born & Grown" after rave review. It has "additional content." So I put it in my Mac on OS 10.7 to play. But I got the "screen" for extra content. I clicked it. The disc icon disappeared and my computer froze. A restart later I managed to eject it and bravely put the CD back in. This time it opened and started downloading bonus tracks I hadn't asked for. The bonus tracks wouldn't go into iTunes. So I clicked them to play from the desktop. A very loud crackle and my B&W powered speakers shut down. Anyway, I binned the bonus tracks, emptied trash and the CD goes back to HMV unplayed tomorrow for a refund! Fortunately the speakers are undamaged. Too much computerised crap. Now they won't even get a listen here.


Entered at Mon Nov 19 19:22:51 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Thanks, David … I knew there was a Captain Beefheart reference pre-1970, and Taj, of course. That gives an intriguing Band link … via Taj's "Bacon Fat" credited to Robertson-Hudson. Ry and Taj are both musicologists of great erudition as well as brilliant players and writers.


Entered at Mon Nov 19 19:14:55 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

I first became aware of Ry Cooder through his work on Captain Beefheart's 1967 LP "Safe As Milk" and Taj Mahal's eponymous 1968 Columbia debut LP. The latter featured that great version of "Statesboro Blues" with Jesse Ed Davis on lead slide and Ry on rhythm guitar. Don't know whether it was Chuck Blackwell or Sandy Konikoff playing drums on that cut. Of course Taj had recorded another version of "Statesboro Blues" a couple of years earlier with The Rising Sons, featuring Ry on slide.


Entered at Mon Nov 19 19:12:14 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

John Beland, mentioned below was also in the last, or one of the last, versions of the Flyng Burrito Brothers.


Entered at Mon Nov 19 18:54:10 CET 2012 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC
Web: My link

Subject: Carnegie Hall 1968

I love that Dylan/Band I Ain't Got No Home from 1968. I think Jimmy Vivino and Levon must have liked it too, because when I saw the Levon Helm Band in 2008 they performed the song with a similar arrangement (and some killer drums by Levon). The link is to Amy Helm performing at Newport this past summer, doing her own great rendition with that same arrangement.


Entered at Mon Nov 19 18:28:59 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Memo From Turner was recorded in late 1968, but I just looked it up and the single came out in October 1970 after the Guthrie Part Two show. No matter, it's an excuse to link to it. One of Ry's best performances and also one of Mick Jagger's greatest performances. Just listen again …


Entered at Mon Nov 19 18:16:26 CET 2012 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Dunc on successful reformed alcoholics

Dylan was drunk when he arrived to his hotel in Stockholm after his concert and show. BTW The key is to find already in Self Portrait; money, ex-wives, contracts.


Entered at Mon Nov 19 18:07:48 CET 2012 from (75.139.218.213)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Ry Cooder - 1970

PSB - I think you're right about Ry's relative obscurity in 1970. I was going to school in Santa Monica (SMCC) then and missed him until Memo From Turner came around that same year. All the Stones' devotees were suddenly crazy for Ry. My first look was at the Santa Monica Civic, which is a mid sized ans popular venue, where he opened for Rita Cooledge as solo-accoustic, 1971 as I recall. Between Ry and Duanne Allman slide guitar became very popular at that time -


Entered at Mon Nov 19 18:09:49 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: A Song (or ten) For Woody

I knew the 1968 show was never intended for a record and in those days this sort of show wasn’t automatically assumed to be one to sell on. The liner notes are thin. The first track to hit my ear was Grand Coulee Dam from the CBS “Music People” sampler. I found the sound unexpectedly muddy, because in 1972 we weren’t as used to live tapes and bootlegs. I had bought “Royal Albert Hall” in 1971, but the excitement carried it through. I rushed to get the record and was expecting The Band to sound like Big Pink, The Band or Stage Fright, and it isn’t that sort of mix, and they are quite far back. Listening nowadays after years of live tapes they sound very good, but at the time I thought ithe band sound muddy and muddled. Yes, Dylan’s in fine voice and I loved the choruses on Grand Coulee Dam. In fact the version of I Ain’t Got No Home from “A Musical History” which is on YouTube (linked) is way clearer than the CBS LP or CD.

Ry Cooder would have been obscure in 1968. In 1970? Memo From Turner was much talked about, and I knew him from that as an ace American guitarist … and his first solo album was 1970.

Tracing stuff is complicated because some artists repeated tracks on both shows.

According to the track listing for the two separate albums (Part One is 1968, Part Two is 1970), which I don’t have, Ry Cooder is on both shows. I had read about “Ry Cooder’s band” on the 1970 one, and the presence of Chris Etheridge figured: he played on Ry Cooder (1970), Paradise & Lunch (1974) and Chicken Skin Music (1976). So he was working with Ry in 1970. Maybe that’s where the story started. John Beland (dobro) was in Swampwater, which backed Arlo and he mentions that he and Ry backed the Hollywood Bowl show.

Anyway, according to the Ry Cooder site, he plays on these tracks on Part One (1968): Oklahoma Hills- Arlo, Rambling Around Your City-Odetta and Do-Re-Mi by Arlo. That one’s particularly interesting as the song’s been a staple of Ry’s live act for years. I’m listening now. Ry says he played electric bottleneck on it, but there’s another bit of lead guitar too. Going back to the piano, does this mean Ry actually DID play with The Band?

And Ry is listed on these tracks on Part Two (1970)

Oklahoma Hills with Arlo, Hobo’s Lullaby with Joan Baez, Woman at Home with Country Joe and Jesus Christ with Arlo Guthrie.

So he did more than just back Arlo Guthrie.


Entered at Mon Nov 19 17:52:56 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Thanks for all that extra info. I knew there were two Guthrie tribute LPs, but didn't know there were two shows years apart.


Entered at Mon Nov 19 17:02:27 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Record Store Day

One of the exclusive releases for the upcoming Black Friday Record Store Day is a 10" vinyl version of My Morning Jacket performing "It Makes No Difference" with Brittany Howard (from Alabama Shakes). This moving version was recorded live last July at the Newport Folk Festival in tribute to Levon.

Although recorded separately, that Woody Guthrie Tribute album is the only recording release I can think of that features both The Band and Ry Cooder, except for the 1995 "Doin' Dylan" compilation that featured The Band's version of "Blind Willie McTell" and Ry Cooder's version of "Need A Woman".


Entered at Mon Nov 19 16:47:36 CET 2012 from (72.78.45.217)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love

Subject: re: Woody Guthrie Tributes

Peter, as the liner notes make very clear, the Carnegie show was taped off the sound system and there were no plans for a record. The Band sound fine as far as I'm concerned and Dylan is singing great. It happens to be one of my favorite recordings of Bob and the Band.

There was no Cooder led band. Even in 1970, not many people knew who Ry Cooder was. At the shows Bob Dylan had his own band and Arlo Guthrie had his own band (at both shows. Ry Cooder backed up Arlo Guthrie. Simple as that.


Entered at Mon Nov 19 16:20:45 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Woody Guthrie Tributes

There were two Woody Guthrie tributes, 1968 (with Dylan & The Band) and 1970 when Ry Cooder led the backing group. There’s no indication that Ry was there in 1968.

Dylan and The Band feature on three tracks of the double album which was recorded at Carnegie Hall on 20 January 1968 and at the Hollywood Bowl on 12 September 1970.

1968 artists include Arlo Guthrie, Bob Dylan with The Band, Odetta, Jack Elliot, Richie Havens, Tom Paxton, Pete Seeger, Judy Collins.

1970 artists include Arlo Guthrie, Joan Baez, Odetta, Jack Elliot, Earl Robinson, and Country Joe MacDonald .

The Dylan tracks are all from 1968, but the whole album mixes up 1968 and 1970 tracks at will.

Dylan’s tracks are numbers 6, 9 and 12 on the CD. The musician credits mix the bands from both concerts in alphabetical order without stating who played where. The complete Band appear. Some of the other musicians listed are presumably the Ry Cooder led 1970 group.

Dylan’s voice is way up in the mix, reducing The Band’s impact considerably. Of course he was performing in front of all his Newport ‘enemies’ from 1965 and would have been foolish to allow the backing to drown him again.

I don’t think they sound anywhere near as good as reviews of the live concert suggest, but this could be the unsympathetic mix. They choogle nicely, but only fly on Grand Coulee Dam (also available on a long deleted CBS 3-album sampler from 1972, The Music People.

The three tracks are: I Ain’t Got No Home (W. Guthrie) Dear Mrs Roosevelt (W. Guthrie) Grand Coulee Dam (W. Guthrie)

The Band also allegedly feature on some Arlo Guthrie tracks, but I don’t know where the reference came from, and as Guthrie was on both shows, electric backing isn’t a necessary pointer. Oklahoma Hills (W. Guthrie) has prominent slide guitar, which points to Ry and 1970.

Do-re-Mi (W. Guthrie) has piano and Richard Manuel is the only piano player credited on the list for both shows. Garth the only other keyboard player, credited as organist (but it could be Garth on piano). The bass lopes along too in a Dankoesque style, but again there are several guitars, bits sound like Robbie, others like Ry. There are backing voices, but that could be anyone on the show. I suspect this one is 1968.

Jesus Christ (W. Guthrie) sounds like Ry Cooder’s smaller band to me.

Everybody from 1968 appears on This Land is Your Land - Odetta, Arlo Guthrie And Company


Entered at Mon Nov 19 15:52:50 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

David P: Good call. I don't have either LP around to look at right now, but I certainly remember thinking that photos on one or both suggested that some of our guys did more than just play with Dylan. Something about Odetta maybe ...


Entered at Mon Nov 19 15:32:15 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: This Land Is Ryland

Ry Cooder accompanied Arlo Guthrie and Odetta on "A Tribute To Woody Guthrie Part One" which also featured The Band with Bob Dylan.


Entered at Mon Nov 19 12:01:10 CET 2012 from (94.172.128.127)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham UK

Subject: WW2 - Pat's prompt

Been away a bit - but breathlessly keeping up. Thanks Pat for the link. Recently toured the Somme battlefield from an ealier conflict.


Entered at Mon Nov 19 07:28:33 CET 2012 from (46.165.210.200)

Posted by:

Access Investment Limited

Subject: Christmas loan offer

Guarantee loan offer. are you finding it difficult in obtaining a loan from the bank around you? or are you looking for urgent loan to pay off your bill? visit us today and get funded. we give out international loan to companies and individual. visit us today. accessbizcenter(at)sify(at)com Company Name: Access Investments Limited


Entered at Mon Nov 19 03:46:38 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: 4 years, no t 20

Some of you will see on FB that The Black Italians are playing Levon's.The info on FB is wrong. It says that this is the first time they've performed together in 20 years...It is not the first time in 20 yeats. The band is in existence for about 20 years.I'm pretty sure the last time they played was in 08,I caught em twice, they played 3 or 4 gigs. That was the first time they had played in years, and that prior time was also the first time they had played in years. They were one of the tightest bar bands, or any kind of band, going. 99.9% of their gigs were in a small bar,Downtime, pretty much a private thing, not really known about unless you knew em or a friend brought you. The rest of thier gigs, after Downtime closed, in slightly bigger places, like The Cutting Room, or similar sized, like The Turning Point. The night before the Cutting Room show, which is being being recorded for release on Blind Pig, they play at Levon's. And it's being filmed..... sort of a filmed rehearsal........ so Felix and I were talking, he reminded me, in case i could get in to NY in time for the gigs. . Knowing the band, I was surprised by filming a rehearsal, cause.... and said, they're filming rehearsal... rehearsal? thinking, the band never rehearsed and why film a rehearsal? He says...."come to think of it- we never rehearsed."

so, what is being filmed, is a gig, .... that's how they rehearse, by kicking ass./ Anyone can make this gig, i reccomend it.... Gonna be a treat.


Entered at Mon Nov 19 02:20:17 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Xactly Pete. As i pointed out, heritage had nothing to do with it, but you are the guy who has referred to Dylan as greedy swine, and a hamster on a wheel..The species selection, is all yours, pal of mine. Considering your portrayals, I'm was just wondering if that's how you visualize him, as a pig, on a wheel, chasing a dollar bill? You can try to find fault with my question, but , you provided all the raw material.

In their heydays, comparisons between the art of Dylan,Simon, and Cohen, would be far apart. It should not be dificult to understand that they behave differently now. Dylan's doing what he's doing.



Entered at Mon Nov 19 01:52:44 CET 2012 from (68.171.231.82)

Posted by:

Bill M

Adam: Cooder and Kooper are both on "Let it Bleed". Sandy Konikoff and Stan Szelest appear on the Taj Mahal album, as does a song cfedited to Garth and Robbie. There's the Jesse Ed Davis LP too.


Entered at Mon Nov 19 00:26:05 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Confused???

I always thougt he was called.........CONFUSIOUS


Entered at Mon Nov 19 00:06:34 CET 2012 from (68.172.208.118)

Posted by:

The Oldest Man In the World

Location: the top of the mountain in Tibet

Jeff..........................I'm confused.


Entered at Mon Nov 19 00:00:03 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I was trying to follow Jeff's thought process which transforms a hamster into a pig. It must be that a hamster looks like a guinea pig or cavea porcellus, but both are rodents. There is only a pig on a wheel in Jeff's word association. I don't think guinea pigs even go on wheels, but prefer to burrow in straw or wood shavings.


Entered at Sun Nov 18 23:41:12 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Jeff, considering that my personifications of virtuous touring with the highest regard to audience comfort, reasonable prices and meticulous preparation are Leonard Cohen and Paul Simon, it’s hard to see how ethnicity could be a consideration.


Entered at Sun Nov 18 23:18:20 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Put James Cotton with Dylan, for a few songs.....Garth on accordion, someone on violin..


Entered at Sun Nov 18 23:03:34 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Peter, we are all aware that you were not the visionary to first make the literary image of a hamster on a wheel. Why you felt the need to turn the discussion downward with that comment to me is wondrous, and probably one of the reasons JT apologized for answering you... Anyway, i wasn't counting but possibly you were the first critic to use the image to personify Dylan's relentless touring.. Add that to your other personification of Dylan here, that of Dylan as greedy swine. Do you see Dylan as pig, running on a hamster's wheel in a cage,chasing a dollar bill in the air? since i know you are not an anti semite, i left out "yarmulke wearing" before the word pig). You are entitled to your opinion, but i'm surprised you are not more cognizant of the different dimesnions at play.

the band, ebing different on different nights....i was going to compare a band going out andf performing to a baseball team.And point out that one night a team may play exceptionally well against a certain opponent, and a nohter night, not, against the same opponent.then decided that hey, it's bad analogy, cause there is no opponent in musical performances.And that is true.But, , look at it this way.I'll bet you could deliver the same pitch to a btater 5 different times, get several differing results.Why?he's human.His left nut may be swollen one day, cauing him to lean alittle more to the left and swing different.Or, he might be about to sneeze one day, then decide the ptich is too good not to swing at it anyway.Or, his fuckinjg oat meal was heavier, and his it effects hios swing.Bands are goind to be different, different times out, especially since it is a synchronized and artistic performance. When some one pays to go to a ball game, if their team loses, are thet greedy swine?


Entered at Sun Nov 18 22:17:06 CET 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: and then there is Kool Haus

Kool Haus capacity ~2500-3000 (sardines); saw Dylan there; my least favourite venue. Standing /no seats.


Entered at Sun Nov 18 21:59:20 CET 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Small halls Toronto

Masonic Temple (Rockpile, Concert Hall) capacity 1200 (Dylan played it).; Roy Thompson Hall - capacity about 2800-2900; Convocation Hall UofT (small)


Entered at Sun Nov 18 21:54:45 CET 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Halls

Dylan sometimes rehearses at The Bardavon in Poughkeepsie. It's a beautiful old opera house which holds about 700. However, the last time he performed in Poughkeepsie he chose to play the ugly concrete 3000 seat Mid Hudson Civic Center. He did play The Chance in Poughkeepsie several years ago which is a great old saloon that holds a few hundred. It was so loud my ears hurt for a week, I'm happy to see him wherever he plays but I'd love to see him at The Bardavon.


Entered at Sun Nov 18 21:41:21 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Elvis - Madison Square Garden

I got it yesterday as I said I would, Thanks for the pointer, Dan. Jerry Scheff's bass playing alone is worth it. BUT … the reason Elvis does so many songs in an hour is that he takes everything at breakneck speed. Maybe it was the dieting pills. Just about every song is faster than it should be. it's still fun … great band, great singing.


Entered at Sun Nov 18 21:41:26 CET 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Massey Hall my favourite medium size venue locally

Known first as Massey Music Hall, it opened on 14 June 1894. Seating capacity of 4000 was reduced to 2765 when the building was redesigned in 1933.


Entered at Sun Nov 18 21:31:12 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Why sorry to respond? That's dialogue and fun. I didn't know we were talking thousands at Massey Hall. The Rolling Stones have used real club dates (200-300) to record stuff. But probably live in a club is not a great idea.


Entered at Sun Nov 18 21:19:10 CET 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Money talks

Yes Peter, of course. Sorry to respond, but I must. If there is a DVD and the possibility that a few thousand people (Massey Hall, or other small venues) would pay $120 or more to see the bard do his thing, it might happen. Not soon, but maybe... I know a lot of people (not the other 5000 of 9000 but the 4000, who would pay). Indeed, for all who work, money is a motivator. I have no problem with that; especially when you are a major enterprise with many mouths to feed. When you do this for 50 years, as long as the ticket holders want to pay, it will continue. I have no problem with that. (Same with hockey in Toronto, when it happens (?); the committed continue to pay big bucks).


Entered at Sun Nov 18 21:10:33 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Let;s not go into Mr Dylan's preference for large standing venues at £85 a ticket rather than smaller acoustically preferable venues … could it be the money that motivates? We have done that one several times. I don't think he'll do small blues venues unless he thinks he can get a very profitable DVD out of doing so.


Entered at Sun Nov 18 19:43:01 CET 2012 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: Robert Johnson

Hi guys!! Been behaving yourself I see? The posts and links are great. Wish I had more time to post,but all of you are much more interesting...

Here is something I thought was good reading/knowing..

By The Associated Press, thecanadianpress.com, Updated: November-16-12 3:20 PM

Pa. merchant finds rare Robert Johnson record.

PITTSBURGH, Pa. - A record store owner has found what he calls "the holy grail of 78s" in a box of old albums he picked up for $50.

Jerry Weber said he discovered a copy of the second song ever recorded by Mississippi blues legend Robert Johnson, "I Believe I'll Dust My Broom," put to disc two years before Johnson's mysterious death in 1938 at age 27.

The rarity, whose value Weber pegged at $6,000 to $12,000, was tucked in a collection of otherwise worthless, water-damaged old platters that sat in a hallway at Jerry's Records for days before anyone looked at them.

"I saw one 30 years ago that was broke," Weber told the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, "and I saw one that a friend of mine found and let me hold before he sold it. It's the most expensive record I've ever found, and it's in real nice shape."

Johnson was an itinerant singer and guitarist from Hazlehurst, Miss., whose landmark recordings would influence a generation of rock 'n' roll icons, including Eric Clapton and the Rolling Stones. Little is known about his life and death. In popular legend, Johnson sold his soul to the Devil at a Mississippi Delta crossroads in return for an extraordinary ability to sing and play the blues.

Weber said the "I Believe I'll Dust My Broom" record he found is in good shape.

Collector John Tefteller, who specializes in rare blues and jazz records, estimates there are perhaps 15 to 30 copies of the record in existence in that condition.

"There's not a huge market for something like that," he said. "Yes, it's rare, but you could count on your hands and toes the number of people who would buy it for a few thousand dollars."

Weber doesn't plan to sell it, at least not right away. His son, Willie Weber, will play it for customers at 2 p.m. every Saturday until the end of the year at his adjacent record store.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxoxo


Entered at Sun Nov 18 19:23:27 CET 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Acoustic Dylan/ small venue Dylan

Jeff: Since Dylan did his "Unplugged" 1994 show and cd, I have been saying that Dylan alone (like the first halcyon days) or Dylan with a band in a small venue (like he did at the Masonic Temple in Toronto (around the time of "Unplugged") is the way to go. I have been waiting faithfully for Bob Dylan to do this. It is certainly not as lucrative but the art of Dylan would be well served by this. I think it is bound to happen in the future. Its a natural given what he is doing best these days.


Entered at Sun Nov 18 19:19:08 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I wish the image of a hamster on a wheel was mine, but I have the sneaking feeling I read it somewhere, but I can't recall where.


Entered at Sun Nov 18 19:02:13 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

It's quite something to compare Dylan to a hamster on a wheel.But if that is how he seems to you Peter, that is how he seems to you..Dylan, obviously, has to create. And has to perform. Even now, it's giving meaning to his life....Whatever the reason, it surely is.This is a man who's spent his life doing what he enjoys which is also what gives it meaning for him. And , at the same time, created some of the greatest art, and surely a large amount of vastly important music. And proven to be one of , if not the, the most admired amd appreciated musical artists ever.

that quote. "Clearly, Dylan has become one of those grizzled old bluesmen he has always admired – living out his days on the road and still passing on the great traditions.It’s our good fortune to watch him do it. Few of his kind will pass this way again." is accurate i'd say. I'd have to agree with it too. And i tihnk he won't stop unless he has to... While there could be an obsessiveness behind it, i doubt it.I'd think dylan has enough dimension to him, that if what he wanted to do was stay home and hang with his family, he would.I'd suspect that Dylan is still too involved with his art to stop. It is his life, like it was the old blues men's life. They never stopped, till they had to ,or they died.Henry Townsend's performances became limited in his 90s. i saw soem great perfromanxces of his in his late 80s, ealryt 90s., At 98, he was at a performance in Wisconsin, when he took ill and died, a day or two before he was scheduled to go on.

Some thing that could add a dimension, would be if Dytlan someohow managed to perform some hit and run shows or short runs in small venues, and by small, i mean small.Some 100 to 3oo fo 400, okay maybe 700 to 1,000 seaters. And incorporate some of the last standing great, mostly traditional blues players in.Johnny Winter.Margolin,.Steve Freund,Johnny Dyers,Finis Tasby, there's more, but these come to mind. And also guys like Garth, Mick Taylor......

Levon's barn could be a place to do it. Dylan might enjoy being in Woodstock again for a while.

Kevin, i agree with you, Winston Watson, yeah. I thought he was kickass with Dylan too. i enjoyed Scott Kempner's playing too, , but Watson was the man.


Entered at Sun Nov 18 18:48:23 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Kid Dynamite

Awright duz any a you Tranna punks remember who he was and what his greatest accomplishment was?.........which will probably never be done again.


Entered at Sun Nov 18 18:13:27 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: That Settles it! .........I guess.........

We definitely are old!......The football games are starting, hosted by the ROLLING STONES.........50 years this year!......where did it all go???.....I musta missed something here.


Entered at Sun Nov 18 17:23:27 CET 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Grizzled Old Bluesmen

From Bernard Perusse: Montreal Gazette: Bell Centre, Dylan, Friday Nov. 16, 2012: "Clearly, Dylan has become one of those grizzled old bluesmen he has always admired – living out his days on the road and still passing on the great traditions. It’s our good fortune to watch him do it. Few of his kind will pass this way again."


Entered at Sun Nov 18 16:56:09 CET 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Now and Then

The local rock radio station in the Hudson Valley, WDST out of Woodstock does what they call Now and Then sets where they play new music from an established artist and then one of their more well known songs. The past few weeks they have been playing 'Pay in Blood' backed with a Dylan classic. The new song really holds up well. Tempest is a great record.


Entered at Sun Nov 18 16:32:27 CET 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: "I'm in the kitchen with the Tombstone Blues"

That is a thoughtful and clear presentation, Peter, of why you do not attend Dylan concerts. Dylan is now succeeding live predominately with his blues-oriented songs. His new arrangements of old songs are welcomed by some and bother others. I get that but encourage a careful listening despite the changes. Sometimes they work; sometimes they don't. But it is the effort to create after all these years that I admire. The major strengths of those recent shows as I noted before were old or new blues with a sharp band that knows what needs doing and is capable. If I had to describe Dylan's strengths for 2012, they would indeed be his last 5 albums (not Christmas which was a lark) and his live blues. Dire is a strong word to describe an entire Dylan concert but if that is how your ears perceived it, then I understand why you would stay away. Let me just say that the rendering of Thunder on the Mountain, Early Roman Kings, Highway 61 Revisited, Joey, and Man in the Long Black Coat showed Dylan in his kitchen. Forget for a minute that it was this performer. He can do blues and always could as well as the best of them.


Entered at Sun Nov 18 16:25:00 CET 2012 from (86.173.115.84)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Agreed

I couldn't agree more with support band comments.

Peter V, I'll finish on a positive. I saw the Sandy Denny tribute show recently on BBC 4. I reread your blog today. I couldn't agree more with your blog and your additional comment. Thea Gilmore, who I had not heard of, PP Arnold and Jerry Donnahue were great I thought, but I noticed another commenter thought the tone of his guitar playing was not great. I'm going to buy a couple of Thea Gilmore albums. I noticed when googling she has recorded a version of John Wesley Harding. Thanks.

For non Brits, you can trace a real Band influence, through Halfbricking, then Sandy Denny to this concert.


Entered at Sun Nov 18 15:31:27 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Arrogant bastards

Like Dunc, I cannot and will never understand the monumental arrogance of musicians going on late. I’ve heard them say “it builds anticipation.” Bollocks. Three or four minutes with the lights down builds anticipation. Van Morrison is spot on time every show. I’ve never thought, ‘Oh, I’d like to sit here for 60 minutes first.’

The other is unbilled support bands … several times this year. Plus support is fine. Better to name the support. But not billing a support act? Why? Because people wouldn’t turn up?

Another irritation is 45 minutes or more after the support band before the main band wanders on. You can do it in twenty minutes, and they always do … then just leave people staring at an empty stage.

You can go to the theatre and see Jude Law or Patrick Stewart or Judi Dench or Zach Braff, all arguably bigger "names" than most musicians, even those in pretty major bands, and the show starts on time every single night. Anything else is toweringly arrogant.


Entered at Sun Nov 18 12:28:15 CET 2012 from (86.173.115.84)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Talk about any concert, Jeff. What happens here is that an American act may only visit rarely. Paul Simon three times in the last ten years and because of this they are put on pedestals. And it's difficult to get tickets. Expectations are high.

The thing I've noticed about successful reformed alcoholics is that they've got to keep busy. They've to keep going. I've looked for an insightful book on Dylan's alcoholism. I believe he has to keep touring, it's essential for his wellbeing. Younger colleagues of mine went to a Dylan concert in Glasgow and he performed with his back to the audience. They not surprisingly lost interest in him.

Yet, I'm first in the queue to get tickets for Dylan concerts and played Bringing It all Back Home and Tempest yesterday. Some of the lyrics on the early albums are unsurpasssable and continually surprise me. I'm a better listener now than at any other time in my life. I focused on Love Minus Zero, Mr Tambourine Man, Gates of Eden, It's Alright Ma and It's All Over Now, Baby Blue. I think how could a young man write such lyrics.

But I'm very happy with the last five Dylan albums. (Xmas I'm not including.) And as Jeff pointed out, the band on Tempest is very good.

Brian Wilson concert was great. What an opening. Acoustic. One guitar and about fifteen singers.

Also, I got fed up of concerts and stopped going for a while. Why should I be expected to sit around for an hour and a half for a band to appear. You can see why there was punk. I, like others here, don't want to stand now.

There was also the Rolling Stones concert many years ago in Scotland where because of the state of the lead guitarist miming took place.

I'm playing The Healing Game just now. Really enjoyable album.


Entered at Sun Nov 18 11:56:31 CET 2012 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Best shows

1.) Swedish version of THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW. I was kissed by a female vampire in the ensemble. 2.) DUBLINERS. Happily, I was not kissed by anyone in Dubliners and beverages were served punctually. 3.) THE BAND GUESTBOOK BAND doing Peter V's articles in talkin'-blues version (or was it a dream?)


Entered at Sun Nov 18 10:53:18 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Dylanology

OK, I'll walk into it then … yes, life is change, how it differs from the rocks (Grace Slick, 1968) but the point about Dylan's changes were that they were mercurial. A year or two, and he shifted again. Or a few months (Dylan & The Dead) and he shifted. My pal who saw him in May 1966, stopped buying after being disappointed by John Wesley Harding and never bought again … he loved the Highway 61 / Blonde on Blonde sound exclusively. People dropped out all along the way, and for me Saved was the point where I got off the bus and stopped assuming that Dylan was right and I was wrong. You don't go back. We all differ … I loved both Street Legal and Budokan, and I know that was another jump off point for people.

The thing about the Never-Ending tour is that it is indeed never ending, and he's been locked into a certain style for at least a dozen years. It's not a try-out or an experiment. It's just what he does. Relentlessly. I do agree with the point made here that his stage act would be improved by ONLY doing recent albums. I'd love to hear stuff from Tempest … I'd even buy a ticket and travel a long way if I thought he was doing (say) half of Tempest live. But I can't bear to see him murdering Like A Rolling Stone again. Those songs are too important to me.

So, yes, "Tempest" is one of his full-force great albums. But "Old Ideas" by Leonard Cohen is just as good. As I tirelessly repeat, his contemporaries Cohen, Paul Simon and James Taylor put a great deal more effort and rehearsal into live shows with bigger, more flexible and far more interesting bands, and all three retain way better voices.

When I've seen two dire live shows in a row by an artist, I don't try again. I have been given bootlegs of later shows too.

I see Dylan and to a degree Paul McCartney, with an equally stripped down band and a voice that's just recently starting to go (though nowhere near as badly as Bob's), as hamsters on a wheel, fending off the grim reaper.


Entered at Sun Nov 18 03:01:11 CET 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Hilda. I think that many who occupy this site with their insights and ideas and comments fall into an enlightened group to which you clearly belong. It is reassuring to hear you. Thank you. I too have been on this ship since 1962-63. It has been a wonderful journey and I am grateful for the privilege of listening and learning. My comments cannot be applied as universal; however, it is disturbing when the wider view of an artist of the importance and vitality of Bob Dylan is denigrated for superficial reasons. Everyone is entitled but when it comes to the live presentation, it cannot be expected to be identical for 50 years for anyone who evolves his art as Dylan does. Moreover, the tools you have change over time. It is true for all of us as we move through our lives. Finally, the critics should no better. Laziness of thinking and writing is unacceptable.


Entered at Sat Nov 17 23:37:48 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Total Devistation

Looking at the images on the link Joan has posted, brings to mind ol' Bumbles down there in Jersey. I don't quite recall what part he occupied, but the devistation there is sickening.

Also in Conneticut, haven't heard from Todd, hope he is well and coping with all this. This seems to make the "Cliff" even more devistating.


Entered at Sat Nov 17 21:43:37 CET 2012 from (62.140.137.100)

Posted by:

Hilda F

Location: The Low Countries

Subject: JT on Dylan

There is only one thing I don't agree within your piece a few posts back...

I am an old fan...ever since I was 16 years old in 1962.... So I have lived through all the changes and I am still a 'hardcore' fan and so are many of my friends...

For the rest you took the words right out of my mouth...

I could not have said it better...

Thank you !


Entered at Sat Nov 17 21:30:25 CET 2012 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Thanks Kevin & JT

Glad some folks get what Bob is doing out there! Daily I read Expecting Rain,all the reviews,the familiar whining and moaning about the shows,the voice,the arrangements,the piano,Charlie's limited guitar leads,not enough Tempest,blah,blah,blah.This whining and moaning has accompanied every phase of Bob's career.It bores me silly and yes,us older folk sound as rigid as we accused our elders to be.We are blessed to have Bob out there and each time I've seen him,from the first time I saw him in 74 to the last one Labor Day in Bethel,I've only been inspired to deeply think and feel,and have never once been disappointed.


Entered at Sat Nov 17 21:28:27 CET 2012 from (74.108.32.67)

Posted by:

Joan

Web: My link

Subject: Sandy

This link takes you to an article about Sandy and the aftermath It is even worse than I knew. There are some videos at the end of the article.


Entered at Sat Nov 17 19:34:57 CET 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Apologies to Ronnie

Sorry for the spelling. Ronnie Hawkins. Mea culpa. And media, not medial. Keyboarding errors.


Entered at Sat Nov 17 17:24:06 CET 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Thanks Kevin

Thank you Kevin. That sounds a lot more like what I heard in Toronto. Maybe some of the Toronto papers need to have more than 1 music critic so that some balance occurs in the comments. Some people dismiss critics as 'unimportant' (even Dylan has mainly derisive things to say in his own context of what music critics are and do). I do enjoy both the positive and negative comments that follow reviews. These speak volumes about what people hope to find when they go to an artistic presentation. Preset expectations for those who have heard little of Dylan since the 1960s and 1970s will certainly usually result in disappointment. As I noted before, it seems to be the younger kids (fuelled on Sonic Youth and YoLo Tengo and others) who 'get it'. They are not fooled. They are receptive to the artist and what he/she is doing NOW. They may have heard (from cds and their parents) what's up, but they open their ears and listen to what is happened in that concert hall or arena. They aren't intimidated by changing arrangements of blues growls and they accept change. I'm not surprised that the children of the 60s have 'become their parents' (who they criticized for this very closed-mindedness) and can't tolerate the change. The folkies hated Dylan's electric (some of them); the committed hated the 'conversion' (I had my problems with this for a short time, but I got over it). And now, as when Budokon came out and the arrangements changed yet again, the Dylan generation (some only but enough to get media attention from journalists who have some difficulty with artistic expression and who have trouble mustering original thoughts - they might as well just 'mail it in' and not show up at all if their opinions are preformed by previous medial reports. It is clear to me that the Montreal reporter did show up, did listen, and formed positive and some critical comments that were a true reflection of what is being presented by Dylan today. To reiterate.. from my perspective, Dylan and his band (like all nightly shows) can be superb (as they clearly were in Toronto or Montreal and recent other shows, like Detroit) or spotty (as the show I heard in Vancouver, where there were some high points and some areas where work was required). That is what artistic expression is.. a work in progress. And that never changes. Finally, you don't have the opportunity to know what is really superb if you don't experience the lesser presentations. That to me is the essence of music art. I wrote this obviously to get a response, both positive and critical. Let it rip!


Entered at Sat Nov 17 16:46:00 CET 2012 from (74.198.9.247)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Above Link from Montreal newspaper - finally a review that got it right. I'll have more to add when I get back to TO.


Entered at Sat Nov 17 16:02:30 CET 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Toronto bars and high schools

Levon and the Hawks in the early 60s (first with Ronny Hawkins) and then on their own played bars up and down Yonge St. and over on Bloor at the Concord. They were a fixture of the Toronto music scene before and in the early years of Yorkville. As for high schools, I saw The Dimensions ( a bunch of kids from the North York area and way before the Blushing Brides) at my school, W.L. Mackenzie, in the mid 60s. They were a Rolling Stones cover band and they were good! They evolved to A Passing Fancy and had a local hit "I'm Losing Tonight" with Jay Telfer then going on to some success while others became professionals (dentist etc). I also saw Richie Knight and the Midnights at Mackenzie when Charlena was at 'the top of the charts'. Again there was some local school talent in that band, as Bill M knows. I still have 'I'm Losing Tonight' in my iTunes.


Entered at Sat Nov 17 09:11:20 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Dances v Concerts

Some of the best shows I’ve seen in the 60s would have been billed as “dances” not ‘concerts” and were in ballrooms … which I’m sure was true for Levon & The Hawks too.

More on David Bowie. There’s an energy at a certain point where a career is set to explode, which Bowie had at the start of the Hunky Dory tour. The costumes were outrageous, the band great, and Bowie played rhythm guitar most of the evening. As I said, by the Ziggy Stardust tour even that “explosion” edge had gone.

Friends reminded me that I’d seen him a few times before. Two bands that friends were in were on the “support” band roster at Bournemouth Pavilion. There would be two support bands, and Davey Jones and The Lower Third (and other Bowie bands) were sometimes second billed with friends’ bands third billed. Once it was the other way round. But while I remember seeing the band, no memory of the music or performance has ever stuck. Perhaps it was because it was a “dance”. Loyalty meant you watched your friends’ band. You watched the headliner. So Davey Jones & The Lower third was the bit you danced in, either because you were with a girlfriend, or because you were trying to find one.


Entered at Sat Nov 17 08:37:24 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Shows 2012

I counted Simone Felice, and the first show was a club with 60 seats. Bap Kennedy last year was a restaurant with 55 seats, both superb shows. I totally disagree that quality is going down. Yes, the quality of 60s and 70s acts often is, though not Leonard Cohen, who just gets better.

I've seen great younger bands recently - Felice, Decemberists, Unthanks, Jonathan Wilson.

I forgot Brian Wilson, twice.


Entered at Sat Nov 17 02:13:18 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

aSo, whilst compiling lists , what do you gents and damsels count? HAll and gymnasium or stadium shows only? Or do 150, 200, 300 seat clubs count. Do 400 to 1000 seat clubs count.WOudl the Bitter End, or Other End, in Greenwich Village count? A coffeehouse on a college campus,The Chance in Poughkeepsie, The GoldenBear in huntington Beach, Troubador in L.A? would you count that sort of place?The Bottom Line or the Lone star Cafe? I'm curious.But, still, 40 years in to going to shows, the last 7 or 8 the slowest period for that,I just don't think it possible to pick the first ten or twenty best.I doubti coudl say which were the ten best? It's alot of music, andi woudl imagine it;s the saME FOR SO MAny poeopel here. i just can't see how..........Too many motherfucker shows.Speaking of....i halfassed watched the Stones documentary on HBO whilkest doing paperwork.It;s good. And one of the Stones referred to Midnight Rambler was his favortite song, or soemthing along that line.....

Thinking about what it must be like for kids to watch this kind of doic, or The LAst waltz, and try to equate that kind of quality of music, ands what was happoening in the world musically and culutrally, with what is happening and available today, and i wonder what they think? so I feel bad for kids today cause . to me it almost seems.they have no idea what good music sounds like. I started acupuncture again..., now this is just one 27 or 28 year old kid , but she is really good at what she does, and intelligent, and we've talked music. The bands she thinks are great here, well, they are okay, some evry good, but great? no.No way. ALso, like many places, the night before thanksgiving , there isa LAst Waltz renactment happening in one of the clubs here, 9th year running in that club.... Now, those kids know what good music is...but, will their performances be any good?I heard someone cover IT MAkes No Difference on the radio today, acoustic, with way too many backup vocals.I was in shock that anyone would play it on the radio.Horrible..


Entered at Sat Nov 17 01:46:25 CET 2012 from (62.140.132.62)

Posted by:

Hilda F

Location: The Low Countries

Subject: Van Morrison/ best performance

On second thoughts the year Van Morrison performed in Carré must have been 1974.....

And the most memorable performance I ever watched was by Youssou NDour

The musicians came back for an encore and they had changed into tribal dress

They did a spinechilling rendition of Chimes of Freedom

Of course Youssou NDour is now The Secretary for Culture in Senegal...


Entered at Sat Nov 17 01:10:08 CET 2012 from (62.140.132.62)

Posted by:

Hilda F

Location: The Low Countries

Subject: Double posting

Sorry for that.....Ipad troubles... But the best concert ever The Band 1971 Amsterdam Concertgebouw Good second Van Morrison and The Caledonian Soul Orchestra in Carré, the Amsterdam Circus Theatre but I forgot what year it was....


Entered at Sat Nov 17 01:03:06 CET 2012 from (62.140.132.62)

Posted by:

Hilda F

Location: The Low Countres

Subject: Ain't in it for my health

I have not been here for a few weeks but I am very happy to read that this film is going to be released on dvd next summer. I saw it at the IDFA festival here two years ago and have been waiting ever since...


Entered at Sat Nov 17 01:01:46 CET 2012 from (62.140.132.62)

Posted by:

Hilda F

Location: The Low Countres

Subject: Ain't in it for my health

I have not been here for a few weeks but I am very happy to read that this film is going to be released on dvd next summer. I saw it at the IDFA festival here two years ago and have been waiting ever since...


Entered at Sat Nov 17 00:43:47 CET 2012 from (101.164.6.125)

Posted by:

Dlew

Subject: Oh, crap...

I did the last post, not mr cooder, who could surely settle the question once and for all.


Entered at Sat Nov 17 00:38:27 CET 2012 from (101.164.6.125)

Posted by:

Ry cooder

Subject: The only connection I can think of off hand

David p will have a much closer one. Cooder once filled in on bill Monroe's band on banjo. Ad monroe was he first band Levon saw...


Entered at Sat Nov 17 00:02:56 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: I Just Can't Help Believing

If we're on Elvis on stage, follow the link. There was a BBC TV play in the 70s or 80s that featured this performance in bits all the way through … I can't remember the play, but I definitely remember Elvis on this song.


Entered at Fri Nov 16 23:55:20 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Thanks, Dan. I'll look out for the Madison Square show tomorrow – it looks asif the 2 CD set has the "previous release" plus "complete concert."

The other totally amazing shows … David Bowie right at the start of the Hunky Dory tour, then Lou Reed with the Rock & Roll Animal tour band … both at Southampton Guildhall. Subsequent Bowie was but a pale shadow.


Entered at Fri Nov 16 22:25:18 CET 2012 from (99.121.52.221)

Posted by:

Dan

Subject: Elvis Presley & The Band 1971

The Elvis Madison Square Garden Concerts were released this week on the 40th Anniversary. Encouraged by a review of the King summoning up a great song at about the time of the Last Waltz, that mentioned that the King had sold out Madison Square Garden 4 straight days in 1972, I had to give it a try. The band is great and the King's delivery is really strong, and subtle when required. You can hear him trying to move beyond the Hound Dog stuff to more mature songs. How the KIng got from those heights to 1977 is beyond me. Also interesting that he could sing 20+ songs with a 2001 Space Odyssey Introduction in about one hour. Play The Band's Rock of Ages, this and Van's Too Late to Stop Now, and you get some really great music from 1971-1972 with "all the spokes" as I think Levon says of rocck n roll.


Entered at Fri Nov 16 22:08:20 CET 2012 from (86.173.115.84)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Best concerts

The Nice at Dundee, knew something different was happening

The Who at Dundee first performance of 'Who's Next' three thousand seater hall with many others in attendance with forged tickets.

John Martyn at Ayr

Rolling Stones at Hampden

Paul McCartney at Hampden

Neil Young Glasgow

Roger McGuinn story telling concert in Glasgow

Dan Penn and Spooner Oldham in Glasgow

Any Michael Marra concert

Lou Reed Glasgow

Bob Dylan in Oporto, first half quiet and acoustic, but it swung

Alex Harvey, Dundee - could not be captured on album

John Fogerty open air in courtyard of Zurich museum

Leonard Cohen last one in Glasgow, although elderly something very special

Paul Simon Graceland tour

Van Morrison Glasgow with great band and Crawford Bell backing singers

Lucinda Williams with bass, lead and drums

Jock Tamson's Bairns at Celtic Connections

Joe Cocker in Glasgow

Kevin Coyne in Dundee

Maura 0'Connell at Celtic Connections

AWB, Michael Marra and Hue and Cry at Celtic Connections


Entered at Fri Nov 16 20:03:15 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Memorable Concerts

Two concerts from November 1969 immediately come to mind. On Friday Nov. 14 that year I saw the Rolling Stones at Auburn University in Alabama. Terry Reid & Chuck Berry opened. My friends & I had nose-bleed seats in the coliseum that cost around $8.00, but thanks to the Stones road crew, we got to watch their set from the front of the stage. Highlight song: "Midnight Rambler".

Just over a week later, on Sunday the 23rd, saw the Allman Brothers Band at the old Georgian Terrace Hotel ballroom, just across Peachtree St. from the Fox Theater. Several local groups, including the Hampton Grease Band opened. It was general admission seating on the ballroom floor and I sat directly in front of the stage on the side where Gregg & Duane were set up. Highlight song: extended version of "Dreams".


Entered at Fri Nov 16 18:33:35 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Live concerts

Last time I did the best concerts wasn’t very long ago, and memory gets mixed up. I reckon this is about half different:

Muddy Waters, Hull, 1968

Marvin Gaye, Bournemouth, mid 70s

Leonard Cohen, all three times

Paul Simon, Hammersmith Apollo, about ten years ago, just before he started to get a slightly sibillant sound on his vocals.

Simone Felice, three times 2010-12

Rahsaan Roland Kirk, Norwich, 1970 (Volunteered Slavery tour)

King Crimson (Larks Tongues 5 piece) 1973/4

James Taylor, 6 or 7 years ago, Steve Gadd on drums

Wings, Live & Let Die tour, 1975

Van Morrison – about a third of the many times I’ve seen him.

Most pleased to see (but not at their peak) The Band 1993.

Most exciting (but I bet it wasn’t that good musically) The Beatles, 1963, twice, 1964.

Most charismatic start: Bob Dylan, mid-90s with Absolutely Sweet Marie.

Most disappointing: Bob Dylan, 2000s; Van Morrison jazz tour 1995?

Worst major international band I've ever seen: Santana.

Worst I've ever seen anywhere in my life: Principal Edwards Magic Theatre.


Entered at Fri Nov 16 18:30:33 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Congratulations, Pat! Must keep a look out on the schedules!


Entered at Fri Nov 16 18:28:28 CET 2012 from (68.164.5.132)

Posted by:

Pat Brennan

Web: My link

For all our British friends, this is a link to a show that will premier on National Geographic/UK on November 23. I was fortunate enough to co-write the script, serve as historical consultant, and write/produce the music. It will show in the US and Canada in the Spring.


Entered at Fri Nov 16 17:38:01 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: San Francisco Neil Young 1975

And moreover, there is Kezar Stadium's SNACK. CONCERTS PLAYLISTS Bob Dylan - guitar, vocals Neil Young - guitar, piano, vocals Tim Drummond - guitar Ben Keith - pedal steel guitar Rick Danko - bass, vocals Garth Hudson - keyboards Levon Helm - drums, vocals Following the outstanding performances that proceeded it, this closing All-Star set from the 1975 Bay Area S.N.A.C.K. benefit had a lot to live up to. With a lineup that featured Neil Young and Bob Dylan, backed by two members from Neil's group, the Stray Gators, and three from the Band...


Entered at Fri Nov 16 17:34:19 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: Young and Hudson

And then there's this powerful version of "This Wheel's On Fire", featuring Neil and Garth backed by the Sadies.


Entered at Fri Nov 16 17:22:53 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: On The Beach

This might help. I agree. More involvement would have been interesting. Neil Young: On the Beach (from Wiki) Side one "Walk On" – 2:42 "See the Sky About to Rain" – 5:02 "Revolution Blues" – 4:03 "For the Turnstiles" – 3:15 "Vampire Blues" – 4:14 [edit]Side two "On the Beach" – 6:59 "Motion Pictures" – 4:23 "Ambulance Blues" – 8:56 [edit]Personnel Neil Young – guitar on 1 3 5 6 7 8, vocal, Wurlitzer electric piano on 2, banjo on 4, harmonica on 7 8 Ben Keith – slide guitar on 1, vocal on 1 4, steel guitar on 2, Dobro on 4, Wurlitzer electric piano on 3, organ on 5, hand drums on 6, bass on 7 8 Tim Drummond – bass on 2 5 6, percussion on 5 Ralph Molina – drums on 1 5 6, vocal on 1, hand drums on 7 8 [edit]Additional personnel Billy Talbot – bass on 1 Levon Helm – drums on 2 3 Joe Yankee – harp on 2, electric tambourine on 8 David Crosby – guitar on 3 Rick Danko – bass on 3 George Whitsell – guitar on 5 Graham Nash – Wurlitzer electric piano on 6 Rusty Kershaw – slide guitar on 7, fiddle on 8


Entered at Fri Nov 16 16:45:43 CET 2012 from (63.88.115.195)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: PA

Subject: Fantasy Bands

I always thought Neil Young should have done an album with the Band post RR. And speaking of NY - Rick would have been a great vocal addition to many of the songs penned by Danny Whitten & Nils on Crazy Horse's self titled CD which goes mostley unknown but is very good.


Entered at Fri Nov 16 16:40:10 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Very glad to read that Kevin. I don't know about the rest of you, but i'd be willing to kick in a few bucks to paddle Viney across the ocean to one of thoss canadian shows.......is it possible Dylan simply likes playing for a roomful of Canucks a whole helluva lot more than he does a roomful of Brits? Maybe it's the Band association. Maybe he considers a Canadian audience as relatives of The Band, next of kin....


Entered at Fri Nov 16 16:23:02 CET 2012 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Thanks JT and Kevin J for your dedicated posts on Bob "All-will-be-yours" Dylan.


Entered at Fri Nov 16 15:41:56 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronno
Web: My link

Peter V: I think I read once of a short but civil conversation when Albert broached the idea back in '67. Presley simply replied, "No, sir. I ain't goin' down into no god-damned basement." And that was it. Pity.

JT: Top five, in chronological order, more or less: McLaughlin and Santana, MLG, 1974; Eugene Smith and the Warm-Up Band, Hotel California, 1978; BB Gabor and Instaband, Grossman's, 1979; Luke Gibson and the Silver Tractors, Brass Rail (?), 1981; Danny Brooks and the Rockin' Revelators, church at Bay and Dav, 2005 (ish).

David P: The Globe's Moment in Time feature today commemorates the hanging of visionary and Metis leader Louis Riel on Nov 16, 1885. Riel had led what is know as the North-West Rebellion earlier that year - the closest thing we've had to a civil war in Canada. I'll provide a link rather than attempt a precis.


Entered at Fri Nov 16 10:51:58 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Elvis Presley & The Band, 1971

My first reaction to Dlews 1971 fantasy show was negative. First, The Band didn’t need a singer, and second, Elvis didn’t need a “better” band instrumentally than he already had, plus he needed the female backing singers and orchestral section. Also I could see Levon quitting after a couple of months saying, “I cain’t stand to see a grown man in a romper suit jumpin’ around the stage trying to do karate kicks. I had enough of watching a grown-man prancing around with Ronnie.’ Then there’s the forty years since of Robbie complaining about writing credits on his greatest songs like “Acadian Driftwood” (Presley-Robertson). “Some of the guys in The Band got credits for being in the room while I wrote it, that’s true, but Elvis got them without even being in the room. And don’t get me started on the insistence on alphabetical order in credits.” Socially, I could see Elvis getting on with Levon and Rick, but I’m not sure the other three were his kind of thing.

Then I read more closely … managed by Grossman. No Tom Parker. No Las Vegas. No electric blue romper suit with diamante. Ah. Elvis gets encouraged to return to rhythm guitar, and from those early live survivors, he was good. And at home at Graceland he loved playing bass guitar, meaning he could swap with Rick on a few numbers, letting Rick play fiddle, or guitar. With the 90s Band, Rick seemed disinclined on the more repetitive (i.e. easy) bass lines. And they wouldn’t be doing the same sort of stuff, except for American Trilogy which blended so well into The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down. I think they’d have to take the Rock of Ages horn section along. The fun would be integrating Elvis, not backing him. You’re talking the 1967 comeback TV show, not Aloha from Hawaii. But even watching that I think by 1967 Elvis was too used to sycophants to work with people who weren’t obsequious, and I can’t see Robbie or Garth laughing at jokes to order like the 1967 guys did.


Entered at Fri Nov 16 10:47:14 CET 2012 from (99.141.52.246)

Posted by:

Adam

Subject: Ry Cooder

Been listening to the great Ry Cooder a lot lately. I've always wondered: what is his closest connection to the guys in The Band? Does anyone know? I can only think of the rumors that he might join in the early 1980s, and that he associated with friends of the Band.


Entered at Fri Nov 16 07:09:40 CET 2012 from (101.164.6.125)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Subject: My best shows, plus a fantasy show that should have happened

Years are approximate

1985 Queen

1994 Eric Clapton (supported by tommy Emmanuel )

1990 Pink Floyd

Various B B King

Elton John

Heaven and Hell

David Lee Roth 1989

And, imagine Elvis dumps Tom Parker in 1971 and signs with Grossman. And he puts his main act as Elvis's backing ban... Tour in 1971-72.


Entered at Fri Nov 16 05:09:15 CET 2012 from (74.198.9.247)

Posted by:

Kevin J

JT: Well done on the Dylan review. Just arrived in Montreal for the show Friday. Loved last night......hadn't thought I would be able to attend but so glad I did. "Tangled Up In Blue" was the most enjoyable version I have ever seen live.....I was too young to see the Rolling Thunder one but by far last night beat anything since for me. "Visions of J" was beautiful and "Thunder on the Mountain" took the show over the top. Even "Joey" with its tighter arrangement had a punch that I would not have imagined. I was also really pleased to hear "Sugar Baby". I disagree with you only on "New Roman Kings" as surprisingly it was one of the few songs where I could not make out the words......and the band as they have become almost little. Sexton in particular was almost invisible.....was it not striking how Knopfler kicked Bob up a gear while he was out there with him.........and Knopfler was sensational with special kudos to his drummer.........reminded me how much Bob could benefit from having Winston Watson kick just a little more life into some of the songs......that is my only complaint.........a wonderful night all around.......I knew it was going to be special 10 seconds into that surprising opener which Bob sang as well as he has on a first song in 25 years.....no joke........Wondering what surprises might be in store for Montreal.


Entered at Fri Nov 16 04:49:53 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Awwhaaaaa!

You think I'm not on to you JT..........you.....son of a pill pusher.........I envy you. I don't have the opportunity to get around that much......yet......but my tug & barge will sell pretty soon. Then...watch out!


Entered at Fri Nov 16 03:19:43 CET 2012 from (65.94.136.88)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Best shows

Best shows for me 1) Dylan with Levon and the Hawks Nov. 15, 1965 2)Dylan and the Band Jan. 10, 1974 3) The (reformed Band) Convocation Hall, UofT, Toronto approx. early 90s (too lazy to look up date) 4) Dylan Masonic Temple Toronto 1994 or so 5) Madeleine Peyroux Victoria about 3- 4 years ago or so 6) Blackie and the Rodeo Kings - Horseshoe Tavern about 8 years ago 7) Stephen Fearing - on a number of occasions 8) Steely Dan - late 90s 9) Diana Krall at the piano on the 33rd floor of a Toronto Hotel at the piano before she got really big 10) Any Levon and the Hawks matinee that I had the privilege to be at in the early 60s 11) All and every Leonard Cohen show I was ever at 12) Bruce Cockburn again and again 13) Metric on 2 or 3 occasions 14) Simon and Garfunkel 1967 or so. Peter, as you can plainly see, you've got me thinking. Time stands still and moves forward all at the same time when your rocking or in a chair.


Entered at Fri Nov 16 02:18:11 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

Subject: Marching through Georgia

I got halfway through E.L. Doctorow's The March recently and was enjoying it, but I have put the book down somewhere and can't find it. Will look tomorrow.

On Dylan, I was talking to an old school friend at lunchtime on best shows we had ever seen. One of his was London May 66, at the Royal Albert Hall. While I was reeling in envy, he said the boo-ers were a small group who had been discussing it before the show. Judas was Manchester of course, not London.


Entered at Thu Nov 15 22:30:14 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: NOW HERE THIS!!

So, it's.....official then........time does not stand still.


Entered at Thu Nov 15 22:13:01 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

I was happy to read about your experience at the Dylan concert, JT.


Entered at Thu Nov 15 21:34:05 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: late-breaking news advisory ...

Bob Dylan's voice is not what it once was. Take that as you may.


Entered at Thu Nov 15 20:16:33 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Reviewing the reviews

How banal! No other word to describe the hacks who copy from other hacks. Yes, there are threads of truth that run through any review. But when 99% of the audience stays to the end and only a few people leave, I would not emphasize the departed but rather focus on those who appreciated the concert. Dylan would be the first to admit that the voice is not what it was, but he is out there with a crack band trying to do what he can do now. As they say, if you don't like it, don't buy a ticket. I can't see the sense in comparing what once was with what is now. What is currently the case is Bob Dylan presenting his art in the only way he can now. That does not suggest he retire. He was fresh and his effort to do it the best way he can today is appreciated more by the younger people who attended (many said to me that the show was 'awesome') than the older crowd who just can't let go of their memory of what once was. It will never be that way again. 'Things Have Changed'. Get used to it.!


Entered at Thu Nov 15 20:05:04 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Arkansas Connection

One of the Confederate generals opposing Sherman during the battle of Atlanta was John Bell Hood, who Levon portrayed in the Tommie Lee Jones movie "In the Electric Mist". Several months after his capture, Gen. Stoneman was released in a prisoner exchange for Confederate Brig. Gen. Daniel Chevilette Govan, who owned a plantation in Helena, Arkansas.


Entered at Thu Nov 15 19:36:18 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Twilight Zone

Gaaaawwwd........you got an imagination Bill.


Entered at Thu Nov 15 18:43:31 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Rockin Chair: I was working through what something of a mash-up of TNTDODD of the Dead's "Driving That Train" might look like. Obviously you'd still have Virgil Caine riding, but his brother Caseyco would be in the driver's seat.


Entered at Thu Nov 15 17:48:01 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Outsiders

When Stoneman's cavalry came and tore up the tracks ...agaain!......I don't think you've gotten over it David.

If any of you have ever seen the old movie "The Outsiders", when Ralph Macchio was dying, he said to his buddy "Stay gold Pony Boy", (C Thomas Howell).

Well my daughter Amanda loved that movie when she was an early teenager, I bought her the video long ago. Resently she has had some hard times. I put on her facebook yesterday, "You are gold Mandy". She replied "Stay gold Pony Boy, stay gold."

This morning Susan had looked on Amanda's page and she asked me, "What did she mean?" I explained it to her, which brought me to the band "The Outsiders". Susan couldn't remember them so of course she googled it because I told her of their biggest hit and she remembered the song.

On reading their history I was surprised. There has been 23 different members in that band. Now make a BAND connection out of that!....you wize guys.


Entered at Thu Nov 15 17:01:11 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The Day They Burned Atlanta Down

In September 1864, during the seige of Atlanta, Gen. Sherman ordered the civilians to evacuate. When the mayor and council members asked him to reconsider, he responded with his famous words "War is cruelty, and you cannot refine it; and those who brought war into our country deserve all the curses and maledictions a people can pour out." He further urged them to go while the getting is good, "insted of waiting till the plunging shot", warning that when his troops get through "there will be no manufacturers, commerce, or agriculture here" to support the population.

The following month he followed through with his dire threats, ordering his troops to set fire to certain strategic locations such as depots, machine shops, factories, founderies and arsenals. Beginning on November 11 Union troops began setting fires. On November 15 Sherman ordered his engineers to torch the previously designated areas, setting fires with explosive devices that soon spread throughout the city. The following day Sherman began his march to the sea, as foragers along with the troops ruthlessly raided farms & plantations along the way. The state capitol, then located at Milledgeville, was captured a week later and the advance began towards Savannah on the coast. Union Gen. George Stoneman, however, did not take part in the march. He had been captured at the end of July, after having torn up the railroad between Atlanta & Macon, during a reckless attempt to free Union prisoners held at Macon & Andersonville.


Entered at Thu Nov 15 15:58:36 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

David P: The "Globe and Mail" newspaper always runs a feature called "A Moment in Time" on page 2, commemorating the anniversary of something noteworthy (birth, death, start of something, end of something ...) Always a decent photo and short write-up. Today the subtitle was "The Southern states never forgot or forgave him, while Sherman's campaing became a textbook case of the scorched-earth doctrine of warfare. As the general famously told those who questioned his cruelty: 'War is hell.' My guess is that you, like me, watched the movie "Sherman's March to the Sea" circa 1980, but emerged none the wiser (not that you would have needed a history lesson on the subject).

Sticking with the Globe, yesterday's edition, yesterday evening having seen Bob Dylan play the Air Canada Centre on the same evening as Gordon Lightfoot opened his traditional four-day stint at Massey Hall, had a little head-to-head feature on the showdown between the two geriatric folkies. The statistical categories were a bit off the wall, with the 'Saturday Night Live Appearance' category being particularly enjoyable. In '76, Lightfoot was cut off before the third song by Samurai Warrior John Belushi cutting Gord's guitar strings; later that year a camouflaged Dylan was spotted in the audience watching the the Band.


Entered at Thu Nov 15 14:25:39 CET 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: JT

Thanks for the review JT. Where's the next review coming from?


Entered at Thu Nov 15 06:56:48 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Web: My link

Subject: Johnnie Johnson, jimmy vivino, live at Chicago Blues.

I'm Goin Fishin ( written by John Sebastian and Johnnie johnson ) and Reelin and A Rockin . A very laid back performance for this lineup (Johnson, Mike Merrit, James Wormworth, Jimmy Vivino, plus one).

Apparently 2001, doubt i was at this, the organist was not Scott Healy, or Brian Mitchell, and (it also doesn't look like Danny Louis to me either, no t that i recall that happening, but he would have been a possible suspect),I was only in NY from Mid Jan to ealry May that year. Even so, this takes me back a long time, a lot of pounds, and alot of memories. This is just a small glimpse of Johnnie, typical and untypical, gives you an idea of how great a musician this man was even if you sat him at a piano in his sleep.You get to see a few smiles, but none of his big beautiful, ear to ear grins, when he was his happiest, playing like nobodies business and excited, excited that he was doing what he was born to do and the crowd was loving it.Those smiles were priceless. I'm hoping this guy has more Johnson Vivino stuff. Apparently he's put up about 1,200 videos he took.


Entered at Thu Nov 15 05:54:46 CET 2012 from (65.94.136.88)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Dylan shines in Toronto

Mark Knopfler was again great. No surprise there. He and his band delivered with superb precision and took you to the hillside, to the deep briny waters, and to a lot of other places. Dylan and his band reduced that hockey arena (with suprisingly good sound) to an intimate honky tonk bar with tight raw straight up blues punctuating a 15 song set. Rollin' and Tumbling, Early Roman Kings (yes, thank goodness, from Tempest), Thunder On the Mountain, and Highway 61 Revisited were all top notch and the band and Dylan rocked big time. The voice, though still growling, had some variation (different than last time I saw him in October) with Visions of Johanna a beautiful presentation. That was worth the price of admission. There was something for everyone, from the opening You Ain't Goin' Nowhere to Man in the Long Black Coat to Joey to the echo of Ballad of a Thin Man and the expected Rolling Stone and Watchtower. I thoroughly enjoyed it and this reminded me again (if I needed reminding) that when you go to a Dylan show, you never no what you will get. This time it was A-1.


Entered at Thu Nov 15 05:22:45 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Looks like Shuggie Otis is on tour. Apparently he has London dates next week, france dates, and just booked Chicago next April.



Entered at Thu Nov 15 03:20:48 CET 2012 from (68.171.231.85)

Posted by:

Bill M

JT: I, and no doubt others went through all the actions of posting in the 22-hour dead zone after PV's Monday morning posts about E-less Barb Jungr, but nothing appeared here for some reason. My own had two parts, the second of which was about Garth Hudson being mentioned in the new Leonard Cohen biography. The time when Mary Martin got him to turn Cohen's songs into sheet music. Martin's other charges, the Stormy Clovers, are also mentioned a few times (they were the first artists to perform Cohen songs), but their work with Garth was not mentioned. ,


Entered at Thu Nov 15 02:42:39 CET 2012 from (99.141.52.246)

Posted by:

Adam

Web: My link

Subject: Festival Express material to be released

The link is to the previously posted "Jemima Surrender" from Festival Express! Joe Lauro, who runs Historic Films, recently mentioned that his company bought tons of unseen Festival Express footage in hopes of releasing it sometime next year. This would supposedly be a "Vol. 2" companion to the original documentary, with more unreleased performances from all the groups involved. There is a treasure trove of material from The Band. Festival Express was their tour, and is a exhilarating document of their live peak.

If you follow Joe Lauro or Historic Films on Facebook, be sure to let them know how much we all support this project and that we will ALL buy multiple copies!


Entered at Wed Nov 14 21:54:45 CET 2012 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

mike h

Web: My link

Article / interview w/ Jimmy Vivino supporting the Nov. 24th The Band tribute.


Entered at Wed Nov 14 19:39:37 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Knopfler/Dylan yet again

The music commentary is becoming sparse here. (Where are the usual suspects?) Nevertheless, I'm off to my second Knopfler/Dylan concert tonight, this time in Toronto. I saw them in Vancouver last month and wrote here that I was pleased with it all but had grave concerns about 'the voice'. Since that time, in reviews by discerning reviewers/critics/listeners, there have been some comments indicating a 'softening' at times when appropriate and this is welcome. I'll write back after the show in the next day or two. In Detroit, "Pay in Blood" from Tempest was played yesterday. That makes 3 songs from Tempest played since the start of this leg of the tour (Scarlet Town, Early Roman Kings, Pay in Blood). I hope we get something tonight from Tempest. Knopfler is accompanying Dylan on 3-4 songs each night now near the start of the show.


Entered at Wed Nov 14 16:08:49 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The other surprise in the John Cale article is he pronounces VU as "view" not V. U.


Entered at Wed Nov 14 13:19:25 CET 2012 from (101.164.6.125)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: the Kinks and the Punks...

I never knew there was any doubt: although Davies turns into a neat songwriter, 'You really got me', for example, is purely punk pop. Townshend has long clamed Ray Davies as the inventor of guitar feedback (till he realised they all invented it togheter...)

The strange conservatism of the Kinks as well: the Village Green Preservation Society has many parallels with punk's looking back to older rock as the model... ... how do I put this more clearly and succinctly... PUnk, while having some polticial radicalism, yearneed back to an earlier time. As did, to an extent, Ray Davies... (and does..)


Entered at Wed Nov 14 11:13:03 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: John Cale / The Kinks

John Cale chooses his ten greatest records in Mojo, and among them is "Something Else" by The Kinks. He goes on to say the VU used to listen to The Kinks all the time, so that puts to bed the "origins of punk' question in Ray Davies' favour.


Entered at Tue Nov 13 22:48:58 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Helicopters

I've worked at heli logging & flown in helicopters for close to 30 years...maybe a little more. My son is quality control manager for a company called "Helitech" building and repairing them. So I have some knowledge of them. As a matter of fact, I have sat on the lifting hook about 50 feet under the helicopter and got lifted and carried a few miles quite a lot of times.

I'd feel safer in a helicopter than any fixed wing. If you've ever hit a down draft in a plane, (especially big ones) and had them drop right out from under you....well helicopters don't do that. At least with a helicopter you many times have the chance to "auto-rotate" and come down easy. I stood in the hanger one day right underneath a Blackhawk with my son looking up at it....those are frightening looking gawd damn machines. But I think you guys better take another look at how many planes crash.


Entered at Tue Nov 13 21:19:06 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I had a friend who worked for a nameless helicopter manufacturer so often travelled in them. One day he saw the mortality statistics and got another job. BUT the British royal family use them a lot.


Entered at Tue Nov 13 19:51:11 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Rotary Connection

JT: I'm reminded that Stevie Ray Vaughan and Bill Graham, along with fellow passengers & crew, were killed in helicopter crashes. In 1960 Francis Gary Powers successfully ejected from his U-2 spy plane after it was hit by a missle while flying 80,000 feet above Russia. Seventeen years later, as a civilian, he was killed piloting a helicopter in California. All three of these crashes involved Bell Jet Ranger model helicopters.


Entered at Tue Nov 13 17:06:47 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: Helicopter Blues

I know helicopters (and motorcycles) are useful means of transportation and that they are beloved and used by many. I know cars are the vehicle most often associated with serious accidents. What is it about music people and helicopters that so often there is 'trouble'? I have always been a McCartney fan and I must say this morning's story in 'The Mail' disturbed me. I avoid helicopters personally and use the other form of air travel when I have the chance. Statistics are informative but I am an 'n of 1'. Thank goodness for pilot skill.


Entered at Tue Nov 13 11:54:00 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Al, this might interest you. And others of course.

Fuel Records/ Universal re released Carla Olson / Mick Taylor "Too Hot For Snakes" (aka "Live At The Roxy") album with the The Ring Of Truth, a record of theirs from 2001. Percy Sledge and John Sebastian were ont he record as well.


Entered at Tue Nov 13 11:38:41 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Cut and pasted from Music wire: "STILLS ON EFFECTS OF BUFFALO SPRINGFIELD TOUR CANCELLATION Buffalo Springfield had planned to tour the country this year but Neil Young wound up scrapping the trek so he could focus on new projects with his band Crazy Horse instead. Now, Buffalo Springfield’s Stephen Stills is talking about how that affected him. The singer told Rolling Stone, “It left me in a lurch for three quarters and ruined my financial planning. Also, 150 people got laid off that were supposed to work on that tour.” Stills added, “When Neil is involved with anything, you need a seatbelt… Working with Neil is a privilege, not a right.” He went on to say that he did not think Buffalo Springfield would tour again. Read more at RollingStone.com. TIDBIT: Buffalo Springfield first reunited at Neil’s annual Bridge School Benefit concert in 2010. They then performed seven shows together before announcing the bigger tour which never happened."

Calvin, i imagine you, like i , and anyone else aware, have to wonder about how, at this stage of the game, the differing social and political views amongst the three main guys left in that band ever coulda lived with each other long term.


Entered at Mon Nov 12 13:44:51 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Barb Jungr

Also all the stuff on YouTube looks like live versions with just piano … it's the studio ones with more backing that you should try.


Entered at Mon Nov 12 10:31:45 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Barb Jungr

I mentioned Barb Jungr recently. She specializes in the songs of Bob Dylan with one on every album, including her current "From Stockport to Memphis." But the Dylan fans will be most interested in "Every Grain of Sand" and "Man in The long Black Coat" both composed entirely of Dylan covers. They're on the audiophile Linn label, and the first is a hybrid CD / SACD. I've been immersed in them for a couple of weeks. The bass player is extremely good for starters. The arrangements vary. Some are radical reinventions like The Times They Are A-Changin' and Just Like A Woman. Others are taken simply and sung beautifully with great clarity on the lyrics. Obviously in such an enterprise she falls on her face a couple of times … I don't think she does anything for Like A Rolling Stone for instance … but overall it succeeds. None of my favourites seem to be on YouTube, but you can find samples on iTunes. Both title tracks would be a good place to start and find out if you like it.


Entered at Mon Nov 12 07:20:46 CET 2012 from (72.215.139.197)

Posted by:

ugg pas cher

Web: My link

Subject: ugg pas cher

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Entered at Mon Nov 12 01:25:19 CET 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY
Web: My link

Subject: Bruce saves the day!

Al Edge, I think you will enjoy this article. I know I did.


Entered at Sun Nov 11 23:35:13 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: We'll gather lilacs

Music moves, that's the idea. Terry Wogan had a live singer on his 11th November show who did Ivor Novello's "We'll Gather Lilacs" live as a mark of Remembrance Sunday. It was a favourite of my mum's and I thought of her being left with a three week old baby (my older sister) then not seeing her husband for five years. No wonder such songs resonated with such power. We have been such a privileged generation or three, especially here in the UK, where we had no Vietnam. I've linked a classic 40s version, but it was much nicer today done in an unaffected way, just voice and piano.


Entered at Sun Nov 11 20:41:34 CET 2012 from (74.108.32.67)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Dlew review

David, thanks for the excellent review. I'll add it to my reading list.


Entered at Sun Nov 11 20:36:14 CET 2012 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Location: Kitchener, Ontario...

Subject: REMEMBRANCE DAY

God Bless you all who have fought in wars to keep us free.

In Flanders Fields... by John McCrae, May 1915

In Flanders fields the poppies blow, Between the crosses, row on row,

That mark our place; and in the sky The larks, still bravely singing, fly

Scarce heard amid the guns below. We are the Dead. Short days ago

We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow, Loved and were loved, and now we lie In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe: To you from failing hands we throw The torch; be yours to hold it high.

If ye break faith with us who die We shall not sleep, though poppies grow In Flanders fields.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Remembrance Day 11th November

A soldier died today... Written by A Lawrence Vaincourt

He was getting old and paunchy, and his hair was falling fast as he sat around the legion, Telling stories of their past.

Of war that he once fought in and the deeds that he had done. In his exploits with his buddies, they were heroes, everyone!

And tho sometimes to his neighbours, his tales became a joke. All his buddies listened quietly, for they knew of where he spoke.

But we'll hear his tales no longer, for ole' Bob has passed away, and the world's a little poorer for a soldier died today!

He won't be mourned by many, just his children and his wife for he lived an ordinary, very quiet sort of life.

He held a job and raised a family going quietly on his way. And the world won't note his passing, 'tho a soldier died today!

When politicians leave this earth, their bodies lie in state. While thousands note their passing and proclaim that they were great.

Papers tell of their life story, from the time that they were young. But the passing of a soldier goes unnoticed and unsung.

Is it the greatest contribution to the welfare of our land, some jerk who breaks his promise and con's his fellow man.,

Or the ordinary fellow, who in times of war and strife, goes off to serve his country and offers up his life.

The politicians stipend and the style in which he lives, are often disproportionate to the service that he gives.

While the ordinary soldier who offered up his all. Is paid with a medal, and perhaps a pension, small.

it is not the politicians with their compromise and ploys who won for us our freedom that our country now enjoys,

Should you find yourself in danger, with your enemies at hand, would you really want some cop-out with his ever waffling stand?

Of would you want a soldier, his home, his country, his kin. Just a common soldier who would fight until the end.

He was just a common soldier and his ranks are growing thin. But his presence should remind us we may need his like again.

For when countries are in conflict, we find the soldier's part is to clean up all the troubles that the politicians start.

If we cannot do him honour while he's here to hear the praise, then at least let's give him homage at the ending of his days.

Perhaps just a simple headline, that the paper might say. " OUR CONTRY IS IN MOURNING, A SOLDIER DIED TODAY!" ( I make no apologies for the lack of pictures as this poem should stand alone)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxoxo


Entered at Sun Nov 11 14:19:34 CET 2012 from (101.164.6.125)

Posted by:

dlew919

Web: My link

Subject: Just scroll on by...

A review of Pete Townshend's 'Who I Am'.


Entered at Sun Nov 11 10:17:24 CET 2012 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Web: My link

Subject: I'm on a roll

never heard this before


Entered at Sun Nov 11 10:13:42 CET 2012 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Web: My link

Subject: Unfaithful Servant

parts of this look like the Shoot Out In Chinatown video posted earlier - but still interesting


Entered at Sat Nov 10 20:48:46 CET 2012 from (174.54.185.44)

Posted by:

Kevin from NEPA

Web: My link

In case anyone cares to hear the song Willie covers it's in the attached link.


Entered at Sat Nov 10 20:46:49 CET 2012 from (174.54.185.44)

Posted by:

Kevin From NEPA

Web: My link

Subject: Willie Nelson / Eddie Vedder

A friend of mine who is a big Pearl Jam fan found this on YouTube. It's Willie and his band (including his family) talking to Eddie Vedder who called in to Willie's XM Radio show. They have a discussion about Willie covering a Pearl Jam song written by Eddie. Around the 3:00 mark Eddie mentions Duck Dunn who has just passed (this must have been recorded back in May) and the conversion get's around to Levon who had also passed around that time.


Entered at Sat Nov 10 15:30:34 CET 2012 from (173.49.232.163)

Posted by:

Joe

Location: Pa

Does anybody know where I can find the chords and or music for If I should fail


Entered at Sat Nov 10 13:52:06 CET 2012 from (92.40.254.65)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham UK

Subject: The Band on the Beeb

There's a Saturday morning talk programme on Radio 4 (Saturday Live) in which, each week, a celeb guest is asked to choose their inheritance tracks. These are two pieces of music which the interviewee identifies as one which has somehow been passed to them in their youth and another which they wish to pass on to their kids or followers. The former poet laureate, Professor Andrew Motion was on the prog this morning and chose Music From Big Pink, specifically The Weight, as the track he 'inherited' from his youth. He's always been well known for his respect for Bob Dylan (whom he spoke about) but I was impressed by his love of The Band. And delighted to wake after a very late night to 'I pulled in to Nazareth...'

and glad to hear your fine Joan...


Entered at Sat Nov 10 09:59:46 CET 2012 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Adam thanks for posting that - it is truely a hidden treasure. Would have loved to see a full shot of Levon on the guitar but seeing Richard singing and playing drums made up for that. levon kind of looked a bit like Dave Rawlings.


Entered at Sat Nov 10 02:34:00 CET 2012 from (71.184.199.161)

Posted by:

Tim

Location: Boston

Subject: Festival Express

Adam, nice find, thanks for sharing


Entered at Sat Nov 10 01:30:08 CET 2012 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Old(er) White Guys

I think there is really something correct in assigning this moniker to the GOP's primary membership. And I think there's likely loads of older white guys that post here. But there is a huge difference in attitude and kop-on. I've been listening to a lot of right-wing media since the election and their lack of understanding of what just happened is astounding. Today Rush issued a string of invectives at the Hispanics, like accusing them of coming here for the bennies only - while still claiming to be confused why Hispanics voted for Obama.

It reminds me of my sibs trying to persuade my parents that Elvis was great - they just could not get it.


Entered at Fri Nov 9 21:28:18 CET 2012 from (68.164.5.132)

Posted by:

Pat B

Bill M, big smile although Sandy is horrifying.

I don't mind saying, after Kerry's loss in 2004, I posted right here, "Barack Obama, Hurry up."


Entered at Fri Nov 9 15:07:34 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Adam: Thanks for the link. Good stuff. Should someone fill out the lineup for the fine people at Historic Films?


Entered at Fri Nov 9 13:42:56 CET 2012 from (95.193.210.118)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster (again)

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Monologue from Los Olivos

He-he, just travelled in the memory lane and found a long forgotten paper in the archives. A discount coupon (10%) to an Internet cafe in Los Olivos from mid nineties. There is a risk that it has expired... or is it only me who has expired?


Entered at Fri Nov 9 09:58:48 CET 2012 from (99.141.52.246)

Posted by:

Adam

Web: My link

There is a new, previously unseen vide of "Jemima Surrender" from Festival Express 1970 now posted courtesy of Historic Films. They recently bought old film of the tour. It's a single angle of Levon singing, in great quality! Unbelievable.


Entered at Fri Nov 9 09:55:38 CET 2012 from (95.192.22.33)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Reading

"Life is a carnival - it is in the book."


Entered at Fri Nov 9 04:29:32 CET 2012 from (50.92.94.218)

Posted by:

Kristie

Subject: Acadian Driftwood

Thank you , Peter. I really enjoyed reading that. I had a feeling that Robbie knew the sequence of events, but the song just worked better with those lyrics. He certainly wouldn't be the first musician to take historical liberties for the sake of the song. And it doesn't change my opinion of the song, I love it. It has always been one of my favorites.


Entered at Fri Nov 9 03:49:43 CET 2012 from (71.62.70.35)

Posted by:

Charlie Y

Location: Down in Old Virginny

Subject: You are Welcome, RC

I'm glad you liked that, Rockin' Chair.

I forgot to mention there's a song called "Richard Manuel" on a new album called "A Tear in the Eye is a Wound in the Heart" by Black Prairie, a group which includes members of the Decemberists.


Entered at Fri Nov 9 02:01:37 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The Lineup

Thanks for that Charlie. It worked great. What a wonderful lineup. They started out slow and sad, I expect with Levon in everyone's heart......but....as the song went along everyone got into it as you can't help doing....I'm sure Levon was pround.


Entered at Fri Nov 9 01:15:04 CET 2012 from (199.19.136.100)

Posted by:

Charlie Y

Location: Down in Old Virginny
Web: My link

Subject: "The Weight" at Americana Music Awards

I hope this link works. It's a nice version...


Entered at Thu Nov 8 23:04:13 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT and LvdB

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: What is lacking when the Tempest hits

I have spoken to some people closely related to the East Coast maelstrom scene. Aside from the damage and property loss (and of course tragic loss of life ) the ack of electricity and light, lack of transportation and ability to get around... that was all bad... but the worst was lack of toilet facilities and what you had to do to deal with nature's recurrent calls. It made me think yet again of how much we take for granted. Strength to all who have to endure this difficult time.


Entered at Thu Nov 8 22:19:19 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Robbie did get the timescale wrong on the Acadians, as I'm sure you know.


Entered at Thu Nov 8 22:16:46 CET 2012 from (50.92.94.218)

Posted by:

Kristie

Location: Nelson, BC

Subject: Acadian Driftwood

I just wrote a paper on the expulsion of the Acadians. It made me love "Acadian Driftwood" even more. Although, I now realize that the Acadians were enemies of the British before the Plains of Abraham. The battle just helped build the British peoples distrust of the Acadians.


Entered at Thu Nov 8 21:17:36 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Pat B: Good to have you back too - from a different kind of storm. I can see that big smile on your face from here.


Entered at Thu Nov 8 21:12:41 CET 2012 from (108.195.0.55)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: The Roman Empire

Joan, so glad to hear that you got your power back. I grew up on the other side of the Sound from you, and have been through a few of these storms in the past. Never saw flooding like this one though. My parents still live there, about 1/2 mile inland, and like you, were high enough in elevation to avoid any direct flooding at their house. However the two roads that lead into their area both flooded, essentially making their neighborhood an island for a couple of days.

I see on the news that there are some neighborhoods on Staten Island 1 mile and 1/2 inland that had water up to 12 feet deep. Really unbelievable.

Bob F., Thanks for the heads up on Carrie Rodriguez. I wasn't familiar with her, but like her sound. Smoother voice, but I was kind of getting a Lucinda Williams vibe from her and her band. Good stuff.


Entered at Thu Nov 8 21:09:23 CET 2012 from (68.164.5.132)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

Wednesday, December 5. Joan, great to hear you are safe.


Entered at Thu Nov 8 19:35:10 CET 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F

Location: Hudson Valley, NY
Web: My link

Joan, I'm so glad your safe. I hope yesterday"s storm wasn't to bad where you are.

Todd, I loved the Amy Helm video you posted and the 2 new songs Jan posted. If your not familiar with Carrie Rodrigues, please check out her website. Carrie started out as a duet partner with Chip Taylor and they made several wonderful Americana records together. Chip wrote Wild Thing, Angel of the Morning and Try (just a little bit harder) that Janis Joplin did an amazing version of. Carrie has her 3rd solo album of orginal songs due in January. You can download a new song on her web site for free plus you can hear a bunch of her older stuff. I think you might really like Carrie's music.


Entered at Thu Nov 8 18:42:11 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: wwriting about writing ...

sadavid: Thanks. I take it back. They probably used a ruler to prop the window open.


Entered at Thu Nov 8 18:23:11 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

If fortune telling counts as reading, “She reads the leaves …” in Caledonia Mission. That’s thin though. BUT they go on to believing in hexagrams which indicates a passing acquaintance with the i-Ching.

Record Collector mentioned the Mobile Fidelity vinyl version of Rock of Ages as a new release.


Entered at Thu Nov 8 16:55:41 CET 2012 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: sealed with a kiss me Katie

"She wrote one time, and sent her love."


Entered at Thu Nov 8 16:54:43 CET 2012 from (70.50.65.252)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Joan: A great way to start the day….and all the best during the recovery that continues for you and your family.


Entered at Thu Nov 8 16:50:49 CET 2012 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: and, of course, Ferdinand

"I got a message in the mail, Ferdinand was thrown in jail"


Entered at Thu Nov 8 16:49:32 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

The Civil Wars certainly picked an appropriate day, November 6, to release their statement. On that day in 1860 Abraham Lincoln was elected president of the United States and on that day the following year Jefferson Davis was elected president of the Confederate States of America.

Glad to hear you are safe Joan.


Entered at Thu Nov 8 16:08:25 CET 2012 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: epistle to exile

"They wrote in a letter, life is a whole lot better - so pull up your stakes, children . . ."

from "Acadian Dwiftwood"


Entered at Thu Nov 8 15:39:53 CET 2012 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: epistle to Patience

Bill M: "Wrote a letter this mornin' - put it in your hat . . ."

from "Wuben Wemus"


Entered at Thu Nov 8 15:29:19 CET 2012 from (68.171.231.82)

Posted by:

Bill M

PV's mention of "Epistle to Womans" reminded me of "Epistle To Dippy", which caused me to think of "The Letter", which made me wonder if our guys did any letter songs, or note-writing songs, or anything else touching on literacy. There's "Book Faded Brown", but I'm not sure it did more than prop open the bathroom window for a couple decades.


Entered at Thu Nov 8 13:45:48 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Word association

There you are … St Paul … Epistle to the Romans … Early Roman Kings. OK, so work out which city gets the next extract from "Tempest."


Entered at Thu Nov 8 13:08:23 CET 2012 from (65.94.136.88)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria
Web: My link

St. Paul heard the second live song from 'Tempest' last night with 'Early Roman Kings' in the set list. Perhaps this augurs well for things to come? The reviews remain positive from most critics despite the usual concerns. Some critics have noticed some 'softness' intruding . The only constant in Dylan continues to be the surprises and the unusual intermittently keeping it interesting.


Entered at Thu Nov 8 12:25:51 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: A stirring in the nether regions!

Ha ha!!

Nice one Pete. Made my chuckle muscles twitch


Entered at Thu Nov 8 10:58:02 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The 1861-1865s

They met via Christian Rock, and both were involved in writing it. They both stress they are happy with their partners and kids in every interview and that they're not a couple. I believe them. But the sexual tension portrayed in their stage act nightly, however brilliant they are as "actors" must cause some tensions outside the act. Without wishing to be crude, I know if I had to stand that close for 90 minutes, I would be retiring nightly with um, a low ache in the nether regions.


Entered at Thu Nov 8 10:41:26 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Civil Wars

Hmm, seems like they chose an apt name. What a huge disappointment as they are unbelievably good. One of those rare acts you just wouldn't hesitate to go and see time after time safe in the knowledge they would always hit the spot - terrific material and unique intuitive soaring harmonies beyond the reach of most.

And what a bitter kick in the teeth for those like PV and many others who were so looking forward to seeing them.

Anybody know any more?

Mystic Meg? Your crystal ball reveal anything else? :-0)

My guess is John Paul is the fly in the ointment. Can't possibly be anything to do with the wonderful saintly Joy who is surely incapable of anything divisive.

:-0)


Entered at Thu Nov 8 10:35:05 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: You don't know what you got till it's gone indeed

Joan, I was telling my wife about your eight day ordeal and was immediately asked to go and look on maps and find out how far we are above sea level, being only half a mile inland. But as you go along then down a steep cliff it must be 100 feet. We were talking about survival … we have wood burning stoves fortunately as back up. They say in Britain the mains gas can't ever be switched off because of the dangers when it's switched back on, but I'm not so sure! And anyway, electricity pumps the gas central heating around and switches it on and off. There were two hurricanes here in the late 1980s, though they are also "once in a century" events … well, usually.


Entered at Thu Nov 8 09:58:22 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Joan

Relieved to hear you and yours are safe. Those extra 10 feet seem priceless but Jeez, what an awful time. Keep your spirits up kiddo.


Entered at Thu Nov 8 06:44:35 CET 2012 from (50.92.94.218)

Posted by:

Kristie

Subject: Joan

Glad to hear you are well, Joan. Stay safe.


Entered at Thu Nov 8 04:50:52 CET 2012 from (125.167.29.3)

Posted by:

toko bunga surabaya

Web: My link

This post is content rich and productive. A lot of people will definitely agree that everything in your website is great. If you continue writing helpful posts on your website, there's always a much better probability that many readers will go to your internet site.


Entered at Thu Nov 8 03:55:17 CET 2012 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Joan: Yes, a relief. Thanks for the report.


Entered at Thu Nov 8 00:37:06 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Relief

I just got in the door. You made my day Joan. We have been very worried about you and your husband. So glad you are ok and your home is intact. There have been so many terrible stories to watch.

I hope you get a chance for some relief from this storm. We're pulling for you.


Entered at Wed Nov 7 23:37:19 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Joan- glad you are okay.Cold, tired, & hungry, but okay.

Tide washing your clothes after a flood- That is the height of irony. Request free and clear.See what they say.


Entered at Wed Nov 7 22:44:30 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Joan, so good to hear from you. Stay safe!


Entered at Wed Nov 7 22:30:44 CET 2012 from (74.108.32.67)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: You don't know what you've got till it's gone

Kevin J, Norm, Jeff and anyone else I'V missed, thank you all for your concern, It has been an incredible 10 days. This crazy storm Sandy was unreal.I live on the north shore of Long Island, We had about a 15 foot water surge but my house is up about 25 feet above sealevel so that was OK/ We lost our power Last Monday night 10/28 .We had no light heat., phones or internet,This lasted 8 1/2 days. It's amazing how cold it can get inside a house. We walked around in multilayers and spent a lot of time trying to warm up under covers,/We had our 2 cell phones but were only able to use the sparingly till we could locate someplace to charge them. Getting and keeping food was a problem.

It is a very strange experience to find myself living like a third world country. On the upside I avoided the last week of awful political ads on tv. Aside from time and misery and boredom, my only personal loss was my beautiful Elm tree that got wacked by a dead maple that fell. People on the South shore and NJ and Staten Island really are hurt.

Believe it or not we are in another storm. I pray my power stays on. During crises Tide detergent brings a truck to wash clothes for people.The truck is here. We are a disaster area.


Entered at Wed Nov 7 22:10:34 CET 2012 from (70.50.65.252)

Posted by:

Kevin J

First Obama and now this on the Civil Wars…………..the good news continues! Look, I called this last year…..simply put, any band that refers to themselves as “the brand” and “the franchise” as they did in interviews at the Grammys last year is not worth getting excited about......A bit severe and silly I know but it bothered me enough to write them off then….plus I could not see ever sitting through more than 10 minutes of those oh so cute covers………

Thanks Bill….....I always like these old clips.


Entered at Wed Nov 7 21:59:30 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Bill: The War of Internal Dis-Chords :-)


Entered at Wed Nov 7 21:52:10 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

David P: How will this Civil War spat come to be known to you southerners - the War of White Aggression or the War of Joyous Aggression?


Entered at Wed Nov 7 21:22:22 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Peter: Adding to the equation is the fact that Joy Williams' husband, Nate Yetton, is also the group's manager. Earlier this week they posted a photo of themselves & their infant son visiting Abbey Road Studios.


Entered at Wed Nov 7 21:00:32 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Thanks for the link, David. It kind of pisses me off. So the internal differences allowed them to fulfil dates up to Tuesday, but were too bad for them to do Wednesday? As I thought, cancellation periods set in the contract. What happened to "the show must go on." How many bands have such differences and soldier on? Virtually all of them. You know, you organize your time round a 100 mile trip to a concert some time ahead. Illness, fine. Tantrums? No, screw you.

I've been into Donald Fagen's "Sunken Condos" recently … very good, if unheralded. It reminds me that I had tickets for two Steely Dan "no-shows" in the 70s, so simply stopped buying their albums. That's what happens (thoughI relented for Donald Fagen solo).


Entered at Wed Nov 7 20:48:29 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: The Civil Wars Strike Internal Discord

For those who haven't heard, Joy Williams & John Paul White of The Civil Wars released a statement yesterday expressing regret for canceling all of their upcoming tour dates, citing that "due to internal discord and irreconcilable differences of ambition we are unable to continue as a touring entity at this time."


Entered at Wed Nov 7 20:41:11 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: GAWD DAMN!

I'm always left out Mike.......just got down in the engine room on the Rockin Chair this morning, picked up some tools to start the work I'm doing......my cell phone rings. Low and behold it's my buddie Dave Franz from Juneau, Alaska. Wantin' to talk about boats. I mentioned how I was telling you guys about Alaskans being called American...."Oh hell yeah," he says you don't do that.

Anyway Todd, I'm happy for you that some good came from this. It is encouraging to hear. This poor old ship of mine was left in poor condition. Under the main engines are nice aluminum drip trays. They were full of crap, the brass and copper lines were left in a mess.

When you open up your engine room for others to look at, it is respectful of your ship and a good feeling to have everything in the shape it should be in. To that end, I will carry on. Y'all have an enjoyable day.


Entered at Wed Nov 7 20:17:18 CET 2012 from (184.145.69.245)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Web: My link

For all the socialist liberals out there. (Not you, Norm!)


Entered at Wed Nov 7 19:47:37 CET 2012 from (108.195.0.55)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT
Web: My link

Subject: 'I Ain't Got No Home In This World Anymore'

Thanks to jan for linking to a couple of the new tracks from Amy Helm's new album which is planned for a Spring 2013 release. Really nice and I'm looking forward to hearing the rest of it.

I saw one of Amy's solo shows about a month or so ago up in New Hampshire, where she played a few of the new songs that she co-wrote with Byron Isaacs. I shot some video from that show and will upload it to YouTube once I get a chance. In the meantime, the link above is from a performance from 2012 in Newport. I wasn't at this show, but it shows her current touring band having a lot of fun. It's a real toe tapper. They're playing the Woody Guthrie song "I Ain't Got No Home In This World Anymore". It's basically the same arrangement that Bob Dylan did with The Band at the Carnegie Hall show in 1968.

As the snow begins to fall and the wind begins to blow here in the Northeast, my thoughts are with the people along the coast who have recently lost their homes and are suffering.


Entered at Wed Nov 7 19:17:08 CET 2012 from (108.195.0.55)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT-USA

Subject: Democracy in Action

I'm happy to say that the spending initiative that I was campaigning for in my local district, overwhelmingly passed last night and that we can soon begin construction on a much needed resource for our town. This referendum passed with bipartisan support, and it was great to see so many members of our community come together in support of a common goal.

On the National level it was encouraging to see such a great turnout participating in this election, and that the world at large is happy with our choice. Public service is a huge undertaking and commitment, and I applaud those who make that sacrifice in an attempt to make their world a better place.



Entered at Wed Nov 7 19:15:12 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: two Hooks dangling

Agreed kevin, We're both happy to not need to look up Genghis Cohen or Bessie Khan. Though I did hear her daughter Sylvia was a looker...

Wetsie, yes, you raise a point. The electorate was divided. along racial and age lines. Romney carried thwe white vote heavily, and the elder vote. at the same time, the Repuiblicans got to be hit over the head witht the fact that white don't make political might anymore. So, what does that mean.Do they just become better liars the next time, prevto Obama fdorm accomplishing alot, again, this time around,then lie their asses off to win the next election, then rape pillage and plunder again?it's possible.I sure hope not. i'd like to think that doesn;t happen.I guess we'll find out ]n Back to religion, and Peter's right- it;s scary as hell.i dont see why God must be brougt into everything.Even at the end of his accpetance speech,Obama mentioned hinm at least twice at the very end. God bless the USa,God bless theses united States. I knowwo he;s a bel;iever, but, it surs seems asx though any President, or anyone running for office who does not mention God in every speech , is now doomed. And will face public media flogging for it.Plain old wrong.


Entered at Wed Nov 7 18:29:03 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Kevin J: Can't recall if I posted this link already, but here goes. It's Yorkville blues band Luke and the Apostles live ca '66. Note Mike McKenna's Robbie-ish guitar solos on both songs. They really were signed to Electra, and recorded with Paul Rothchild, but only one 45 was ever released - and it wasn't these songs. They must've hit it off with the Blues Project, as organist Peter Jermyn was offered Al Kooper's spot, but he turned it down because it meant getting a green card, and getting a green card meant getting drafted - or at least that was the understandable fear. In the early '70s, Luke Gibson looked ready to sign on with the Son of Blues Project, Seatrain, but eventually passed.

I have no idea if everybody sees the same follow-on links as I do, but what I see is a lot of links to Band videos. And also one to three songs by another super-talented Yorkville band, Influence. Influence was artsy on top of a strong R&B foundation; guitarist, bassist and keyboardist had all been in Wilson Pickett's band with Buddy Miles, and two of the three subsequently joined the Buddy Miles Express and are on "Them Changes". And to keep things confusing, two of the three also did time in the Luke and the Apostles reunion band that did another '45 in '70. That was the awesome "You Make Me High".


Entered at Wed Nov 7 18:04:42 CET 2012 from (70.50.65.252)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Oh My........and to think that I was comforted in knowing that I might be spending the rest of my life in Mongolia with relatives of Jeff………On second thought…..Thank God for Ohio!!


Entered at Wed Nov 7 17:39:16 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Agreed, Jeff. Put it simply. You're in a plane in bumpy weather with lightning. You can choose the pilot. Number one believes 100% that when he dies he will be whisked to paradise and live in glory on an engraved and cushioned seat next to God. The other guy has a wife, two young kids and wants to get home.

Who would you trust your life too?


Entered at Wed Nov 7 17:30:28 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Treme

In the most recent episode ("The Promised Land") of the excellent HBO series "Treme" singer/violinist Annie's manager mentions to her that he scored two tickets to Levon Helm's Midnight Ramble. The show is in its third season, which is set in 2008. Among the legendary New Orleans music figures appearing in this episode are the Neville Brothers, Dave Bartholomew and Cosimo Matassa. Annie T & her band perform Chuck Berry's "Promised Land" and Steve Earle's "This City".


Entered at Wed Nov 7 17:29:10 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Pete, last night was the first time i ever watched election results.I watched all the way till the end. The amount of relief i felt is unmeasurable. then going on FB, and seeing some things that normal people linked to, showing Tea Party members posting of talk of revolution, taking the country back with guns, shook me up. One of the news commentators was talking about how where ever Obama goes, the streets all around his path are shut down.Not just monitored, but shut down.

all that, i still feel hopeful. there's always going to be lunatics. but the Tea Party nuts have to be face to face with the fact that their vision of the U.S. is not possible.But i watched Todd Akins losing speech last night, and he is insane.God, prayer, mentioned over and over.He accpeted his loss as god's will, said some weriously disturbed things that indicate he is out of touch.. But this God business, so many of these nuts gives it all to GOd, that the U.S.is ordained by God, mandated by God...that's it- Akin said soemthing about the U.S. 's right to life, liberty, and the poursuit of happiness is a direct mandate from God...... scary shit.

anyone besides me notice that Brian williams, the lead guy on NBC, seemed to have been very prejudiced in favor of Romney.


Entered at Wed Nov 7 17:11:36 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Polarized

With all respect to Todd in Conneticut and our American friends, to watch the divided attitude in the USA is scary sometimes.

Going from channel to channel on the US news last night you can feel the harsh attitude, and racism is very evident. The division of power between senate and congress seems impossible to overcome. Lets hope they try harder to work together. In world trade and business this affects all of us more than many realize I think.


Entered at Wed Nov 7 16:10:26 CET 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Across the great divide ...

... Just grab your hat, and take that ride ...


Entered at Wed Nov 7 11:41:24 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I recognize Bruce, but who's the guy on his right? (Sorry, the ancient O'Riley joke). I woke up at 4 a.m. by chance, switched on my iPad, read the news and went back to a much more restful sleep as a result. Dunno what it's like for the USA, but the world feels a safer place this morning.


Entered at Wed Nov 7 11:17:33 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Is there no end to Brucie's greatness?

You want another term in the White house my little right hand man?

No problem!

:-0)


Entered at Wed Nov 7 09:20:32 CET 2012 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Glad to see Obama get the nod again. Did anyone outside of the US actually like Romney?


Entered at Wed Nov 7 06:56:59 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

for fuck's sake- thank our lucky stars!


Entered at Wed Nov 7 00:07:21 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: .......For President!!!

I think they should elect Eddie Murphy for president! He can be any body....... a little Jewish guy, a big old fat lady.......he can be anybody......he understands the people....I seen him DO IT!


Entered at Tue Nov 6 21:28:32 CET 2012 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

When people say things like "America, love it or leave it", they mostly seem to mean just "the stuff I like about America" and nobody else's views really count for much. But if you really respect people, you like democracy, and if you really respect democracy, maybe the cry in the US ought to be "America, love it or work to change it". Not that leaving shouldn't be an option. n


Entered at Tue Nov 6 20:16:35 CET 2012 from (184.145.69.245)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: add brushes with greatness

I was strolling near Hollywood and Vine in the late 1990s when I was attracted to a commotion nearby. David Geffen was getting his "star" installed. Being an out-of-town hick (outta-country, too), I had no idea who he was was at the time. It was my only encounter with show-biz greatness. (Unless you count the time Sal Mineo and I got drunk together.)


Entered at Tue Nov 6 20:09:16 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Peter, Reagan was a scary mothafucka. This country is still reeling from the effects of what began during his presidency. What is sad is that one of the principles this country was founded based upon was a separation of church and state and the bible thumpers managed to steal it.


Entered at Tue Nov 6 20:06:48 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Robbie Robertson is among the interviewees featured in the documentary "Inventing David Geffen", premiering later this month on PBS as part of the American Masters series.


Entered at Tue Nov 6 19:39:07 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Towin' the line

Mother,mother ocean, I have heard you call

Wanted to sail upon your water since I was three feet tall

You've seen it all....you seen it all.

Watched the men who rode you switch from sails to steam

In your belly you hold the treasures few have ever seen

Most of 'em dream....most of 'em dream

Yes I am a pirate 200 years too late

The cannon balls thunder there's nothin' to plunder

I'm an over fourty victim of fate

Arrivin too late......arrivin to late.

I can't piss around like this Kevin. I got to go out and pick apples and peel 'em and cut 'em up. It's the only way I can ghet Susan to bake one of those pies of hers you'd kill for.....now y'all get along.....GAWD DAMN IT!


Entered at Tue Nov 6 19:23:45 CET 2012 from (70.50.65.252)

Posted by:

Kevin J

”Kevin - if you want the US to be so much like the rest of the world - why not just leave. Here is a little secret that the rest of the world wont tell ya. They don't want the US to be just like them because then when something really bad happens, they wont have us to lean on” - Carmen

Toronto is not part of the US….obvious to the rest of the world, by the way...........a suggestion for Carmen: Travel….do lots of it…with eyes, ears and heart open……and try to de-program from years of Hollywood propaganda…….There have been two World Wars, look up who came late to both and don’t be surprised that almost no one in Europe or Canada would ever expect to have the US do their ‘leaning” for them……………In Canada’s case specifically, we have a very good relationship with our neighbours to the South and when you suffered that horrific attack in September 11 years ago, we were overwhelmingly supportive of sending troops to Afghanistan – where many Canadians fought and died for years in the roughest pats of that country..............but the Chenny inspired illegal invasion of Iraq and many other such manufactured conflicts are not a joke. People die in them….and it never ends…..send the troops is the call of the Right…..as long it is not one of Chenney’s kids or Romney’s….some other kid – well ok…and we will call him a hero over and over until the next budget when funds are cut back so drastically that the Veteran’s hospitals are without paint and power……..Hey Bubba, let’s turn on Fox news, them EEEEERANIAN’S want a fight…….the anchor says so……………………..

Norm: Sing a song…………..


Entered at Tue Nov 6 19:08:42 CET 2012 from (108.195.0.55)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Rockin' In The Free World

Mike Nomad, thanks for the kind words, but this may be the first time I've ever been accused of being lucid. I do try. Just know that lurking under the surface behind my greasy smile and sneaky handshake, I'm always trying to figure out a way to get my digs in.

In all seriousness though, thank you for sending utility crews to help us out in a time of need. That's what being a good neighbor is all about and it's appreciated.
I hope that they didn't have too much trouble scaling the wall. ;-)

Norm, thanks for not gouging us on the hydro and gas, but if the value of our dollar continues to depreciate, you'll really be getting the short end of the stick. Pleasure doing business with you! Interesting tidbit about Alaskans not calling themselves Americans. I was not aware of that. Makes ya wonder if they have a similar attitude in Hawaii…..

JQ, You may be right, or not..…but that outlook only serves to reinforce my desire for a "no-party" system.

JT, Thanks for the tidbit on Dylan from his Wisconsin concert. In his recent Rolling Stone interview, he seemed to go out of his way to avoid any sort of endorsement. It seems now that he may have been waiting for the timing to be right. Speaking of Dylan, I'm starting to think that he wouldn't have earned Peter V's vote for any type of office around the time of the 'Saved' album.

We'll, I'm off now to continue campaigning at our local polling area to help secure a Yes vote on a referendum item that will raise our local property taxes in order to get a local infrastructure project completed. My understanding is that it's "shovel ready", so it's something that I can really support.


Entered at Tue Nov 6 18:55:50 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Method Acting in Atlanta

One of Schwarzenneger's co-stars, Sam Worthington of Avatar fame, was arrested here this past Saturday night. He allegedly showed up at at midtown bar & grill in an intoxicated state and the bouncer at the door refused to let him enter. They got into a scuffle, resulting in Mr. Worthington being pepper-sprayed, handcuffed & arrested for disorderly conduct. At that point Worthington announced that he was a DEA agent, which is his role in the film "Ten". the misdemeanor charges were later dropped when the complaining witness, the bouncer, failed to show up in court at the arraignment hearing.

Years ago I met another method actor, Nick Nolte, at a courthouse in Atlanta where he was "researching" for his role as a Southern attorney before filming Martin Scorsese's remake of "Cape Fear".

Other films currently being filmed in & around Atlanta include "The Hunger Games: Catching Fire" sequel and "Ride Along", featuring Ice Cube. Late last week the latter was filming scenes downtown in the Underground area, where signs were posted warning of "simulated gunfire". In addition, the AMC tv series "Walking Dead" has been filming in various locations in Georgia, which may have resulted in some confusion recently on Halloween.


Entered at Tue Nov 6 17:48:56 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Movie makers

David; You are our south pole then. Vancouver BC is known as Hollywood North. Many movies made here. However those confounded easterneres in Tranna have been under biding and brown nozing to take all the work back there resently......I guess I'm gonna have to shoot some one....come to think of it some one did just erase one of those Montreal Mafia types.


Entered at Tue Nov 6 17:39:28 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Rockin Chair: The disgraced, former governor Schwarzenegger has been here in Atlanta lately filming another stupid action movie in which he plays a DEA agent. This city, by the way, has become known as the Hollywood of the South due to all the film projects. There are currently three movies being filmed in the area. Recently old talkin' to the chair Clint Eastwood filmed his latest here, "Trouble With The Curve", with one scene filmed in the office building where I work.

Speaking of California governers, who have included Ronald Reagan and Earl Warren, the 15th governor of the Golden State was none other than former Union general George Stoneman, who had ironically been that state's railroad commissioner before serving one term as a Democrat.


Entered at Tue Nov 6 17:27:57 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

OK, in for a penny in for a pound. Why did Ronald Reagan, now considered a likeable, even loveable, old chap, scare me? It all came down to one interview. He was asked if he thought war was imminent and inevitable in Israel. He said, yes, he thought it was. The interviewer asked why, and he said “Because it tells us so in the Bible.”

That scared the shit out of me, as he had his finger on the nuclear button. I’d rather have politicians without blind faith. Belief enhances people’s lives and helps them to sleep at night, and often makes them kinder. Faith is faith, so let’s take it that it’s irrational, though some belief systems are more outrageously irrational than others. But I wouldn’t vote for anyone anywhere who believed his or her faith excluded unbelievers; or that only people of that faith had a place reserved in heaven. Hearing Tony Blair recently equally scared the shit out of me. May the Lord protect us from all those who KNOW they are correct.


Entered at Tue Nov 6 17:24:44 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

JQ- it's tempting to refer to people who call themselves Democrats but vote Republican cause they claim to be voting with their wallets, as moderate Republicans. But, iof they were moderate republicans, they'd probably be more likley to vote for Obama than for Romney and Ryan. I agree with you.


Entered at Tue Nov 6 17:10:01 CET 2012 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Republican Moderate??

Given how hard right the GOP (and Romney) has moved in the last 20+ years I don't think there's any such thing as a Republican moderate anymore.


Entered at Tue Nov 6 17:03:10 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: I am outraged!!

Todd! you may be surprised to know that, In California they pay the same for our hydro and natural gas that we do right at home. The reasoning goes back a long time where deals were cut. Some states had something to do financialy with the building of hydro dams in the Koutnees here in BC so that they are never charged more than we pay. I guess it was a good deal at the time.....but...

Many people like you recognize how Merican folks is seen by other countries. (Remember these kits they buy to be Canadian abroad, how to look and act Canadian). It's kinda crazy a place like this guest book even shows the mind set of people from different countries at times.

Something that I've for a long time got a chuckle out of. Alaskans, (having been there a lot in the last couple of years) they don't call themselves Americans up there. They get pretty surly if you refer to them as Americans. They are ALASKANS!


Entered at Tue Nov 6 16:44:28 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Web: My link

Subject: Timely Song and Album title.



Entered at Tue Nov 6 16:06:14 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

We try to avoid politics, but I think this week should be a free pass to mention it.

Foreigners like me find American politics endlessly fascinating. I’ve read much more on the USA than Britain. Going back to actually studying this stuff in the 60s, America had umbrella parties. So that in the South, the Democrats were if you like the “right wing party” while in the North they were the urban, union “left wing party.” Let’s accept that “left” in American terms would be “central” in European terms. Over the last forty years things have polarised to be more like parties elsewhere. The red / blue state map is typically American in reversing the “red” / “blue” symbolism used everywhere else. Virtually every country assumes “rural” to be more conservative, and “urban” to be more liberal. It is getting stuck pretty hard on that US map. That map appears to becoming set in stone, though tomorrow may prove me wrong


Entered at Tue Nov 6 15:42:14 CET 2012 from (184.145.69.245)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

This site is most amusing, I've discovered, when political topics are "discussed." In that respect, Mr. Viney and Todd from Conn. appear to be the most lucid. (Norm, you can check that word in the dickshunerry.) Todd may also be interested to hear that, as in the past, Ontario, Quebec and New Brunswick (Canadian provinces to the unwashed) have utility (aka "hydro") crews already in those affected states, once they managed to clear U.S. Customs, of course.


Entered at Tue Nov 6 15:05:46 CET 2012 from (174.116.242.232)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria

Subject: The answer my friend....

There may be nothing new from 'Tempest' in the concerts, but the media report that in Madison , Wisconsin, last night, during the finale "Blowin In the Wind" , our 'song and dance man' did something new: Bob Dylan is said to have stopped the song and predicted a landslide for Barak Obama this evening. (then finished the song) The implication that the polls may be wrong (they have been before and it may not be as close as they predict) and that the prediction media pundits are off base is something that rings a bell for me also. We shall see.


Entered at Tue Nov 6 15:01:43 CET 2012 from (108.195.0.55)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: All You Need Is Love

Peter, Thank you for paying off the loan from WW2. Feels good, doesn't it! Lord knows we could use the funds. We've probably already spent it all on Norm's overpriced hydro!

You got to it before me, but I was going to change my description to "excessively moderate" as a nod to Kevin's ex girlfriend. (Something tells me that Kevin has had too much fun). But for now I'll have to leave it alone.

Just for the sake of clarity, when I was talking about efficiency in Government, I wasn't suggesting that we need more signs and power lines. Obviously there is a need for well placed and managed regulation. In fact the town I live in has very strict zoning on signage, and the neighborhood that I live in has underground wires. It makes for a very bucolic setting, even if it doesn't help our predominately residential tax base very much.

Carmen, much of the world doesn't like us very much. They don't want to be like us and are actually pleased to see us struggling. There's a sense of knocking a perceived chip off of our shoulders. But don't let that get you down. Continue to donate time and money to charitable causes, do good things, and get out and vote today.

To the rest out our International friends, there's a lot of folks in the Northeastern United States, including New Jersey and New York, who are going through very tough times right now and another storm is forecast for tomorrow. Rain, snow, sleet, freezing rain, high winds and coastal flooding. If you can help out, the American Red Cross can always use donations. Thank you.


Entered at Tue Nov 6 14:56:51 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

What exactly didn't this administration do? Well, for starters it didn't invade Iraq and Afghanistan. I hope we are saying in four years time that the next administration can make a similar claim.


Entered at Tue Nov 6 14:44:37 CET 2012 from (63.88.115.195)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: PA

Subject: silly little comments

Just exactly what did this administration do that makes everyone think that without Obama the world will end? What did you get a free phone? I do not for 1 minute think that our history has been perfect, but regarding our contribution to the world - without re-writing history - I think it is clear. And Peter - I have a great deal of respect for Great Britian, but do you really think for a second that they would have survived WWII without the US? By the way, I am not for the US being the worlds police, but everyone else does when something goes wrong.


Entered at Tue Nov 6 13:23:09 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Loans and leans

In 2006 Britain paid off the final instalment of the loan from the USA that we took out in World War II, when, from 1939-41, we could indeed "lean on" the USA for money (with interest), but militarily the British Commonwealth were going it alone.


Entered at Tue Nov 6 13:01:44 CET 2012 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

I think that Americans (of the U.S. civilian variety) should live a spell overseas, in countries that host US military installations, then they'd get to view up close the "exemplary" behavour of their young warriors.

Google "Okinawa" and "military crimes" and see what you get....and spare me the " a few rotten apples..." bullshit.


Entered at Tue Nov 6 12:53:32 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Lean on Me.....when your not strong..........

This silly little comment from Carmen could open the door to huge debates. Who leans on who. The state of California is so broke that in a couple of generations they could never hope to get out of the hole. They owe us so much money for hydro, water and natural gas that if we ever got paid we would be a debt free province.

All-nold Swarsneggar, (that's pretty good spelling ain't it?) When he was governor took us to court to try to get out of paying over a billion dollars we are owed. A US Supreme court judge told him he had to pay.....I think he should have paid it out of his own bank account for all the stupid movies he made.


Entered at Tue Nov 6 12:27:20 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

You're right, Norm. Now I think about it the epitome of moderation would be an extremely moderate moderate or an excessively moderate moderate. A moderately moderate moderate would be not overly moderate … I think.


Entered at Tue Nov 6 12:11:16 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Moderation??

Does this mean yer very modern?? Peter!....yer starting to sound like yer with those Monty Python guys for sure. A moderately moderate moderate.......there's no such thing.


Entered at Tue Nov 6 11:55:30 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Carmen, I just wrote a reply to your "love it or leave it" point, but in the interests of peace and harmony, I scrapped it. I don't think you'll find the "everyone has to lean on us" philosophy even crosses the 49th Parallel, let alone gets to Europe or Australasia.


Entered at Tue Nov 6 11:21:12 CET 2012 from (76.98.218.136)

Posted by:

carmen

Location: PA

Subject: USA

Kevin - if you want the US to be so much like the rest of the world - why not just leave. Here is a little secret that the rest of the world wont tell ya. They don't want the US to be just like them because then when something really bad happens, they wont have us to lean on.


Entered at Tue Nov 6 11:13:25 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Guitar lessons.

The thickest string is E. That'll be $20. When the money is received, we'll move on to the next one.


Entered at Tue Nov 6 10:23:35 CET 2012 from (88.235.136.1)

Posted by:

gitar dersi

Location: turkey
Web: My link

Subject: online guitar lesson

Do you give guitar lessons online via skype


Entered at Tue Nov 6 09:19:30 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I don’t think Todd’s a moderate moderate. That’s too fixed. I think he’s a moderately moderate moderate.

Red tape … I’ve been assembling lots of photos of American streets and buildings and made the point “You can always tell whether it’s the USA or Europe.” You can, but even if you ignore building styles (and often they’re very similar)., American shopping streets have more advertising signs, which vary more in size and position and in quality … some being hand done, and there are constant overhead cables criss-crossing the street. I assume that’s lack of red tape. Our current bunch of Old Etonian rich boys want to de-regulate town planning further here, but having had a lot to do with town planning people (relatives and friends) I think that our “red tape” on signage and underground cabling preserves a more pleasant visual ambience. Cables underground, strictly regulated shop signage in size and position. This is true over much of Europe. Red tape is not always a bad thing.


Entered at Tue Nov 6 04:55:30 CET 2012 from (74.198.9.248)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Todd: You've made me smile describing yourself as a moderate moderate........reminding me that I once dated a women who was an excessive excessive.


Entered at Tue Nov 6 04:00:52 CET 2012 from (174.252.35.3)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: Blue State

Kevin, Everyone agreeing to raise taxes would be a start, but I fear the solution to our long-term debt is more complex. Eventually we will run out of taxpayers in this country. I can’t speak for anyone else, but between a flat economy, and high food and energy prices, I’m tapped out. Which brings me to your idea of allowing the World at large to vote in our election. Of course there would be a price tag / cost of admission, but wouldn’t that be a wonderful way of adding more taxpayers to the U.S. tax base. Imagine the revenues we could collect. And then, the votes would actually mean something, rather than simply being a popularity contest. Representation with taxation…..it could be a winner!

  I care less about who wins the U.S. Presidential election this year, than I do about restoring a sense of unity to the process of governing. The two party system seems to have been reduced to the type of emotional attachment that people assign to sports teams, where the other team is hated just because they are the other team. Reason, compromise, and a sense of a common good cannot flourish under that type of undisciplined ideology. I’m starting to think that we need to do away with party completely and have a no party system (Let’s call it the American Party), where candidates are supported based on their competence and leadership first, without being beholden to party.

  JQ, only in the GB could I be excoriated for agreeing with President Obama’s desire to not let bureaucracy get in the way of progress. Neither I, nor the President were advocating for completely unrestrained lack of regulation, and it’s silly to try tie myself (a moderate moderate) or the President (a moderate progressive) to the tea party.

  Clearly laws and regulations are necessary in a complex society such as ours, to ensure that things are done well and to avoid abuse. But when excessive red tape becomes a burden to the system operating at an efficient level, then it’s worth taking a closer look at areas where improvements can be realized. More efficiency should translate into more resources to serve all of us better. My point was that we shouldn’t wait for natural disasters to think about ways to improve the processes of helping people. People need help every day.

 


Entered at Tue Nov 6 00:16:28 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

the more social humankind became, which does indeed correlate with the population,and industrialization and technological advances, the greater the need for all sorts of red tape- laws, regulations, etc etc, etc.

On another , and related note, and one always of interest here, i've been reading some things and talking to a variety of intellectual property and entertainment attorneys recently cause I'm preparing for preparing for some projects and hope to go into this with an attorney that I feel good about working with for a long haul. (Pray for me).but, now this is not meant to be a commerntgary on songwriting, or songwriting shares, no , no no.But something i read was a cautionary warning by a respected attorney that advised bands that just the act of working together under a name was enough to make the case that unless otherwise legally agreed to, that band was a legal partnership. Of Course, it wasn't meant for one offs, or short termm relationships, but I guess if enough time and effort was involved.


Entered at Mon Nov 5 22:52:42 CET 2012 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Red tape

Todd - The current emergency aside; the red tape you decry is our best chance to control spending, protect the environment and insure a level field for all. Your POV is the same as the anti-regulation tea-baggers.

One of the more serious kop-ons the nation needs is to realize is that old saw "all politicos are the same" is strictly a myth and has been since 1980.


Entered at Mon Nov 5 22:02:09 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

You surprise me, Kevin. If asked about the UK, I would have guessed 98% Obama, 2% Romney. There will be blanket TV coverage tomorrow. The USA votes, but the result affects the world, and I'm sure that Europe is Obama territory. From a distance he seems the "bleedin' obvious" choice!


Entered at Mon Nov 5 21:51:57 CET 2012 from (70.50.65.252)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: If only the world could vote......and a phrase you won't hear Tuesday "Romney has carried Pakistan"

......see below from Globalscan/BBC:

"A new 21-nation poll for BBC World Service indicates that citizens around the world would strongly prefer to see Barack Obama re-elected as US President rather than his Republican challenger Mitt Romney.

The poll of 21,797 people, conducted by GlobeScan/PIPA between July 3 and September 3, 2012, indicates that Obama is preferred to Romney in 20 of the 21 countries polled. Overall, an average of 50 per cent would prefer to see Obama elected, compared to only 9 per cent who prefer Romney. The rest express no preference between the two.

Of all the countries polled, France is currently the most strongly pro-Obama, with 72 per cent wanting him to be re-elected and just 2 per cent preferring Romney. Australia (67%), Canada (66%), Nigeria (66%), and the UK (65%) are among the other countries with large majorities favouring Obama.

Pakistan, where 14 per cent want to see Romney elected compared to 11 per cent who prefer Obama, is the only country where the current President is not the favoured candidate—but here, three-quarters (75%) express no opinion. The countries with the largest proportions favouring Mitt Romney are Kenya (18%) and Poland (16%).

Despite Obama facing a closer race than in 2008, his support around the world has not slipped relative to four years ago."


Entered at Mon Nov 5 20:50:27 CET 2012 from (70.50.65.252)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Just for you Norm.......see above link......


Entered at Mon Nov 5 20:36:59 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Terrorized!!

Yer a mean man Kevin!


Entered at Mon Nov 5 19:14:17 CET 2012 from (70.50.65.252)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Todd………very good thoughts and observations as usual……but the answer to your question is really quite simple……two words: Grover Norquist……as long as politicians on the Right allow themselves to be bullied into signing this nonsensical no tax pledge that is enforced almost with gangster zeal that no society dating back to the Romans could ever have lived with ( as there will always be things like wars and roads that have to be paid for ) then there will be dysfunction….this is not a “both sides are wrong” situation. This is a one side is wrong case. Jeb Bush had the guts to tell that little twirp to get lost…..Romney, not surprisingly, did not. God help us all if he wins Tuesday.


Entered at Mon Nov 5 17:59:32 CET 2012 from (70.50.65.252)

Posted by:

Kevin J

dlew919: I’ve jangled enough thoughts lately so I understand………and I think I have seen that profile you mentioned on Jagger…..it really was great……..i recall it showed him going o a party and someone asked him a question that could only have been asked in this nutty celebrity obsessed red carpet world we now live in………something along the lines of “who’s your jacket by/”…..he looked dumbfounded and replied that he” couldn’t give a f*ck” as his daughter had told him to wear it so he was wearing it – simple as that.

As to joggers and Bob F……..this was really just in response to seeing a bunch of people on the news complaining that they had travelled all the way to New York and were “disappointed to not be able to run” Boo hoo…….idiots all of them………I have run much of my life and never needed police escorts and volunteers manning the side of the road to hand out water and cheer me on……..don’t you think that rather than complaining they should have just automatically offered to volunteer….it would have been much more rewarding…………………anyhow, there should only be one marathon – The Boston Marathon……for the rest of the country – run on your own……and as to left and right……I have always just assumed the people that insist on taking off their shoes, curling up on couches and just generally taking up too much space at high-end coffee shops are lefties….that is when they are not plotting travel to another city to run in a marathons and make driving hell for locals.


Entered at Mon Nov 5 16:20:33 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

The Civil Wars previously had to postpone some of their European tour dates last spring "due to a serious illness in the band's immediate family".


Entered at Mon Nov 5 15:59:28 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: In Harmony

Thank you for that Todd. Hopefully things will get back to some kind of normal soon. I beleive you are right in your assessment of news media. It always seems that it is awfully bad when it takes disasters to bring people together to work in harmony.

I've watched this election campaign with some astonishment the way they talk about "The Union" and "The Confederacy". Did we go back a hundred and fifty years or so?


Entered at Mon Nov 5 13:35:35 CET 2012 from (108.195.0.55)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Norm, we are really not as divided as it may seem. Most people I know generally go about their business, try to keep a roof over their heads and feed their families. It's just that the news media amplifies the extreme elements of both parties, as that's what makes the most noise and gets the most attention. Must be good for ratings?

Taking the aftermath of this recent storm as an example, the media were marveling over the way that President Obama and Governor Christie of New Jersey had set aside any partisan differences in order to help the residents of New Jersey begin to cope with this tragedy. In reality, both men were simply doing the jobs that they were elected to do.....which is the way that it should be, every day and all day. They work for all us regardless of party, not just extreme conservatives or extreme liberals.

Both men said that they would cut out bureaucracy and red tape to minimize any delay getting help to the people who needed it most. My only question is; why doesn't government operate like that every day of the week. It shouldn't take a devastating storm to realize that red tape never helps any one, in good times or bad. It just makes things cost more and take longer.


Entered at Mon Nov 5 09:54:33 CET 2012 from (180.183.148.49)

Posted by:

Kristian

Web: My link

I love this. When will u add more audio files


Entered at Mon Nov 5 06:08:54 CET 2012 from (74.198.9.173)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

...dig these two live from "Music for Native Americans".......a masterpiece.....listened to it today on a long drive...timeless and beautiful.

by the way.....DVD BOX and LED LIGHT want a dragon tattoo


Entered at Mon Nov 5 01:34:20 CET 2012 from (24.250.23.129)

Posted by:

lizbeth hardwick

Subject: pepote rouge

Very much enjoyed your analysis of Pepote Rouge. Never understood the song at all and of course after your analysis understand pretty definitively that there is nothing to understand, a wonderful hodge-podge as in stop making sense or I'm too high and drunk to much care or notice. Still wold like to know who pepote rouge is -- did you mention peyote? I got bogged down with Baton Rouge and kind of gave up with make-up and Indians, but you probably got to peyote also. Was there a red peyote? Was this maybe a about The Mentalist many black moons earlier?


Entered at Sun Nov 4 19:42:28 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Racist Remarks??

Turning my computer on line yesterday,(which always brings me up a news page), The headline is a remark, apparently from a black man who says, "Don't vote for Obama, it was a Republican who freed the African slaves".

Now it's being said this is the "dirtiest" federal elections in US history. So my question is this. If some one due to the terrors of nature such as this latest storm needs help, do you first ask if they are Republican or Democrat? Is it not sad that one of the biggest greatest countries on this planet with so many very intelligent people can be so devided..........all you can do is shake your head sometimes.


Entered at Sun Nov 4 03:24:08 CET 2012 from (68.171.231.82)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Teronna
Web: My link

Subject: Red Rubber Ball

Sadavid: A late-arriving thought is that "Red Rubber Ball" suffered a minor revival here in the late '70s as the first 45 by the Diodes, one of the city's high-wanking punk bands. They were the first Canuckapunks signed to a major label (Columbia), a signing that in retrospect may have had something to do with the fact that their producer, and CBS Canada's A&R guy, Bob Gallo, was a Brill Building refugee whose earlier career (see link) would have put him in contact with the originators of the song. David P: Gallo had a habit of calling Nashville super-drummer Larry Londin up to Toronto to rescue sessions, but not likely this one.


Entered at Sun Nov 4 02:10:58 CET 2012 from (68.171.231.85)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: a universal truth

Fred: No one is more aggressive than a lycra-clad, vegan, folk-loving, record-collecting cyclist on his way to a giant garage sale.


Entered at Sun Nov 4 01:08:21 CET 2012 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Peter V's lycra-clad cyclists...

I wonder if they're vegans....no one is angrier and more aggressive than a lycra-clad vegan cyclist, unless they're a folk music loving lycra-clad vegan cyclist. : )


Entered at Sat Nov 3 23:59:07 CET 2012 from (101.164.6.125)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Subject: Kevin...

I jumped thoughts. There was a phrase I thought, but didn't write, which was, going back to pop.... Whoops. There's a great doco on mick, called 'a day in the life of mick jagger' I think, in which he goes and votes. He quips he's voting for 'socialist youth, AGAIN". But we don't find out (as we shouldn't). (Actually its quite funny, when he rocks up to the voting booth, the electoral commission employee is genuinely excited as mick says 'Michael Phillip jagger’ ( like he needs to say who it is...).


Entered at Sat Nov 3 22:15:58 CET 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Civil Wars

Thank you Peter.


Entered at Sat Nov 3 21:14:51 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

My son and his wife have done the last two NYC marathons. It’s a lot of hard work preparing and working up to it. I didn’t get the jogger = left wing bit either.

Mind you, my issue is with lycra-clad loonies … aggressive cyclists pumping away like hamsters, riding on the footpath, ignoring lights. I saw an old lady hit by one in the street at full pelt. I read later she died. Last week I saw one ride full speed between schoolkids on a pedestrian crossing against a red light. They seem incredibly aggressive people … all the adrenalin. I like to see a family riding along with young kids on bikes. But the lycra-clad brigade don’t have families. I’m ashamed that Britain did so well at aggressive cycling in the Tour de france and Olympics!


Entered at Sat Nov 3 21:08:29 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: The Civil Wars

John, the link is to the Pollstar page. I've cut and pasted the relevant stuff here too. It seems I'm extremely unlucky … they're fulfilling dates to November 6th , cancelling from November 7th in Brighton where I had tickets. It's odd … if there was an emergency, they'd just cancel right away. It might be (pure guesswork) the amount of notice to cancel a show, though bands insure against cancellation. When I Googled, some Florida 2013 dates came up as cancelled too.

Folk duo The Civil Wars has canceled all upcoming 2012 dates beginning with Nov. 7 in Brighton, England, as well as a 2013 run through Australia. A message posted on the group’s Facebook page cited personal reasons for the change of plans.

“The Civil Wars have canceled the remainder of their 2012 European tour dates after concluding their show at the Camden Roundhouse in London next week on 6th Nov. The band are extremely regretful, and their reasons are personal. There is no more information at this time.”

The Civil Wars’ January schedule is also off the books. In Michigan, the Ann Arbor Folk Festival announced the group would not play the annual event, saying it had been notified that the group’s 2013 dates had been canceled. Other venues scheduled to host the duo in January have posted similar messages on their websites.


Entered at Sat Nov 3 20:51:55 CET 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Civil Wars

Saw talk on here; about Civil Wars stopping touring including 2013. I have gone to their site and googled about that topic and nothing found; regarding stopping touring. Where did that info come from?


Entered at Sat Nov 3 19:28:51 CET 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Born to Run

Kevin J, Do you really think someone running 26.2 miles is a jogger? If you can't appreciate the effort it takes to run a marathon your just not a sports fan.


Entered at Sat Nov 3 18:43:28 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Oui Oui Si Si Ja Ja Da Da

The latest Madness CD got a few "moderate" reviews, like three star, but can I recommend it? Second day of non-stop listening. Tracks to test: La Luna, My Girl 2, Leon. Check out a few 30 second bits on iTunes.


Entered at Sat Nov 3 18:41:23 CET 2012 from (166.147.88.21)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Rolling Stones and C&W

I've always thought the RS have recorded enough country songs to make a really good C&W LP -


Entered at Sat Nov 3 18:24:39 CET 2012 from (74.198.9.173)

Posted by:

Kevin J

dlew919: How did Jagger get tossed into the country music category.........anyhow no point guessing how someone may have voted as I would think it safe to say that a very high % of working musicians simply do not vote..........again, the question was - would finding out that a musician you had admired was a supporter of reprehensible political views ( the current Republican Party in the US qualifies ) affect your enjoyment of their work? For me, the answer is yes.


Entered at Sat Nov 3 17:25:38 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Vulnerable

For quite some time now, since we've had the pleasure of using Google Earth I've often looked down that Atlantic seaboard, the Florida Keys and the the coast of Louisiana and thought to myself. Those people are brave to live in such a vulnerable place.

When you look at Staten Island, Fire Island and the Jersey shore, to me (spending my life at sea and watching the horror of what water can do) it is scary and there is so many people in those areas it is ceratinly hard to try and care for so many in a disaster of this size.

We are sure lucky on our coast of British Columbia there really aren't many areas with that vulnerable of an out look on to the sea.


Entered at Sat Nov 3 15:26:12 CET 2012 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: IDs - left & right

There's always the sense of humor giveaway. The right-wing here is terrifically unfunny - think Dennis Miller & Bill O Reilly. Amongst actors it's normally the worst that rep the right-wing, eg Chuck Norris. However when it comes to talk radio the left is left out; it's totally dominated by the right - anybody know why that is?


Entered at Sat Nov 3 15:01:54 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Thanks Dlew.


Entered at Sat Nov 3 14:26:07 CET 2012 from (101.164.6.125)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: the politics of country music...

It's somewhat of a tangle... the audience is not as uniform as you might think... and ... of course the performers run in three major groups: the left - Dixie Chicks, Willie Nelson, Kris Kristoffersen (all examples); the right: Toby Keith, Roy Acuff; The neutrals (which subgroups include the apolitical (Garth Brooks, (though he came out in favour of gay marriage)to the hard to classify (Merle haggard (really a libertarian) and Johnny Cash...

they're all examples, adn of course there aer many others. I suspect Jagger votes according ot policy: I'd almost certainly bet he voted for Blair then Cameron....


Entered at Sat Nov 3 12:04:13 CET 2012 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: It Hurts Me Too

Thanks for posts on this issue. I can't see that I am any wiser now but at least I am dummy on a higher historical musicology level.


Entered at Sat Nov 3 08:29:49 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

On NYC, even those who retained power and cell phones (my son in Brooklyn) lost internet access for some time … though it's back working today. Hope that people check in when it comes back.


Entered at Sat Nov 3 08:26:23 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Oi! and

There are examples of right-wing genres of music as well as plain "right-wing musicians"… I was thinking of Oi! in Britain, a subclass of punk in the UK, with neo-nazi political sympathies, the dreaded combination of radical working class political movements with extreme right-wing ideology. It was also associated with football violence.

Then I always thought rugby players a right-wing lot, and the "Rugby Songs" series of LPs sold very well in Britain in the early 70s. I think a lot of muddy men with their arms round each other in a bath singing misogynist ditties is inevitably right wing.

Wagnerian opera, and martial music make me think "right wing". Military bands? This is guilt by association rather than intrinsic in the music.

C&W of the more lachrymose kind ( … and then I ran over my old dear dog) would make me guess that the inhabitants of a bar listening to it were more likely to vote to the right.

But in the end it's only music. Loudon Wainwright III sang "The Good Ship Venus" on the "Sea Shanties" project, it's THE classic rugby song, but I'd associate him with the left.


Entered at Sat Nov 3 06:39:03 CET 2012 from (101.164.6.125)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Jeff...

Happy Birthday! Hope it's a good one.

On another note, now I'm curious as to the artist... ;)


Entered at Sat Nov 3 05:57:15 CET 2012 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: The Boss

A cross between Casey Stengel & Jimmy Durante is my take on it. : )


Entered at Sat Nov 3 02:38:32 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

The Red Cross is accepting doantions for the victims of Hurricane Sandy.

i just saw three performances om NBC's telethon to raise money. The 2 guitarists and tyler from Aerosmith, Sting, and the last was Springsteen, with the full band. John Stewart and Brian Williams, both jersey guys, introduced him,a nd the intro alone was enough to get me teared up right now.Got to hand it to Springsteen, though there are artists whose music has moved me more alot of the time, the Boss towers above so many on opther levels. he and the band did Land of Hope and Dreams and sequed into a few lines of PEople Get REady.it was powerful, and The Boss is beleivable..It ain't bullshiot with him.....And not to be irreverent, but he is startingn to look like a charicature of a combination of Robert DeNiro, and some other people i can't think fo the names of right now.Maybe Jimmy Cagney toughness, maybe Jimmy Durante soemthing, maybe it's Casey stengel i'm thinkiong of.I don't know.But aside from the earring he was looking more and more hard ass working class and blue collar tough determined tonight than i;ve seen.



Entered at Sat Nov 3 01:59:52 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Norhwest

Subject: Trying to come to gryps

There's not a lot being said here, and probably just as well. However being humaine, and feeling for people it is difficult to watch.

At this time Anderson Cooper is on Staton Island showing us the devastation, and children lost. As I sit by my fire, warm and with a drink while supper cooks easily in our galley, you feel a pang of guilt for these poor folks. In all honesty I would, and actually have before, (at sea when we have pulled people out of cold water, I've given my dinner away).........I wish I could do it now......it's hard to watch common people suffer.


Entered at Sat Nov 3 00:02:14 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Joan lives in Port Washington. My friend Felix does as well. We usually talk a few times a week, i have not been able to reach him. Alot of people have lost their cell phone use and electric. My friends and family in the city, the 5 boroughs, mostly have their power, some of em lost it for just a couple of hours. My buddy's sister, living right where i grew up, has been without power a few days now. I grew up in Marine Park, pretty damn close to Breezy Point, where they lost over ahundred houses ina fire. I used to ride my bike over the Marine Park Bridge ( a big one) and make the right , ride around Brezzy Point, a pretty desolate strecth of beach.


Entered at Fri Nov 2 23:26:40 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Joan

Kevin; Many of us are thinking of her the same as you. I put a note on her face book page last Sunday, but as yet she has not replyed. Others have asked after her there with no reply.

Hopefully it is just a hydro problem. We'll keep a close watch.


Entered at Fri Nov 2 21:57:26 CET 2012 from (70.50.65.252)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Joan

Joan has always added a touch of grace whenever here and friends from another neighbourhood have remarked that she has been silent since Sandy…..I hadn’t known she lived on Long Island but sure hope she is ok…….Torontonians can remember the hardships of being without power for a week…….add water or the debilitating factor of something like ice and life can get difficult in a hurry.

The NYC Marathon should have been cancelled......joggers are a particular type of lefty that even I don't like


Entered at Fri Nov 2 21:20:12 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Connections

Now there y'go see.........thanks Sadavid, that'll show those Yankees 'n' y'alls.


Entered at Fri Nov 2 20:51:17 CET 2012 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: Red Rubber Ball - The Band Connections

Rockin Chair: see [My link], paragraph 4.


Entered at Fri Nov 2 20:36:06 CET 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: In yer head!!!!!!!

Y'know how it is...that ear worm thing. I was out raking leaves from....THAT GAWD DAMN MAPLE TREE!......it got stuck in my head.

You guys remember that song from '66....."Red Rubber Ball"? So I came in for a break and got it on Youtube. I remembered it from the band "Cyrkle". I didn't realize how many people had done that song, and that Paul Simon was one of the writers........annnd, supposedly it was John Lennon who came up with the name, and spelling of their band.

Well.....there you have it. That's my bit of trivia for the day. Now David Powell will some how come up with some Band connection, or Chicago Pat Brennan will.


Entered at Fri Nov 2 20:35:52 CET 2012 from (70.50.65.252)

Posted by:

Kevin J

The question though on Right or Left was does it interfere with your listening pleasure? I would have to say that it would in most cases for me…….and times change, Carter was an ineffective leader and Reagan – by today’s standards – would be seen as a flaming leftie….so far removed from the wingnuts in charge of the Republican Party of today……..Jeb Bush and Rick Perry are the types of men with spine that although I would surely still disagree with much of what they might ultimately enact, I could well see why others would support them and that would be ok. But, the line is crossed when men of no spine in Romney’s case or pure evil in the case of Dick Cheney accumulate followers of musicians that I had admired ( none by the way that I can think of….but hypothetically…)….put simply, if that did happen, I would never be able to listen to them again with complete pleasure……………….Funny aside, seeing Jack Nicklaus stand side by side in support of Romney has me now hoping Tiger does break his records….where previously I really didn’t want that to happen I think out of a memory of how much my dad liked Jack…..Oh well thank God we don’t have to listen to golfers.


Entered at Fri Nov 2 19:04:39 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: The One on the Right is on the Left

Johnny Cash with a humorous take on mixing the folk songs of our land with politics.


Entered at Fri Nov 2 18:28:06 CET 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Jesse Winchester

Thinking about Obama and playing Jesse Winchester's 'Tell Me Why You Like Roosevelt'. I remember when Jesse first came back to America he played 4 shows at The Chance in Poughkeepsie. He did that song every show with the last lines added about Jimmy Carter. It was obviously a very charged emotional moment for him and for those of us in the audience an unforgetable performance.


Entered at Fri Nov 2 18:25:08 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: You're right, I'm left, she's gone

Whether musicians are right wing or left wing? I'd hazard that the day after the Brit Awards they push at least as many Daily Telegraphs under the hotel doors as Guardians. We tend to assume that the idealism of the 60s and being anti-establishment go hand in hand with rock.

It's said Lennon claimed to have voted Conservative in 1964 (well, at 95% tax, what would most of us do?) and an aide claims he was pro-Reagan and anti-Carter. Paul McCartney has been consistently pro-labour, but George wrote "Taxman" and later funded a fringe party based on levitation as a cure for all ills. You have to wonder about Sir Mick Jagger. Particularly at the folky end, it was kind of expected to be radical. But these are all very rich guys … I don't know. I think almost anyone accepts an invitation to 10 Downing Street or The White House, regardless of where they stand in the left to right range. Blair had more rock guests, but then he probably issued more invitations.


Entered at Fri Nov 2 16:39:09 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: The Evangeline Trio

Levon performing with Sheryl Crow & Emmylou Harris in 1996.


Entered at Fri Nov 2 16:12:58 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Dlew, Calvin and i are not discussing Dion, but one of the two i mentioned is Dion.


Entered at Fri Nov 2 15:22:42 CET 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The Civil Wars

The tour cancellations are certainly cause for concern as the reasons are reportedly "personal". Ms. Williams had just recently returned to touring after a maternity leave, having given birth to a son just a few months ago.


Entered at Fri Nov 2 15:20:27 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Looks like I slept late & missed some fireworks.Dlew, were you starting trouble again....darn aussie, always starting a fight!


Entered at Fri Nov 2 15:15:23 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Al,I bet Mrs.Edge hopes that the Civil Wars return soon :-).


Entered at Fri Nov 2 14:42:54 CET 2012 from (158.39.165.137)

Posted by:

jh

Racist entry and some follow-up comments deleted.


Entered at Fri Nov 2 14:11:24 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Lake Garda

Only been there out of season and it was belting with rain. We walked or rather stumbled along the beach between showers. All I remember was the hotel was packed with elderly German tourists doing some kind of mass gymnastics in the rain.


Entered at Fri Nov 2 14:06:14 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Cancellations

Just read about that on another forum, Pete.

There was no mention last night. Could it be something to do with Joy's recent new arrival?

Gutted for those who'll now miss out, including your goodself. Just glad you had the privilege last March, Pete. People coming out of the concert last night were just agog at how good they were. I expected something special but I just never thought such perfection was possible on song after song. I've also never seen an artist appear to take such delight in each second of her performance in the way Joy does. She relishes every note and every motion that accompanies those notes. As for John paul's guitar playing. Fuck me.

:-0)


Entered at Fri Nov 2 13:49:07 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Civil Wars

Just googling … all 2013 concerts are cancelled as of two days ago … USA, Australia, New Zealand. With the ones going next week, I reckon you were VERY fortunate Al to catch them in time.


Entered at Fri Nov 2 13:47:18 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Oh Yeah, Jeff lad

There's times on certain songs when their harmonies are so astoundingly perfect, just so laden with beauty you just melt. I thought Emmylou and gram had nailed that boy/girl harmony - and, boy, they did too. And later hearing Gene Clark with Carla Olsen they occasionally matched Gram and Emmylou.

But these two. Well when Joy and john Paul somehow reach those spots of sheer heaven it kind of makes the other amazing artist couplings sound like mere mortals having a nice croon.


Entered at Fri Nov 2 13:46:18 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Bugger! Just had an e-mail from The Brighton Dome to say The Civil Wars is cancelled and will not be rescheduled.


Entered at Fri Nov 2 13:04:40 CET 2012 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: The stones I throw

Peter V: I guess you're not a fan of (most of) the "beaches" of Lake Garda then. : )


Entered at Fri Nov 2 10:36:28 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Joy (to the world?)

We have tickets for The Civil Wars next week in Brighton. Suggestions go round and round … after I mentioned The Civil Wars, David P recommended The Mastersons, who are also on tour at the moment. The Civil Wars have more charisma on stage, but both have lovely songs.

In Brighton, we'll do what all Bournemouth / Poole people do in Brighton, which is to look at the beach, with the traffic jam running alongside it, and comprised of large uncomfortable stones, and say "Do you call THAT a beach?' No wonder the Mods and Rockers were pissed off, driving down on a bank holiday to such a lousy beach. Bournemouth and Poole beaches are fine sand without traffic. I spoke in Brighton a couple of years ago and the conference was opened by the mayor, who asked where I was from. When I told him, he said "Pity about your football team" to which I replied "Pity about your beach."

For the Americans, Brighton and Bournemouth are the two largest south coast resorts, 100 miles exactly apart, and traditional rivals.

Football trivia for Al: before AFC Bournemouth's ground was rebuilt ten years ago, the nasty filthy gravel bank at one end was called the Brighton Beach End because that was what it was like.

In fact Brighton has far better record stores than Bournemouth, though on secondhand vinyl, Poole has three good ones. I've also been invited to speak in Brighton about six times in recent years to once in Bournemouth, so I can't knock the place!


Entered at Fri Nov 2 09:23:30 CET 2012 from (101.164.6.125)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Subject: Calvin, Jeff

Me too. I mean, you know, you can have any opinion you like, within some kind of reason (extremes are no good - fascism, Stalinism, etc). But I'm a friend ofhe same guy on fb... I was genuinely surprised. There are right wing artists I Ike: Brian may is apparently a conservative voter, and johnnyramones politics were incongruous to say the least. And I still love the voice and won't defriend - I just scroll past. The man has a right to hs opinion.

You also need a plurality of views. S I guess I'm saying I'm surprised, but not disappointed. What other right wingers (open ones) are there in music?


Entered at Fri Nov 2 09:17:25 CET 2012 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Web: My link

and here's something to really get your blood boiling (though I sort of agree)


Entered at Fri Nov 2 09:06:08 CET 2012 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

sad to see things getting out of hand. Though Jan's links to trolling and the thickness of glass were interesting.


Entered at Fri Nov 2 06:23:02 CET 2012 from (74.198.9.173)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

.....oh......yawn.


Entered at Fri Nov 2 01:10:41 CET 2012 from (198.179.198.1)

Posted by:

Calvin

Im with you Jeff, Ive FB "Friended" him-you and I are both long time fans of that amazing voice. But the cosntant polictical and Religous posts are getting to me as well.


Entered at Fri Nov 2 00:34:09 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: The beauty of a forum like this - rammed with true music lovers

Muchos gracias to PV.

Saw the amazing Civil wars tonight at the Phil, Pete. Indebted to your goodself for flagging them up.

Anyroad. Occasionally words fail me.

So, Wow!

Just fuckin Wow.

:-0)

Oh and I officially confirm my love for Joy.


Entered at Thu Nov 1 23:19:06 CET 2012 from (85.255.44.134)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

another fine example of trolling. yawn.


Racist entry and some follow-up comments deleted


Entered at Thu Nov 1 08:24:03 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Modern Times

The link is to a piece on the 21st century bonfire nights. I did it for the local residents magazine a few years ago.


Entered at Thu Nov 1 08:13:58 CET 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Guy Fawkes Night

Remember Remember the fifth of November

Gunpowder, treason and plot

And we did. Around early September every little local sweet shop filled a glass case with individual fireworks. The firework collection was bought one at a time over two months. No “selection boxes” except maybe one half a crown one from a kind auntie. Nowadays it’s illegal to sell them before October 15th.

These fireworks had a price range from a penny to sixpence. Most popular were bangers. That’s all they did: explode. They came in penny banger, tuppeny banger and thrupenny banger sizes, and were banned decades ago. A tuppeny banger was dangerous, and a thrupenny banger was basically a hand grenade without the shrapnel case. The instructions were “light the blue touch paper and stand clear.” But nobody did. Many were the tales of boys “playing silly buggers” throwing them around and losing a hand, eye or in the most terrifying version, a testicle or two.

The jumping jack was a zig zag arrangement of gunpowder and fuse that exploded seven or eight times while jumping around the garden in unpredicatable directions making all the women scream and hold their skirts in tight (long since banned). There were always some budding serial killers or merchant bankers perhaps, who would practice their future trade by attaching a jumping jack by string to the tail of an unfortunate cat or dog. Often this would be in a can. A boy round the corner did it to their cat. They say cats have short memories but even two years later he would come into school bleeding from fresh claw marks. The cat attacked him at unexpected moments ever afterwards.

Then there were Catherine wheels, which never spun properly, Vesuviuses, Roman candles, Emerald or Chysanthemum Fountains, rockets launched from bottles (never aim them at anyone, but they did). There were at least five rival brands and we would debate their comparative worth. Each shop sold just one brand, so we would trek to shops further away which sold a different brand. Standard, Pains, Lion, Brocks, Astra.

Firework nights were best held at one house, attended by five or six kids who would pool their collections, so the actual lighting, always one at a time, took hours. There were no parties of adults sipping mulled wine. The bonfire with the full sized guy on top was invariably damp given the season. The guy was stuffed adult clothes so life size. Paper was collected for stuffing, and you’d try to slip a couple of bangers inside. Health and safety was unknown. My dad would cheerfully encourage the flames by pouring turpentine from the bottle onto the fire, after warning us never to do anything so stupid ourselves. Turpentine had to be used with care, because part one of the bonfire feast was potatoes roasted in their jackets at the base of the fire. These would be eaten, blackened skins and all with just salt and butter, with maybe a faint note of turps adding flavour. Part two was toffee apples, which were not store bought.

Ah, well. Nostalgia isn’t what it used to be.


Entered at Thu Nov 1 06:11:50 CET 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Web: My link

Subject: New Garth interview

link


Entered at Thu Nov 1 04:16:01 CET 2012 from (68.171.231.81)

Posted by:

Bill M

Al E: Is duck apple when you get to stick your face in a basin of murky water to try getting your teeth around an apple that your dirty-faced classmates have managed just to lick and slobber on in their failed attempts to do the same? No thanks.

Peter V: My one and only Guy Fawkes event was a non-descript evening on Midsummer Common in Cambridge in '83. Lots of people around, but about as exciting as watching the little schoolhouse burn up at the end of a typical Firecracker Night back in Ontario. Tells you that tradition is everything in these things.


Entered at Thu Nov 1 03:20:30 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Spot on Pete. Bommy night - and the two months collecting for it

Best time of anyone's life. Anywhere. Ever. Great sex doesn't come remotely near. Nor the Band. Nor coming from 3 Nil down in Istanbul even.

Fact.

:-0)


Entered at Thu Nov 1 02:54:26 CET 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Serenity - slight correction

Halloween or Hallowe'en (a contraction of its original title "All Hallows' Evening"), also known as All SOULS' Eve, is a yearly holiday observed around the world on 31 October, the eve of the Western Christian feast of All Hallows. Most scholars believe that All Hallows' Eve was originally influenced by western European harvest festivals and festivals of the dead with pagan roots, particularly the Celtic Samhain. Others maintain that it originated independently of Samhain. The only true festive Halloween activity is duck apple. Fact. Everything else is pure American shite.

:-0)


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