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The Band: Live at the Academy of Music 1971

Levon Helm: Ramble at the Ryman

The Band: Three of a Kind

Robbie Robertson: How to Become Clairvoyant

Garth Hudson Presents a Canadian Celebration of The Band

Levon Helm: Electric Dirt

Garth and Maud Hudson: Live at the Wolf

Pulse

Dirt Farmer

Elliot Landy's Woodstock Vision

The Band Guestbook, January 2014


Entered at Fri Jan 31 22:06:00 CET 2014 from (96.54.178.226)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: B&RK

John: I could have easily listed 20 songs in that list. You are of course correct as usual.


Entered at Fri Jan 31 21:01:42 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Blackie

Well JT we are all armchair quarterbacks. Red Dress is still one of my absolute faves.


Entered at Fri Jan 31 19:15:05 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Blackie & The Rodeo Kings

Today's excellent Toppermost by JT is on Blackie & The Rodeo Kings. See link.


Entered at Fri Jan 31 09:43:26 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

Subject: 30th Anniversary

They have been pushing the Blu ray first in ads I've seen, which makes me think it must be clearly and obviously HD. Sinead or not Sinead is the question.


Entered at Fri Jan 31 05:12:00 CET 2014 from (99.233.208.199)

Posted by:

Mark from Toronto

Subject: 30th Anniversary Concert

If John D. is right. HD would be great. Are they including Sophie B. Hawkins?


Entered at Fri Jan 31 02:44:01 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Dylan 30th Anniversary Release

As I've stated many times, I always wanted this concert to surface on DVD. Here is an interesting explanation of why we haven't been able to see it and a different view of the concert we are going to be able to see for the first time.

There's been talk of re-releasing the show for years. "We were just able to locate the high definition footage," says a source close to the Bob Dylan camp. "It had been sitting in Japan at NHK. Japan was an early adopter in HD and they had HD cameras at the event. What you're seeing now is their cut of the show, which nobody had ever seen before. Getting the full rights was very complicated because of bankruptcies. A Sony lawyer who was a passionate music fan sorted it all out."


Entered at Thu Jan 30 14:19:33 CET 2014 from (193.60.143.13)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham UK

Subject: Thanks Frank

Thanks Frank - I've bookmarked it to record. Sky Arts has some great stuff on it.


Entered at Thu Jan 30 10:56:19 CET 2014 from (86.174.138.241)

Posted by:

Frank

Location: AINT IN IT FOR MY HEALTH
Web: My link

Subject: Ireland

For anyone in the UK maybe not aware of it..Aint In It For My Health plays on Sky Arts 1 this coming Monday evening.


Entered at Wed Jan 29 18:12:33 CET 2014 from (81.107.236.227)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham and Bournemouth

Subject: Only the lowly

But Birmingham beat Bournemouth 2-0 in December (I was there rooting for Bournemouth) which means Birmingham are now level with Liverpool. Or not.


Entered at Wed Jan 29 16:20:13 CET 2014 from (96.30.173.135)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Subject: One more waltz

Looks as if there will be a 'Last Waltz' on the rock after all. Several years ago some local musicians toyed with the idea of staging a concert tribute but it never happened. Looks like it will this April in a great venue, The Holy Heart of Mary Aud.


Entered at Wed Jan 29 11:21:50 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: 4-0

I always remember the Jasper Carrott sketch, where lowly Birmingham were playing Manchester United, and he said "At half time, Birmingham were winning 0-0". We felt that way in Bournemouth, only losing 2-0 to Liverpool last week in the cup. For us, losing 2-0 to Liverpool counts as a victory. It also means we're two goals better than Everton.


Entered at Wed Jan 29 07:51:22 CET 2014 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Al Edge

4-0 : )


Entered at Wed Jan 29 04:20:06 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Perfect beauty

Re Peter Stone Brown's retrospective regarding Pete Seeger: There are obituaries for Pete Seeger and then there is this absolutely lovely, eloquent personal retrospective for Pete Seeger. Thank you Peter.


Entered at Wed Jan 29 01:59:24 CET 2014 from (72.78.38.119)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love
Web: My link

Subject: My tribute to Pete Seeger

Wrote this very late last night after seeing the news.


Entered at Tue Jan 28 22:54:07 CET 2014 from (173.3.48.123)

Posted by:

Jeff A

Subject: Black Italians on TV tonight

Tonight, on the Conan Show. Jimmy Vivino and The Black Italians will perform Felix Cabrera's arrangement of Maggie's Farm, with Felix and Jimmy trading verses, and also, Fire On the Bayou.


Entered at Tue Jan 28 19:03:16 CET 2014 from (96.232.159.74)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Pete Seeger

Pete Seeger and the Weavers were the sound track of my very early years. I went to a summer camp in the Catskills and we were very into folk music Pete was the king of the folkies, I saw him with the Weavers and concerts for good causes. A good man working for good causes Rip Pete.


Entered at Tue Jan 28 18:06:09 CET 2014 from (108.16.206.96)

Posted by:

bob w.

Web: My link

Subject: Rest in Peace

Rest in peace, Pete Seeger. We should all be so committed to the things that are truly important. Thank you for your music and your wonderful energy.

Link to some kind words from Bruce Springsteen on the occasion of Pete Seeger's 90th birthday.


Entered at Tue Jan 28 17:38:10 CET 2014 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: RIP Pete Seeger

One of a kind.Was alot of things to alot of people.To me,he was a music maker and a darn good one at that.Those songs were important.


Entered at Tue Jan 28 17:19:35 CET 2014 from (99.247.205.63)

Posted by:

biffalo bull

Subject: midem festival cannes, france

quite possibly a modern "BAND" type band, appearing at morrison,s pub, cannes, france, feb. 3/14, called "ghost town orchestra". they are from brantford, on. and toronto, on. imho they are quite good


Entered at Tue Jan 28 16:07:13 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Inside Pete Seeger

Pete Seeger is a true American legend who transcended so many boundaries in his life and times.


Entered at Tue Jan 28 15:14:01 CET 2014 from (152.72.151.71)

Posted by:

Brendan Buitenhuis

Location: Norfolk County, Ontario

Subject: Guitarist and general rock and roll enthusiast

I live ten minutes from where Rick Danko was raised and am a huge fand of The Band and a related trivia. Great site


Entered at Tue Jan 28 12:02:55 CET 2014 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Pete Seeger

Politics, integrity, banjo playing! - As a (more or less) leftist I followed him ever since 'Pretty Boy Floyd' made me run to a shop and get me a banjo. Happy Traum was not totally innocent to that move either.


Entered at Tue Jan 28 11:51:18 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

RIP, Pete Seeger too. In spite of running jokes over many years here, I really did come to appreciate what a key figure he was. It was a fine age.


Entered at Tue Jan 28 08:35:25 CET 2014 from (94.197.120.114)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: United Kingdom

Subject: RIP PETE....

...Seeger. I didn't follow him but we all know how important he has been.


Entered at Tue Jan 28 04:38:40 CET 2014 from (72.196.147.150)

Posted by:

Calvin

I always wondered why the Kinks so fell out of favor in the UK Peter. In the midwest part of the US, where I grew up. there was a span from the late 70s to the mid 80s the Kinks could draw 15-18K for a show without much problem.

In many ways those, even though they still had Ray/Dave/Mick, it was a different band. Ray stopped singing songs about Nostalgia and a world that use to be and actually got a little political. The band did change direction.


Entered at Tue Jan 28 04:28:35 CET 2014 from (72.196.147.150)

Posted by:

Calvin

Web: My link

Todd? Im game for doing a collaborative list for the Kinks. Wouldnt mind doing a solo Ray as well. Peter or Todd, you can contact me at cvan3064 at aol.com And while Im more of an archivist than a writer a link to a couple of my books to give me "Street Cred"


Entered at Mon Jan 27 21:23:57 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Duane Allman timeline

The Doris Duke Capricorn sessions were recorded a couple of months after Duane played on Ronnie Hawkins' Muscle Shoals sessions in September 1969.


Entered at Mon Jan 27 21:11:22 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P.

Subject: Doris & Duane

Duane Allman also played on Doris Duke's "I'm a Loser" sessions recorded at Capricorn Studios in Macon in late 1969. In addition to guitarist Jesse "Pete" Carr, Duane played on at least two songs, "Ghost of Myself" and "I Can Do Without You." Pete, along with Duane, his brother Gregg, Paul Hornsby and Johnny Sandlin, who were also on the Doris Duke sessions, were members of the pre-Allman Brothers group, The Hour Glass. "Ghost of Myself" was recently included on "Skydog: The Duane Allman Retrospective" (7-disc box set).


Entered at Mon Jan 27 14:37:54 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Ron Bennington interviews musician/songwriter Ray Davies...October 30, 2013.
Ray Davies discusses....Americana: The Kinks, the Riff, the Road: The Story

Previous Robbie interview posted was from October 13, 2013.


Entered at Mon Jan 27 14:32:14 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Ron Bennington interviews singer songwriter Robbie Robertson.


Entered at Mon Jan 27 11:16:31 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: P.P. Arnold, Kevin Coyne, The Kinks

The link goes to yesterday's Toppermost on P.P. Arnold whose voice I've praised here for years. Today is a fascinating one on Kevin Coyne.

On THE KINKS … they still haven't appeared. Both Calvin and Todd put interesting lists here. Does one of you want to contact Toppermost and do a definitive one there? Or even co-operate and do a combined ten there? If so, contact the webmaster at the site. The Kinks are crying out to be done. Interestingly, their star faded (like the stars on Hollywood Boulevard) somewhat in the UK and they did better in America in later years, which is why you don't want a Toppermost from a Brit like me who'd load it full of 60s stuff.


Entered at Sun Jan 26 23:27:11 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Swamp Dogg

He was incredibly honest and upfront as well as funny. It makes me want to look up the other stuff in his "Blues and Soul Collection". Sandra Phillips is one whose LP he has reissued too.


Entered at Sun Jan 26 22:30:39 CET 2014 from (67.84.79.248)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Pete, that link was a great read. For people removed from the music business, it might serve as an eye opener. What people get to hear, is often so far removed from what people go through to get it heard, and they've no idea. It's wonderful, and amazing, that any good music gets heard. Music, itself, is on a different plane than the rest of it. After making School For Fools in 2002 it was not unusual for me to be heard saying, and i still say it, it's a miracle that a record ever gets made and released. It would just be great if more worthy music got heard, as opposed to the schlock that prevails.


Entered at Sun Jan 26 17:25:35 CET 2014 from (108.16.206.96)

Posted by:

bob w.

Web: My link

A report on high end audio technology from CBS Sunday Morning. Always a topic of interest.


Entered at Sun Jan 26 16:31:18 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Doris Duke

Picked up the new remaster of Doris Duke's 1969 "I'm A Loser" in the Swamp Dogg Soul & Blues Collection. The link takes you to the liner notes which are online as a downloadable. Great liner notes! See sample below:

SWAMP DOGG: She fired me as her manager at least once a week and called me and told me things like the venue promoter is taking over her career. I ran in to one hard-ass that shot the tires off of the station wagon, with the band in it, and gave her less money than we contracted for. He was going to show her how to make her money grow. Doris refused to come back from that North Carolina gig, so I called Nate McCall, the executioner, who I had recorded for and became friends with. I told him the story and in two days, Doris was flying to Atlanta for her next gig and the promoter was in traction in a North Carolina hospital. Doris started missing gigs so I sent Sandra Phillips on the road as Doris, because no one knew what the fuck she looked like. Thank God all black people look alike. Doris’ record broke in Missouri, Kansas, Oklahoma and St. Louis based on Sandra’s appearances.

And it is a great deep soul album too. Well worth getting.


Entered at Sun Jan 26 04:05:31 CET 2014 from (68.196.242.53)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Joe, i'm ashamed of myself...the lyric is "If the river was whiskey, and i was a diving duck...." fucking 50s,,,...how i ever typed that...gawdamn, westie's getting old, and i'm catching it........


Entered at Sun Jan 26 03:27:09 CET 2014 from (96.30.173.135)

Posted by:

joe j

Jeff, I'm mortified. I guess it's a case of 'the horses are out' and 'what's to be done'. Nevertheless, an investigation should be held and someone should be held accountable. I've got a little Bowmire in the cupboard that'll have to be sacrificed I suppose.

Been playing a lot of Coltrane lately. Some Joni. Who's that sings 'A Million and One'? Can't find anywhere.


Entered at Sat Jan 25 22:01:08 CET 2014 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Midnight Ramble Band

Seeing them tonight at Capital Theater in Portchester.That place brings back many fine 70s memories.Last time there was,I believe,early eighties-Hot Tuna,Rick,Sredni,mostly empty place-kinda sad seeing them that night.We did get great seats last minute so if anyone is interested I'm sure fine seats remain.Geez it seems darn impossible to make a living as a musician these days.


Entered at Sat Jan 25 20:13:28 CET 2014 from (68.196.242.53)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Diving Duck Blues

"If the river was whiskey, I'd be a diving duck." Read the story at the link, and know Sleepy John Estes is smiling right now.


Entered at Sat Jan 25 15:48:37 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Self indulgence in music: Bruce and Tom

"Personally, speaking overall, I can do without it. Morrello is manifestly a truly outstanding guitarist specialising in that amazing screech effect but for me his effots in that direction do tend towards a self indulgence that can divorce itself from the object of the exercise - which as ever simply has to be the song itself NOT the accompanying guitar solos. Contrast his playing with say Robbie on Kingdom Come or King Harvest where Robbie's input perfectly complements the rest of what is on offer, thereby enhancing it."

In the spirit of dialogue and discussion, Al, I cannot separate the vocal performance from the accompaniment by the musical instruments for any song. Bruce could easily be found guilty of 'self indulgence' in his vocal performances but I embrace that attitude and bask in his guilt. Same for Tom Morello.

Just as Robbie's input is as you described it, for Bruce Springsteen, subtlety is not always required. He has found a different way to present and in this sense both his and his accompanying guitar's 'self-indulgence' is always welcomed.


Entered at Sat Jan 25 14:23:51 CET 2014 from (197.210.248.52)

Posted by:

besty

Location: usa
Web: My link

Subject: Spell caster who help me to get my ex back to me

For the past 3 years now I have been looking for good Spell to bring back my love and success my business and it has been a hard time for me finding the right place until I get in contact with Dr Shiva who gave me spell that I use to bring my love and business back on track, Now I am happy with my family once again. Please if any body needs LOVE OR MONEY SPELL please contact Email: Dr Shiva at hinduspelltemple@yahoo.com as he is the best u can think of. http://loveth.bandzoogle.com/home


Entered at Sat Jan 25 14:19:20 CET 2014 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCiaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: State Artist Pension (A jealous post)

Jim Pembroke, lead singer in Wigwam known for Band covers has got State Artist Pension in Finland. He was born in London and lived between 2000 and 2002 in Bournemouth of all places. - And here comes another guy: my class mate. We geeks who went home early and did our home works believed that he would be absolutely nothing in this world. Now he has received State Pension for his achievements in progressive rock blues and jazz.


Entered at Sat Jan 25 12:39:37 CET 2014 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Various

Calvin - Hoping to make it tonight to the Leaf where she's appearing. Few logistical problems but fingers crossed.

Pete, JT and John W.

Really pleased you gave it another listen Pete. The Wall is yet another in a long list of wonderful individual demonstrations of just what an incredible product of 20th century songwriting Bruce Springsteen is, ranking alongside anybody you care to name, right back as far as you care to name.

As for the Tom Morello factor. He's clearly become a kindred spirit with Bruce, sharing a passionate craving for the need for social justice and human decency. This 'union' has never been more evident than on this album on which Bruce has at times allowed Morrello a free hand.

Personally, speaking overall, I can do without it. Morrello is manifestly a truly outstanding guitarist specialising in that amazing screech effect but for me his efforts in that direction do tend towards a self indulgence that can divorce itself from the object of the exercise - which as ever simply has to be the song itself NOT the accompanying guitar solos. Contrast his playing with say Robbie on Kingdom Come or King Harvest where Robbie's input perfectly complements the rest of what is on offer, thereby enhancing it.

That said, the track Tom Joad is another matter entirely from the other fingerprints he leaves on the album.

Disagreeing entirely with John W that the original Tom Joad was a 'dirge'. On the contrary it ranks right up with Bruce's very best work and was the centrepiece of possibly Bruce's most underrated album, an album that I think is one of those that only brings it listening rewards with repeated plays.

However, where I do agree with John is that this version really does take Tom Joad to another level. And in this context, the guitar and vocals of Tom Morrello work spectacularly.

The point being here is that the anger Bruce felt for the plight of others when he penned the song, clearly struck a nerve with Morello. And judging by his performance on the track it is a kindred rage against injustice that has remained with him.

In every single note that Morello pierces with his screeching guitar - and there are hundreds - you can sense the utter manic rage Morello feels. Likewise his singing is even more impassioned than Bruce's own.

The upshot is that the entire thing works so perfectly that for me it truly does merit the 'tour de force' I originally labelled it with.

As for the album as an entity, the adjustment to the new styles of the album's early tracks takes more than a few plays but it's starting to work on me and I now look forward to each play right through.

:-0)


Entered at Sat Jan 25 11:17:52 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Howlin' Wolf / Stephen Fearing

Over at Toppermost, today is Howlin' Wolf, and yesterday was Stephen Fearing (a great piece by JT from the GB). Howlin' Wolf is an article by Cal Taylor, and really has to be read by all blues fans. And do comment!


Entered at Fri Jan 24 21:28:20 CET 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter M: An understandable reaction, but were you able to get away with one of the standard excuses or did creativity come into play?


Entered at Fri Jan 24 19:51:14 CET 2014 from (76.124.39.182)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: by the turtle pond

Subject: Live at The Academy of Music 1971

I needed a haircut today, so I took the soundboard mixes out for a first listen in my wife's "new" 2003 Honda CRV with 6 speaker stereo. A quarter tank of gas later, no haircut. Wow!


Entered at Fri Jan 24 19:43:16 CET 2014 from (1.54.116.232)

Posted by:

john peter

Location: california
Web: My link

Subject: jbwebcam.net

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Entered at Fri Jan 24 00:08:09 CET 2014 from (79.160.47.202)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Subject: Mike Bloomfield

From RS


Entered at Thu Jan 23 18:42:18 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

A Blu-ray version of "Festival Express" is scheduled for release on Feb. 11 by Shout! Factory.


Entered at Thu Jan 23 18:33:23 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Apparently the Spector family persuaded Barney Kessell to give the young Phil guitar tuition … when Phil was fifteen.


Entered at Thu Jan 23 16:46:31 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Cause I can play this here guitar

It's often overlooked, amidst the malevolent madness and genius, that Phil Spector was a decent guitarist himself. A prime example would be his guitar solo on The Drifters recording of "On Broadway," where he was learning the ropes early in his career working with Leiber & Stoller. Link above to Mr. Spector's demo version of "Spanish Harlem."


Entered at Thu Jan 23 15:01:34 CET 2014 from (79.160.47.202)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Subject: The Midnight Ramble Band live this weekend

This Friday and Saturday, at the Capitol Theatre, Port Chester, NY: The Midnight Ramble Band!


Entered at Thu Jan 23 13:50:15 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: BEG

Thank you so much for the links to Neil's concert at Massey Hall. Now that's the Neil Young set(s) that I would want to see and hear.


Entered at Thu Jan 23 05:48:19 CET 2014 from (172.56.2.70)

Posted by:

bob w.

Jed, Joan, BEG......you are welcome. It is a wonderful recording of a very nice show. A good friend attended the night before and said it was a great night of music. Glad we can enjoy it as well.


Entered at Thu Jan 23 02:27:29 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

...and many thanks to bob w for the complete Neil Young acoustic show at NYC's Carnegie Hall. I still can't believe I didn't buy a ticket for Toronto's Massey Hall show. I have seen Neil with Crazy Horse and with CSN.....but this show would have been so intimate.....Thanks again.


Entered at Thu Jan 23 01:27:04 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Watch four songs from Neil Young's January 12 2014 Massey Hall show

"Neil Young played the first night of his 'Honor The Treaties' run of concerts to raise money for the Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation Legal Defense Fund. The show took place at Massey Hall, Toronto.
The set list was almost identical to Young's recent run of shows at New York's Carnegie Hall, with the addition of "Pocahontas".
Scroll down to watch fan footage of "Ohio", "Southern Man", "Pocahontas" and "Heart Of Gold".
The Honor The Treaties concerts will aid the native Canadians in their battle against oil companies and the government to preserve their land.

Read more at http://www.uncut.co.uk/watch-four-songs-from-neil-youngs-january-12-2014-massey-hall-show-"

Hey Joan. :-D


Entered at Thu Jan 23 00:07:42 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Of course, one issue about comparing a YouTube clip to a CD is that one is via computer speakers (even my powered Bowers & Wilkins), the other through a hifi with a decent D/A converter and speakers …


Entered at Thu Jan 23 00:05:30 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Satisfaction

I found it fascinating to hear the stereo mix, but unsatisfying in the end … I wanted to go and take my "BACK TO MONO" badge out of my Phil Spector box set.

On Phil Spector, I picked up a Barney Kessell Trio LP "Slow Burn" (a Robbie song title too, as it happens) because it was on Phil Spector International, and produced by Phil Spector. I knew Barney Kessell played on all the key Spector sessions (as well as "Pet Sounds") but I was quite surprised to see a Phil Spector produced LP … it was 1965 originally, though the Phil Spector International label in the UK was 70s. Anyway £3. Haven't put it on yet. Tomorrow!


Entered at Wed Jan 22 21:42:45 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Can't Get No Piano

Pat: The right channel in the Youtube clip sounds muffled compared to the London CD, where the acoustic guitar and piano are much more distinct.


Entered at Wed Jan 22 19:32:50 CET 2014 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

David P, that piano is indeed buried.


Entered at Wed Jan 22 19:28:11 CET 2014 from (96.232.159.74)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: BEG

BEG How do you manage to find all these treasures? Glad to see you around

Bob W Thanks for Neil. It totally amazes me what you can find in youtube

Congratulations to Sebastian. I'm looking forward to getting my copy


Entered at Wed Jan 22 19:21:36 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Rare Stones Stereo Mixes

The other day I helped a friend of mine arrange his large CD collection, which had been boxed-up in storage for several years. There were several discs that were interesting "collectors items," including a 1985 London (West German) version of the Rolling Stones "Hot Rocks 1." This version, mastered (reportedly on the sly) from analogue to digital tapes prepared by Mobile Fidelity for their early '80s Stones LP box set, featured several rare stereo mixes. These include "Play with Fire," "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction," and "Get Off Of My Cloud," previously released only in mono. Although the wide-stereo mix of "Satisfaction," is more of a curiosity item, in the right-channel one can clearly hear Brian Jones' acoustic guitar and Jack Nitzsche's piano, which are buried in the definitive mono version.


Entered at Wed Jan 22 19:14:00 CET 2014 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Thanks,Bob W.

Very excited to hear/see this.Reviews have been awesome!


Entered at Wed Jan 22 18:36:59 CET 2014 from (108.16.206.96)

Posted by:

bob w.

Web: My link

Subject: Neil Young at Carnegie Hall 1.7.14

A good quality audience recording (audio/video) of Neil Young's solo acoustic show. Thought some folks here might enjoy it.


Entered at Wed Jan 22 10:25:53 CET 2014 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

According to a computer security company (Kaspersky I believe) thirty per cent of those who read and post in internet forums are not human beings.


Entered at Wed Jan 22 08:11:57 CET 2014 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: Nerf guns and Blackjacks

I'm not sure if any of you guys have kids that still play with Nerf guns (or admit they do). My youngest bought the smallest Nerf gun the other day. Small enough to fit in the inside pocket of his "leather" jacket. I told him the story about The Hawks at Jack Ruby's club - he spent the next half hour walking around pulling out his gun and saying "oh no they wouldn't"


Entered at Wed Jan 22 02:37:10 CET 2014 from (67.84.79.58)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: DISINFECTED GAWDAMMIT!

Any GBer who has not yet been, should go get disinfected. JT is on staff and ready with the treatment, cure, and vaccine.


Entered at Wed Jan 22 00:11:24 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

My London: The lives of The Band’s RICHARD MANUEL and Guy Lombardo will be chronicled in new plays

By James Reaney, The London Free Press

"Manuel is Grainger’s first full-length play. It brings together his longtime connection with the Manuel family, his passion for music and his vocation and advocacy. Grainger, 39, is a London mental health worker with WOTCH. He supports adults who are finding their way back into the workplace. The play is told from the point of view of Manuel’s brother, Al Manuel, who has helped shape the work. Al Manuel was a teacher at Grainger’s Elmira middle school and so Grainger grew up with the story of Richard Manuel. He recalls clearly the March day in 1986 when word of Richard Manuel’s death shocked the school. Five years ago, Grainger and Al Manuel reconnected. Grainger began to write the script of Manuel after visits to Al Manuel’s home on Vancouver Island, as Al and his wife Pat would share memories and insights.

On Saturday, the play project receives support at Aeolian Hall from an old Stratford friend of Richard Manuel’s, former Janis Joplin guitarist John Till. Along with Terry Danko, brother of the Manuel’s late Bandmate Rick Danko, and Beal secondary school singer Katy Carswell, Till and his Plum Loco bandmates honour Manuel and The Band’s legacy. Off-stage, Till has been an inspiration to Grainger as the script has developed.

“It is not a musical in the classical sense where suddenly someone bursts out into song — it’s more of an intimate depiction of a man’s life,” Grainger told an Elmira-area publication in 2011 when Manuel was forming. “It has big rock ’n’ roll moments with the full band, but is a psychological profile on Richard and delves into some intimate dialogue of what was going on inside his head.”

In keeping with Richard Manuel’s own personality and creative impulses, the mood varies. “It’s not all gloom and doom. All the funny stories I heard from Al over the years, I tried to incorporate into the play,” Grainger said then.

Two years on, Manuel looks to be a year away."


Entered at Wed Jan 22 00:00:02 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Here's another sneak preview of another drawing by Adam Gustavson from Rock and Roll Highway: The Robbie Robertson Story by Sebastian Robertson.


Entered at Tue Jan 21 23:54:47 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Congrats again SEBASTIAN ROBERTSON!

October 14, 2014

ROCK AND ROLL HIGHWAY: THE ROBBIE ROBERTSON STORY [Hardcover]

SEBASTIAN ROBERTSON (Author), Adam Gustavson (Illustrator)

Hey S.M....I think you were the one who posted about the passing of Robbie's Mom?
As you know, I grew up along the same Grand River as you and Robbie.
I am sorry that you feeeeel dissed on this site. I've probably felt the same way at times and I would add to your list......discredited, disengaged, dismissed, disliked.


Entered at Tue Jan 21 20:34:08 CET 2014 from (174.118.11.165)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Movies: Experience and its impact

I read with interest the review s and comments regarding the Coen's "Inside Llewyn Davis" from the various sources. There are the film critics who either love it (best film of the year from NY Times and winner at TIFF and various other prestigious awards) to 'too sad' and inaccurate with subsequent denigration of the film.

The people who 'lived' the early 60s in the Village (performers and their wives, relatives etc) and those who visited there and knew enough don't like most of what this film depicts. They have said so in countless blogs and reviews.

The soldiers didn't like "Hurt Locker" (inaccurate). The participants didn't like "Captain Phillips". I don't like most medical TV shows even when they are amusing if they are inaccurate.

So, we get to the crux of the matter. These are fictitious presentations and perhaps they deserve to be judged on their artistic merits rather than their accuracy. Like a novel which is set in a time, there are likely inaccuracies. These films are not documentaries. They are not meant to be a representation of an absolute truth. "American Hustle" was loosely based upon the phenomenon that was called 'Abscam'. It was a very good film but was in no way accurate. If you want accuracy in film, you will not get it in most films that are out to sell lots of tickets. They may be creative, artistic, beautifully filmed with superb cinematography and acted effectively and with great music. But accurate? That is the stuff of a good documentary. We tend to confuse, I think, what the authors and directors and producers wanted to achieve. They want to entertain. If one wants to criticize "Inside Llewyn Davis" because it is a poor movie on those criteria, OK. But accuracy?...I don't think so. Just my opinion.


Entered at Tue Jan 21 20:29:05 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Eric Andersen

Eric Andersen is today's Toppermost.


Entered at Tue Jan 21 17:31:21 CET 2014 from (174.118.11.165)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: John Hammond Jr. at BobFest 1992

John D: and anyone else interested. Check this site out.

http://www.examiner.com/article/dylan-s-back-pages-attending-bob-fest-october-16-1992-part-one

See That My Grave Is Kept Clean - John Hammond Jr.


Entered at Tue Jan 21 17:26:41 CET 2014 from (174.118.11.165)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Dis site is fun

Jed: Thanks but no need. to apologize. I knew it was all in fun. I was doing the same. Keep on smiling.


Entered at Tue Jan 21 17:13:57 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: JT this one's for you.

What's the question I've asked here over and over again? Well I finally got an answer.

Columbia Records and Legacy Recording, the catalog division of Sony Music Entertainment, will release Bob Dylan - The 30th Anniversary Concert Celebration - Deluxe Edition in three configurations (2CD, 2DVD, Blu-ray Disc) on Tuesday, March 4, 2014. AT LAST!


Entered at Tue Jan 21 16:57:27 CET 2014 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: JT

No intent on my part to evoke bad feelings.I was,I thought ,merely playing around.My apologies.


Entered at Tue Jan 21 16:47:36 CET 2014 from (174.118.11.165)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: 'Dis' not.

No need to 'dis' the GB site. We all have appropriately 'thick' skins and we are reminded to be civil to one another. This is always a good policy. The music- front and centre. Keep on writing.


Entered at Tue Jan 21 14:57:43 CET 2014 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: So,are GB'ers Despondent?

No need to be.


Entered at Tue Jan 21 04:28:09 CET 2014 from (70.26.153.213)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

S.M., with respect, you forgot "disregarded."


Entered at Tue Jan 21 01:10:44 CET 2014 from (216.121.189.31)

Posted by:

S.M.

Subject: Jed: Where are all the GB people

Disrespected, disappointed, disapproved, disallowed, and eventually discouraged and disappeared


Entered at Mon Jan 20 18:27:51 CET 2014 from (70.26.153.213)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: Doug Paisley

Yes, thnx for the vid link, Angie. Also, always great to hear O'Hara, albeit briefly.


Entered at Mon Jan 20 15:39:45 CET 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

BEG: Thanks for the Paisley clip. It's well worth watching just to see the shots / footage of Garth Hudson in the studio, including at the piano.

Mary Margaret O'Hara fans are advised to follow the embedded link to her long interview with Jian Ghomeshi. When she talks about "Miss America", she's clearly taking aim at Joe Boyd, who claims to had a lot to do with the album in his memoirs published a couple of years ago - something about "bicycles".


Entered at Mon Jan 20 13:25:58 CET 2014 from (208.120.36.230)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC
Web: My link

Subject: Garth and Maud

That's quite cool that Garth and Maud will be at the Kate Wolf Festival. Kate Wolf is a California folk singer-songwriter who sadly passed away in 1986, but there's an annual CA festival of her music and it always sounds like a great time, with an often astonishing array of performers. I love her songs and voice, and was surprised to see that the 2000 'Weaver of Visions' anthology that got me started on her music is now out of print and offered for crazy money on Amazon... link is to a different compilation... try the starred sound samples. Of note is a song called Across the Great Divide, which apparently had its title (but nothing else) inspired by the Band song of the same name, and a number of wistful, rootsy folk songs that fans of the Band would almost certainly enjoy ("Telluride", "Carolina Pines" and others).


Entered at Mon Jan 20 08:50:13 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

I have done three of those this week, Jeff, but no wakes or funerals. Fortunately our latest advertiser will enable me to get a new main spring for my computer. The old spring was losing its twang a bit.


Entered at Mon Jan 20 05:56:51 CET 2014 from (76.124.39.182)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: with the turtles

Subject: thanks, BEG

One of the most beautiful things I've ever witnessed was the look on Levon's face as Amy first sang All La Glory at a Ramble. It was written about her when she was first arrived on this planet. When she sang it as a new mom, it was so appropriate and lovely. Thanks, luv.


Entered at Mon Jan 20 05:04:17 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Doug Paisley featuring the Band’s GARTH HUDSON – Strong Feelings (January 21, 2014)

Doug Paisley writes with a subtle beauty, with a steel-toed determination, with a twilit ache. Context, however, is everything in music. Otherwise, they wouldn’t be songs; they’d be poetry. The Band’s Garth Hudson provides that context, once again, on Strong Feelings.

This forthcoming album’s unquestioned centerpiece is the ruminative “What’s Up Is Down” — a song that explores, without artiface or cutesy feints, the feeling of falling ass over teakettle for someone. There’s as much fear as exhilaration in that tumbling, weightless trip, and Paisley (with a vocal assist from the always mysterious Mary Margaret O’Hara) goes a long way toward capturing that with the lyric. But Hudson, playing a CD 318 piano once owned by Glenn Gould, does the rest — balancing the proceedings with a carefully drawn, almost crystalline hopefulness.

Elsewhere on Strong Feelings, due January 21, 2014 on No Quarter Records, Paisley sings with a similar fortitude (and a voice that’s been favorably compared to AM Gold) about an unbending, if devastatingly lovelorn chase for lost passion (“Radio Girl”), a quiet and desperate wait for his luck to change (“Old Times”) and the gospel-tinged realization of our shared fate, with an absolutely otherworldly contribution from Hudson (“Growing Souls”).

All of them possess this Canadian singer-songwriter’s by-now-expected done-live nerviness, but with a slightly more conceptualized feel than 2010′s Constant Companion, which also featured Hudson.

This one feels more thought out, with emotions — and arrangements — that are more completely sorted through. It comes as no surprise, for instance, to learn that “To and Fro,” a gutsy rumination on life’s circular challenges, has been banging around in Paisley’s head for seven or eight years.

Then there’s “Song My Love Can Sing,” a gruff examination of a once-troubled, now-departed love, that finds Hudson adding just the right amount of melancholy introspection — shading the verses with dark colors, and then adding a series of heart-squeezing flourishes through the song’s middle. He remains, as he always was with the Band, Paisley’s secret weapon.


Entered at Mon Jan 20 04:58:59 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Hey Jed...Thanks for your response.
The post was also for Peter M as he also attends a lot of shows.

Heads Up for June....

19th Annual Kate Wolf Music Festival
June 27-28-29, 2014
Beautiful Black Oak Ranch
Laytonville, CA
GARTH HUDSON featuring MAUD HUDSON

Amy Helm, Los Lobos, Joan Baez and others also will be there.


Entered at Mon Jan 20 03:57:11 CET 2014 from (68.199.208.62)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Jed

At doctor's appointments, wakes, funerals, physical therapy, or changing grandkid's diapers.


Entered at Mon Jan 20 02:57:08 CET 2014 from (12.238.61.12)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Where are all the GB people?


Entered at Sat Jan 18 22:34:43 CET 2014 from (12.238.61.12)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: BEG-Amy

Seeing Amy with a few people in the Lake when she started until today it is a real joy to see how her singing and playing have progressed.The clip you posted is quite nice although my favorite Amy moment was hearing her and Teresa sing Silent Night.A stunning version made particularly beautiful watching Levon sitting behind the drums,eyes closed,head swaying and kvelling as he listened to his daughter knock that holiday favorite right outta the park! And,all that love for that seasonal rendition from me,a nice Jewish boy.!


Entered at Sat Jan 18 20:21:34 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John d

Subject: Cohn Bros.

Just came from the new movie. Very well acted. Very, very depressing. Not even T Bone's music perked me up till I heard Bob at the very end. The central figure in the film.........poor bastard. Not really anybody in his corner. Justin Timberlake continues to pleasantly surprise me with his acting.


Entered at Sat Jan 18 17:55:35 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Canadian recipe

From my experience, dogs will eat just about anything. The taste test may not help in your decision, my northern friend.


Entered at Sat Jan 18 17:29:08 CET 2014 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Tony Garnier, Thousand Islands

If someone would ask: If you could change trousers - a Finnish proverb - with a famous musician for one day, who would that be? As a schoolboy band bass player I would answer...TONY GARNIER! - Thanks JT, but I'll try it on my dog first.


Entered at Sat Jan 18 16:43:32 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Oooops! I forgot to mention that the bidding for Robbie's guitar and book closed last month. ;-D

Jed...I've only seen Amy Helm once with Levon and the Barn Burners. I saw her at the Silver Dollar in Toronto. You could feeeel the hot buzzzz throughout the room that night. Levon received a standing ovation as he entered the room. Amy's rendition of Wang Dang Doodle will always stay with me. Apparently JD and Bill Avis were there too, but I hadn't met either.....yet....and I think the Canadian lawyer who used to post here as well.
When I met Amy in NJ at an outdoor concert with Ollabelle via of Crabgrass.....I was hoping she'd perform it again but......of course song didn't fit in with Ollabelle's music...I say bring it on!!! :-D
She was very sweet to everyone she met....including children.

Here is Amy with Levon and Donald Fagen performing All La Glory.


Entered at Sat Jan 18 16:17:05 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

"Sweet Relief has a new item up on Charitybuzz. Please bid and help us raise money to assist career musicians facing illness, disability, or age-related problems.

Own this American made American Special Stratocaster signed by The Band’s Robbie Robertson plus receive a signed Legends, Icons, & Rebels book."


Entered at Sat Jan 18 16:06:22 CET 2014 from (174.89.36.94)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Another photo by Chris Bradford to add to this site. The other photos here are already included on the Band site.
"Richard Manuel of The Band, Frost Amphitheater, Stanford, July, 1976. One of my very favorite concerts. This was the first time I'd seen them live, and I had a pit pass to boot. Great songwriting and playing."


Entered at Sat Jan 18 15:58:24 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Dylan 8 Track and Reel-to-Reel

Peter: If I go to that store next time I'm in the UK and if i get to your town, I'll certainly seek out Dylan on 8-Track. But then I have a 'collector problem'. And R-to-R .... no question.


Entered at Sat Jan 18 15:36:04 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: "What is this S**t-NOT": With respect, a dissenting voice

With trepidation, I write to admit that I (unlike others who I respect here) am a Tom Morello fan and feel that RAGE AGAINST THE MACHINE is a superb band made so in large part by his unusual guitar methods I think Bruce Springsteen saw what a new face on his music could deliver. It certainly brings many of these songs to life. Some of the material is great while some of it is only good But, like Dylan, good Springsteen is equivalent to great 'other' in most cases.

The reviews are either favourable to Morello or castigate the guitar and/or the songs as somewhat weaker in some cases than what the reviewers are used to. Of course, all albums can't be Born in the USA or Blonde on Blonde.

Some of the criticism conjures up another time when folkies asked why Dylan sold out, why Dylan did covers, etc. I think we are going to have to settle into the notion that even hexagenerians and sepatgenerians are capable of changing their approach and creating something new or different. We should continue to welcome the new variations. It is to Bruce's favour that he takes chances. Good on him! I like 'High Hopes" and I think the verdict in the next few weeks or months will evolve.


Entered at Sat Jan 18 15:28:02 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: 8-track

There's a second hand record shop in the UK with a pile of 8 tracks in the corner. i was looking at them and the guy said he had 2000 more out the back that he'd bought in bulk. The problem is that 8-track arrived later in the UK, and never got any market share before compact cassette arrived and wiped it out. I only knew one person who had a car 8-track. Plus they will have printed through etc. I suspect he might have the 2000 for a long time.


Entered at Sat Jan 18 14:46:08 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Thousand Islands Dressing

Northwestcoaster: You forgot the Thousands Islands Dressing in the mix. And where was the 8-Track player and Dylan on 8-track and reel-to-reel. I've got some of that as well as almost all the C-cassettes by Dylan.


Entered at Sat Jan 18 13:32:01 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: American Hustle

“Inside Llewyn Davis” is still a week away here. We saw American Hustle last night (review at the link where I also chat about other Oscar hopefuls in comparison). I’m critical of the film, but I was going to order the OST last night. I changed my mind and drove to HMV and bought it at 9 a.m. this morning. A great evocative soundtrack, but I had to have the new version of White Rabbit immediately. (And I know I could have downloaded it).


Entered at Sat Jan 18 13:18:55 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Wall

Thanks, Al. Just pulled it back out and listened. Worth it if only for that sublime horn at the end. No, you've rescued the album for me. The Wall leads right into the track that got me first time, Dream on Baby. (Still can't stand Tom Morello).

I remember staring at the wall in Washington DC myself, and thinking how lucky our British generation were. I stood there a long time thinking how these were all my contemporaries. I knew none of them but felt a tear welling up. I don't often thank Harold Wilson, but reading those names, I thanked him in my heart for resisting all that intense pressure and keeping us out of it.

At the time, we all thought Wilson was a bastard for declining to interfere in the Nigeria / Biafra conflict which was a slaughterhouse. I felt we should be intervening, but Wilson was absolutely right: it was another Vietnam waiting to happen. It would have been our Vietnam. So, thanks Harold. RIP. We're here. A lot of us wouldn't have been.

On Robert McNamara, my political studies tutor was American. McNamara was doing the graduation ceremony at the US university he'd been at, and the students wore black armbands for Vietnam. I think it was McNamara's daughter, certainly a relative, who came up in a black arm band. McNamara went apeshit and physically attacked my politics tutor and was captured on camera. He had the newspaper cutting framed in his office.


Entered at Sat Jan 18 13:16:07 CET 2014 from (92.18.203.109)

Posted by:

solomon

Subject: INSIDE LLEWYN DAVIS

I thought it was an average film with a decent soundtrack. I will watch the new Scorsese film next week to see if it has been overrated by the critics like the Coen's latest.


Entered at Sat Jan 18 12:08:10 CET 2014 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: C-cassettes

CD-man, consider yourself as a youngster. I just listened to a C-cassette purchased in China Town in London in 1987. I cooked a Chinese dish and mixed soya sauce with Canadian maple syrup. Don't tell Canadians!


Entered at Sat Jan 18 11:47:03 CET 2014 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Further reflections on Springsteen's latest album

The live ‘Youngstown’ treatment of ‘The Ghost of Tom Joad’ may be the album’s tour de force but the bitter laced poignancy of ‘The Wall’s’ haunting ‘Fields of Barley’ refrain runs it close. Like so many of Bruce’s gems ‘The Wall’ was written and seemingly put to one side for a later day. Which now has arrived.

I've gathered together some background to the song. I believe it's a song worthy of it.

Bruce wrote it after prompting from his great friend Joe Grushecky. He’s played it live four times: twice in 2003 at the special benefit of Double Take Magazine in Somerville and twice during the Devils & Dust tour some years back.

'The Wall' in question may be familiar to many of our American cousins. It refers to the long black wall memorial for Vietnam veterans in Washington DC engraved with the names of soldiers who died in the Vietnam war or went missing in action.

As those who follow Bruce's music know only too well, the Vietnam War is a recurring theme in Springsteen's music. There are many songs that directly or indirectly refer to the war in which Bruce himself could have been involved had he not failed his own medical.

Springsteen knew personally two musicians who were sent to Vietnam and died there: Bart Haynes, the drummer of The Castiles, a Freehold, New Jersey group in which Bruce himself played , and Walter Cichon, the lead singer of The Motifs, a popular band in Freehold in 1965. The impression the war and the deaths of his friends had upon him has been deep and lasting. ‘The Wall’ is yet a further legacy of that.

In the liner notes Bruce writes about Cichon: "Walter was one of the great early Jersey Shore rockers, who along with his brother Ray (one of my early guitar mentors) led the Motifs. The Motifs were a local rock band who were always a head above everybody else. Raw, sexy and rebellious, they were the heroes you aspired to be. But these were heroes you could touch, speak to, and go to with your musical inquiries. Cool, but always accessible, they were an inspiration to me, and many young working musicians in 1960's central New Jersey. Though my character in 'The Wall' is a Marine, Walter was actually in the Army, A Company, 3rd Battalion, 8th Infantry. He was the first person I ever stood in the presence of who was filled with the mystique of the true rock star. Walter went missing in action in Vietnam in March 1968. He still performs somewhat regularly in my mind, the way he stood, dressed, held the tambourine, the casual cool, the freeness. The man who by his attitude, his walk said "you can defy all this, all of what's here, all of what you’ve been taught, taught to fear, to love and you'll still be alright." His was a terrible loss to us, his loved ones and the local music scene. I still miss him."

Cichon was 22 when he died in Vietnam. Bart Haynes, the drummer from Springsteen's second band The Castiles, was 19 years

In December 1997 Bruce and Patti Scialfa visited the Vietnam Memorial in Washington. Bruce was invited that evening to attend the Kennedy Center Honors gala diner, where Bob Dylan was being honored. Standing in front of the wall, Bruce and Patti looked up the names of Chicon and Haynes.

Later that evening, they sat at dinner together with Robert McNamara, the man who became Secretary of Defense during the Vietnam war and who had been a primary force in keeping the war going, even when most American people were against it. It was only in the mid nineties that McNamara had expressed his regret for the terrible consequences of that policy, admitting his judgement had been wrong at that time.

In the lyrics of the song, the main character is standing in front of the wall and begins to talk to a deceased friend that lost his life in Vietnam:

Cigarettes and a bottle of beer, this poem that I wrote for you
This black stone and these hard tears are all I got left now of you
I remember you in your Marine uniform laughing, laughing at your ship out party
I read Robert McNamara says he's sorry

Your high boots and strap t-shirt, ah, Billy you looked so bad
Yeah you and your rock and roll band, you were the best thing this shit town ever had
Now the men that put you here eat with their families in rich dining halls
And apology and forgiveness got no place here at all, here at the wall

Well I'm sorry I missed you last year, I couldn't find no one to drive me
If your eyes could cut through that black stone, tell me would they recognize me
For the living time it must be served as the day goes on

Cigarettes and a bottle of beer, skin on black stone
On the ground dog tags and wreaths of flowers, with the ribbons red as the blood
Red as the blood you spilled in the Central Highlands mud
Limousines rush down Pennsylvania Avenue, rustling the leaves as they fall

The music is subdued, Bruce plays on an acoustic guitar and later during the song, piano is added. Other instruments come later : an organ solo, accordion appears in the last verse and at the end, a beautiful trumpet solo plays over a snare drum. It is a beautiful and moving addition to Bruce Springsteen’s canon.


Entered at Sat Jan 18 01:12:53 CET 2014 from (98.28.188.82)

Posted by:

Abby


Entered at Sat Jan 18 00:46:23 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Bowers & Wilkins got great reviews a couple of years back for powered speakers for a Mac. I'm delighted with mine, though no doubt there's a New Kit On The Block, as there always is. I hadn't made the B&W connection either, though I have a 10-12 year old B&W set up in another room.


Entered at Fri Jan 17 20:57:01 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: JT

Feeling a little foolish here. I said I was not familiar with Bowers & Wilkins. Just talking to my buddy at Brentview Electronics. He said, "John. You certainly remember B&W speakers." DOH! They now use the full name; but you already know that.


Entered at Fri Jan 17 19:43:57 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: JT & Bowers & Wilkins

Jerry I just went on to their site. You and Peter are on to a manufacturer that I wasn't really familiar with. Which model of earphone do you use Jerry? I see they have a few to choose from.


Entered at Fri Jan 17 19:38:45 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: BEG

Thanks so much for the link to Larry and David.


Entered at Fri Jan 17 17:43:37 CET 2014 from (174.91.164.113)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

David Bromberg and Larry Campbell - Sunday Breakfast
11.18.13

"David Bromberg and Larry Campbell have had a mutual admiration society for many years. It got renewed when Larry produced a session with David and Levon Helm for David's last album, Use Me, prompting David to ask Larry to produce his new CD, Only Slightly Mad. I was able to entice these two masters of multiple string instruments to join me in Studio A together.
They shared memories of Levon, stories about Dylan, and insights into the art of the sideman — plus they treated us to three exquisite live performances."


Entered at Fri Jan 17 17:40:11 CET 2014 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Tony Garnier is a cool guy and it would be fascinating to hear his perspective on working with Dylan for such a long time. I'm sure he would have many positive things to say about Dylan as a musician, and rightly so IMO. With that said, I think there's enough circumstantial evidence to suggest that over the years he's been there, Tony has likely seen other musicians he has enjoyed working with forced out for no apparent reason.


Entered at Fri Jan 17 17:08:18 CET 2014 from (67.87.216.89)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

People have different personalities. Some people can take a job, consider it a job, and nothing more. We don't know Garnier's rleationship to dylan, but maybe, for some reason, Dylan treats him dfferently than others.Isn't Recelli still with Dylan, which would be quite a long time for a drummer...

Dylan might be a total prick to his musical employees, might be a total headcase, despite the few stories that leak into circles, we don't know, i don't care... After he dies, will people start to talk more? i'd think so. I hope it is not for a long time, and we are all old enough that we are semi blind, can't read it, and reasonably deaf, can't hear it.


Entered at Fri Jan 17 16:42:14 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: hard copy and info

Peter V: I agree about having the info and the hard copy and when I want to know (and I often do), I buy the hard copy. Of course, you can get all that information on line, but it is a chore. The cd library will stay The question now relates to how I buy my music in the future. I'm sure I'll still get cds as long as they are released but I have been buying vinyl increasingly in addition. Will I replace the purchase of all cds? I don't think so.


Entered at Fri Jan 17 16:13:27 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Oh, and Bower & Wilkins speakers connected to the Mac too …


Entered at Fri Jan 17 16:11:36 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: hi-fi stuff

Yes, iTunes takes over a lot. I still have a CD drive and put CDs in the computer in preference. I also like to have the object, sleeve notes, musician and writer credits. My son has an external CD drive on a near Mac. I have a NAD D/A converter taking a cheapish Sony deck (but a proper one, not a USB one) into the computer. It's not a great one because it mainly plays 45s and actually really good decks have tone arms that track too light for 45s. But my preference is to put vinyl onto a CDR-Audio from a much better Goldring turntable with an old Philips CD Recorder, mainly because the NAD software for vinyl direct to computer is awful and clunky to use.

I only use Apple Lossless, never MP3s. In the car I have an iPod with a dedicated connection, but I've tried it and the built in CD player is better quality immediately … I've switched between the two and even people with cloth ears can hear the difference even though the iTunes are Apple Lossless.

But I'm still buying vinyl … today Chuck Berry "You Never Can Tell" LP, an original 1960 "A Date With Elvis" (a mere £6 too) and "Everybody's Rockin' With The Champs" (also £6).


Entered at Fri Jan 17 16:08:48 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Bass

Jon: I wonder if Tony Garnier would agree?


Entered at Fri Jan 17 15:50:49 CET 2014 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

JT, if a musician joins up with Dylan's tour hoping for "communication and warmth" from him, "a few weeks" might be the perfect length of time to stay. :)


Entered at Fri Jan 17 15:44:23 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Colin Linden on Dylan

Just as an aside regarding the few weeks that Colin Linden played in Dylan's band this summer as he toured(written as part of a review of BARK: South released Jan 14): Colin was very positive about things like communication and warmth in the interactions he had with Dylan. This is not what the press has usually written about Dylan and his interactions with his musicians. You've heard me rant about press, media and journalist inaccuracy and repetition of untruths as a pet peeve. I was happy to read about Linden's positivity and wonder if this is not the rule rather than the exception.


Entered at Fri Jan 17 14:48:37 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: I Phone and I Pod music

I forgot. I have a lot of music on my I Phone and when I walk the treadmill I listen to my I Phone through the B&W earphones. The iPod is still around but the phone is more convenient now.


Entered at Fri Jan 17 14:43:52 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Rega turntable

Peter V and John D: (and anyone else who is interested) I have been listening to most of my music exclusively on my computer by putting it through Apple TV and our sound systems, both in Toronto and in Victoria. It is an ideal way to listen to music and is much superior to the sound obtained from the average built in MacPro computer speakers. When flying, I have Bowes and Wilkins earphones which I use with my computer. The sound is very good through these. I find the cd rom connection to my computer useful to transfer my cds when I choose to to i Tunes. My previous Mac Pro has a cd/dvd player in it. We bought an external one for the new Mac. Sometimes I will just Airdrop music from one computer to the next. Its all very easy

As for turntables, my sisters bought a turntable/cd player for me a number of years ago for my birthday. This converts vinyl to cd. I found myself listening to the vinyl at a time before the vinyl renaissance began. This was in Toronto. Then Lucretia bought me a Rega (UK) high end turntable this year for a holiday present. It arrives in Victoria in the next 2 weeks and with it I have received as presents and repurchased a number of vinyl records. The problem will be keeping them in pristine condition. I always had problems with that but 'I was so much older then, I'm younger than that now'. As for cds, they are stored but available to provide a source of music (to be transferred to the computer rather than played on the cd players still available) when I have an interest in listening to something again that I have had since the mid 1980s. That happens at times.


Entered at Fri Jan 17 13:54:51 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Peter V & vinyl.

I'm with you on that Peter.


Entered at Fri Jan 17 13:53:04 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: John W & CD's

Interesting comment John. I had a quick rebuttal for you and then I thought about it and your mostly right. I rarely listen to CD's anymore . However I do use them as source material. I posted the other day that I was looking at buying a new Mac. The salesman was almost gushing over the fact that Macs no longer have a CD/DVD drive. He said, "who burns CD's or DVD's; or watches movies; on their computer anymore." I looked at him and said, "I do."

The fact is I use CD's to rip them to iTunes. He asked me why I didn't use iTunes as my source. I said, "well, I have over 100 gigabytes of iTunes. He just kind of looked at me. My wife still uses her CD player in her car. I'm told the CD will be gone in under 5 years? To conclude, I listen to 99.9 percent of my music; on my iPod; or computer.


Entered at Fri Jan 17 13:47:49 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Indeed, John W. It's all back to vinyl now …!


Entered at Fri Jan 17 08:17:04 CET 2014 from (74.101.59.125)

Posted by:

John W.

CD's? Showing my age. Who listens to those anymore.


Entered at Fri Jan 17 08:13:15 CET 2014 from (74.101.59.125)

Posted by:

John W.

I thought the rocking, electric "Tom Joad" with Morello was an improvement over the original dirge-like acoustic Bruce solo. Though I have not listened to the new album yet, nor "Foreverly", despite having these CD's for about a week now. Will have to listen and give my opinions. JEB - That was one GREAT post. I was more in the City than the Catskills at that time, but you really captured the way it felt in the '80's. Thanks for that.


Entered at Fri Jan 17 04:49:33 CET 2014 from (24.252.156.96)

Posted by:

Calvin

Hey Al, did you get to see Lindi Ortega yet?


Entered at Thu Jan 16 23:27:35 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

By which I meant Born in the USA


Entered at Thu Jan 16 23:01:13 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Boss

I think it's the guitarist, Al. I don't like "THe Ghost of Tom Joad" with Tom Morello too. I do like the closer, Dream Baby Dream. It's the tracks with Morello's cliche-ridden guitar all over them that bore me.

I'm sure you know that if you get the £12.99 one in HMV instead of the £9.99 one you get the "Born to Run: London 2013" DVD packaged in.


Entered at Thu Jan 16 22:12:10 CET 2014 from (96.54.178.226)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: The Boss/Fallon performance

Al Edge and other Boss fans: The performance regarding the governor and traffic a la 'Born To Run' was a big deal on this side of pond. There has been a lot of USA TV coverage of this 'traffic thing'in New Jersey. Fallon is a master of mimicry and he did Springsteen really well. Lyrics were humorous. And then the duet! It was genuinely funny. Check it out on line.


Entered at Thu Jan 16 16:31:33 CET 2014 from (174.91.164.113)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

First track on Just A Season's self-titled album (Northern Electric, 2013).
Written by Scott Smith/Bryce Fieldhouse

"Rick Danko's In Heaven" - Just A Season


Entered at Thu Jan 16 16:25:41 CET 2014 from (174.91.164.113)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Rick Danko (w/ Buddy Cage & Sredni Vollmer)
1988-03-07
Pauly's Hotel, Albany, NY


Entered at Thu Jan 16 13:51:05 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Accolades for 'South' (Blackie & the Rodeo Kings) (BARK)

A review of 'South' by Blackie and the Rodeo Kings.

http://www.americansongwriter.com/2014/01/blackie-rodeo-kings-south/


Entered at Thu Jan 16 13:03:02 CET 2014 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: High Hopes - A real mixed bag.

Jeff - I concur.

:-0)

I'm all for artistic progression in that an artist should never stop trying even at 64 to find new vehicles for their music. However, the production, the sound, the whole ambience of the track High Hopes leaves me completely underwhelmed.

And the opening tracks of the album itself has a similar ambivalent impact. Of those opening tracks the only one that draws me in is Down in the Hole. I've never been a huge American Skin fan and the rest are simply too contrived for me - Bruce at times trying too hard to present something different that leaves me a bit indifferent.

The second half the album is a different matter entirely. From the wonderful Frankie Fell in Love which would fit like a glove on 'The River' alongside Ramrod, Out in The Streets and Cadillac Ranch to The Wall we enter real Bruce territory - some outstanding stuff and the 'live' Youngstown treatment of Ghost of Tom Joad [which I'm sure I've seen him do live] is a tour de force in the same manner as Wrecking Ball and Land of Hope and dreams were on the last album.


Entered at Thu Jan 16 11:05:50 CET 2014 from (86.171.130.87)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: JT, Peter

I think BARK are a great band, JT and play them regularly. In addition to their own compositions I think they really enhance other musicians' compositions. I'm not familiar with their individual work.

Peter, I bought Vintage Violence yesterday (better late than never) and really enjoyed it. Thanks, re discussion before Xmas. Two great albums if you include Paris 1919.

I'll need to seek out Wokey Hole.

If music becomes hard to access, I find it difficult. Although complete on the Velvets and still play them, there are some tracks I find difficult.


Entered at Thu Jan 16 02:35:26 CET 2014 from (96.30.173.135)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Subject: The band plays on

Power outages are things you just have to deal with.


Entered at Wed Jan 15 22:30:40 CET 2014 from (184.66.137.72)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: You read my mind, Dunc. : B&RK

Dunc: Thanks. I'm in the midst and have almost completed the Toppermost list and notes to accompany for B&RK. I have been following this band since the late 90s and saw Colin Linden play with the reformed Band at UofT (Convocation Hall) in a brilliant concert. He fit right in. This is a labour of love.


Entered at Wed Jan 15 21:42:34 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Bill M

Bill. As I am without a computer at the moment, and don't have all my contacts, I just wanted to thank you for your kind comments yesterday. It meant a great deal to me. Typing on the iPad is giving me the fastest index finger in town.


Entered at Wed Jan 15 21:34:16 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Macs

Thank you JT & Peter. I must admit that beautiful screen of the iMac is beautiful. Right now; after years in the PC world, the sticker shock takes a little while to get over.


Entered at Wed Jan 15 21:00:50 CET 2014 from (86.171.130.87)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: JT

Hi JT. I'm a BARK convert and have every album. Bill M and the late Steve's enthusiasm got me into them.

That coupled with Garth and Richard Bell's appearances, and also I noticed how much they liked John Martyn.

I look forward to getting the new album. Great band.

I think it would be good if a Canadian posted a Bark list on Toppermost. Give the band even more exposure.


Entered at Wed Jan 15 18:38:54 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Macs

Well, I can't see there's any competition, but I went from BBC-B computer straight to Mac when it was launched (1984?), and am totally perplexed by PCs to this day. The elegance of the interface will win you over. But all transitions have some frustrations.


Entered at Wed Jan 15 17:56:45 CET 2014 from (69.121.106.149)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Jed, it's not often the Flamingo gets mentioned.:-). i just spent some time with various people from those times and it felt good. Like old clothes.. . Not a lot feels that good or familiar.


Entered at Wed Jan 15 17:24:56 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Apple rules

It just takes some a little time to catch on. There is utility and there is utility with creativity. It depends what you want.


Entered at Wed Jan 15 17:20:00 CET 2014 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Belated happy birthday John D from Nordic Countries, too. - I was thinking about your words about going from PC to Mac. I follow with greatest interest what will happen in April when Microsoft stops supporting Windows XP. People go to Mac, it is sexy, yes. Google hopes that we shall fade away in their Chrome-colored cloud. We in Linux "taliban" remain in one per cent.


Entered at Wed Jan 15 17:14:27 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: SOUTH : Blackie and the Rodeo Kngs (B&RK)

'South' was released yesterday and Blackie and the Rodeo Kings are touring Ontario, then western Canada, then USA (northern) in support. Highly recommended!!


Entered at Wed Jan 15 15:37:51 CET 2014 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: BEG-Woodstock

I have to ask my wife if we were in Bearsville in 77 for that particular picnic.We went to so many picnic concerts in town through the years,many evenings with Levon,Rick when it seemed no one really was interested or cared anymore.Levon in The Falmingo in Saugerties on a night of pouring rain.Sat with Levon at the bar and talked a bit.He was most gracious as he always was when we spoke,but clearly he was not in a good way.So many shows with Rick,Jorma ,Sredni,Jack,Paul Butterfield at Uncle Willies in Kingston.Many evenings with Levon and Amy and The Barnburners at The Lake.The picnic at Whistlers pool with Rick,Levon,Dr. John,Max Weinberg and others.Still recall fondly the echo of Levon's voice through the mountains.It fit so well,so perfectly.The many evenings with Jim Weider all over town.No venue was too small for the guys during the late 70s,80s,and 90's and it seemed then like everyone but a handful forgot about them and we maintained our little "secret".We attended a bunch of rambles,loved them and loved that Levon was,once again,big time.But we cherish the days when it was small but special.Each small place gig brought the ability to spend time hanging with the musicians as well.A fond memory of talking for a bit with Garth when he sat in with Levon and Amy with The Barnburners.Garth was very funny that evening and this was before Amy was known by anybody,She was honing her chops,learning the business with her daddy laying down that perfect backbeat.


Entered at Wed Jan 15 10:34:00 CET 2014 from (101.164.0.90)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Web: My link

Subject: Today's Toppermost

Irish band the boomtown rats: continuing the gb theme...


Entered at Wed Jan 15 00:22:30 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Thanks, Pat. Just ordered the Jennifer Nettles album!


Entered at Tue Jan 14 22:41:37 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Belated happy birthday John!


Entered at Tue Jan 14 21:07:54 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Thank You

Thank you everyone for your kind comments. It means a great deal to me. JT! Getting closer to that MacBook Pro. Been a PC guy for a couple of decades; but the Mac has caught my eye. Fortunately I'll have a pro migrate my iTunes from Windows. A lovely birthday gift from my lovely wife.


Entered at Tue Jan 14 20:58:03 CET 2014 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Jennifer Nettles, the uberstar of Sugarland, has recorded a solo record with Rick Rubin at Shangri-La.


Entered at Tue Jan 14 19:07:07 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: High Hopes, Low Expectations

By track four of the new Springsteen I was praying for someone to shoot the guitarist, Tom Morello, who stamps way too much identity over the songs. I've been dubious about a couple of recent Bruce albums, but on first listening this is between mediocre and poor. I will persist hoping to change my mind. Down The Hole (with no Morello) is the only track I enjoyed.


Entered at Tue Jan 14 16:03:18 CET 2014 from (174.91.164.113)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

The Money Chant
Performed by Robbie Robertson
ft. Matthew McConaughey


Entered at Tue Jan 14 15:27:26 CET 2014 from (174.91.164.113)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Hey Jed...I guess I'm in a Woodstock state of mind. I was there once....in 2005. I remember eating very spicey food in the restaurant where Richard Manuel performed?

Were you at this picnic in 1977?... OLD GREY WHISTLE TEST 1977 Bearsville Picnic

I especially enjoyed seeing the younger Jesse Winchester here as it brought back great memories of seeing him older.....but still able to get his groove on for the rhumba man at the Horseshoe Tavern. I saw him again years later at Hugh's Room where I shook his hand and told him Charlie from the Band Guest Book says hello!

Another shout out.....Happy Healthy Birthday to John D!

It's great that you're writing your own story about the many years in the radio bizzz. I do remember with FM radio I'd call up late at night and request.....Louuuuu. ;-D

It's interesting to note....I'd hear Joan Baez's cover of TNTDODD more often than The Band themselves......


Entered at Tue Jan 14 15:23:44 CET 2014 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: John Donabie

Happy Birthday, JD. I too had the privilege of being tutored on radio (CKFH 1430, then CHUM FM and recently Toronto Jazz station and of course Sunday mornings at CFRB talk radio. In all cases, the music and the conversation were entertaining and always informative and vital.


Entered at Tue Jan 14 10:21:14 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Why they drove old Dixie down …

I don't usually link film reviews, but the link goes to my review of 12 Years A Slave as the antebellum South is a topic that I know interests several here.


Entered at Tue Jan 14 09:45:57 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Happy birthday, John!


Entered at Tue Jan 14 04:03:23 CET 2014 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Terronno

BEG: Thanks - and as always thanks to John, easily the most influential DJ in my life - and I suspect those of others. I was 'with' him for his final year at CKFH, which could be counted on to play every Band 45 upon release, including "Time To Kill" (which made 'bubbling under', if not the CKFH chart proper). In '71 I switched to CHUM-FM and was happy to find that John had just switched too. He played more Band stuff of course, but also shared his love of '60s Dylan (which was mostly new to me, sad to say). I think I first spoke to him in late August '74 (when DJs would actually answer the phone and chat with you as if you were mature) when I called to ask him where I might find the old Toronto records he sometimes talked about. He sent me to Don's Discs, a dinky little shop at Queen and Parliament; I first entered it the day after Labour Day and it changed my life.


Entered at Tue Jan 14 03:44:56 CET 2014 from (108.16.206.96)

Posted by:

bob w.

And I believe today is his birthday.........Happy Birthday, John. And many, many more in health and happiness.


Entered at Tue Jan 14 03:01:29 CET 2014 from (174.91.164.113)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Hey Bill M...Another magical moment happened in 1965.

"John Donabie started his radio career in Oshawa at CKLB in 1965. He signed on to CKFH in 1967 and from that point he was a typical broadcast nomad racking up experience at more than ten stations across the country. He left 'FH for CHUM-FM in 1971. Later he would move to CJFM in Montreal. Two years later in 1977, John returned to Toronto to put Q-107 on the air. In the summer of 1979 he switched to CBC-TV to host an interview programme, "Afternoon Delight". In the fall of that year, he again went on-air at CHUM-FM but three years later moved over to CFGM Richmond Hill (1983-85), followed by CFRB (1985-87), crossed the hall to CKFM (1987-89), and then went on to CKEY until 1992. He then helped to put CISS-FM (new country) on the air. In 1995 he was back at CFRB to do a talk show which lasted for 15 years. In 2010, John re-located at JAZZ-FM91 in Toronto where he did the morning show until he retired to write a book about his broadcasting career. In October 2012, John was inducted into the Canadian Broadcasting Hall of Fame."


Entered at Tue Jan 14 02:02:34 CET 2014 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

JT: Making allowances for differences in character between the vulnerable Richard Manuel and the cocky Todd Rundgren, it's easy to link the closing lines of "Lonesome Suzie" and "We Gotta Get You A Woman":

"Just seeing you makes me lonesome too
Why don't we get together; what else can we do?"

vs

"And when we're through with you
We'll get me one too"


Entered at Tue Jan 14 01:31:02 CET 2014 from (108.16.206.96)

Posted by:

bob w.

Subject: Van Morrison Tour Dates

Are there any resources (beyond his website) that might have scheduled 2014 show dates ?

Thanks. Happy New Year.


Entered at Mon Jan 13 21:46:39 CET 2014 from (80.3.71.222)

Posted by:

Ian Woodward

Subject: Jackson C Frank again / Basement Tapes book / Dylan's American Journey

JACKSON C FRANK:

According to Wiki and other sources, his one and only album was recorded at CBS studios in London in July 1965. CBS took over Oriole Records around September 1964 and started up its UK operations earlier in 1965. One of the reasons was that Oriole had its own pressing plant. One of the principals of Oriole was, as I recall, Morris Levy (Not the U.S. one) and Levy's Recording Studios in New Bond Street seems to have been part of the deal. This is where Paul Simon's first album ("The Paul Simon Songbook") was recorded in June/July 1965 and, since Paul Simon produced the Jackson C Frank album and since I don't believe that CBS had any other studio in London in 1965, I suspect that Levy's was where the Jackson C Frank album was recorded. Incidentally, it was to Levy's Studios in May 1965 that Dylan went to record a Sales Message for the forthcoming Columbia Records Sales Convention and also to attempt to record with members of John Mayall's Bluesbreakers, including Eric Clapton who had recently joined the group. The session was not a success.

SID GRIFFIN’S BOOK ON THE BASEMENT TAPES:

BEG displayed some extracts from this book and it was interesting to read now, a few years later, of Dylan fans seeking recordings of the likes of "Minstrel Boy", now that the Basement Tapes recording of this song has been released on Dylan's last Bootleg Series album.

DYLAN'S AMERICAN JOURNEY:

This exhibition started in Seattle, where I saw it, and, though substantially the same, I think there were some differences between it and the one at the Morgan in New York.


Entered at Mon Jan 13 20:36:13 CET 2014 from (174.88.44.175)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Open My Eyes: Nazz and TR

I used to visit the multitude of record stores in the mid and late 60s a lot on Yonge St. Walking down the west side of Yonge St. near Wellesley (north of Sam's and A&A where there were some stores selling some LPs), I passed a store that was blasting "Open My Eyes: (with that electrifying guitar opening riff) into the street. I was instantly a Nazz fan and bought the album immediately. It was soon after that I found out that a major part of that creative force was Todd Rundgren. Then "We Gotta Get You a Woman" came out and from then on, I waited for the LPs to come out with the anticipation that you all understand. I haven't lost the awe I feel for the work of this man in all his aspects Excellent and committed, he remains always interesting and vital to this day.


Entered at Mon Jan 13 19:24:45 CET 2014 from (79.160.47.202)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Subject: Todd and...

Had to share this link. Check who he is compared to at the end of this article, from the Guardian in the UK last week...


Entered at Mon Jan 13 16:14:30 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Todd Rundgren

Todd Rundgren's early productions for Bearsville were released on the Ampex record label. He produced the self-titled album for the Philadelphia band The American Dream in 1969, which was released in 1970. He then produced a self-titled album for the jazz great Gil Evans, also released in early 1970. As Robbie Robertson later collaborated with Mr. Evans, I wonder if they first met while he was recording at Bearsville Studios. Mr. Rundgren then went down to Nashville to record Ian & Silvia's group Great Speckled Bird and also engineered Jesse Winchester's eponymous debut album, recorded in Canada with Robbie producing.

I first became aware of Mr. Rundgren through his earlier work in the group Nazz, also from Philadelphia. This led me to pick up that LP by The American Dream when it was first released. As a Band fan, I also bought the Jesse Winchester album when it came out.


Entered at Mon Jan 13 14:52:39 CET 2014 from (174.91.164.113)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Bob Dylan, The Band, and The Basement Tapes


Entered at Mon Jan 13 14:50:34 CET 2014 from (174.91.164.113)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Bob Dylan’s American Journey, 1956-1966


Entered at Mon Jan 13 14:48:50 CET 2014 from (174.91.164.113)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Many thanks to all for sharing thoughts and experiences about your visits to Woodstock and seeing Levon perform.

"Rundgren’s reputation as a studio wunderkind began to circulate after he worked with Grossman’s clients The Band, whose third album Stage Fright (1970) he engineered in the local Woodstock Playhouse theater. The Band’s original plans for the album sheds an interesting light on how Woodstock community responded to the famous rock festival.

According to [guitarist Robbie] Robertson, The Band had initially intended to record Stage Fright, their third album, in the form of a free concert staged at the Woodstock Playhouse for the local townspeople, whom they felt had been unduly disturbed during the previous summer’s Woodstock Music & Arts Festival in nearby Bethel, New York. The town still harbored lingering resentment toward the rock musicians and hippies who had disturbed their formerly quiet artists’ enclave, however. “We’d felt really bad about it,” laughs Robertson, “so, as a gesture, we thought we could just rehearse some new material and put on this private concert for the townspeople. The town council said ‘Thanks, but no thanks.’ I think they thought that the show would just attract more Volkswagen buses like the year before” (pg. 36).

Rundgren attempted to mix Stage Fright back at Bearsville Studios, but The Band’s dissatisfaction led them to pick British producer Glyn Johns to do the final mix. Also of note, at this recording session Rundgren met Patti Smith, then a young unknown poet who was visiting the session with songwriter and Dylan associate Bob Neuwirth. Today, the Woodstock Playhouse still functions as a community theater."


Entered at Mon Jan 13 10:50:52 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Jesse Winchester

Today's Toppermost is Jesse Winchester for a strong Band connection. Recent ones are New Grass Revival by Dlew, Cream by Rob the Organ and Mark Knopfler by Roger W, so four in a row from Band site posters. Any more care to join in? And do comment over there if so moved.


Entered at Mon Jan 13 10:10:09 CET 2014 from (80.3.71.222)

Posted by:

Ian Woodward

Subject: Jackson C. Frank

I saw Jackson C Frank a couple of times when I lived in London. I remember him particulalrly when he turned up at one of the all-nighters in Les Cousins. When his album came out, I didn't have a record player but a friend did. It was very much the album to play at the time - that and Bert Jansch's first album.

I have since bought the Jackson album in several of its various incarnations since its original release.


Entered at Mon Jan 13 03:21:18 CET 2014 from (67.87.217.234)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

All the years living and coming and going there, I never ate in The Bear Cafe. I did eat next door in The Little Bear today. Excellent various kinds of Asian foods. I had a delicately breaded and just as delicately fried stuffed eggplant that was superb. My cousin had a curried dish that was also excellent. The Inn on the Millstream, formerly known as The Millstream Motel might be a little more rustic than some travelers prefer, but it is a fine place. Unless they are elderly or somehow impaired, if it's too rustic, they can just just drive to Saugerties to the Comfort Inn or to Kingston.


Entered at Mon Jan 13 02:34:58 CET 2014 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Tinker Street Cafe or Bearsville Complex?

More of the spirit of the town I felt in the many years eating at Dylan's famous chess table with my kids and hanging out after dinner for music with local talent:Rick,Jim Weider,Gizmo,Sredni,etc. at the Tinker Street Cafe-or one of the other names it had over the years since Dylan lived upstairs.The pasta was excellent and the apple pie was first rate!And on a summer night we could sit at our outdoor table and hear the music while taking in the sweet smells of being upstate.


Entered at Sun Jan 12 20:16:52 CET 2014 from (79.160.47.202)

Posted by:

jh

Subject: Woodstock/Bearsville

The Bear Cafe is a wonderful place, indeed. In the summer of 2012 we shared a superb meal there with the lovely Lynda and Elliott Landy. During that visit we stayed at the Woodstock Inn on the Millstream, very enjoyable and relaxing, within walking distance from the Village shops and restaurants.

Last November we took our son to Woodstock and Levon's Barn/Big Pink etc. for the first time, and had a family meal at the Bear. The food was again excellent, the wine selection very good, location and view from the riverside tables unbeatable. This time we stayed at a little gem of a house/cottage called the Blue Pearl, also a relatively short walk from Tinker Street. If you have the budget for it, I highly recommend the Pearl.


Entered at Sun Jan 12 16:43:40 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Bearsville Complex

I've had the pleasure of meeting Peter Cantine many times; when dining at the Big Bear. I always figured he was the manager. I had no idea he was the co-owner of the entire complex. I thought Sally Grossman still owned it all. I learnt something. By the way the steak with Stilton cheese is second to none. Try and get a table by the stream. You can stroll into the opening of the woods; where Albert Grossman is buried. A bench is there for contemplating.


Entered at Sun Jan 12 15:37:00 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Jackson C. Frank

Link to the Toppermost piece on Jackson C. Frank a couple of weeks back.


Entered at Sun Jan 12 14:32:22 CET 2014 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: BEG-A Beacon in Bersville

The article is very good.My family and I have seen many years of great music and eaten many fine meals at the the Grossman's Bearsville complex.The only difference I have with the author is the comment at the end on lodging in the area.A mere 8 minute walk off Tinker Street is the Woodstock Inn which has some of the most beautiful stream side acreage,gardens and woods in the area and IMHO,the world.In fact,the vibe you pick up at the Bearsville Grossman property is similar.Both are stream side,but the Inn boasts some falls,a swimming hole beautiful,super clean rooms and the most competent,nicest hippe manager on the planet.Each serve their own purpose and the Inn is where The Band stayed during their early trips to Woodstock and where some fine musicians come to stay to this day.No,I don't work there but I've rented the 2 bedroom apartment and house many times for extended stays over the last 40 years and what a wondrous place.


Entered at Sun Jan 12 14:00:15 CET 2014 from (174.88.44.175)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Jackson C. Frank

Interest in Jackson C. Frank persists. Read Mojo this month to hear more about this American artist who put out 1 album. He had a stint in the UK and then gradually faded as he succumbed slowly, it is written, to illness. His album is being released next week on vinyl. This is an important relatively unknown piece of the complex puzzle.


Entered at Sun Jan 12 11:10:20 CET 2014 from (76.124.39.182)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: The Zydecological Observatory & Turtle Pond

Subject: BEG...

Angie, your Barnburners comments rocketed me back to a day in 2000 when I was itching to take my new Toyota Echo on a roadtrip. I packed my 11 yr old son, David and we headed out to the Stanhope House in NJ to see the Barnburners. A half hour before the gig started I lost David, only to find him hanging with Miss Amy talking about how tired they both were. She asked him if he played any instrument, and he answered, "Only the drums". We came out again later that year to see them play at The Bubba Mac Shack in Somers Point NJ only about 5-700 yards away from the old TonyMart's. I missed the first Ramble, but made it to four Rambles a year at The Barn, and as many more road shows from The LHB. Always treated to the best seats in the house whether home for me, Lee, or farther flung on the road. I see bands play live 50 times a year. A show at The Barn was always the most sanctified event I've ever had the honor to attend. It will NEVER get better than that. (sigh)


Entered at Sun Jan 12 03:58:21 CET 2014 from (174.88.44.175)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: You made my day!

Angelina: You made my day! Thank you for the John Kay document. The Concord lives.


Entered at Sat Jan 11 20:38:23 CET 2014 from (216.193.165.93)

Posted by:

Little Brøther

Location: The Guestbook Archives
Web: My link

Subject: FYI, "Inside Llewyn Davis"

I haven't seen this movie, but it was supposedly inspired by "The Mayor of MacDougal Street", a memoir written by Dave Van Ronk with Elijah Wald that was published after Dave's death.

Check out the linked "Village Voice" article written by Van Ronk's ex-wife (and one of Bob Dylan's early managers), Terri Thal.

Also see Peter Stone Brown's Counterpunch article, "This Film is Not About Dave Van Ronk"

http://www.counterpunch.org/2013/12/20/this-film-is-not-about-dave-van-ronk/

FWIW, these articles aren't hostile to the film, nor are they an attack on the Coen Brothers' use of Van Ronk/Wald's book as the basis for a fictional story about a struggling 1960s folksinger.

They both seem mostly interested in clarifying that the title character is nothing like Dave, although some of the scenes are based on actual Van Ronk anecdotes. Terri also found the film's fictionalized Greenwich Village scene to be authentic in some respects, but distorted and inaccurate regarding the musicians' motivations and the emotional and psychological solidarity that existed apart from each artists' career ambitions.

Both Thal and Brown know perfectly well that the Coen Brothers didn't set out to make a documentary, or film a roman a clef, about Van Ronk and the Village scene during the 60s folk revival. They just want to make it clear that viewers shouldn't mistake Llewyn Davis for Dave.


Entered at Sat Jan 11 18:26:01 CET 2014 from (173.3.50.129)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Al- The Boss has a new song out, High Hopes, that has been getting tons of airplay here.. The title track of his any day now release, High Hopes is rather riveting for a moment, and very powerful. There are aspects of the production i find problematic, but, are designed to give the song a far ranging and very modern appeal. In fact, they do. But modern is out of the furthest range i cover.

Radio announcers and poorly edited written pieces have confused me- i;m not sure if High Hopes , the song, is a remake of Sprngsteen's, or if Springsteen is covering someone else's song . In any event, it;s a great performance and in many ways, a great production, has neat hooks- but- it might be too long ( didn't hold my attention once the whole way through, but who knows what i had going on in the car at the same time) the tone, the sound itself- beats the piss out of you and deadens it, makes it boring.It's that modern sound quality- the life is sucked out of it, it sounds like the control room has been held under water for a day or two, or something like that. A muted, murky, quality of some kind, that has invaded modern contemporary music. Like a vacumm was placed inside the musical molecules, the air and life was sucked out of them and the a concrete mixed with the puree of recycled plastic bottles was pumped in it's place.


Entered at Sat Jan 11 16:14:21 CET 2014 from (174.91.164.113)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

A beacon in Bearsville
Albert Grossman's complex continues to define the community
By Deborah Medenbach
Photos by Michael Bloom


Entered at Sat Jan 11 15:48:16 CET 2014 from (174.91.164.113)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

A Message from Alpha Wolf

Canada's (via of Germany) John Kay of Steppen' Wolf.

"Just hours ago the music community lost one of it’s great forces of nature, namely Levon Helm. Most knew him as the drummer and the singer of some of “The Band’s” best known songs, but Levon was in fact its heart and soul and gave the group its southern musical authenticity. I was still in high school in Toronto when I saw and heard Levon for the first time as a member of “Ronnie Hawkins & the Hawks”. Ronnie and Levon, both from Arkansas migrated to Canada and there mentored young Canadians –Robbie Robertson, guitar / Rick Danko, bass / Richard Manual, piano and Garth Hudson, organ – who joined the Hawks and made it the great band it was. Seeing these guys play at the Concord Tavern - where on Saturday afternoons we under age Kids were able to attend – was nothing less than thrilling, absolutely chicken skin time. Robbie’s guitar playing was raw and searing and made other players emulate him for years. Ronnie as well as Richard and Levon would take turns on lead vocals and the whole band was cooking. There was no band in the country that could top them.

A couple years later the Hawks left Ronnie and became “Levon and the Hawks” for a while. Then after playing on John Hammond’s “Big City Blues” LP, they joined Bob Dylan as I’m sure most of you know. After Bob’s motorcycle accident put things on hold, they emerged as “The Band” and released “Music from Big Pink” which I think is still one of the best albums recorded by any American band. The film “The Last Waltz” showed them all and particularly Levon at the height of their prowess, even though it was to be The Band’s swan song. But Levon was all about the music and just kept going.

Some years back Jutta – who knew Levon from the Toronto days as well – and I saw him with his band the Barn Burners in Nashville and, not surprisingly, they were excellent. With his daughter handling most of the vocals, Levon could rest his pipes, for he was going through his first bout with throat cancer. We visited after the show, he was in good spirits, his health was on the mend and he was looking forward to being able to sing again. Not that long thereafter, when the Wolf played a Blues Aid benefit in Memphis, I saw Levon again, he invited me to his “Midnight Ramble” at his barn in Woodstock, but I never had an opportunity to take him up on that. However Jutta and I saw and thankfully heard him sing as well, about a year ago in Vancouver where he played with a large band of fine musicians, including his daughter and horn players from New Orleans. I will always treasure that night. While I’ve seen many outstanding performances – Bob Marley as well as Bruce Springsteen, both for the first time in LA at Roxy, Ry Cooder’s Chicken Skin Revue and many more – Levon’s band performance was more than just a great musical event, it was a love fest between him the band and the audience. In spite of his failing health and frailty he gave all he had left and the crowd responded with an outpouring of affection that was nearly overwhelming, for they and we loved this man. America has lost one of its most faithful sons, one who never strayed from its musical roots. On Levon’s “Dirt Farmer” CD he sings about having a “Wide River To Cross”, I like to think he’s reached the other side by now and his journey is at a peaceful end. Farewell Levon, you gave us much joy and music to hold onto, may you be rewarded accordingly, wherever you are."


Entered at Sat Jan 11 15:37:03 CET 2014 from (174.91.164.113)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

MAKING THE SCENE:

Yorkville and Hip Toronto,
1960-1970

by Stuart Robert Henderson

A thesis submitted to the Department of History
in conformity with the requirements for
the degree of Doctor of Philosophy


Entered at Sat Jan 11 11:15:57 CET 2014 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: Crazy Chester

BEG - that was an interesting piece on Rick and The Weight. I always wondered why he sang that verse. It make sense it that was his story.


Entered at Sat Jan 11 08:20:30 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

George Harrison was George Formby's greatest fan and enthusiast. McCartney has spoken of him too. Mainly novelty songs with a ukulele.


Entered at Sat Jan 11 03:30:20 CET 2014 from (68.199.208.62)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Hear Hear

Roseanne Fino's recording is an all around, enjoyable, fine piece of work. For those of you who might have missed it, I am referring to the record that Peter reviewed.


Entered at Sat Jan 11 02:47:38 CET 2014 from (24.108.1.255)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: Influence's

A bunch of us were sitting around a while ago talking about music and the topic of what music did your parents listen to and did it influence you in your music choices. My parents listened to a hell of a lot of music by a guy by the name of George Formby. Some of the songs they would sit around and sing to with glass in hand were 'who through the over-alls in Mrs. Murphy's chowder' and something called 'my granddads flannelette niteshirt' or something like that. I'm not sure if any of this influenced me as a child but on looking up George Formby and his songs it sure as hell sounds like Skiffle music which the Beatles started with. Just a thought.


Entered at Sat Jan 11 01:57:38 CET 2014 from (174.88.44.175)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: PILEDRIVER

Bill M: I remember the name of the group, Piledriver, but never saw them or in fact did not ever go to the Running Pump for any show by any group. I was away for some of those years at school in the US and then very busy with little time for such things.


Entered at Sat Jan 11 00:13:34 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: RoseAnne Fino review

Link to my review of a fine new album by RoseAnne Fino … of great interest here with Professor Louie & The Crowmatix AND John Platania providing the backing.


Entered at Fri Jan 10 21:20:19 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Lost classic albums …

I pulled out a record I hadn’t played or thought of in years today, “Rains / Reigns of Change” by Marc Ellington. A great 1971 Fairport Convention connected record. Several tracks have Richard Thompson on guitar, Dave Pegg on bass, Dave Mattacks on drums. Add Sneaky Pete to that lineup on several tracks; vocal guest appearances by Sandy Denny, Trevor Lucas, Ian Matthews and Chris Hillman. I’d forgotten just how great the record is. I saw him a couple of times in 1968.


Entered at Fri Jan 10 17:50:26 CET 2014 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: "Snowbird" was written by Gene MacLellan, who was in two early groups with Robbie Robertson - the Consuls and the Suedes. Eddie Hinton played on Ronnie Hawkins' first Cotillion album along with another former Suede (and early Hawk), Scott Cushnie.


Entered at Fri Jan 10 17:13:38 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Elvis Country

Prior to the 1970 sessions with Elvis, Nobert Putnam had produced Joan Baez's cover of TNTDODD.


Entered at Fri Jan 10 15:08:52 CET 2014 from (174.91.164.113)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

House of Cards...Steve Forbert's song about Elvis.


Entered at Fri Jan 10 15:04:22 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Elvis Country

UNCUT has an article on "Elvis Country" recording sessions, which are clearly 2014's candidate for "Great Elvis Remaster" with new promotion of the Legacy editions etc. They're connecting it to the upsurge in country rock around the recording dates in 1970 and that Elvis hijacked yet another saccharine pop session with unscheduled country and rock. It was easy enough as some of the session guys had played on the original C&W songs years earlier. They also note that the version of Whole Lot of Shaking with Jerry Carrigan on drums, Norbert Putnam on bass and Eddie Hinton on guitar, obsessed Elvis in the 7os, and he would play it over and over.

I'm trying to think whether to get it … the key tracks are on "The Essential 70s Masters" (which I have) already I reckon … Whole Lot of Shakin, I Washed My Hands in Muddy Water, I was born about 10,000 Years Ago. The review notes that the June session with James Burton did 90% of the tracks, and that when they went back to do four more in September, they had (the great) Eddie Hinton instead, but did Snowbird which didn't make use of Eddie's abilities … though "Whole Lot of Shakin' certainly did.


Entered at Fri Jan 10 10:57:01 CET 2014 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: A dry cold indeed!

Bill M: will they be travelling by snowshoes? it may be the quickest way. : )


Entered at Fri Jan 10 04:24:15 CET 2014 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: BARK news

Blackie and the Rodeo Kings' new CD, "South" drops on Jan 14.

Fred: Perhaps you alone will appreciate the hardships of their upcoming tour, which is insanely out of keeping with the album title: T Bay, Feb 1; Fort Frank, Feb 2; Sioux Lookout, Feb 3; Dryden, Feb 4; Red Lake, Feb 5. At least it's a dry cold.

JT: I've been meaning to say that the Running Pump was action central when I was in grade 13 at West Hill Collegiate. (This was during those few years after the drinking age was dropped from 21 to 18 but before it was raised back up to 19 precisely to keep grade 13 students out of bars.) I suspect that our friend Northern Boy, though across the mighty Rouge in SW Pickering, would have had at least a passing acquaintance with the establishment as well. I saw John King, the guitarist of Piledriver, the Pump's old house band, playing with Danny Brooks at Hugh's Room in November (when John D emceed.)

,


Entered at Fri Jan 10 00:43:54 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Toppermost

No, I don't run it. Merric (an old friend) does. I just contribute, as do Dlew, Roger W, Dunc and Rob the Organ.. It's open for anyone to send in a list, but you should ask first just in case one is already lined up … there is always a line of posts waiting to go up, and another set "in preparation". For example, I'm currently working on Weather Report.

One for you Ari … no one has done Garth solo yet! Just contact the webmaster on the site and volunteer … which goes for everyone.

Also comments and alternative ideas enliven it.


Entered at Thu Jan 9 23:31:56 CET 2014 from (74.71.203.44)

Posted by:

Ari

Web: My link

Subject: Bob Dylan Quote of the Day

Also this is my brother's site. Thought y'all might like it.


Entered at Thu Jan 9 23:30:05 CET 2014 from (74.71.203.44)

Posted by:

Ari

Peter, I don't know if you run the Toppermost, but I've just recently started going to it and I'm kinda loving it. I'm so excited to just browse through the posts. Great site.

On another note, how do you guys feel about The Wolf of Wall Street? I saw it last Saturday but I caught a late-night showing after a party and was more than a little wasted. I'm seeing it again at the Ziegfeld in about an hour but I want to know what you guys think.

Robbie has a funny credit in the movie. I heard a group of dudes chanting this in a bar called McSorley's the other day. Imagine that...

The Money Chant

Written by Robbie Robertson and Matthew McConaughey

Performed by Robbie Robertson and Matthew McConaughey

Produced by Howie B. and Robbie Robertson


Entered at Thu Jan 9 17:31:03 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Basement Tapes... Continued

Peter: The news on this release broke a couple of months ago. Dylan's publishing company recently discovered lyrics to some "unrecorded" songs he'd written in 1967 and Dylan has "entrusted" them to T Bone Burnett. Mr. Burnett will use contemporary musicians to record versions based on the material at Capital Studios. The project will be released on Mr. Burnett's new label Electromagnetic Recordings.

I'm sure all of us would agree that it would be a shame not to include Robbie and Garth in this project.


Entered at Thu Jan 9 17:09:45 CET 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

David P: Sounds like a little Peyton Place, though I'm no Jeannie C. Riley calling people Harper Valley hypocrites. Now I've got Bobbie Gentry's "Fancy" running through my head; I wonder if there's a Basement Tape of "The Clotheshorse Saga"?


Entered at Thu Jan 9 16:59:56 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Bill M: You can connect Rodney Crowell with Nick Lowe in another way. During the time that Mr. Crowell was married to Rosanne Cash, Mr. Lowe was married to Carlene Carter, Ms. Cash's step-sister. Around the same time, Rosanne's sister Cindy was married to Marty Stuart. One can imagine family gatherings with Johnny and June where guitars were pulled and songs were sung.


Entered at Thu Jan 9 16:39:11 CET 2014 from (68.199.208.62)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Bonk- you wouldn't have to kill, but the average schmoe may have to rob a bank. Let me know.


Entered at Thu Jan 9 15:49:07 CET 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

BEG: Thanks for the link to that terrific Crowell song. Here's a link to my own favourite of his. (Can't help but think of the newly late Phil Everly at the end.) Whenever I played the vinyl I'd be moved to follow up with Nick Lowe's "Rose Of England" (youtube.com/watch?v=9ZZQyLK-wi4), which would lead me to "England" by Sparks - youtube.com/watch?v=jQUKFKm3hCg. And then, depending on my mood, the Clash's "This Is England" - youtube.com/watch?v=ROj_1R36lX0


Entered at Thu Jan 9 15:11:34 CET 2014 from (174.91.164.113)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Thanks to Mary Martin's interview, I downloaded this great country song which Bob Seger also covered.


Entered at Thu Jan 9 14:57:09 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: vinyl

Just found a copy of "Mr Dynamo" in superb condition, original 1960 EMI Columbia UK issue. Phew! Been looking for years.


Entered at Thu Jan 9 07:51:39 CET 2014 from (58.104.15.95)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Subject: Basement Tapes

I cannot say I was a great fan of the official release even before I found out some of the tracks were actually just Band out takes. There was just something about the sound and the sequencing of the songs I didn't like. I think the three Basement Tape songs Dylan did with Happy Traum on his Greatest Hits Volume 2 are amongst my favourite Dylan tracks.


Entered at Thu Jan 9 03:48:13 CET 2014 from (67.167.233.21)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland Tx

Subject: 75

After watching the "Down In The Flood" film, I was amused that the last feud left seems to be over the 75 Basement Tapes album. Well, I'm firmly in the pro 75 camp and have always felt the hostility to the album was based on A) snobbery of Dylan fans who had that bootlegs, and let me tell you, they were not THAT easy to come by, and B) Dylan fans who are, to put it baldly, just to F@ckin stupid to love the Band. Whatever. I don't believe that anybody who hates the 75 release even likes the BTs. And for all the people who see God when "I'm Not There" comes on, I believe every major take from the sessions is on it. I do like the punchy mix of the Safety Masters, but that's about the only caveat.


Entered at Thu Jan 9 03:34:19 CET 2014 from (24.108.1.255)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: Bernard Purdie

Hey Jeff! I'd probably kill to have a two hour lesson with Mr. Purdie.


Entered at Thu Jan 9 03:03:28 CET 2014 from (174.91.164.113)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Rick Danko and the Starlights (1960)

Shakey Neil Young's Bio...."The Band had built their Shangra-La studio just down the road, and Rick Danko was a constant visitor at Young's.
"We used to call him 'Quick Rick', 'cause he used to pull his car up, back in, keep it running, say what he had to say, then leave," said Connie Moskos, living with David Briggs at the time."

Hey there Nomadic Mike. How are ya doin' in the land of story book gardens? I've been slippin' and a slidin' (almost four times) here in the land of snow.


Entered at Thu Jan 9 02:43:17 CET 2014 from (174.91.164.113)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Rick Danko: From butcher shop to hall of fame

By Daniel R. Pearce, Simcoe Reformer
Wednesday, September 4, 2013

Danko's music was infused with his life in Norfolk County.

"Crazy Chester was my brother. Jack is my dog. Fannie was my horse," explained Phyllis Renton, who was Phyllis DeCarolis a long time ago when she lived in Walsh across the road from Danko's grandparents.

Renton is referring to the characters in the song The Weight and said she believes they are her brother, dog, and horse.

"We were always together because he spent a lot of time at his grandparents," said the 78-year-old.

"He just loved to tease Chester. They just had a connection. He'd come over and say 'What are you doing today crazy Chester.''


Entered at Thu Jan 9 02:42:25 CET 2014 from (174.54.185.44)

Posted by:

Kevin from Northeast PA

Web: My link

Subject: Guy Clark

I had meant to pick up that Guy Clark release and then forgot all about it. Thanks for those comments as it jogged my memory.

A few months back I did pick up a 2 CD tribute to Guy - This One's For Him: A Tribute to Guy Clark - and can highly recommend it.

Link should take you to Amazon to see the track list. Lots of help from Guy's friends.


Entered at Thu Jan 9 02:28:12 CET 2014 from (67.84.78.71)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Drummers

Anyone in NYC- Bernard Purdie,just back from dates with Grant Green JR., performs Jan 15th, at the Iridium

Jimmy Cobb is about to celebrate his 85th birthday Jan 19th at Dizzy's CLub Coca Cola in Manhattan. The man is everywhere, plays all over the place.


Entered at Thu Jan 9 01:04:53 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

Web: My link

Subject: Basement Tapes Correction to my earlier post

Sorry Peter I was off on the project. This is going to be much like the Hank Williams project that Levon and Larry were a part Of. In other words they have discovered songs that were unfinished. T Bone will have certain artists finish these songs like the Williams project. Check link.


Entered at Thu Jan 9 00:57:58 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Basement Tapes

Peter, this was a piece that ran here a few months back. It's a "tribute" album if you will. No Band and no Dylan. Newer artists doing covers of Basement Tapes songs.


Entered at Thu Jan 9 00:08:43 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Basement Tapes Continued

Uncut February 2014 (kinks cover) announces the major releases of 2014, which include T Bone Burnett with The Basement Tapes Continued - the lesser known songs which were not on the 1975 album. It is not clear whether these are new recordings, or a 'produced by' production of the originals. Uncut says 'late 2014.'


Entered at Wed Jan 8 20:29:17 CET 2014 from (76.99.127.111)

Posted by:

Luke

Location: PA

Subject: Graham Nash

Graham Nash's tribute to Levon, "Back Home" was tremendous. If you haven't heard it yet, it's definitely worth hearing. One other thing, I've always thought that Levon played guitar on When You Awake, but it sounds like maybe he and Rick both played bass. Any thoughts?


Entered at Wed Jan 8 16:48:53 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Guy Clark

Sadly, Guy Clark's wife Susanna, who was the subject of the title song "My Favorite Picture of You," passed away last year. She was a talented songwriter herself, as well as an artist. She co-wrote "Easy From Now On" with Carlene Carter, which was covered by Emmylou Harris on her 1978 album "Quarter Moon in a Ten Cent Town." The album's title derives from one of the lines in the song and a painting by Ms. Clark, depicting a quarter moon rising above a stretch of lonely highway, was used for the record's cover.

This fine album, produced by Brian Ahern, also featured Rick (on harmony vocals & fiddle) and Garth (on accordion) accompanying Ms. Harris on a rousing version of Rodney Crowell's "Leaving Louisiana in the Broad Daylight."

Above is a link to a revealing interview with Guy Clark from American Songwriter magazine.


Entered at Tue Jan 7 23:14:40 CET 2014 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Talkin my language

Thank you so much Joe. Now you are talkin my language. That is with out a doubt the finest. For those who don't know this album, I've put up Guy's title track here.

His explanation of the song, and the way a lot of us were back then, brings to my mind one of Hank Williams Jr's few great songs. "All My Rowdy Friends Have Settled Down".

I'dike just a nickel for the amount of times I sang "LA Freeway" so many years ago.

Happy New Year Joe. Keep the home fires burning. I'm away to Port Hardy tomorrow to be back aboard my tug.

Gawd Damn it, I can't get the link to work, it is.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qIftiMZPVsE


Entered at Tue Jan 7 22:01:46 CET 2014 from (79.160.47.202)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

This is one of the videos from Elliott Landy Official's Kickstarter campaign for his Fine Art photography book on THE BAND. Don't forget it closes on Jan 28th.

Elliott talks about photographing Robbie Robertson being hypnotized so he would be able to perform despite his bad case of the flu on the night of their debut performance as THE BAND at the Fillmore West in San Francisco, 1969.


Entered at Tue Jan 7 22:01:01 CET 2014 from (96.30.173.135)

Posted by:

Joe J.

No, lawn movin has never really caught on down here.

Surviving the miserable weather quite nicely thanks to Scotland's finest. Everyone I know has gone south; someone has to stay behind and keep the water running.

Norm, I'm recommending Guy Clark's 'Favourite Picture of You' as one of the best of 2013.



Entered at Tue Jan 7 19:39:15 CET 2014 from (96.232.159.74)

Posted by:

Joan

Web: My link

Subject: Graham Nash'a tribute to Levon

Graham Nash and Levon


Entered at Tue Jan 7 17:17:44 CET 2014 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

An amazing coincidence, given this thread: today's paper noted that it's the anniversary of Hank Snow's first appearance on the Grand Ol' Opry. The article went on to say that his first hit was soon to follow - titled something like "I'm Movin' Lon".


Entered at Tue Jan 7 17:09:27 CET 2014 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Subject: The same

... back to the see, of course, after the storm!


Entered at Tue Jan 7 17:07:37 CET 2014 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Subject: Ooops

Sorry, Crabgrass with a _C_.


Entered at Tue Jan 7 17:07:04 CET 2014 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Movin' yer lawn????????????

Where yuh goin' tuh "move" yer lawn to?????


Entered at Tue Jan 7 17:03:55 CET 2014 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest ... the warm place

Subject: Movin' yer lawn (Rockin Chair's thread)

... but where is GRABGRASS? Renember him? A lovable person.


Entered at Tue Jan 7 15:46:18 CET 2014 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest......the warm place

Subject: Neufenlan'......Republic of Snow??

Joe........JENNINGS!!!.....are ya mowin' yer lawn lately bie??-:)


Entered at Tue Jan 7 03:29:10 CET 2014 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Toronto
Web: My link

A nifty answer tune to an Everlys hit, ""Go To Sleep Little Suzie", was one six sides recorded in Toronto in the late '50s by two New Brunswickers, Cliffy and Jerry. Unfortunately only one of those songs is on youTube, but fortunately it's the best - see link. Terrific guitar work by Eddie L'Ecuyer, who made similar worthy contributions to sessions by a number of local artists of the day.

I spoke to both Cliffy and Jerry - thirty years apart - and they both recalled, unprompted, a vague Hawkins link: one that Ronnie was at one of the sessions; the other that Levon was going to play drums but bowed out when he learned that he was to bring his own kit. Also, Jerry taught Bob Lucier to play steel, and Bob Lucier taught Daniel Lanois.


Entered at Mon Jan 6 21:03:08 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Phil Everly

Phil Everly singing harmony with Warren Zevon on "Hasten Down the Wind."


Entered at Mon Jan 6 15:44:34 CET 2014 from (70.26.153.213)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: Mary Martin

Angie, you never fail to amaze.


Entered at Mon Jan 6 15:15:40 CET 2014 from (66.55.188.178)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Mary Martin one more time

It is nice to see that a Canadian organization recognized Mary Martin. I think its time for the US august organizations to recognize her contributions.


Entered at Mon Jan 6 14:06:59 CET 2014 from (101.164.0.90)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Web: My link

Subject: Toppermost

Led Zeppelin...


Entered at Mon Jan 6 13:49:06 CET 2014 from (174.91.165.7)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

MMF Canada Announces that Mary Martin will receive 2011 MMF Canada Pioneer Award

Presentation to take place at the 5th Annual MMF Honour Roll Reception on Friday March 11, 2011

Toronto, Ontario – January 4, 2011 – The Music Managers Forum Canada is proud to announce that the 2011 MMF’s Pioneer Award will be presented to Mary Martin. Created to pay homage to the efforts of those who have been instrumental in creating the framework for Artist Management in the Canadian entertainment industries, this presentation will take place during Canadian Music Week 2011 on Friday March 11 at Bymark Restaurant, as part of the 5th Annual Honour Roll Reception. Terry McBride is this year’s Honour Roll recipient."


Entered at Mon Jan 6 11:29:37 CET 2014 from (101.164.0.90)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Subject: Cone brothers film

I believe it's based very loosely on Dave van Ronk...


Entered at Mon Jan 6 10:59:38 CET 2014 from (124.25.159.252)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Subject: Wallsend/Classic Albums

Yes, that's the kind of stuff I was thinking of. Similar issues with the "Classic Albums" doco from a couple of years later. The most disconcerting thing about that one was that, even though there is some lovely footage in it, the interviews were edited to look like an argument! Whoever cut them together had seen a pattern and took, I believe, deliberate pleasure in enhancing the contradictions. They may have even contrived the situations with their questions. I'm overseas for a while so I can't transcribe specific transitions, but there were many, and between various interviewees, not just Levon and Robbie. Not sure if others were struck the same way.


Entered at Mon Jan 6 09:10:59 CET 2014 from (58.104.14.90)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Subject: Kerrin

I agree completely. There is a short 'documentary' on the Band on You Tube from 1995 called The Road in which Robbie has been airbrushed out of the Band's history. Rick says 'Bob Dylan invited Richard and I to Woodstock' and Levon says 'Life is a Carnival is based on a pattern that Rick and I came up with'. Clearly an agenda at work there.


Entered at Mon Jan 6 03:41:12 CET 2014 from (174.91.165.7)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Hail Hail Mary Martin! Complete Interview here....

Richard Manuel brought Van to her......


Entered at Mon Jan 6 03:28:28 CET 2014 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

John D: Yes indeed. That there's Oshawa footage! By the way, in the late '60s Billy was in the loungy and Dunc-less version of Dunc and Judy and the Regents that had evolved from the little instrumental three-piece Robbie Robertson joined very briefly circa '59.


Entered at Mon Jan 6 01:50:30 CET 2014 from (174.91.165.7)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Mary Martin, uncompromising music exec, honored

"She's also the woman who cold-cocked a rude patron at a New York nightclub with a left hook. She recalled trying to get Warner Bros. to sign Jimmy Buffett. The company's brass refused."

"The next record that came out was 'Margaritaville,' " Martin said. "So everybody can eat (something unappetizing) and die as far as I'm concerned."

"Martin's heart-first attitude to her clients over the years flies in the face of today's compromise-happy industry practices. When representing Canadian writer-poet Cohen, she heard Joan Baez in concert as Baez changed some of the lyrics to Cohen's "Suzanne." Martin wrote a letter to Baez, saying, "I don't think you would take another brush to Andrew Wyeth's paintings, so don't alter Leonard Cohen's poetry." At the time, Baez was the undisputed queen of American folk music, while Cohen was a talented but still-scuffling songwriter."

"In a two-hour conversation with Orr, Martin spun stories. She talked of bringing producer Brian Ahern to hear Harris at a Maryland club; the two would later collaborate on best-selling country albums. She talked of introducing Cohen to Judy Collins, and of her swimming races with Dylan. ("He won, even though I had the flippers. Scrawny people from Minnesota, I guess, were good athletes.")


Entered at Mon Jan 6 01:38:53 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Bill M

Bill are you talking about the Jan Haust doc?


Entered at Mon Jan 6 01:29:05 CET 2014 from (174.91.165.7)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Since Mary Martin shares about Garth Hudson, here she is again....Talking about Leonard Cohen.


Entered at Mon Jan 6 01:22:24 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Bill

Thanks for the update Bill. Many of my friends and I have wondered whatever happened to him.


Entered at Mon Jan 6 01:21:52 CET 2014 from (174.91.165.7)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Mary Martin talks about The Hawks and Dylan (around 51 second mark).....

This clip...."Video courtesy of THE COUNTRY MUSIC HALL OF FAME'S program "The Louise Scruggs Memorial Forum, November 17th, 2009"

There is also another clip with Mary Martin talking about Leonard Cohen on youtube.


Entered at Mon Jan 6 01:03:53 CET 2014 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

John D: great stuff! All new to me, aside from how good Billy Dancer (real name: Gaugin) was. He was from New Brunswick and died 10 or so years ago in Sudbury, where he'd lived since the '70s. In You the Yonge Street documentary, that was clips of his legs doing the dancing interspersed between clips of Robbie playing.


Entered at Mon Jan 6 00:20:11 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Billy the Dancer and Bill M

Bill. When I was first starting out I managed a local band from Courtice called, Linda and the Chancellors. Members included Doni Underhill; who would later join Trooper. Founding member Bill Wade; who would go on to join Moxy. And the fabulous Billy The Dancer. One of the greatest guitar players to come out of the Southern Ontario circuit. He taught the band "Sac 'O Woe". The Howard Roberts version. You brought back great memories; with the mention of those names. Zeke Sheppard. One of the greatest.


Entered at Sun Jan 5 23:51:28 CET 2014 from (68.171.231.81)

Posted by:

Bill M

JT: Coincidentally, today I open the book about Dutch Mason and see a piture of him as leader-drummer of Dutchie Mason and the Esquires. Wrong Esquires I think, as Dutch, I believe, had done his time hanging with Hawkins in the '50s before heading back to Nova Sotia to stay. The book has another photo with his bassist, Zeke Sheppard, in another early group that is cited elsewhere as the Escorts (with Billy Dancer and Harold Boates). All of this matters to the Hawks story only because the super early "Yonge Street Rock and Roll Stories" footage of Robbie and Levon playing together in Oshawa before Robbie was even in the Hawks also shows Billy Dancer, Zeke Sheppard and Oshawa musician Frank Surette, all of whom would join the Hawks main farm team, Jerry Warren and the Tremblers (with Stan Szelest and eventually Rebel Paine).

Zeke would later play the Concord at the helm of Franklyn Sheppard and the Good Shepherds, the original version of which would jump ship on a trip to Vancouver, there to merge with another group and go to Motown and some level of success as Bobby Taylor and the Vancouvers. Back in Toronto, Sheppard put together a new Good Shepherds that included drummer Sonny Bernardi, who'd basically grown up at the Concord (or at east I think it was the Concord), where his parents had the coatcheck concession. I've seen a photo of a very young Sonny literally sitting on Levon's knee; Sonny turned into a fabulous drummer himself, best known for his many years with Crowbar, beginning with "Bad Manors".


Entered at Sun Jan 5 23:27:58 CET 2014 from (173.72.150.253)

Posted by:

Dat Head

Web: My link

interesting interview with RR on youtube and the usual back and forth arguments in the ensuing messages (on jambands, not youtube) http://www.jambands.com/news/2014/01/02/robbie-robertson-talks-about-final-meeting-with-levon-helm#.UsnTIPvlksY


Entered at Sun Jan 5 23:20:30 CET 2014 from (66.55.188.178)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: "Stoking the star maker machinery Behind the popular song."

The image. Essential? Probably. Sad but true. So much more than talent is needed to 'make it'. Talent: necessary but not sufficient.

I sometimes imagine a world where I don't know what the musician looks like or what his/her image is? When we didn't see much of our performers, then talent and presentation was often enough.

I have no doubt whatsoever that capitalizing on Levon Helm as the country down-home friend gave him a required image that sold the music effectively. But it was very good in and of itself and I think he was the real deal from what I knew of him and from what I had seen even in the old days. But you have to do this - the record company says so- there is no way around it.

A great example perhaps is how Alanis Morrissette changed her image to suit "Jagged Little Pill" and it sold a ton. It was a good record, but probably exceeded what it might have done because she was presented to her audience in a new way.


Entered at Sun Jan 5 20:18:43 CET 2014 from (58.104.14.90)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Subject: Peter V

Interesting stuff Peter but I wasn't thinking of Levon's accent (which was priceless) but the 'mythologising' of Levon which took place in the last few years. It would make more sense to think that this was done by the people around him rather than the man himself once they realised they had a marketable product. He was portrayed not as an ageing rock musician, which was what he was, but as a character out of King Harvest. All the talk of holding the Rambles 'to pay the rent' seemed suspicious and contrived to me. I don't know what the tax laws are in New York but in my part of the world there would be some benefit in having a mortgage on an income earning asset. The other day I saw an article about one of Levon's luxury cars being up for sale - didn't seem like the kind of vehicle Tom Joad would be driving.


Entered at Sun Jan 5 19:52:03 CET 2014 from (31.53.17.46)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Levon

What a lovely post on Levon, John.

I've been neglecting the Band a little just now, playing Michael Marra, John Martyn, AWB, Velvet Underground and the Byrds. I got a couple of Gene Clark albums for Christmas and am really enjoying them.

Here's what John Martyn said about Levon. Levon was 'friendly, sweet and decent...The thing I loved about Levon and still do is that he has an awful sense of humour and his continual irreverence, he's a mad beatnik. He was just fucking real.

I remember he once said to a bodybuilder called Fabio:'Ya legs is awl swollen up - what's up, ya gaut gout?'

What's sad about this post I heve just realised is that Michael Marra, John Martyn, Lou Reed, Gene Clark, Michael Clarke and Levon are all deceased.


Entered at Sun Jan 5 19:16:36 CET 2014 from (96.232.159.74)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: inside Llwen Davis

Not "finding" but "inside"


Entered at Sun Jan 5 19:04:36 CET 2014 from (96.232.159.74)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Finding lewyn Davis

I've not seen it yet,but I heard it is supposed to be loosely based on Dave Van Ronk


Entered at Sun Jan 5 17:17:04 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Divided & United

This 2 CD set arrived yesterday … songs of the Civil War from the likes of Loretta Lynn, Jorma Kaukonen, Taj Mahal, Vince Gill,T-Bone Burnett, Ricky Scaggs, Chris Hiilman, Old Crow Medicine Show, Dolly Parton, Ralph Stanley and a lot of people I hadn't heard of. They're all genuine Civil War songs, produced by Randall Poser. Very much "strong Americana" and CD1 is blue and CD2 is grey.

Anyway if you like "Dirt Farmer" I think you'll enjoy it!


Entered at Sun Jan 5 16:55:25 CET 2014 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The Movies

Landmark, thank you for your response, and happy new year.


Entered at Sun Jan 5 16:50:17 CET 2014 from (96.20.158.81)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

I saw it and enjoyed it. While I am not familiar with the whole folk scene as it existed back then, circa 1961. You could see some similar characters, whom I won't divulge. While I prefer the Coen's comedies(Raising Arizona, Lebowski, Hudsucker)there was enough humour in this one for me.


Entered at Sun Jan 5 16:27:17 CET 2014 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Inside Llewyn Davis

Although I realize this film is just out, I'm wondering if anyone has any opinion on it? Is it a take off on any particular musician we have known?

Music by T Bone Burnett.


Entered at Sun Jan 5 16:03:59 CET 2014 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Peter V / Higgins

Yet another post which makes the future generations of cyberspace historians call us for 'Sir Peter and two girls and some other guys'.


Entered at Sun Jan 5 15:35:54 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Mary Martin

If you walk into the Hard Rock Cafe; on Yonge St. today; which was the Friars Tavern........there is a plaque on the wall commemorating Dylan's visit to see the Hawks; with Mary Martin.


Entered at Sun Jan 5 14:53:45 CET 2014 from (66.55.188.178)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Sweet

I alert you to the New York Times magazine and a wonderful and complete (and to me fascinating) article on sweeteners for food and drink.

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/05/magazine/the-quest-for-a-natural-sugar-substitute.html?ref=international-home

Not music, but my instinct is that many in our readership may enjoy this article.


Entered at Sun Jan 5 12:46:39 CET 2014 from (174.91.165.7)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

The Hawks Meet Dylan...Guest Appearance Mary Martin


Entered at Sun Jan 5 12:13:39 CET 2014 from (66.55.188.178)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Mary Martin

Thank you, BEG, for bringing Mary Martin's magnificent contributions to light by connecting us to her papers in the R&R Hall of Fame. It is clear that she played a very important role in the careers of so many superb talents and that she should be recognized.


Entered at Sun Jan 5 12:07:24 CET 2014 from (66.55.188.178)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Remembering the Everly Brothers

Read PSB to get a personal perspective on The Everly Brothers.

http://www.counterpunch.org/2014/01/03/remembering-phil-everly/

Excellent!


Entered at Sun Jan 5 11:42:14 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Location: Pygmalion

Subject: Professor Higgins' opinion

On Levon … Can I come in as Professor Higgins (from Pygmalion). He was an expert on regional accents. OK, everyone has an accent. There is no such thing as unaccented English, even if one accent might be “posh public school received pronunciation.” We moderate our original accents to different degrees. Women moderate more than men, and this is connected to what every language teacher knows: in general, women are better at foreign languages than men.

I am thinking of two friends. One was born in Yorkshire, but after 40 plus years in the south of England still had a very strong Yorkshire accent. The other was from Liverpool, and retains a faint lilt of intonation and some words, but has moderated a long way over 30 plus years in the south … having a musical ear tends to encourage that. How much we retain regional accents differs strongly … my mum grew up in Wales, left at 15 and had not a trace of Welsh accent. Mrs V grew up in Belfast and has not a trace of Ulster, except that she stresses both syllables in Belfast (BEL-FAST) while the rest of Britain stresses only the first (BEL-fast). Professor Higgins would have heard that Van Morrison had spent five important years of his early life in the USA … there are touches here and there woven into the Northern Irish accent.

OK, back to Levon and Wallsend’s sense of self-parody. I think that’s down to strong accent retention. Levon went north at age 16, but in the company of Southerners and in the music business, would have found the Southern accent was a very positive thing … it fitted the music, and people loved the sound of it. Hence early on, he would have been encouraged to retain it. Which is why someone who spent 40 odd years living in New York State sounded so comfortably Southern. It was not self-parody or lack of authenticity, just rational accent retention. He'd always had positive feedback about his accent … though I'd bet an Arkansas native would have detected drifts northwards in words here and there.

It's also true that our accents return when we revisit places … my mum would sound slightly Welsh after a few days in Wales.


Entered at Sun Jan 5 10:14:31 CET 2014 from (124.25.159.252)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Subject: Wallsend/John W.

While envious of your personal connection with Levon John, I also saw a change between Levon's interviews in the 80's and early 90's (which were very enjoyable and informative) and the clips that appeared later. I certainly don't question his authenticity and basic good nature, but Wallsend has a point in that an agenda became apparent as time went on, and I think he over-emphasised the equality of all Band members contributions, and the shoddiness of their management, to support his royalty complaints at every opportunity. This could be a subtle thing, or if you caught him on a bad day or asked directly about TLW, a very angry and crude outburst. To be fair, Robbie has always had an agenda too, but the agenda was to protect not only his own reputation, but the reputation of The Band and all its members. Either approach is fine and understandable, it only bothers me when I know the facts are being distorted to serve the agenda.


Entered at Sun Jan 5 08:03:20 CET 2014 from (58.104.18.133)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Subject: John W

Thanks for the feedback. I never had any personal dealings with Levon so my impression is just based on what is in the public arena. I am certainly willing to accept what you say based on your first hand experience. Maybe it was just something about the way the publicity was done that struck me as insincere and heading in the direction of 'self-parody'. I realise musicians have to make a living and having a certain kind of image is an important part of selling the music. I don't doubt for a minute that Levon was the real thing. The share-cropper turned musician is a super-cool image and nobody did it better than Levon. It is a pity he wasn't able to come up with the Ramble idea in the 1980s when he was still healthy. If he had done that instead of reviving the Band things might have gone in a much more positive direction. The idea of the Ramble was taking something old and revitalising it by adding something new. If he had done it in the 1980s it would have been a step forward from TLW whereas reviving the Band was just going backwards. Anyway, just my personal thoughts.


Entered at Sun Jan 5 07:39:42 CET 2014 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: a question for Sebastian

A question Sebastian. I'm going through the recoding process now for the first time. I started wondering how the songs were chosen for The Band's albums. Was Robbie conscious of keeping a balance between the slower and more up tempo numbers wheb he was writing or did they just go with what they had?.

thanks Rod.


Entered at Sun Jan 5 05:52:21 CET 2014 from (68.199.162.84)

Posted by:

John W.

I must respond to Wallsend's post re Levon: "I have often wondered how much of the way he presented himself was real and how much was an act. I don't doubt that he was the real thing in terms of his origin and the music he played with the Band but I got the feeling that he began self-consciously playing the role of the share-cropper turned musician. For me the music on Dirt Farmer didn't seem genuine. I think it was popular with a lot of people who wanted 'authentic' music but who didn't actually know what the authentic form of that music was. People are calling it 'Americana' but this just seems like some way of giving something a fancy name so they can make money out it." Let me tell you, first of all, that man was one of the few I ever met who did not have a manipulative or insincere bone in his body. I get what you're saying, but if the share cropper-turned-musician thing was mythologized too much, it would have been on the part of the promoters, the media, maybe the fans, but never by the man himself playing an "act." I only got to know him as a fan that he kind of took under his wing, allowing me backstage or on the bus and stuff, no more closer than "the guy who pumped his gas" (yes that line by that writer Carol still bothers me). But in that time I realized what a totally honest, genuine, possibly naiive individual he was. He had no mind for business, public relations, or image. He was only into the music. And that was real -- a combination of the blues, country, R & B and gospel that combined to be called rock and roll. His focus was never as as sharply attuned to his public image as you are making it out to be, I can tell you that for sure.


Entered at Sun Jan 5 04:50:41 CET 2014 from (173.3.50.219)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Jerry T., thanks for putting up that piece from 2000 by Goddard. It was a good read, that i enjoyed. I met Mary Martin very briefly in 2004 in Nashville at that Burrito Deluxe show. She is a very fine looking woman, has a very nice way and air. Clearly, that piece shows her to be very astute, and very dogged in her pursuit of things. Sharp woman.


Entered at Sun Jan 5 04:48:23 CET 2014 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

BEG: Thanks for the link to the Mary Martin papers. I understand that her job with Grossman wasn't her first foray into the music biz, as she'd previously worked with the Billy O'Connor agency in Toronto, the one I mentioned a couple of weeks ago as having had one of Robbie's uncles on the roster as a magician - and as a result of whose efforts the agency drafted Robbie himself to play guitar on Dianne Brooks's "The Orbiteer Twist". Re Van Morrison, I believe he was still with Schweid-Merenstein at the time of "Moondance"; if Mary worked for them at the time then she would have known Stan Szelest, Sandy Konikoff, Ernie Corallo and the other members of the Ravens and the frontliners they backed on LP - Garland Jeffreys ("Grinder's Switch") and John Cale ("Vintage Violence").

Ian W: I think it's in Wallis's book on Ronnie Hawkins and his various Hawks that Mary Martin suggests that the Toronto groups she was really pushing while with Grossman were the Stormy Clovers, who sank without a lasting trace aside from an NFB documentary on Leonard Cohen, and Amos Garrett's old group, the Dirty Shames, who at least got to make two 45s for Philips, one of which was built on the Bo Diddley beat. (The two US additions went on to co-found Cat Mother and the All-Night Newsboys and be produced by Jimi Hendrix). Amos Garrett returned to Toronto and eventually got hooked up with Brian Ahern, as did Dianne Brooks; all of them wound up working with Rodney Crowell and, one suspects, Mary Martin.


Entered at Sun Jan 5 02:24:40 CET 2014 from (174.91.165.7)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Everly Brothers - Crying In The Rain


Entered at Sun Jan 5 02:23:01 CET 2014 from (174.91.165.7)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Guide to the Mary Martin Papers (ARC.0134)


Entered at Sun Jan 5 02:16:33 CET 2014 from (174.91.165.7)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

"On Sept. 15, 1965, Dylan flew to Toronto to catch the Hawks performing at the Friar’s Tavern and, as the story goes, jammed with them until the early morning on Sept. 16 in what Time magazine calls “the most decisive moment in rock history.”

Hey Bill M. I lent my copy of Carole Pope's autobio to Northern Girl. Late last year she was playing at a restaurant on Parliament Street.


Entered at Sun Jan 5 01:19:44 CET 2014 from (80.3.71.222)

Posted by:

Ian Woodward

Subject: Mary Martin (Bill M)

Thanks, Bill M, for the correction. I should have thought of different practices on different sides of the Atlantic. My point that she rose from being a receptionist still stands. A letter from Grossman much earlier in the year was typed by someone having "ch" as initials. Perhaps "mm" took over from "ch" in the intervening period.


Entered at Sun Jan 5 00:26:02 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Phil Everly

I did a very rapid "Ten best Phil Everly solo tracks" for Toppermost today. In advance of it being revised and edited, I have put up a draft version on my own blog as an instant tribute. See link.


Entered at Sat Jan 4 23:53:06 CET 2014 from (66.55.188.178)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: The Esquires

Other than the name, Bill M, I recall nothing. Sorry.


Entered at Sat Jan 4 23:03:15 CET 2014 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Ian W: That's the son's view too, and it makes a lot of sense. Also, I've worked with a lot of secretairies with all levels of training, and I've never seen any of them use "p.p.". Always either "Dolly Jones per John Smith" or "John Smith (in Dolly's handwriting" per Dolly Smith". An English thing that "p.p."? Whatever, MM was obviously very capable, and smart enough to know that a good approach to climbing a ladder is to step onto the bottom rung. The Leonard Cohen biography has some good material on her.


Entered at Sat Jan 4 22:52:27 CET 2014 from (66.55.188.178)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: The Running Pump

Bill M: The Running Pump on Kingston Rd. got into real trouble when a local alderman-type started a project that took about a year to complete (sewers etc), cutting off the tavern from the public and making it hard to get to.


Entered at Sat Jan 4 22:42:33 CET 2014 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

JT: thanks for the additional info. Which establishment on Kingston Road? Do you recall anything about those particular Esqires? Jackie Shane would have played the Concord as frontman for Frank Motley and the Motley Crew, and would have nipped a few blocks down Bloor at breaks to do a guest performance of his big hit, "Any Other Way", with whatever band was playing the highschool dance at Bloor Collegiate. Wish I'd thought to ask him if he ever guested with Hawkins.


Entered at Sat Jan 4 22:09:01 CET 2014 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

great picture jh.


Entered at Sat Jan 4 18:31:14 CET 2014 from (79.160.47.202)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Rick and Richard, early '80s. Feeling very little pain.


Entered at Sat Jan 4 18:04:53 CET 2014 from (80.3.71.222)

Posted by:

Ian Woodward

Location: Dylan and The Hawks in 1965

Thank you, JT, for directing me to that John Goddard article. I can’t recall if I’ve read it before but, if I did, I had forgotten it. I do have the Anthony Ferry STAR concert review (and the Bruce Lawson GLOBE AND MAIL review, too) but both are poor photocopies. I do not have Robert Fulford’s follow-up to the Ferry review, though I do have Fulford’s Dylan interview at Friars (published in the STAR on 18 September 1965) but, again, it is poor quality copy. I would appreciate decent copies of all four articles, should anyone here have them.

The 2005 Jeff Scwachter article on Somers Point ’65 (also in the archive on this site) was republished in 2010 with, I think, a bit extra - though nothing too grand as I recall.

I had forgotten that Dylan told Jann Wenner about Mary Martin pushing Levon and the Hawks. She may have joined the Grossman set-up as a receptionist but she was a bit more than that in 1965. I have a photocopy of two March 1965 letters from Grossman that she signed on his behalf. She wrote “AG per MM” and “ABG per MM”; I guess a trained secretary would have written “MM p.p. AG” and “ABG p.p. MM” but, nevertheless, not the action of a receptionist. And a letter in April was signed by Mary Martin in her own name and she described herself as “Secretary to Albert B. Grossman”. She was certainly in a position to push Levon and the Hawks.

As PSB has reminded me, John Hammond Jr’s SO MANY ROADS album, released in the Spring of 1965, had Robbie, Garth and Levon on it, as well as Mike Bloomfield, all of whom went on to record with Dylan. I don’t know the details of the recording sessions but Dylan was said to have attended one of them. As I recall, John Hammond Snr, Dylan’s early producer, was of the opinion that his son was a link between Dylan and The Hawks.

Maybe a bit of both.


Entered at Sat Jan 4 18:02:28 CET 2014 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Don & Phil

When I was about 13 my brother Howie and I began singing and playing together. Howie is the same age as Phil. The link is to Don & Phil doing one of those first songs of theirs we learned to play all those years ago.

Phil is the same age as my brother Howie. This really hits home. Thanks to Skype I talk to Howie just about every day.


Entered at Sat Jan 4 17:28:44 CET 2014 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Bye Bye Love

This was the first record I ever bought - 1957, Westchester Music in LA - $2 bucks I think.


Entered at Sat Jan 4 15:22:11 CET 2014 from (66.55.188.178)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Musicians, dancers, and even a wrestler

BEG: Thanks for 'Ghost City" article. Jack Fisher had the classy joint and the start of the Ronnie Hawkins/Levon and the Hawks era. My dad and his partners continued that and had Jackie Shane and Jon and Lee and The Checkmates. Go-go dancing gave way to different types of dancing and music as the pressure was on to survive and good music gave way to schlock and then the end came with the sale of the tavern as the partners moved on to another establishment on Kingston Rd. Those early 60s years were dynamic. It was my first time seeing a band rehearsing and preparing and those boys were superb. So were many others including DCT and the Shays, the Esquires and Jackie Shane. Even Sweet Daddy Siki (the wrestler) did stints there in the 60s.


Entered at Sat Jan 4 15:03:32 CET 2014 from (174.91.165.7)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Ghost City: Concord Tavern
925 Bloor St. W.

This Bloor and Ossington location played an essential role in the development of Toronto’s music scene.

BY: JAMIE BRADBURN


Entered at Sat Jan 4 14:56:37 CET 2014 from (174.91.165.7)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

The Everly Brothers had a weekly show.....Beautiful harmonies.

I'm still reading bio on Neil Young as it's around 700 pages. I didn't know about Neil's collaboration with Robbie and one with Levon. Apparently Neil had played "Homegrown" to Rick Danko and other musicians as well as "Tonight's The Night"......Rick said, "Go with the raw one." Neil ended up choosing TLN instead. Btw, I didn't get why Rick was referred here to Rick the .....

"Homegrown is an unreleased country-rock album by Neil Young. It was so near to being released that a cover had been created. At the last moment however, Neil Young chose to drop Homegrown and release the previously shelved Tonight's the Night instead. Young stated that he had a playback party for Homegrown and Tonight's the Night happened to be on the same reel. He decided to release Tonight's the Night after that listening because of "its overall strength in performance and feeling" and because Homegrown "was just a very down album."

White Line: "A bittersweet song that Young had recorded as an acoustic duet with The Band's Robbie Robertson in England a few days before CSNY's Wembley show."

Separate Ways: "The song begins in the middle of a doomy chord; Tim Mulligan lunged for the record button just as Young and the band dove into the song. Levon Helm rattles out a slow counterpoint as Ben Keith spins up a stark, bird-on-the-wire steel solo that has to be one of the lonesomest sounds ever recorded. 'I won't apologize/The light shone in from your eyes/It isn't gone/And it will soon come back again,' sings Young, sounding dead."


Entered at Sat Jan 4 14:48:27 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Phil Everly

I am so deeply saddened by his passing. Those harmonies were such an important part of my musical journey. This one hits hard.


Entered at Sat Jan 4 14:30:16 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Politicians were worse, I reckon! Anywhere where people have power leads to those weaker / less powerful being exploited. And often it's men over women. When I was at university, the deputy Prime Minister came to speak at a meeting, that was George Brown in 1966. Paralytically drunk, and three separate women complained he's grabbed a breast or a buttock … and these were 18 / 19 year old students. A foul man, who everyone knew about, but it never stopped him achieving high office. We could move on to the last government … Blunkett? Prescott? Or any government.


Entered at Sat Jan 4 12:54:58 CET 2014 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Good ol' Boys........Musicians?? Hell

As I laid around thinking about some of your comments Peter, I got to thinking. We are talking about the days of people like Senator George Wallace and that whole kind of mind set back in those days. Never mind just musicians.


Entered at Sat Jan 4 12:09:35 CET 2014 from (66.55.188.178)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: For Ian since you were surprised

Ian: This appears in the archives of this site

but I thought I would lift the material and remind all of the history since it is of interenst

Havergal is a high end girls school still present on Avenue Rd. near Lawrence

From the Toronto Star 11.18.2000 by John Goddard/rock journalist/excellent!

"The story begins in 1963 with the matchmaker, Mary Martin. She works now as a talent scout in Nashville but she was born in Toronto, went to the Havergal girls' school, and after a brief stint working for a Toronto insurance company, moved to New York's Greenwich Village. By chance she landed a receptionist's job with Albert Grossman, manager at the time to the hottest acts in folk music - Peter, Paul and Mary; Ian and Sylvia; and Bob Dylan. She kept her connection with Toronto, however, sometimes returning for a couple of months at a time and becoming one of the biggest fans of Levon and the Hawks. ``We would go to drink at the Pilot Tavern near Yonge and Bloor,'' she says of her and her friends. ``Then after several beers, or gin-and-tonics, we'd go down to see the Hawks at `the Le Coq d'Or.' ``Those boys talked to each other musically,'' she says. ``They had conversations with themselves that were so deeply musical that if you listened, you got to go along. They were the best band that we had ever, ever heard.'' The Hawks had formed as backing players to Toronto rockabilly star Ronnie Hawkins, splitting with him in late 1963 to extend their range into early rock 'n' roll songs, bluesy ballads and soulful r 'n' b tunes. In his 1993 autobiography, This Wheel's On Fire, Helm says that the Hawks considered themselves ``the undisputed champions of Canadian rock and roll.'' But they were still playing bars. In search of something bigger, they started travelling to New York, playing club dates and cutting an unsuccessful single there in early 1964. Some of the members also played on So Many Roads, the third album by solo blues artist John Hammond - ``one of the first to see the possibilities of having an electric band,'' Helm says. In early 1965, still looking to make a record of their own, the Hawks sent a demo tape to Mary Martin. She was back full time with Albert Grossman by then, and passed a copy to a Grossman assistant. `` `Miss Martin, we aren't interested in talent of that calibre,' '' she recalls him saying - ``meaning, I suppose, `They're a bar band. Who cares?' '' At the same time, Martin noticed that Dylan was becoming agitated. She dates the period to April, 1965, when a new group called the Byrds recorded an electric version of Dylan's ``Mr. Tambourine Man.'' ``He was just sitting in the office sort of shaking his leg and his head, going, `Golly, what do I do next, huh?' '' Martin recalls. ``And what had happened is very simple to explain. Bob Dylan had heard drums, an electric bass and an electric guitar on `Mr. Tambourine Man' - and for a folk singer that was a giant leap to think, `Damn, now I'm going to have to get a band.' ``But that's really what he had to ponder. And he did ponder it, and I said, `Well, go to Toronto and see the Hawks.' '' Dylan did not go right away. He went to England and Dylan's biographers all agree that he went through some kind of profound dissatisfaction that spring. He was fed up with playing guitar and harmonica alone in front of reverential sold-out crowds, a mood intimately captured in D. A. Pennebaker's film Don't Look Back. At one point before walking onstage, Dylan says, ``I don't feel like singing.'' In early June, 1965, he returned home. Within days he wrote ``Like A Rolling Stone,'' and on June 15, with an electric band, he recorded it - a six-minute masterpiece that represented, in the words of biographer Paul Williams, ``a whole new kind of music.'' It wasn't folk. It wasn't rock and roll. It was something else - a rich, stately release, perhaps, of all the restlessness and boredom Dylan had been feeling that spring. On July 20, ``Like A Rolling Stone'' was released as a single and five days after that, at the Newport Folk Festival, Dylan made his first controversial stage appearance with an electric group, put together the night before. Mary Martin was in the audience and says watching Dylan at that now famous concert where fans booed him off the stage stiffened her resolve to play go-between. ``Bob Dylan still needed his own band,'' she says, ``and I really felt that the boys needed to take that other step before they really emerged.'' The Hawks were playing all that summer at a teenage nightclub near Atlantic City. Martin persuaded a Grossman scout, Dan Weiner, to check them out. She also told the Hawks about the Newport concert, and in early August she brought Rick Danko an advance copy of Dylan's sixth album, Highway 61 Revisited, with ``Like A Rolling Stone.'' The Hawks had still barely heard of Dylan. ``We had no idea how big Bob Dylan was,'' Helm says in his book. In their ignorance, they dismissed him as a folkie - a ``strummer'' they called him - and viewed themselves far more favourably as a hard-edged bar band. They were worlds apart, but the band's resistance to Dylan still seems astounding given the phenomenon he had become. At 24 years old, Dylan stood at the centre of a new music that critics were calling folk-rock and that Dylan himself refused to label. Sound, lyrics, and emotion swirled and fit together in his songs in revolutionary new ways. All that August, ``Like A Rolling Stone'' rode near the top of the charts, soon followed by ``Positively Fourth Street.'' Other artists scrambled to record Dylan songs and sing in the Dylan style. That month alone, 48 Dylan songs were released by other people, including the Turtles' hit, ``It Ain't Me Babe,'' and Cher's ``All I Really Want To Do.'' But if the Hawks were not entirely sold on Dylan, neither was Dylan sold on the Hawks. His first choice on guitar was Chicago guitarist Mike Bloomfield, who had played the Newport gig. Only after Bloomfield turned him down for other commitments did Dylan turn to Hawks' guitarist Robbie Robertson. ``(Mary Martin) knew all the bands and singers from Canada,'' Dylan later told Rolling Stone editor, Jann Wenner, ``and she kept pushing these guys the Hawks on me.'' Dylan invited Robertson to audition in New York with the beginnings of a band, and Robertson suggested replacing the drummer with Helm, which Dylan did. The other Hawks would continue to play the nightclub, while Robertson, Helm and two other musicians would play two electric concerts with Dylan. The first took place on Aug. 28, 1965, at New York's Forest Hills Tennis Stadium before 15,000 people - the biggest audience Robertson and Helm had ever played to. Dylan divided the concert into two sets. In the first, he sang seven numbers by himself with an acoustic guitar and harmonica. Then came the electric set. Before they went on, Helm says, Dylan gathered them together and said, ``Just keep playing, no matter how weird it gets.'' Boos and catcalls followed. ``Yeah, yeah, shake it up, baby.'' ``Scumbag.'' ``Where's Ringo?'' A fight broke out. People threw fruit at the band members, although not at Dylan, and at one point a man rushed the stage and knocked keyboard player Al Kooper off his chair. Six days later, the group repeated the show at California's Hollywood Bowl, after which Dylan proposed to tour. Kooper, however, said he'd had enough. Helm said he would not break up the Hawks. ``Take us all, or don't take anybody,'' he recalls telling Grossman, and Dylan later replied, ``When can I hear the band?'' On Wednesday afternoon, Sept. 15, 1965, Dylan arrived in Toronto by private plane. At midnight, he went to the Friar's Tavern to watch Levon and the Hawks play their final set, and afterward he rehearsed with them until 6 a.m. The whole next night they rehearsed together, and at one point Dylan gave an interview to Robert Fulford, then a reporter for The Star. ``I know my thing now,'' Dylan told him. ``I know what it is. It's hard to describe. I don't know what to call it because I've never heard it before.'' Two months later at Massey Hall, before the Hawks' hometown crowd, Star reviewer Anthony Ferry let go one of the harshest attacks of the entire tour. ``Here was a Bob Dylan who once was a purist,'' he wrote,``electronically hooked up to a third-rate Yonge St. rock 'n' roll band.'' Fulford disagreed. ``To me the new Dylan seems the better Dylan - more expressive, more exciting,'' he wrote in a column later that week. ``The second half of the Massey Hall concert, with that wild rock beat coming from Levon and the Hawks, was a remarkable experience - great waves of sound roaring off the stage in marvellously subtle rhythms, a tremendous roaring hurricane of a style . . . ``I love it.'' "


Entered at Sat Jan 4 11:49:56 CET 2014 from (66.55.188.178)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Dream

The music of the Everly Brothers had a big impact on me as well. Harmonies like that were from heaven. We heard them again with the Beachboys but the Everlys had it first. As a 12 year old, these harmonies blew me away. My influences in the 50s were the Everlys and Chuck Berry. I loved the Flamingos (I Only Have Eyes For You) and Searchin' by the Coasters. These were my first 78s. I used to take my nickels to the juke box at Jackson's Point near Lake Simcoe in the summertime so I could hear these songs (Dream, Wake Up, Little Susie and the others). So for me Phil and Don played a big part in my musical growth.


Entered at Sat Jan 4 10:22:16 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: RIP Phil Everly

Phil Everly … I’m deeply saddened by this one. When I used to go to youth club when I was 14 to 16, the choice of records that kids brought along was Elvis. Cliff Richard, Buddy holly, The Everly Brothers and Bddie Cochran.

For me, the Everly Brothers and Eddie Cochran wre the pick of the bunch.

Both David P and I chose “Foreverly” the Billie Joe Armstrong & Norah Jones re-creation of “Songs Out Daddy Taught Us” among our “Best of 2013” and I added Bobnnie Prince Billy & Dawn McCarthy’s What The Brothers Sang". So the songs of the Everly Brothers are at last being recognized this year. The originals are so definitive that people held back on covering them till now.

I was surprised at The Guardian obituary which says they were on a downward spiral “before The Beatles”. Not so in the UK, with their mid 60s hits Price of Love, Love Is Strange, Ferris Wheel and Gone Gone Gone (which will be many a tabloid headline today).

I last saw them in Hyde Park supporting Simon & Garfunkel in 2004, where they only did a short set. Phil would have been 63 / 63, so I was surprised that we’ve heard nothing from them in many years, as others of their age continued to continue. I hadn’t known there were health issues.

LINK goes to Toppermost on The Everly Brothers… one of the very first ones too. It's short as a result, but it might be a good time to comment and add some personal "tens".


Entered at Sat Jan 4 07:37:31 CET 2014 from (68.199.162.84)

Posted by:

John W.

R.I.P., Phil Everly from the Everly Brothers at age 74.


Entered at Sat Jan 4 03:03:31 CET 2014 from (66.55.188.178)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Yes. Ian, that is the story as it has been repeatedly told

The Friar's Tavern and Mary Martin go down in history as the place and person with respect to Bob Dylan and Levon and the Hawks. I don't know anyone who personally can confirm this, but it has been written and rewritten so many times that it has become the reality. John Hammond Jr. may have had a role to play as well. It apparently did happen that Dylan saw the Hawks play Toronto. I know it was not the Concord because my dad owned it and it did NOT happen there, though Levon and the Hawks played there repeatedly in the 63-65 period.


Entered at Sat Jan 4 02:28:48 CET 2014 from (58.104.17.97)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Subject: Dan's Link

I see in the article Dan linked they repeat the story about Neil Diamond being rude to Bob Dylan at the TLW. I get tired of reading that. Neil denies ever saying it. Apparently, the story started as one of Ron Wood's recollections. It is amazing how these stories take on a life of their own.


Entered at Sat Jan 4 02:04:54 CET 2014 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: going for baroque

BEG: Thanks for the link to Historicist. I just wish that they'd placed the Concord - grim or not - near Ossington or Dovercourt, or even Dufferin, rather than distant Lansdowne.

BTW, I finally read Carole Pope's "Anti-Diva", which appeared under the Xmas tree. Funny that Vaughan Meader has been mention here of late, especially for attending TLW; I can't be bothered looking it up, but Pope has him sitting near her at some other event.

Also under the tree, as anticipated, was the euro-EMI Band two-fer - Big Pink and Big Brown, remixed with all the bonus tracks. What struck me listening to MFBP is that all the previously buried frilly bits that had been brought up in the remix serve to date the album. Maybe Left Banke's second with a soupcon of Buffalo Springfield (especially the bg vocals on "In A Station"). Not "The Weight" though; everything's thoroughly lovely, but its simple majesty stands out even more than before- and seems much more related to the songs in Big Brown. It's as if the hero comes to town and has his usual series of encounters with Nazareth's resident odd ducks, but this time also witnesses a series of vignettes based on local stories. Only then can he go back across the great divide, bag sinking low, etc.


Entered at Sat Jan 4 01:45:23 CET 2014 from (69.112.79.86)

Posted by:

Dan

Location: New Jersey
Web: My link

Subject: Lightfoot At TLW

Ok John D I apologize if my information is incorrect regarding Lightfoot & TLW. I got it at this site : Turns out, Lightfoot was invited to play The Last Waltz—albeit too late, by his standards. "I was there as a spectator," says Lightfoot, reached by phone at his home in Ontario. "I was asked to do it, but I don't think I was prepared to do it at that time. I didn't feel I had the confidence to do it. Robbie [Robertson] came out before the show and asked me. I wish I had, but I just wasn't prepared."


Entered at Sat Jan 4 01:36:35 CET 2014 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Standards & Sub-standards

I'm in total agreement with you Peter. However, what I am referring to is not to condone the mistreatment of women you refer to. I bruised my knuckles "more than one time" on faces of people whose treatment of women were disgusting.

I was talking with Susan just the other night about what a "baby sitter" I had been for years. That bares some explanation. This is how it goes. One particular club, "Gabby's Cabaret" in Langley comes to mind right away. I lived in Langley for 8 years, and spent a lot of time playing music in that bar. I suppose the fact that I have 3 daughters may have some personal influence, but I have never been able to reat women badly, (even some that deserved it.)

Many nights, not only me but the guys in my band and some of the bouncers would be approached at closing time by some of the young ladies. Some had come alone, some were in pairs. Gabby's had a real big, real dark parking lot. Many of these girls were genuinely scared to go out and get in their cars to leave. I couldn't count the number of times walking these young girls out to their car, making sure they had their keys out before they ventured out there. Stand there beside their car while they started up and drove away. Some body had to do it.

One night in that same club, a bunch of us who had a night off went down to visit an out of town band of friends who were playing the place. When they took a break, there was about ten of us sitting around a table beside the stage having a beer and chatting. Beside us at a table was a real good looking blonde by herself.

I noticed this guy, (he hung around that place a lot.) A big sloppy bully. Well he was hitting on her and real vulgar. I happened to turn, as she was sitting closest to me and I heard what he was saying to her.

Just kind of like a joke, I grabbed her chair and pulled her over to me, and I said to this guy, "Hey...leave my old lady alone." This idiot goes ballistic what he wasn't going to do to me......but his vulgar display was scaring her. I said, that's enough now shut up and go and have a drink or something. Well he had to keep it up. This guy weighs about 230 he's big so I figure, well I'm going to have to make this shot a real hard one. I looked up at him still sitting in my chair and said.....ok, I'm gonna hit you now....you ready? I came out of the chair, and caught him right under the chin on that bone that turns your lights out. He folded up like a sack of shit. My brother says.....he wasn't ready.

Well my point is I understand where your coming from. We are not all like that and none of them that took advantage of women like that should have gotten away with it. However we could get into that argument over "countries" that condone that treatment of women.

More and more hopefully that sort of thing is changing, example is the sentencing of those guys in India that raped that young woman on a bus.


Entered at Sat Jan 4 00:42:09 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Not sure I agree on "the code" Norm, as the whole BBC DJ / musician exploitation of very young girls starts to emerge here and indeed people are being prosecuted 30 plus years on in Britain. Some will be wrong, some will be right. False memory syndrome exists, but can be discounted when half a dozen girls have near identical memories. The "code" worked for the guys, fine. It didn't work for the female victims, with "victims" being the right word. Times have changed it's true. I never thought any of these people were role models. That doesn't interfere with appreciation of the music for me, but I also don't think it should mean the Jerry Lee Lewis's and Chuck Berrys of this world (restricting it only to the convicted) should get away with impunity either.


Entered at Sat Jan 4 00:41:15 CET 2014 from (80.3.71.222)

Posted by:

Ian Woodward

Web: My link

Subject: Levon and the Hawks at Friar's Tavern - 1965

This was new to me:

http://citiesintime.ca/toronto/story/bob-dylan-me/

It may not be new to you.


Entered at Fri Jan 3 23:49:48 CET 2014 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Most Respected??????? & Real Hard Times

Now it seems to me that Ari, has claimed he is quite young. I of course have no knowledge of his experience in the bar scene. However by comments he holds people in "high regard". For the music they played, that,s true. For their conduct as young men.....the old saying, "if you can't say somethin' nice......." applies.

I have never, and will never make comments about the personal behaviour of members of the "BAND", or any band for that matter. We have a code, "what happens on the boat....stays on the boat". That code is "supposed to " hold true to the bars and the road as well.

Why does any body want to know what went on in bars, cars, and bedrooms all those years ago. In truth.....it's none of yer fuckin business! So things that I have in second hand information about those guys, and others, stays with me until the cremation.

Rather than type a bunch of words not too interesting to some Jerry, I put a link to Wikipedia about "Hard Times".

Set during the great depression when a guy made a buck any way he could, Charles Bronson was a bare knuckle fighter. Read it up. Whether you are a fan od pugilistics or not, it is a very well acted movie. Charles Bronson, growing up as a coal miner was always more believable in a part like this than most.


Entered at Fri Jan 3 23:32:36 CET 2014 from (66.55.188.178)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: The Point is...

Angelina; The point is not what they write (LH or CS or anyone else). It is the interest that everyone has in getting into other's private business. I know history is determined by sex and crime and man's inhumanity to man and all that. What offends me is that the art (in this case, music) is influenced in the minds of so many and even at times seems secondary to the 'dirt'. I really don't give a damn about Levon's dirt or anyone else's for that matter. I cue up the stylus and turn on the machine and beauty emerges. I don't allow it to be tainted by this type of crap. Its of little or no interest to me. I find it incredible that it shapes the view of others and can be of interest to them. That's where I'm coming from and I make no exceptions. I understand it is relevant historically but I for one read the books (not CS's) when I think maybe I can be informed about some aspect of the music. Anyway, that's where I'm coming from in this diatribe.


Entered at Fri Jan 3 23:18:11 CET 2014 from (174.91.165.7)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Historicist: The Hawk Nests in Toronto

BY KEVIN PLUMMER
Every Saturday at noon, Historicist looks back at the events, places, and characters—good and bad—that have shaped Toronto into the city we know today.

Hey JT...Why is Cathy Smith's laundry dirty, but not Levon's in his book? The Band were not only musicians.....Dylan's first wife shared her laundry as well.....
Anyway, would you believe I was standing in line to return home from Jamaica one summer, and a retired police officer was right in front of me. We started talking about music in general because a Buffet song was playing and I don't know how The Hawks came up but he did share some general comments about that time in TO and the authorities and The Hawks.....
Maybe Cathy Smith wrote the book for her daughter......
I was given CTD by a former poster. For obvious reasons, everytime this topic comes up......brings up a lot of emotions. I orginally responded to Ari's post because I felt Cathy Smith at least needed to be known not only for what she provided the three Band members, but what she was capable of herself.


Entered at Fri Jan 3 23:03:03 CET 2014 from (74.71.203.44)

Posted by:

Ari

Hey BEG,

Sorry about the misquote. Like I said, I left the book in Texas accidentally so I cannot quote directly. Perhaps you are all right that Cathy Smith deserves the benefit of the doubt. Seems to me that back then she was the person who was always in the right place at the right time, hanging out with two of greatest most respected bands of all time and having customers as illustrious as Robert De Niro and Robin Williams, but in retrospect happened to be the unlucky individual who was in the wrong place at the wrong time.

My apologies for the harsh bias. I do remember though as I was reading the book that I felt I was reading something that was not supposed to be read, that the more I read the more poison I was swallowing. That's not a shot at Cathy but that's simply the way I felt reading the book as a whole. Once I was done I felt like I had eaten to much candy and needed to lie down.


Entered at Fri Jan 3 22:28:37 CET 2014 from (66.55.188.178)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Lightfoot backstage

Never saw 'HARD TIMES', Norm. I'll watch for it.

In 1966 or so, I was backstage briefly with Gordon Lightfoot after a Massey Hall concert with his trio performing You reminded me of this by talking about this wrt TLW. Those were heady times. He was very friendly to us.


Entered at Fri Jan 3 22:13:03 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Divided & United

The "Divided & United: Songs of The Civil War" 2 CD set arrived today. Taj Mahal, Jorma Kaukonen, Dolly Parton, T Bone Burnett and many more!


Entered at Fri Jan 3 22:08:10 CET 2014 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Hard Times

Hope things are improving for you John....you folks out there certainly take some rough winters. We haven't had any of them for some time out here. Today is sunny with a little extra bitter Nor-West but, it'll be dropping for tomorrow, then it's like July.

We'll be cutting some wood tomorrow. I never loose sight of how fortunate we are on the sunshine coast here. At our age now hard winters are too "hard". Mexico is the only place.

If Lightfoot had been at TLW, I'm sure we would all have known about that long before now.

As I was typing "Hard Times", it flashed a memory of that movie from long ago. Charles Bronson & James Coburn. Did you see it Jerry? I've always been a fan of those two guys. Great actors, and the real deal for what they did. James Coburn trained with Bruce Lee.


Entered at Fri Jan 3 22:07:20 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The First Family

Vaughan Meader at TLW? A huge influence on my life was the Churchill exchange history teacher from Pittsburgh we had when I was fifteen. A couple of years ago, I saw “The First Family” LP in a charity shop and picked it up. I took out the inner sleeve and it was a gift dedicated from my old teacher from Pittsburgh to my old school. I was so pleased to find it (and so pissed off that they gave it to a charity shop).

Yes, Meaders’s whole career was screwed by the Kennedy assassination. Nowhere left to go.


Entered at Fri Jan 3 21:36:49 CET 2014 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

I attended with my first wife--and it was about as cold as it is today.


Entered at Fri Jan 3 21:14:25 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Before the Flood

Following Pat's post it would be appropriate to note that forty years ago today The Band began their tour with Dylan in Chicago.


Entered at Fri Jan 3 21:07:01 CET 2014 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Wait a minute. Vaughn Meader was at TLW? With biceps and triceps alive alive oh?


Entered at Fri Jan 3 21:03:47 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

Thanks RC. having a rough couple of days.


Entered at Fri Jan 3 20:49:03 CET 2014 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Chuckling!

Read it again John........what you meant was he "would be hard to miss".


Entered at Fri Jan 3 20:45:12 CET 2014 from (68.171.231.81)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

I'd try this online booksellers' site. Search title and author or you'll have to wade through a lot of Christian lit.


Entered at Fri Jan 3 20:28:18 CET 2014 from (96.232.159.74)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Lisa

I agree with you. I think Cathy Smith was much maligned. She was a 14 year old kid with not a lot of parental guidance. She took the role of "Groupie" to heart with a lot of reinforcement from some of the guys.

one thing popped out at me when I read Keith's autobio. C Smith spoke about living in Keith's house as a a sort of assistant. Keith said he barely knew her name and she was a supplier of drugs and not much else. Very different take.


Entered at Fri Jan 3 20:24:30 CET 2014 from (58.104.17.97)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Subject: Kerrin

I always find those 'Robbie wasn't much of a guitarist' comments amusing. I think one thing that the recently discovered video shows is that he was amazing (if we didn't know that already). When I was watching it my first thought was the comment Clapton made in the making of second album documentary about how Robbie approached a song from a songwriters point of view rather than from the point of view of a guitarist. He played guitar parts that suited the song rather than flashy solos. I have listened to all these songs a million times but just seeing them play that concert (much more than TLW) made me aware how guitar driven the songs were. It is amazing that it is still possible to find new perspectives in the music. Now to get back to the dirty linen ...


Entered at Fri Jan 3 20:26:28 CET 2014 from (99.244.70.115)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Lightfoot at TLW?

Well Dan if he was there he was really hidden. I was backstage for the whole event; including rehearsals. Also the after party. I didn't see him at all and he wouldn't be hard to miss. Robbie may have wanted him there; but I never saw him. I did see Ms Smith with Richard and Vaughn Meader; whose career ended when Kennedy was killed. His "First Family album was one of the biggest comedy album sellers of all time.


Entered at Fri Jan 3 19:56:43 CET 2014 from (38.113.85.40)

Posted by:

Dan

Location: New Jersey

Subject: Cathy Smith

The Cathy Smith book "Chasing The Dragon" is long out of print and expensive if you find it on EBay etc. There are rumors she inspired the song "Sundown" by Gordon Lightfoot. Her background vocals do appear on the song "High and Dry" on the album Sundown. Note that Lightfoot was at The Last Waltz and was asked to perform by Robbie, but felt that he did not have enough time to prepare.


Entered at Fri Jan 3 19:45:56 CET 2014 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

In 2014 smart people shouldn't be vying to name and shame the person who brought marijuana into the room. In any case, wasn't alcohol Richard's demon?


Entered at Fri Jan 3 19:29:15 CET 2014 from (58.104.17.97)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Subject: Lisa

Thanks for the clarification. Sounds like she really got hurt. I remember one of the most touching moments in the autobiography of Malcolm X is when he expresses shame and regret for having corrupted a young girl. I wonder if our heroes ever had those feelings - doesn't seem like it. Seems there was a divide between Garth and Robbie on the one side and Levon, Rick and Richard on the other. That probably explains why they are alive and the others aren't. Got to get me a copy of that book.


Entered at Fri Jan 3 18:56:15 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: 1964

No Band connection, but today I was in a waiting room reading a magazine. I used my iPhone to capture the article. They had the sums that EMI paid out in royalties in the first quarter of 1964.

Royalty figures for the first quarter of 1964 show how much of EMI’s total revenue was still from classical music (The Oldie, February 2012):

The Beatles £46,982 10s 4d


Cliff Richard £18, 847 15s 9d


Dave Clark Five £13, 535 16s 10d


Herbert von Karajan £10,903 7s 8d


Maria Callas £10,022 9s 9d


The Shadows £7,760 3s 6d


D Fischer-Dieskau £7,165 17s 3d


Otto Klemperer £6,234 7s 5d

3s 6d means three shillings and sixpence, or 17.5p in today's money.

Cliff Richard was therefore earning more than any individual Beatle, at least in that quarter. The classical bias is even more than it looks. Herbert von Karajan was already working mainly with Deutsche Grammophon and his main work with EMI was pre-1957. Maria Callas was watching royalties spiraling down rapidly from greater heights.


Entered at Fri Jan 3 18:49:08 CET 2014 from (12.161.43.5)

Posted by:

Magnus1964

Location: Roanoke, VA

Subject: Live at the Academy of Music 1971

I stumbled across this site while listening to the new release at work (I rec'd the set for Christmas and am enjoying it completely), and wondering what they were singing about in "Caledonia Mission." After reading the post about the song here, I'm glad to see that I'm not the only who found the lyrics just a bit mysterious.


Entered at Fri Jan 3 18:32:33 CET 2014 from (174.1.247.160)

Posted by:

Lisa

Location: Metro Vancouver

Subject: Cathy Smith

Wallsend, the actual quote is "When I left Woodstock and Levon, I thought to myself that I was somehow the winner of our long, drawn-out battle. It seemed to me that Levon was becoming a caricature of himself - the mystery man had lost his mystery. After twelve years, I finally felt that I was leaving him behind."

I think that she meant this as a personal reflection on Levon, not as a criticism of him as a musician - that the rose-colored glasses she had viewed him through had finally been taken off, so to speak.

I also seem to remember Ronnie Hawkins, in his book, saying that she had been terribly in love with Levon, but ended up with Richard, because he needed looking after, and she liked taking care of people.


Entered at Fri Jan 3 18:32:53 CET 2014 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Dirty Laundry

I'm with you Jerry. I made a comment about trying to get thru a year without this sort of thing. It didn't even take a week to start rehashing this crap.

It would seem there are many here who are avid subscribers to the likes OF, "National Enquirer". It beats me what enjoyment some take in looking in peoples closets to see what sort of dirty underwear they can find.


Entered at Fri Jan 3 17:08:54 CET 2014 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Subject: Historians / Dlew

Dlew wrote: "As a professional historian.... I'm too far removed in time and space." With all academic respect to my former colleague I say: NONSENSE! A historian should stay far in time and space. The longer the better.


Entered at Fri Jan 3 17:03:16 CET 2014 from (66.55.188.178)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: DL

Once again, DL.. dirty laundry. Its in everyone's hamper. No one escapes. Who cares! The music. IMO.


Entered at Fri Jan 3 16:13:01 CET 2014 from (101.164.0.90)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Subject: UK police

If Rolf Harris is found guilty... Many very famous men, knights, commanders of the British empire, et cetera.... Need I go on...


Entered at Fri Jan 3 15:49:29 CET 2014 from (80.3.71.222)

Posted by:

Ian Woodward

Subject: Dylan and the Hawks - Woody Guthrie concert

Looking though my various notes on Dylan and The Hawks, I was reminded of the Woody Guthrie Tribute concerts in January 1968. I thought I might add, in case it hasn't been picked up here, that Bear Family Records are apparently engaged in trying to gather material on these two shows (and the one in Hollywood a couple of years later, without Dylan or the Band) with a view to a comprehensive release of some kind. Quite what this would involve and how advanced or otherwise Bear Family are, is not known to me. Bear Family are usually comprehensive, if expensive, with their releases.


Entered at Fri Jan 3 15:43:31 CET 2014 from (174.91.165.7)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Here are the photos of The Band again in a more organized manner and with Dylan in Houston.


Entered at Fri Jan 3 15:18:44 CET 2014 from (174.91.165.7)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Sunday Break 2 [Fleetwood Mac, America, THE BAND, Chicago and Steve Miller]...Check Thumbnails

Sep 5, 1976, Austin, Texas.


Entered at Fri Jan 3 15:18:31 CET 2014 from (124.25.159.252)

Posted by:

Kerrin

Fantastic to see some balanced and historically revealing contributions to the guestbook. I've always flinched at the deluge of "Robbie ripped off his pure-hearted soulmates" comments on YT and various musician forums, which seem to automatically lead to "he wasn't such a great guitarist either". I love them all for their musical contributions but when we take into account how dysfunctional they were once the money and fame arrived...well, there must have been some very hard days at the office on those later tours. Apologies if I'm covering well-worn territory here, but as I say, great to see some balanced input.


Entered at Fri Jan 3 15:09:50 CET 2014 from (174.91.165.7)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Hi Lisa. The topic of Cathy Smith has come up here before.......I really appreciated your post and Peter's as well. Thank you.

Ari....I couldn't find any reference to Cathy stating that Levon was becoming a parody of himself......She did however comment on the RCO All-Stars "Saturday Night Live" performance and recalls telephone conversation with Levon.

"But the truth was, I thought, they were terrible. The whole bunch of them had not been ready to perform together yet. Levon had been dragging the beat on the drums and his voice had been weak when in other years it used to carry. The camera angles were none too flattering either."

"Well I thought you were absolutely lousy. It was the worst thing you guys could have done. You haven't worked as a group long enough. You weren't prepared for it and you've got a big contract you've just signed with ABC-Dunhlll. To tell the truth, you come off looking like a bunch of morons."

I couldn't find a clip of the performance but I did find Paul Butterfield. Levon Helm, Dr John and others playing "Slow Down" at the rehearsal building at the old Bearsville Studios, circa ~1977


Entered at Fri Jan 3 14:05:47 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The 1976 tour meeting is described by Cathy Smith in some detail. Richard insisting she go along, and the WAGs (wives and girlfriends, a UK soccer term) were furious because they were not allowed to go. He insisted she was his nurse not his girlfriend, and that seems true. It blew up in a big meeting where Richard waved a Grand Marnier bottle and said he wouldn’t go unless she was with him. After the tour, he also paid to take her out to TLW. According to her account, she did save his life when a dealer gave them heroin and she managed to crawl to an elevator and alert a manager. It’s not a pleasant story. She insists that Richard was always sweet and nice, even when in the throes of alcoholism. Robbie and Garth had nothing to do with her though she speaks of both with respect. Rick, also involved, comes out OK, I thought. Basically, Levon comes across badly. Skimming sections just now it reinforces a divide between Robbie and Garth on one hand, and the other three, which ties in with Robbie interviews on NLSC where he and Garth did the lion’s share of the work, and the others did their bits and departed.

On perspective, you can’t argue that Levon’s accounts are gospel because “he was there” but Ms Smith’s accounts are “gossip” or “untrue” even though “she was there.” Not that I ever saw anywhere where Levon denied it, and as I said, one of the most damning exploitative stories is repeated in his own book.

On Levon coming across badly, and he does, it has to be balanced against being 22, chased by lots of women and having grown up like that. When the various tales of dirty deeds at the BBC involving DJs and musicians in the 60s / 70s started to emerge, I imagine very many rock musicians would have been looking with trepidation if a police officer had knocked on the door.


Entered at Fri Jan 3 13:34:22 CET 2014 from (101.164.0.90)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Subject: Cathy Smith

According to Wikipedia, ms smith was given a 12 month good behaviour bond in 1991. I've not read her book, nor do I know anything beyond her except for Levon's recollections, some second hand reminisces from here, and what is on the wiki page.

As a professional historian, I'm loath to pass any judgement on her. I'm too far removed in time and space.


Entered at Fri Jan 3 10:59:49 CET 2014 from (103.253.201.137)

Posted by:

AP Calculus AB

Location: AP Calculus AB
Web: My link

Subject: AP Calculus AB

Wow Great Blog You Have Here.Also Your Site Loads Quickly! That Helps a Lot. Please Keep a Rewarding Job. Thank u.


Entered at Fri Jan 3 10:37:31 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Put it this way, Cathy Smith was 15 or 16 when she met The Band. Levon, for example, was 22. Do you think she introduced them to dope?


Entered at Fri Jan 3 08:11:03 CET 2014 from (58.104.15.43)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Subject: Ari

Interesting that you use the expression 'became a parody of himself'. I haven't read the book (if someone could post the relevant pages it would be great because it is expensive second hand) so I don't know exactly what she meant by that but in the various interviews with Levon I have seen I have often wondered how much of the way he presented himself was real and how much was an act. I don't doubt that he was the real thing in terms of his origin and the music he played with the Band but I got the feeling that he began self-consciously playing the role of the share-cropper turned musician. For me the music on Dirt Farmer didn't seem genuine. I think it was popular with a lot of people who wanted 'authentic' music but who didn't actually know what the authentic form of that music was. People are calling it 'Americana' but this just seems like some way of giving something a fancy name so they can make money out it.


Entered at Fri Jan 3 08:07:14 CET 2014 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: Chasing The Dragon

I'd like to read that book even if it presents some of the guys in a bad light. Ari's comment about Richard refusing to be on the tour unless she came along is interesting. Maybe that sort of behaviour is part of the reason Robbie decided he'd had enough?


Entered at Fri Jan 3 06:47:08 CET 2014 from (174.1.247.160)

Posted by:

Lisa

Location: Metro Vancouver

Subject: Chasing The Dragon

I have always wondered when the subject of this book would appear in the Guestbook.

Ari, I disagree that her writing is either two-faced or mean-spirited. She clearly loved Levon very much, but the feeling was not reciprocated. And to have a baby by yourself and give it up is a very traumatic event in the life of any woman.

Even given the fact that she tries to present herself in the most positive manner, there is little doubt, in my mind anyway, that she was used and then disregarded - the fate of many women who hung around rock groups, sad to say.

As far as selling drugs goes, she was an addict too, you know.

I wonder what became of her ... does anyone know?


Entered at Fri Jan 3 04:16:01 CET 2014 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Web: My link

Subject: Jesse Winchester

A real tear-jerker


Entered at Fri Jan 3 00:59:12 CET 2014 from (74.71.203.44)

Posted by:

Ari

Subject: Two Things

Okay I lied....

I was on a film shoot in Texas and it was misplaced, probably tossed into an art supplies bucket.

Perhaps "trash" is a strong word. Sans Richard, none of the Band members were in favor of her coming along on tour with them, in fact, Richard insisted that she be on tour otherwise he would not attend. Sounds like a very positive influence. On that, Peter, I strongly disagree with you taking the "she's a human being" route. We are all human beings, alot of us don't sell heroine or coke. I'm not calling her evil, but the nature of her book is two-faced and mean spirited. Especially when she explains how she broke off contact with Levon after 1980 and "became a parody of himself". Sounds to me like code for: he wasn't in a rock Band anymore and thus he is uncool.


Entered at Fri Jan 3 00:46:37 CET 2014 from (80.3.71.222)

Posted by:

Ian Woodward

Subject: Levon and the Hawks 1965 - correction

Sorry, I meant to say that I thought the 31 May 1965 advert for Tony Mart's referred to Levon and the Hawks performing there in June 1965, hence my inferring that they had performed at Somers Point in June, July and August 1965.


Entered at Fri Jan 3 00:45:09 CET 2014 from (174.91.165.7)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Cathy Smith : Daniel Richler (son of Canadian author Mordecai Richler) discuss John Belushi 1986.


Entered at Fri Jan 3 00:15:02 CET 2014 from (174.91.165.7)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Levon Helm watching a baseball game in the late '70s.

I scanned this photo and sent to Jan H.

Photo from Cathy Smith's Chasing the Dragon

Hey JT...Thanks. It's all good. Many thanks for your dedication to the gig history of The Hawks and The Band.


Entered at Thu Jan 2 23:33:51 CET 2014 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: Thanks re Cathy Smith. And to change topics abruptly, isn't it nice to see that we're barely into 2014 (have a great one all) and the GB is already showing a scholarly interest in the Hawks.

Ian W: The CHUM chart was published weekly from '57 into the '80s, though for the final few years it appeared only in a local newspaper (if that term isn't a bit strong for the Sun). Remember that JT recalls L&tH performing "Stoes I Throw" when they played Toronto's Massey Hall with Dylan; this would have been be a nice nod to the fact that the song was out on 45 at the time - and did well in the hometown. I'm sure that its success was an element in Levon's departure. Here he was, watching the group with his name choosing to be sidemen rather than artists, playing second fiddle behind yet another singer. Had he allowed himself to be talked into deserting Ronnie Hawkins for this? Must have hurt, watching the record climb the charts while they plunked away unappreciated.


Entered at Thu Jan 2 22:39:09 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

I also recall reading that promoter Harold Kudlets handled the bookings for Levon & The Hawks, including the gigs at Tony Marts. So when The Hawks left to play with Dylan, Tony Marotta turned to "Colonel" Kudlets to supply a replacement group.


Entered at Thu Jan 2 22:16:03 CET 2014 from (80.3.71.222)

Posted by:

Ian Woodward

Subject: Levon and the Hawks

I apologise - I should have said "Thank you" for the Tony Mart's link. Those are the adverts to which I referred. I assume that the 31 May 65 one refers to their being at Tony Mart's in July, that the 30 June one refers to July and the 2 August one to their run there in August.

I have also seen the NEW YORK TIMES piece before and have long thought the band on stage in the rear of the photo looked like Levon and the Hawks. I'm not sure if the writer also thought the same or has actually had that confirmed. I tried to get a better quality print of the photo but failed. Maybe someone else would have (or has had) greater success. If so, I'd love to hear.

I don't recall Tony Mart as the person who confirmed Dylan's "bona fides" (as it were). I thought that was Mary Martin.


Entered at Thu Jan 2 22:02:21 CET 2014 from (80.3.71.222)

Posted by:

Ian Woodward

Subject: Levon and the Hawks - 1965

Thanks for your input. As I recall, local adverts indicate that Levon & The Hawks did not play at Tony Mart's beyond the end of August. I assume that Labor Day in 1965 was Monday, 6 September and that Labor Day weekend was 3-6 September 1965. Since The Hawks were in Los Angeles from at least 2nd to 4th September (for Dylan's Hollywood Bowl concert on 3rd September), I doubt that they returned to Tony Mart's for performances, though I suppose a guest appearance for old times sake might have been possible.

Quite separately, in the “CHUM HIT PARADE” for the week ending 13 December 1965, the “LEVON & HAWKS” single “STONES THAT I THROW” is at #22, having been at #31 the previous week.

Did CHUM have its own weekly publication at that time or did this chart appear in local newspapers?


Entered at Thu Jan 2 21:51:07 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Tony Marts 1965

Ian: Details seem sketchy as to whether all or part of Levon & The Hawks played beyond mid-August at Tony Marts in Somers Point. Evidence shows that Mitch Ryder & The Detroit Wheels were brought in as headliners, replacing The Hawks, for the big Labor Day weekend (Sept.4-6) at the end of the summer season (see link).


Entered at Thu Jan 2 21:41:48 CET 2014 from (80.3.71.222)

Posted by:

Ian Woodward

Subject: Dylan and the Hawks concerts - Part 1

To add to my previous post, VARIETY reported that "Dylan ... spent much of his evenings and early mornings at the Friars Tavern where the group was playing".

The "group" was cited as "Levon & The Hawks" by VARIETY, though BILLBOARD called them "Levon and the Hawks" and also advised that "CHUM deejay Bob McAdorey copped a near-exclusive on Dylan's top secret visit". I assume this to mean that he would have had an exclusive, had Robert Fulford not got an interview for the TORONTO STAR. That leaves the question of whether CHUM actually carried anything about Dylan's rehearsals - an interview with Dylan or one or more of The Hawks perhaps?

Moving to the 1965 shows with Dylan, a few notes:

2 Oct 65: the correct name of Newark venue was Symphony Hall. It had changed its name from the Mosque Theatre or Mosque Theater (both spellings used in different adverts). The concert handbill used the former way, though. One newspaper called it "Symphony Hall (formerly the Mosque)".

17 Oct 65: Baltimore Civic Center

22 Oct 65: Rhode Island Auditorium was the Providence venue. It says "R.I.Auditorium" on the adverts I've seen. The PROVIDENCE JOURNAL review said, "Dylan was backed up by a raucous five-piece combo".

23 Oct 65: Patrick Gymnasium was the Burlington venue (also referred to as “UVM’s Patrick Gym”).

30 Oct 65: Bushnell Auditorium was the Hartford venue, according to a listing in THE BROADSIDE OF BOSTON, though one source called it Bushnell Memorial Auditorium and BILLBOARD’s “College Circuit” correspondent referred to the concert as taking place at Trinity College in the city. The latter may not be a contradiction, of course. Anyone know?

12 Nov 65: not a correction (though the CLEVELAND PRESS called the venue “the Public Music Hall”) but I thought you might like this extract from the review in the CLEVELAND PLAIN DEALER: “These musicians tackled the often-recorded Dylan compositions … with the fierce drive of building wreckers”

19 Nov 65: the Columbus venue was the Veterans Memorial Auditorium.

20 Nov 65: Buffalo, NY, Kleinhans Music Hall (no apostrophe and no “?” required). This concert was part of the Buffalo Jazz Festival.

21 Nov 65: As you probably know (and were limited by space), the full name of the venue is the Onondaga County War Memorial. 3486 tickets were sold at the 6,600-seat venue and the secretary of Local 78 of the AFM complained to the national HQ of the AFM, saying that there was a local agreement for at least 15 AFM members to appear at musical shows at that venue. Now that would have made for an interesting concert!

5 and 11 Dec 65: Masonic Auditorium in S.F.

10 Dec 65: It says Community Concourse Theatre in the advert but Civic Theater in the local press previews/review.

I am still researching the above. And there are additional shows to the listing in “History”. One oddity is that Dylan got married in Mineola, NY on 22 November 1965 and Jerry Schatzberg has an undated concert photograph which he says is from Mineola, yet I can find no record of a concert there. Again, any ideas, anyone?

I shall look at 1966 at some time in the future. Meanwhile, it is my view that Dylan and the Hawks did not play concerts in California in March 1966 (19th – 22nd March in the listing). What is the source or evidence that any of these shows took place?


Entered at Thu Jan 2 21:37:34 CET 2014 from (66.55.188.178)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: History: Concert/show listings

Ian: I got most of my information regarding The Hawks in Toronto early years from the Toronto Star (I checked back). I look forward to your input and corrections after you complete your research and look back at what you have. Thank you.


Entered at Thu Jan 2 20:19:16 CET 2014 from (58.104.15.43)

Posted by:

Wallsend

One of the thing's I didn't like about Levon's book was his attitude towards women. I know it is the usual rock star nonsense but it kind of creeped me out. I think there is something seriously wrong with men that don't respect women.


Entered at Thu Jan 2 20:01:49 CET 2014 from (80.3.71.222)

Posted by:

Ian Woodward

Subject: History: Band Concert/show list

I have done some research on the shows that the Hawks did with Dylan in 1965-1966 and there are some errors in the listing in the "Hstory" section. I'll check and report back.

I have also researched the concerts that Dylan has cancelled over the years including the ones with the Hawks that were cancelled in 1966-1967. I will list the ones I know in the hope that someone here may have additions.

From memory, the Hawks played Tony Mart's at Somers Point N.J. in June, July and August 1965. Following his reception at the Newport Folk Festival on 25 July 1965, Dylan rehearsed at Carroll's rehearsal hall in New York City for two weeks around mid/late August 1965. This presumably involved Robbie and Levon but I'm not sure whether they commuted back and forth, daily, from Somers Point to New York City to fulfill their commitment at Tony Mart's. If not, did the remaining three guys just carry on without them or were they augmented by pick-up players? Anybody know?

Similar questions apply to Dylan's Forest Hills Tennis Stadium gig on 28 August 1965. More so, in fact, since Robbie and Levon were clearly there for the daytime soundcheck as well as the evening concert.

Finally, Dylan first rehearsed with the Hawks at Toronto's Friars Club on 15, 16 and 17 September 1965. As I recall, this was after hours, so I assume that the Hawks were playing Friars in that period. Dylan was interviewed by Robert Fulford of the Toronto Star. Has anyone checked the back issues of the Toronto Star for information on the Hawks appearances at Friars then? Adverts perhaps?


Entered at Thu Jan 2 19:09:42 CET 2014 from (66.55.188.178)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: BEG congrats: excellence personifed

Sorry BEG: You should head my list with your consistent positive input. The Toronto connection is big time and you are its major.


Entered at Thu Jan 2 18:28:07 CET 2014 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Peter's Post

Your comments on Cathy Smith are right on target.Well said-thank you.


Entered at Thu Jan 2 17:36:57 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Foreverly has been playing here today (again). Lightning Express sounds uncannily like The Everly Brothers … oddly, not if you listen back to back, but it does in isolation. Does that make sense?


Entered at Thu Jan 2 16:03:00 CET 2014 from (174.91.165.7)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

2013 Music

Joseph Arthur...Ballad of Boogie Christ

Garland Jeffreys...Truth Serum


Entered at Thu Jan 2 15:40:10 CET 2014 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: 2013 Music

My favorite 2013 new releases:

(1)SOUTHEASTERN -- Jason Isbell
(2)FOREVERLY -- Billie Jow Armstrong & Norah Jones
(3)MEMPHIS -- Boz Scaggs
(4)BAKERSFIELD -- Vince Gill & Paul Franklin
(5)OLD YELLOW MOON -- Rodney Crowell & Emmylou Harris

Honorable mention:
SONGS CYCLED -- Van Dyke Parks' compilation of songs he's recorded in the past few years.

Archive releases:
THE BAND -- Mobile Fidelity's LP & hybrid-SACD reissues
HERE TONIGHT: THE WHITE LIGHT DEMOS -- Gene Clark
LIVE AT THE ACADEMY 1971 -- The Band


Entered at Thu Jan 2 15:31:24 CET 2014 from (174.91.165.7)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Cathy Smith sang back-up with Hoyt Axton and co-wrote "Flash Of Fire" with him.

Healthy New Year to all filled with many adventures. :-D


Entered at Thu Jan 2 14:50:49 CET 2014 from (24.39.33.90)

Posted by:

Mark

Location: Maine

Subject: Cami J

Cami J,

Nice to hear about another Mainer who made the trip to Woodstock for New Year's Eve! I always look for other Maine license plates, but I must have missed yours. What a great show and a great way to ring in the New Year!

Mark


Entered at Thu Jan 2 13:37:36 CET 2014 from (66.55.188.178)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: "We can't help it if we're lucky"

And to John, Peter, Norm, Dunc, Joan, Bill, the New York connections, Jan especially and all the rest of you in thee USA, Europe and South Africa and you all know who you are...Happy New Year! All the best to all of you who continue to enrich our lives with creativity, communication and general good will. This is a unique site and we are lucky to be a part of it.


Entered at Thu Jan 2 13:31:37 CET 2014 from (66.55.188.178)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: History: Band Concert/show list

Happy New Year! I'm sure all of us want to thank all of you who sent additions and corrections to The Band Concert listings which historically list and document the Band shows. I received a number of submissions over the past year and I continue to receive these often with ticket stubs to confirm the date and sometimes the location. Keep them coming. JH receives the updates and periodically the updated list is added in 'History'. Best regards.


Entered at Thu Jan 2 13:02:06 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Another short story

Last year I linked two short stories from our small publisher's website. We got stalled on other stuff and got nowhere in pushing the projects forward for a year, but the whole collection of adventures of various incompetent garage bands in the 60s is nearly ready (23 stories), so I thought I'd add another free one, "Very Last Day" set in February 1965, where our incompetents are rehearsing in the church hall … see link.

Comments welcome.


Entered at Thu Jan 2 11:04:07 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Cathy Smith was a human being, someone’s daughter, someone’s sister, someone’s mother, who got treated as trash by older, wealthier and more powerful men. She is clearly intelligent, as she writes lucidly. She was extremely unlucky, and Richard Manuel seemed to have relied on her, and at face value, found her necessary on the 1976 tour. She was also greatly misguided in thinking you can drip feed and control an addict’s addiction. But so many people make that mistake. Alcoholics infantilize themselves, and I’ve known a few. Some are recovering successfully with many years sober under their belt. Three are dead. It’s not pretty. It is a disease. It’s not a virtue not to succumb to it. I think you are genetically disposed.

I don’t think the book can be judged as music criticism or biography because that’s not what it claims to be. While Levon comes out badly, I suspect that hundreds of musicians wouldn’t come out much better if some of their exploits at the same age were recounted. The book is a sad tale indeed, but I don’t think it’s only gossip, as Rick’s story of the girl and the policeman in Levon’s book covers much the same ground (and I was very surprised they chose to include that as it reflects badly).


Entered at Thu Jan 2 02:22:05 CET 2014 from (24.108.1.255)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: Ari

Cathy never killed John. John killed John.


Entered at Thu Jan 2 01:38:07 CET 2014 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Old Friends

I guess the end of a year causes a lot of reflection for most of us that are fortunate enough to reach the senior years of our life. With that in mind, I dedicate this song to "old friends" I've been fortunate enough to make here in several years.

Lars Pedersen, Paul Godrey, Steve Heggison, Bill Munson, Jerry Tennenbaum, John Donabe, David Powell, Bayou Sam, Kevin John, many more, and all the ladies.

Roger Miller & Willie Nelson are two of my all time favourites singing old ballads like this.


Entered at Thu Jan 2 01:03:34 CET 2014 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Time Has Come Today

The first day of a New Year.......however the conversation remains stuck in the past.....as usual, remembering what was. Always from the talents of a chosen few that doesn't fade.

I don't know how many of you were even around when the "Chambers Brothers" did this song. The message remains the same.....many even more applicable now than ever.

Hoping this Band legacy can be enjoyed throughout a whole year without any of the bitterness that has been tested here over the years.

Happy new year with health and happiness and being safe through out the year.


Entered at Thu Jan 2 00:46:27 CET 2014 from (58.104.18.206)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Subject: Ari

Too bad you through Chase the Drake out. I have been looking for a copy and they seem quite expensive!


Entered at Thu Jan 2 00:44:10 CET 2014 from (74.71.203.44)

Posted by:

Ari

Subject: Peter

I read Cathy Smiths "Chasing The Dragon" and boy is she awful. I threw it away as soon as I was finished. It was complete trash. She is complete trash. But, I will say, it is very warts and all and basically infantilizes Richard and makes Levon look like sex fiend. I don't understand where she even came into the picture? Talk about a book that is pure gossip: I can't recall a single moment where she is legitimately talking about The Band and their music. She does have a nice section where she tries to convince Charlie Watts that he is likely the best drummer in the world. But it begs the question, why did the woman who killed John Belushi write a book?

She does make Robbie look pretty good though, between this and the new unearthed Asbury Park footage, it's sweet to see how much Robbie cared for Richard. All of them in fact, I love how in the footage Rick is constantly watching Richard and how Robbie smiles during Tears of Rage at moments where Richard just barely survives a tough lyric.

Also check out Levon dancing in the beginning of W.S. Walcott.


Entered at Wed Jan 1 21:43:47 CET 2014 from (208.120.36.230)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Subject: Jesse Winchester tribute album

Random thought -- I know this track was already spoken for, but would love to have heard Levon covering "Payday".

Happy new year, all!


Entered at Wed Jan 1 13:46:08 CET 2014 from (188.29.90.199)

Posted by:

bill h

happy new year


Entered at Wed Jan 1 12:09:17 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

It also made me wonder if "Defying gravity" had been the intended track.


Entered at Wed Jan 1 12:06:39 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Sam Bush piece highly recommended! I was doing the forthcoming Jesse Winchester one yesterday and Sam Bush played on the "Humour Me" album.

There is a note about Levon I'd forgotten in the "Quiet About It" tribute album on the songs of Jesse Winchester:

"One sad note- Levon Helm who played drums and mandolin on Jesse's first album and had recently performed with him at his Midnight ramble in Woodstock was anxious to record a track for this tribute. Levon's own cancer returned around the same time as Jesse got the all-clear. He passed away before he could add his own contribution. To fill the space, Mac McAnally stayed in the studio an extra day and recorded a tender version of Defying gravity."

It made me wonder … are LHS going to do a selection of guest spots from Midnight rambles? Seems like a good idea.


Entered at Wed Jan 1 11:39:18 CET 2014 from (101.164.0.90)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Web: My link

Subject: Toppermost: Sam Bush

Your humble correspondent has done today's Toppermost: the Band connection is that Sam has played several Rambles (and boy do I wish is gone). Hope you enjoy.


Entered at Wed Jan 1 04:37:05 CET 2014 from (24.189.208.76)

Posted by:

Bayou Sam

Location: NY

Subject: 2014

Happy New Year


Entered at Wed Jan 1 04:07:07 CET 2014 from (166.181.3.248)

Posted by:

Cami J

Location: Liberty, ME

Subject: The Barn

Happy New Year from The Barn! Getting ready to Ramble.


Entered at Wed Jan 1 00:54:08 CET 2014 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

For more on Richard and 1976, read Cathy Smith 'Chasing the Dragon,' but you will probably wish you hadn't.

Ah, well. Happy New a Year


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