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The Band: Live at the Academy of Music 1971

Levon Helm: Ramble at the Ryman

The Band: Three of a Kind

Robbie Robertson: How to Become Clairvoyant

Garth Hudson Presents a Canadian Celebration of The Band

Levon Helm: Electric Dirt

Garth and Maud Hudson: Live at the Wolf

Pulse

Dirt Farmer

Elliot Landy's Woodstock Vision

The Band Guestbook, August 2012


Entered at Fri Aug 31 23:11:58 CEST 2012 from (108.82.188.117)

Posted by:

glenn t

Web: My link

Subject: jimi bob

perhaps dylan and hendrix did meet...according to the link above.


Entered at Fri Aug 31 21:39:26 CEST 2012 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Web: My link

Subject: Tempest and Election Special

I picked up the new Ry Cooder: Election Special. Lyrically it's strictly topical politics. There's one that is told from the dog-on-the-roof POV. Musically, unlike the last few of his, I find this one more easily likable straightaway.

Here's a link to the song Duquesne Whistle from Tempest.


Entered at Fri Aug 31 21:02:55 CEST 2012 from (81.236.218.77)

Posted by:

Gotesson

Location: Sweden

When was the last time any member of the band performed The night the drove old dixie down? I never heard a post waltz version, except robbie whisper the first lines in that documentary...


Entered at Fri Aug 31 19:57:45 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: hanging around together

in NY: John Hammond (jr) hangs around with Dylan and Robbie. As he also plays with - and likely hangs around with - Hendrix, it makes sense that everybody meets everybody else at some point.

in TO: Red Shea lives with the Hawks as a Leesure, then plays with Pete Traynor and John Stockfish on Music Hop, then joins Lightfoot to replace David Rea, who joins Ian and Sylvia. Lightfoot spends years playing Steeles Tavern, basically next door to Hawkins and the Hawks. For part of that time he alternated weeks with Lonnie Johnson, whose principal local disciple is David Rea. Ian and and Sylvia get to know Dylan very well through Albert Grossman, and introduce Lightfoot to Grossman. Through some combination of Grossman and the Tysons, Lightfoot and Dylan become close as well. Not surprisingly, when Dylan needs a band, he is pointed in the direction of the Hawks. A photo of Grossman and Hawkins standing together in the snow is included on the jacket of Lightfoot's live LP (late '60s). Producer Robbie Robertson pulls in David Rea to play guitar on Jesse Winchester's first.


Entered at Fri Aug 31 18:24:45 CEST 2012 from (64.105.104.78)

Posted by:

Pat B

Yes, the Kettle of Fish in 1966. Jimi was something of a splash in the village but hadn't yet gone to England for the full transformation. Jimi said later they were both drunk. I don't think they connected again after Jimi blew up.


Entered at Fri Aug 31 18:21:08 CEST 2012 from (70.165.193.17)

Posted by:

Peter V

Sorry link fails. Go to peterviney.wordpress.com and scroll down to "Stage" in the right hand bar, then to Love. Hopefully they'll get the next generation iPad to work properly as a word processor!


Entered at Fri Aug 31 18:19:09 CEST 2012 from (70.165.193.17)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Cirque du soleil "Love"

Review added of Cirque du soleil "Love" added on my blog. Hope the link works, but typing on an iPad meant I couldn't insert links properly, and when I pasted it from Pages, it arrived in italic, and the only way to change it appears to be word by word, which I'll do next week on a real computer.


Entered at Fri Aug 31 18:16:19 CEST 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Jimi and Dylan

Dlew919, I remember reading somewhere Jimi saying he met Dylan once at the Kettle of Fish club in NYC.


Entered at Fri Aug 31 16:52:26 CEST 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

......and of course Steeles Tavern was one of the first licensed bars in Toronto; owned by Steele Basil; from 1936-1974 I believe.


Entered at Fri Aug 31 16:47:00 CEST 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Web: My link

Subject: Pete

Sorry Bill. Misread your comment about Pete. I do believe Lightfoot was solo at Steele's Tavern. As well as at The Purple Onion and The Riverboat.


Entered at Fri Aug 31 16:39:31 CEST 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Web: My link

Subject: Lightfoot / Bill M

I never saw Gord at he Tavern. I first saw him play solo at the Riverboat. Bill I don't believe Peter Traynor ever played bass with Lightfoot. Lightfoot did use Pete's amps.....I believe starting with the "Live at Massey Hall" recording.

The only other bass player of those early days mentioned was Paul Wideman. He apparently was Gord's first bass player for a year (1965). John Stockfish joined Gord one year later and left in 1968. Red was there from the beginning.


Entered at Fri Aug 31 16:10:18 CEST 2012 from (202.159.160.88)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Subject: A discussion we were having today...

And noone I was with knew the answer... Did Hendrix and Dylan ever meet?


Entered at Fri Aug 31 16:08:56 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

John D: Thanks for posting about John Stockfish. As Lightfoot's bassist, he was on the first album I got to choose myself. Did you ever catch Lightfoot at Steeles Tavern; if so, do you recall if he was solo or had Shea and Stockfish with him? I believe that the original Music Hop bassist was Robbie's good buddy, Pete Traynor; Traynor told me that Stockfish was in the group at the same time, which would mean he was playing guitar (as he'd done previously with Jimmy (Livingston, later of the Mynah Birds) and the Countdowns.


Entered at Fri Aug 31 15:37:58 CEST 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: John Stockfish

The original bass player for Gordon Lightfoot, a member of the legendary trio of Lightfoot and guitarist Red Shea, passed away on Monday, August 20th, 2012 of natural causes. He was 69.

For a number of years in the early 60's, he performed for the daily CBC Music Hop show hosted by Alex Trebec.

The most memorable period of his distinguished musical career began in 1965 as the bassist for Gordon Lightfoot during the renowned United Artists years. The Guess Who paid tribute to John by naming him in their song Lightfoot.

He will always be remembered for the familiar bass playing on Sundown, Gordon Lightfoot's most successful U.S. single which topped the charts at number one in 1974.

In 1969 , John moved to New York where he lived, recorded, and performed with the late Jim Croce.

Upon his return to Toronto in the early 70's, John continued his music as the bassist for Dan Hill on his first RCA recording sessions.

Over the years he has played with local artists such as Ron Nigrini, and legendary artists such as Gene MacLellan, Mel Torme and Cab Calloway.


Entered at Fri Aug 31 14:48:49 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: when in Vegas, act like the Vegans?

Peter V: Thanks for the tour update. As you've been on the road, you probably missed the bruhaha set off by your Harry Royal's recent stroll in the nude in Las Vegas. Be warned.


Entered at Fri Aug 31 11:04:30 CEST 2012 from (158.39.165.125)

Posted by:

jh

Please take that nonsense somewhere else, will you Glanzmann? Thanks.


Entered at Fri Aug 31 08:14:55 CEST 2012 from (70.165.193.17)

Posted by:

The Moonstruck Ones

Location: Las Vegas

Subject: On tour

The tour has arrived in Las Vegas aka Sin City. Los Angeles saw us all go to Venice Beach to be photographed by the Jim Morrison mural. There was a degree of confusion as Pete kept saying it was "Van" and started playing I'll Tell Me Ma on banjo. LAhas the world's mostt thieving taxi drivers. Not to be racist but they were all Russians.

Next came Furnace Creek. Pete played "I'm On Fire" but the banjo and bass guitar strings were sagging three inches down due to heat. Pete solved it by placing the banjo tuning heads in a bucket of ice while playing at 90 degrees to normal. Encouraged, I did the same with electric bass. My fillings are still vibrating and my three remaining hairs are frizzy and smouldering slightly.


Entered at Thu Aug 30 22:54:48 CEST 2012 from (85.255.44.135)

Posted by:

jh

We're back after a little technical f***up. And removal of ad posts.


Entered at Thu Aug 30 03:39:31 CEST 2012 from (24.108.1.255)

Posted by:

BONK

Location: SaltSpring Island/Cabbagetown

Subject: Rockin Chair

Hey Norm. HAPPY BIRTHDAY! Take it easy on the wife. She's getting older too ya know! Talk to you soon, Carl.


Entered at Thu Aug 30 00:55:26 CEST 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Gettin younger

Thank you David and Serenity for the birthday wishes, and all my guest book friends on Face Book as well.

Susan and I are just heading down to the Rockin Chair to have a little fun this evening. I started gettin older, but I didn't like it much....so I quit.

Hope you are all well and enjoying life. Best regards to all.........Norm Jones


Entered at Wed Aug 29 21:33:06 CEST 2012 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: Norm "Westcoaster" Jones

I 2nd DAVID's post...

Have a good one wherever you are, NORM. Have one on me!!

Over The Hill Birthday

It’s birthday time again I see; Another year's gone by.

We’re older than we used to be; The thought could make me cry.

For getting older is not such fun, When there’s hurting in your back,

And it’s agony if you have to run, And a pleasure to lie in the sack.

Yes getting older is quite a bore, But to not get old is worse.

So "Happy Birthday!" let’s shout once more, And to heck with our ride in the hearse!

Hooray for getting older! Happy Birthday and many more.

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxo

"WHEN THE POWER OF LOVE, OVER POWERS THE LOVE OF POWER, THERE WILL BE PEACE!"


Entered at Wed Aug 29 21:22:20 CEST 2012 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: Canada WOF [again]

Paul Shaffer Announced as Host of the 2012 Canada's Walk of Fame Awards!

Shaw Media and Canada’s Walk of Fame are proud to announce Paul Shaffer (@paulshaffer) as Host of the 2012 Canada’s Walk of Fame Awards. Shaffer, a 2006 inductee, will emcee the prestigious Awards ceremony that introduces and honours this year’s roster of inductees from Toronto’s Ed Mirvish Theatre on Saturday, September 22nd.

"Paul is a very proud Canadian and one of the great musical minds of our generation. He has also become a wonderful friend of Canada's Walk of Fame. We are looking forward to having him back on our show," said Peter Soumalias, Founding Director, Canada’s Walk of Fame.

The two-hour 2012 Canada's Walk of Fame Awards honours the 2012 Inductees for their lifetime achievements. A list of presenters and performers featured in the show will be announced in the coming weeks and the broadcasting will air on Sunday, October 14th – 8pm ET/PT on Global andSlice™.

Tickets to the Awards show are available to the public and on sale now. To purchase tickets, go to www.ticketking.com or call 416-872-1212.

CYA soon xoxoxo


Entered at Wed Aug 29 20:29:28 CEST 2012 from (83.160.180.22)

Posted by:

Ragtime

Location: where else?

Subject: Hurricane

Jan? How's my old friend Uncle Hangover these days?

And I have a question. The best song on Levon's "American Son" IMHO is Hurricane, co-written by Thom Schuyler, Keith Stegall and Stewart Harris. It sounds rather Bandlike, I'd say, featuring a Cripple Creek style clavinette and a superior Levon Helm vocal. It was a hit for country singer Leon Everette in 1981 who subsequently named an album after it. Levon's "American Son" is from 1980.

And now my question: who was first? Who was it written for (if not for you-hoo)? Was it for the insipid Leon, or for the inspired Levon?

And if I'm not the first to bring this up, please forgive me...


Entered at Wed Aug 29 20:05:47 CEST 2012 from (83.160.180.22)

Posted by:

Ragtime

Location: Low Countries
Web: My link

Subject: The Band in the Low Countries

"Music From Big Pink to The Last Waltz" is the not-so-original-but-very-apt-title of a series of shows in several Dutch towns, dedicated to our beloved guys. Presenter is "rock professor" Leo Blokhuis.


Entered at Wed Aug 29 19:20:11 CEST 2012 from (74.108.30.165)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Penn State

Penn State plays its first game since the debacle. The will be playing Ohio U. In most years I would say Ohio would be outmatched, but under these circumstances I think OU has a real chance. They have a good team so we will see. At the very least Ohio should get some publicity out of the game


Entered at Wed Aug 29 17:05:59 CEST 2012 from (202.159.160.88)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Before I forget...

Happy Birthday, Westcoaster, Rocking Chair, you old sea dog. Hope it's another good one!


Entered at Wed Aug 29 04:11:14 CEST 2012 from (72.230.109.86)

Posted by:

Bashful Bill

Location: Minoa, NY

Subject: Penn State

I thought 4. Years, that is.......


Entered at Wed Aug 29 03:20:38 CEST 2012 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Although my opinion on this means little, I thought the Penn State Football program should have been shut down for at least two years.


Entered at Wed Aug 29 02:55:42 CEST 2012 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Web: My link

Subject: Neil Diamond & Penn State University

This is so stupid. Do we feel the same here,guys? One of my Neil Diamonds' faves.

CYA soon xoxoxo


Entered at Tue Aug 28 20:28:51 CEST 2012 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: Canada's WOF

Canada's Walk of Fame Festival

Free Music Programming Announced!

Canada’s Walk of Fame together with National Premier Partner RBC announces three days of free programming featuring musical performances at Nathan Phillips Square taking place September 21 – September 23 as part of the Canada’s Walk of Fame Festival, presented by SHOP.CA.

The Festival’s free programming spotlights a talented collection of Canadian performers including headliners such as JUNO and Grammy Award-winning R&B artist and this year’s Allan Slaight Award recipient Melanie Fiona; legendary singer-songwriter Tom Cochrane with Red Rider; alternative country artist Lindi Ortega; singer-songwriter Jill Hennessy and Montreal multi-instrumentalist DJ Champion. Other notable performers include pop rock recording artist Suzie McNeil and indie rock band The Heartbroken. Emerging artists include pianist, singer, and son of Blue Rodeo’s front man Jim Cuddy, Devin Cuddy, under the Devin Cuddy Band, rising country artist Kira Isabella, and pop-indie gem Darrelle London.

In addition to the free programming at Nathan Phillips Square, Canada’s Walk of Fame Festival will present three free performances at Monarchs Pub at the Delta Chelsea Hotel: Guitar Stars Show featuring The Jack De Keyzer Band with Joe Mavety (September 20), Topper (September 21) and DJ Supreme (September 22).

Canada’s Walk of Fame Festival will also include programming for the Urban Mic series at Toronto Eaton Centre’s Urban Eatery from September 20 to September 23. Urban Mic is a live music experience aimed at profiling the city’s wide range of musical talent.

For a full schedule and list of Festival performers, including those previously announced, visit canadaswalkoffame.com.

CYA soon xoxoxo


Entered at Tue Aug 28 19:05:33 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Frothing in Glory [days]

Ha ha - I'll give you that one Bill - as it is I manage to minimise the foam provided I remember to put my teeth in first.

:-0)


Entered at Tue Aug 28 17:54:10 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Let It Tweet

In the last week it's been reported that the Rolling Stones have been recording in a Paris studio with Don Was. The news was confirmed via a tweet by Sir Michael Jagger.


Entered at Tue Aug 28 17:29:19 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Toronno
Web: My link

Al E: You'll appreciate Alakazam's experience with Springsteen's munificence. The link's from the Toronto Star over the weekend, but the incident took place in Sydney. By the way, Bruce's concert here the other day yielded a review that started out by saying that Bruce's die-hard old-time fans tend to emit spittle when they go on about him.


Entered at Tue Aug 28 15:09:08 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Footage of incredible Incident in Toronto

:-0)


Entered at Tue Aug 28 03:07:24 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

David, i hadn't considered the day of the week. But, you are right, if they ared taping Conan, that would probably prevent Jimmy from performing. I imagine he could get a sub, but , to what end? Wouldn't make sense.


Entered at Mon Aug 27 20:10:38 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Interestingly, Don Was worked with Robbie Robertson on the soundtrack for "Phenomenon". It included his production of Aaron Neville's cover of Van Morrison's "Crazy Love" that featured Robbie on lead guitar (see link).


Entered at Mon Aug 27 19:45:09 CEST 2012 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Don Was

Not a fan.He was the producer who produced Bonnie Raitt's comeback album.He created a pop record that was popular but not good.His production tends to lean towards a slick sound and lacks in the feel that would characterize quality albums.Further,as a bass player he is far from the best.Sure hope he is not the bass player for the concert.


Entered at Mon Aug 27 19:40:31 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Jeff: With the concert in the middle of the week I wonder if Jimmy Vivino would be able to make an appearance if there's a Conan O'Brien taping that night in Burbank.


Entered at Mon Aug 27 18:45:42 CEST 2012 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: was so-so

Googling brings up a couple more degrees:
Levon guested on Bonnie Raitt's 1994 _Longing In Their Hearts_ (D. Was, co-producer);
Was and Helm were both purported members of the purported charity one-off group The New Maroons (see Viney, P., "The Unsubstantiated Sessions").


Entered at Mon Aug 27 18:27:28 CEST 2012 from (64.105.104.78)

Posted by:

Pat B

Re: Don Was. Those are not a lot of strong connections.


Entered at Mon Aug 27 16:09:07 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Don Was

As I recall, among his many credits, Don Was produced Michelle Shocked's "Arkansas Traveler" album, which featured Levon & Garth on the song "Secret to a Long Life". More recently he's worked with Lucinda Williams and John Mayer, who are appearing at the benefit. As president of Blue Note records, he's also worked with Van Morrison.


Entered at Mon Aug 27 15:43:43 CEST 2012 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: More Love for Levon

Well,I've been forced to eat my words from my prior post.The wifey differs with me and feels we should attend.She bought us tickets so I guess I'm in!


Entered at Mon Aug 27 04:18:50 CEST 2012 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Web: My link

Subject: Neil Armstrong/ Neil Young

Thought this was something to see.

CYA soon xoxoxo


Entered at Sun Aug 26 05:58:05 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Bob- Thank you, i enjoyed the conversation. There's plenty of room for more people's thoughts too.


Entered at Sun Aug 26 03:57:23 CEST 2012 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Love for Levon

Would not consider it.The venue's sound is horrible.Always sounds like you're listening to a poorly made audience tape.I do look forward to purchasing a DVD.


Entered at Sun Aug 26 02:19:58 CEST 2012 from (71.184.199.161)

Posted by:

Tim

Location: Boston

Subject: Love for Levon

On the fence about this one. Mostly because its mid week and a 5 hour trip each way. Would be nice to see if Dylan, Ronnie Hawkins or more of his contemporaries sign on. Plus sitting in a crappy seat has limited appeal. How many here are thinking of going?


Entered at Sat Aug 25 23:40:06 CEST 2012 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Web: My link

Subject: Down in the FLood Trailer

Should be interesting.


Entered at Sat Aug 25 13:21:47 CEST 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Jeff's Posts

Jeff, good posts. Thanks.


Entered at Sat Aug 25 06:48:05 CEST 2012 from (68.194.145.145)

Posted by:

Ari

I went to Pleasantville, not Adam. I'm not from chicago, I'm from and in New York.


Entered at Sat Aug 25 03:41:40 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PuEmUp(fFriend0

Subject: Peter

Pete, not sure how nearby you are, or if you have spare time, but- here is a musical treat and bargain:
Joey DeFrancesco, Jimmy Cobb, Larry Coryell reserve your seats 510.238.9200
Aug 24-Aug 26, 2012
Joey DeFrancesco, Hammond B-3 organ
Jimmy Cobb, drums
Larry Coryell, guitar
8pm & 10pm each set $20 Friday and Sunday, $25 on saturday
Yoshi's Oakland
510 Embarcadero West
Jack London Square
Oakland, CA 94607


Entered at Sat Aug 25 01:05:17 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Bob- i forgot to say the big draw to the show for me would be the thought of Mavis and Garth performing together, with the potential for RR or Vivino playing lead on the Weight with them. And honestly, i hadn't considered that till Adam threw it out there. I'm wondering if the Adam that attened the movies in Pleasantville is Adam from chicago..


Entered at Sat Aug 25 00:57:36 CEST 2012 from (75.34.58.67)

Posted by:

Adam

The only Don Was connection I can think of, is that he was featured in the Classic Albums DVD as a longtime admirer of The Band. I was surprised to see him working alongside Larry Campbell as the musical director.

Pat, didn't know you missed the Rambles. I thought you mentioned attending one. I've said it many times before and will always continue to: the Ramble I saw in January was the greatest experience of my life. Ridiculous setlist, last performance with Garth & Levon, meeting them both under such great circumstances. It was magical. But those of you who saw the OQ shouldn't feel too bad!

Exciting news about the tribute concert.


Entered at Sat Aug 25 00:49:20 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Bob, i didn't mean to point that hypothetical at you, and of course, I understand your point... And it is a Weekly thing...But once they drop the price for one show, the price for each show comes into question. The only way to frame the situation NOW is is this a lifestyle and / or foundation or cause that people still will support? If they can see it that way, and want to continue to support it, right on...If the music is good enough weekly, right on..if the value is there, right on. It would be wonderful if the quality is that good to continue to get the buck.

If this benefit rasies enough cash, maybe they lower the $125.00 admission fee.


Entered at Sat Aug 25 00:08:32 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Now You See $241.00, Now You Don't

The title "Was Not Was" always reminded me of "Now You See It, Now You Don't", shell game kind of. I don't see the L.A.connection, this is a "pretty much" a full length east coast thing, but you can't do anything musical on a large scale without some west coasters being involved. I tend to think RR will perform, and he may even help out other ways.But, Ron Delsner is NY, all the way. I don't see this going Hollywood, but you never know. So, if steve jordan is the house drummer, which is likely, is he L.A. or NYC. I'd say NYC. James Wormworth would be a great house drummer, hell, The Black Italians would be one helluva house band. But i think it will be names. Far as celebrity musicians go- The Boss is a natural for this too. $241 .00 might go a long way.


Entered at Fri Aug 24 23:47:36 CEST 2012 from (64.105.104.78)

Posted by:

Pat B

There seems to be an LA connection to this tribute show. Other than a Dylan album, I can't think of any Don Was association to Levon. David P?


Entered at Fri Aug 24 23:45:13 CEST 2012 from (64.105.104.78)

Posted by:

Pat B

How are ticket sales for these recent Rambles?

I'll take it to the grave that I didn't make a Ramble. I did see a Chicago show a few years ago, but I should have made it to the Barn. Of course, I should have kept my 67 Mustang too.


Entered at Fri Aug 24 23:40:51 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Pat- maybe his connections is the connection. i dunno.


Entered at Fri Aug 24 23:39:32 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: W.S.Levon Medicine Show Things Go Full Circle Some Times.

Bob- i ain't superman ;-) But, if Levon asked you for additional backpay- say two dollars fity cents a year in backpay for the five decades he was a musician- so his family could keep the farm, the studio, & the equipment after he died- would you give it to him?


Entered at Fri Aug 24 23:02:33 CEST 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Jeff's Post

Jeff, that is a beautiful post. Thanks. You've helped me justify the cost big time. Would you mind helping me with get my head around one other ticket concern? They're charging 125 dollars a ticket for a Midnight Ramble tomorrow where the only guests are Mike and Ruthie. Mike and Ruthie are playing another show in the Hudson Valley area tonight for a 10 dollar donation. Please help me to understand why the 125 dollar ticket at this point is not wrong.


Entered at Fri Aug 24 22:39:42 CEST 2012 from (64.105.104.78)

Posted by:

Pat B

Why is Don Was involved? Does anyone know of any connections?


Entered at Fri Aug 24 22:25:40 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Music is Medicine,in more ways than one

Maybe it shouid be called W.S.Levon's Medicine Show. With the price of the ticket you would get admission, and a bottle of Levon's Jungle Bush Snake Oil and a bag of Helmland Dirt.There is no doubt that Levon deserves a tribute.The fact is though, this concert is a benefit, in tribute to Levon's musicality and to help his family or estate keep the property. "All net proceeds from the concert will help support the lasting legacy of Levon Helm by helping his estate keep ownership of his home, barn and studio, and to continue The Midnight Ramble Sessions" The question for some will be the fact that it is a benefit and the diginity in that or sense in supporting it. Levon deserved it, but he got more support throughtout his life than in you took (pick an arbitrary #) twenty thousand professioanl musicians and added up all the support they got.. Did he have twentty thousand times more talent- possibly so. Did he give back twenty thousand times in musical worth- I imagine he did.For anyone who can afford it, it promises to be a helluva show. The horn section will be outa site. You can figure Toussaint to be involved in this too, if he is NY at the time.

The trick is to be able to reconcile two separate issues, or not be concerned about the issues or if possible, if you are super flush, the price. The fact is,The Rambles have mostly been in this same spirit all these years, the people working for the studio, being primarily volunteers. so there is a dichotomy, but the cause, past and present, is two fold- keeping Helmland solvent all these years and still, and at the same time- keeping great music and the spirit of great music alive. When Levon was living- it was like falling off a log. The Medicine Man and The Music Man were one and the same.

If I was in NY, i'd buy a ticket.


Entered at Fri Aug 24 19:27:15 CEST 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Love for Levon

I was going to buy Love for Levon tickets this morning during the Citicard presale. However when I saw ticket prices top out at 241 dollars per seat I felt a little sick to my stomach. I undertsand that this show must be very costly to produce but I can't help thinking someone should be ashamed to charge prices like that. I know there are cheaper seats but I don't really enjoy sitting behind rich folks. I think I'm going to stay home and wait for the PBS special.


Entered at Fri Aug 24 19:03:42 CEST 2012 from (184.66.178.72)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Tribute concerts

Though I am a big fan of 'cover version' albums, I usually am not a fan of tribute concerts. For Levon Helm, I make an exception. If I were in charge, I would invite all who played with him to perform and also get some new young talent (Civil War: Mumford and Sons: Avett Bro) etc to participate. It could be quite the show and would make for an appropriate reminder of the lifelong excellence of this musician. It is of course vital in my view that the new material from the last few albums be an essential part of this tribute. The Band was only the beginning for Levon Helm. And I'd like to see a fond recollection of Levon and the Hawks and even the Ronnie era.


Entered at Fri Aug 24 18:57:48 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Correction of Love

I meant to write that while there was a Band, there was no ONE face of The Band.

(Of course there still is no one face of The Band.What will happen to history over time is going to be interesting. The Resurrection of Levon has changed the course that publcity was taking, and decades from now who knows how they will write about The Band. I'd like to think it will always be considered as the purest, most eloquent, and most original of musical collaboration by 5 creative musical gemiuses. )


Entered at Fri Aug 24 18:21:29 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Love For Levon

When Johnnie Johnson died, Chuck Berry was the man behind the tribute to Johnnie at The Pageant in St Louis, and he headlined. Now Johnnie was nowhere near (not in the same galaxy) as publically or privately vocally negative of Chuck as Levon was of Robbie, nor was the publically exposed acrimony as furious, but it was there. Johnnie, did however, play with Chuck ocassionally even in the nineties. Chuck was not booed at Johnnie's tribute. He played a bunch of songs, and received his due in applause. Of course, St Louis is home turf.

Would RR get booed?The thought never occurred to me till Ari suggested it. But there could be some of the sawdust and vomit crowd that would behave poorly.I think however that the way the evenong would progress, is that by the time RR appeared, so much groundwork (including historical video and oratory) would have been laid that he would receive a hearty welcome. I'd expect Hawkins to be there, if possible Emmy Lou, Clapton, Richards, Ringo, I can't imagine Garth not performing and if he has the time, I'd expect the house band to include Jimmy Vivino for a good spell. It would be a mistake for it not to. and though Blondie was more Rick''s friend than Levon's, Blondie's voice would be a big plus on certain songs. Would Levon's band be the house band? Hard to say, why not? But i kind of doubt it. Probably will be bigger names. With Levon's band getting a feature and some of the members playing during the course of the evening. It will be a class production and star studded event. Actors, etc etc , maybe politicians...Bill Clinton?. Hopefully, they earn enough money to pay off Levon's debts and have some left over to donate to World Hunger Year, Animal Shelters, and to Cancer Research Charities or Sloan Kettering. A video will get made for public consumption, it's possible this gets filmed for HBO or some other channel as well. Corporate sponsors may even show up. Coca Cola?Folgers?

If I could choose who would perform Rag Mama Rag,i'd select the Nitty Gritty Dirt band with Garth and maybe Campbell joining, but i'd have to think about a vocalist, maybe not from within the Dirt Band. But McFadden (harp, drums) probably is a good vocalist for it.

The Band's influence on music was huge- while there was a Band there was no face of The Band. But the face of Amercia that primarily emerged from The Band was the face of Levon Helm. The Band's influence was huge, and Levon's influence was huge. This is an opportunity for other artists to thank Levon publicly and for Levon's people to further enshrine him in the present public memory. Of course, the motivation is to pay off the debt, and keep The Barn going. Also part of the canonization, which, by musical greatness is valid...

Modern American music owes more to The Band than any other one act. Levon was the American in The Band.Radio brought US of AA merican music to Canada, but Levon embodied it, Levon brought the life of The South to The Band, and all of them made that music.And i always said Levon was the voice of AMerica. This is a good bye that all America will get to see and take part in, send a check, say good bye and cry together.

I've Often wondered why there never was this kind of a Concert to celebrate the music of The Band. (Without THe BAND, so that eliminates The LAst Waltz).But far as I know, there never was anything like this to celebrate The Beatles or The Stones either. But it is happening for Levon, or to pay off his debt and keep his vision alive- Musicians, and otherr types of artists, paying back their debt to Levon-The face that harkened back to America's further and recent past, coulda been in The James or Younger gang, or a farmer , and the voice of America.


Entered at Fri Aug 24 16:45:37 CEST 2012 from (202.159.160.88)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Ari...

I'd be most surprised if Robbie was booed. Even our most ardent antis would be thrilled to see Robbie and Garth on Levon's stage. I'll take Put Em Up, who has been (in the past) rather supportive of Levon's point of view (for many good reasons). I'd bet Jeff would be among the loudest cheerers were it to happen. Steve (another Levonista) will be smiling down (or up, depending of your views of his politics... ;) ) as well.

Will it happen? I don't know. Will it be great if it did? Oh yes.


Entered at Fri Aug 24 16:03:48 CEST 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Steinbeck

I mentioned to Peter the other day that I hoped he would get to Salinas. I take the tour of the museum every time. Last time we visited his grave. Favorite book for me was Travels With Charley: In Search of America. Probably for the same reason I love Blue Highways by William Least-Heat Moon.


Entered at Fri Aug 24 13:46:27 CEST 2012 from (83.249.111.104)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster's Dog

Location: Pink painted dinge

Subject: Globetrotter Peter V

Wake up me when Peter V is taking a train to Luton, please.


Entered at Fri Aug 24 12:58:05 CEST 2012 from (83.249.111.104)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: BTW Jim Page (not to be mixed with Jimmy Page)

I am a big fan of JIM PAGE from San Francisco Bay area - now living in Seattle. Any stories, Rocking Chair?


Entered at Fri Aug 24 12:46:51 CEST 2012 from (83.249.111.104)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Subject: Peter V / A pessimistic destructive post

I would like to remind you of the words of JIM PAGE, a singer-songwriter from Bay area known about his song of the modernization of the San Francisco Bay Area: "The West is the best - but only as long as you are a guest."


Entered at Fri Aug 24 07:25:05 CEST 2012 from (68.194.145.145)

Posted by:

Ari

I hope Robbie plays at the Levon concert, that would be really sweet. I'd have guessed he would but I can't imagine the amount of pressure he'd have to endure, I'd be worried that he'd be booed once he gets on stage. Hopefully he'd understand, along with all the other Band fans that this is a loving event, I don't think anyone in the right mind would be opposed to Robbie being there, I don't think there's ever been a better creative team then Robbie and Levon. Yesterday I went to a movie theater in Pleasantville, NY called Jacob Burns, a really fine movie theater. They showed archival material on a big screen to a completely full to capacity theater. The footage included all the footage from Isle of Wight, Eat The Document and the Syria Mosque footage. When they are blown up on screen like that you can really see how much Robbie and Levon rely on another. It's not wonder to me the stage arrangement in The Band, it just makes complete sense, they're always looking at one another for a signal. But I would hope Robbie go, I think the safest way to do it would to go on with Mavis Staples and play The Weight. I'm sure he knows how welcome he would be there. Hopefully Dylan will show up too since we know how much he loves getting lost in New Jersey.


Entered at Fri Aug 24 05:45:48 CEST 2012 from (68.171.231.85)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: I didn't get past the halfway mark of Pippin, but otherwise the only Steinbeck I know I've missed is "Grapes of Wrath". Seems too depressing to even start. "In Dubious Battle" is enough injustice for me. But it and "Cannery Row" are my favourites. Coincidentally, yesterday I went into a used-record store that I've been going to since '74. Same people stii run it. Still mostly vinyl. Has Big Pink jacket hanging on the wall and we chatted aout a mutual friend who'd sent me a picture of himself in front of the sacred house a couple weeks ago. And what should be playing but the Beach Boys' "California Saga", complete with Steinbeck reference.


Entered at Fri Aug 24 03:38:08 CEST 2012 from (208.73.9.170)

Posted by:

Peter V

Saturday was hot, but Sunday was miserable in SF. We were fooled because about 16 or 17 years ago we were there on the hottest day ever recorded, but now I know why the hippies grew their hair long as insulation.

We drove through Salinas passing the lines picking fruit and Steinbeck was on my mind. A teacher introduced us to Cannery Row when I was 17 and by the time I was 18, I had read the complete works, n I still have all hose original paperbacks. Completion started there as I even read Cup of Gold and Short Reign of Pippin IV, but Log From The Sea of Cortez was a favourite.


Entered at Thu Aug 23 22:41:37 CEST 2012 from (184.66.178.72)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: In the West

Al: We are in Victoria currently and so even though we are Torontonians, we will miss The Boss. I agree. That is unfortunate given what he is doing on stage. Peter V: We were in San Francisco and Somona and Napa this past weekend for a break. What a beautiful weekend it was. If that is not summer, I'm not sure what is. The wineries were excellent and the city was lovely. Have a great time and congratulations.


Entered at Thu Aug 23 20:24:13 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

So,what are the odds on RR performing at Love For Levon?



Entered at Thu Aug 23 20:08:48 CEST 2012 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: what Neil Young's up to lately

A new Jonathan Demme concert film, etc.
Etc.


Entered at Thu Aug 23 16:59:11 CEST 2012 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC
Web: My link

Subject: "Love for Levon" benefit concert, October 3 in New Jersey

This is pretty cool. Big fundraising concert for Levon's barn. Check out the lineup!


Entered at Thu Aug 23 16:03:30 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: All in the Family

Serenity: And let's not forget Rufus Wainwright's half-sister, singer Lucy Wainwright Roche, whose mother is singer Suzzy Roche. Lucy sings with Rufus on his latest album "Out of the Game", along with his father, sister Martha, and aunt Sloan Wainwright, Loudon's sister. Aunt Anna McGarrigle plays accordion on the album. Jenni Muldaur, daughter of Geoff & Maria Muldaur, also sings with Rufus.


Entered at Thu Aug 23 13:57:47 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Don't forget all you Tontoronians

Tomorrow night [Friday 24th] is your big night. For one night only at the Rogers centre you will have the chance to see Bruce and the the heart-stopping, pants-dropping, house-rocking, earth-quaking, booty-shaking, Viagra-taking, love-making, curfew-breaking - Le-gen-dary E - Street - Band!"

Do not fucking miss it!!!!!

:-0)


Entered at Thu Aug 23 13:22:50 CEST 2012 from (202.159.160.88)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Subject: John d, a pleasure

Id heard of none of them.


Entered at Thu Aug 23 05:40:51 CEST 2012 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: Wainwright's

DAVID P. Seems they just keep going on and on. I have relations like that. Love it...

CYA soon xoxoxoxo


Entered at Thu Aug 23 05:20:22 CEST 2012 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

jtullfan, Todd Akin and a White Sox sweep of the Yankees in the same week. I feel for ya.


Entered at Wed Aug 22 22:25:59 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Serenity: Speaking of the Wainwright musical dynasty, Rufus is also the father of Viva Katherine Wainwright Cohen, who was born last year. The mother is Leonard Cohen's daughter Lorca.


Entered at Wed Aug 22 21:34:08 CEST 2012 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: Canadian musicians...

CANADIAN MUSICIANS TO MARRY:

Avril Lavingne is about to be a "Girlfriend" no longer -- she's engaged to fellow Canadian Chad Kroeger, singer for the band Nickelback.

A rep for Avril confirmed the news to Access Hollywood on Tuesday.

Chad reportedly asked Avril for her hand in marriage on August 8, giving his fellow Canadian a 14-carat diamond ring, People first reported.

The romance will come as a surprise to many. Avril was linked not long ago to Brody Jenner, but the two reportedly split earlier this year.

vvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvv

The Canadian musical dynasty that is the Wainwrightclan is about to get a bit bigger. Crooner Rufus Wainwright, 39, is set to marry his boyfriend of five years, 38-year-old German-born arts administrator Jorn Weisbrodt this Thursday.

The couple recently settled down in Toronto, as Weisbrodt is the new Artistic Director of the city's annual Luminato arts festival. However, the pair is having the ceremony and reception in Montauk, N.Y., beginning with the nuptials at the home of Wainwright's father, Loudon Wainwright III, followed by champagne and lobster rolls at a local restaurant. They'll then move to Montauk's Shagwong Restaurant to party into the early hours of the morning.

Though he's no singer by profession, Weisbrodt is officially joining a family with music in their blood. Wainwright and his sister Martha, both singer/songwriters, are the children of folk musicians Loudon and the late Kate McGarrigle (who performed with her sister Anna, two of Canada's most beloved musical icons).

CYA soon xoxoxo


Entered at Wed Aug 22 18:46:14 CEST 2012 from (74.108.30.165)

Posted by:

Joan

Web: My link

Subject: Peter in California

Mark Twain said "The coldest winter I've ever spent was a summer in San Francisco" September and October into part of November are their 'Good weather months" I have needed ski parkas in July,

While you are in the area, you should check out the Madonna Inn. One of the craziest places I have ever stayed. See link


Entered at Wed Aug 22 17:57:27 CEST 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: California weather

It's interesting to note that; when we return to that region in October, we are doing so for a reason. The last two times we were there it was in August. I mentioned to a local that I thought it was rather cold and damp. He replied that I should come in THEIR summer. I didn't understand. He mentioned that California is made up of many mini climates. He told us to come back in October; when that region has it's "summer." We'll see. Don't know if your a Steinbeck fan as I am Peter; but if you drive 15 miles inland you will get to the home and museum of Steinbeck in Salinas. You will also see the temperature go up over 20 degrees; from the coast.


Entered at Wed Aug 22 17:43:37 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: There may well be more guns than dogs in the supermarket. Why not announce you're conducting an informal poll some day?


Entered at Wed Aug 22 17:14:13 CEST 2012 from (173.13.177.137)

Posted by:

Peter V

The mist is why the vegetation is so lush I am sure. I was amazed to see so many palms etc in Northern Irish gardens, the answer being that palms don't need heat, but rather die at the first sign of frost, so being damp and cool suits them.

Lars, seeing eye dogs are allowed in grocery stores and restaurants, ythe argument being that everyone understands the need, and that these dogs are well trained and are 'licensed practioners' as they are certified as well trained. But is the lap dog in a grocery store trolley normal?


Entered at Wed Aug 22 17:03:12 CEST 2012 from (173.13.177.137)

Posted by:

Peter v

Yes, he is marrying a California girl, the influence of the Beach Boys at an early age. We were in Carmel twice before, and the coast is stunning. Unfortunately, the last two days the chill, damp fog hasnt lifted at all, and it was the same in San Francisco, either no sunny middle of the day or just two hours from 2 to 4. When the sun is shining you think why would anyone live anywhere else? But in the current weather, we are going to head south at speed, ditching plans to stop at Big Sur etc along the way. Two of our party are already coughing, and Mrs V calls it Van Morrison weather _ through the damp ans misty morning weather - which is why she left Northern Ireland as a child.


Entered at Wed Aug 22 16:33:15 CEST 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Dlew919

Thank you very much for posting this video. I was not aware of Lisa Hannigan; but I sure am now. She sings like an angel.


Entered at Wed Aug 22 14:41:18 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Dylan as Gipper

JT: Thanks very much for the kind words and encouragement. I suspect that our Pat B could offer up some helpful insights into aspects of leadership in this case, given he and the rock Bobster share a deep and abiding interest in the US Civil War. Besides the band-leader-as-general model, there's also the band-leader as coach. Maybe there's something those lines in footage of the '65/'66 tours, but I'm not aware of it. However, there is the nifty alternative version of "You Ain't Goin' Nowhere (1)" on disc 5 of the basement tapes bootleg - the one that starts, "Look here, dear Sue ..." I consider the following lines as decent evidence of a gipperish side of Dylan, willing and in some fashion able to encourage a group that he has helped fledge on their upcoming flight to fame and fortune:

Look here you bunch of basement noise
You ain't no punching bag
I see you walking out there
And you're the one to do it
Pick up your nose you canary

Now look here you pile of money
You best go there and find yourself a file ...


Entered at Wed Aug 22 14:32:06 CEST 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Peter V

I can't tell you how excited I was to visit Los Olivos a few years back. For any red blooded American or Canadian boy; that grew up on Walt Disney, Los Olivos is the home of the Fess Parker Winery. Fess Parker; who has since passed away was indeed Davy Crockett, King of The Wild Frontier to a generation of kids. His family also has a lovely; but expensive inn there.

Peter is your son marrying an American; or does he live there already? We're heading back to Carmel in October. One of my favorite places on earth; along with Big Sur. Al Jardine's house is right down by the water at Big Sur.


Entered at Wed Aug 22 14:25:46 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Something's Happening Here...

Here is the video clip from "Eat the Document" with the version of "Ballad of a Thin Man" that I mentioned earlier. Check out Garth's wild flourishes on organ.


Entered at Wed Aug 22 12:17:32 CEST 2012 from (94.172.128.127)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Brum
Web: My link

Subject: Len again

Leonard Cohen has begun the next stage of his tour. He's in Europe for several months. Sharon Robinson sings Alexandra Leaving - and there are new and newly revived songs. One of the most amazing bands I've ever seen is more or less back together (though currently Dino Soldo - the 'master of breath' is not with the band). Anyone in UK going to Hop Farm next month?


Entered at Wed Aug 22 11:19:26 CEST 2012 from (202.159.160.88)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Web: My link

Subject: I don't think this has been posted here

A very nice cover of tntdodd. I know maud liked this one.


Entered at Wed Aug 22 10:03:47 CEST 2012 from (112.111.191.179)

Posted by:

Evangeline

Location: china
Web: My link

Subject: Nike NFL Jerseys

When the best memory has been recalled for many times,it's getting less tasty.


Entered at Wed Aug 22 07:04:24 CEST 2012 from (24.164.173.243)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: NY

Subject: Dogs

Peter- My wife and I used to train seeing eye dogs for the program that's run out of Patterson, NY. If we cleared it with the manager, we could take our Lab pup inside just about any store we wanted, but we never tried to go into diners or restaurants. A Lab lives for food and we were always afraid the temptation would be too great. I guess it exposes a lack of confidence in our own abilities...plus the dogs were under a year old. Their real training started after we handed them over in Patterson. All five of our Labs "graduated."


Entered at Wed Aug 22 07:00:39 CEST 2012 from (173.13.177.137)

Posted by:

peter v

Subject: like a rolling stne

absolotely right, DP, I would use the 45 of Like A rolling Stone to explain the LP / 45 difference. Have seen several record stores, and it seems 45s aren't valued as highly in the USA as in the UK.


Entered at Wed Aug 22 06:50:35 CEST 2012 from (173.13.177.137)

Posted by:

Peter v

Thanks for the radio notes … four hours on Highway 1 tomorrow, so much appreciated advice. Then we're in Solvang / Los Olivos for four days for my son's wedding. We booked a "Jeep Grand Cherokee" class but got a Chevrolet Traverse, which has more luggage space but falls back in drive on the gentlest slope, something I was taught automatics can't do. This one does. All the speakers have BOSE on them, but the sound's crap. I wanted a Jeep!


Entered at Wed Aug 22 06:50:28 CEST 2012 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: The Boss for Prez?

Why would he want to sully his good name and reputation? : )


Entered at Wed Aug 22 06:24:33 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Al, you may want to consider beginning the process of obtaining U.S.Of A.citizenship. I realize you would not be able to forgive yourself when the man runs for office if you can't vote for him.

There's room here for another good contractor. I might even suggest a partnership. Scouser Friend0 Inc. is an unforgetable name. Friend0 Edge ain't bad either.


Entered at Wed Aug 22 04:39:35 CEST 2012 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: NorthCoast Cal

Hi Peter - Try 107.5 K-Pig for decent radio while your around there.

The dog lovers up there tend to intellectualize their feelings about dogs: like, what is it about humans that make them think they're the only valuable life on earth?


Entered at Wed Aug 22 04:38:57 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Peter, While you are in northern California, if you have a chance to see Steve Freund perform, i suggest it highly.You can google him .find his website and his schedule,He is all over San Fransisico,San Jose,Oakland, etc etc.

Dogs in stores and restaurants- yes, i've seen it in NY, Arizona, and St Louis. It's sometimes a matter of individual store policy, i guess igf the local government hasn't restricted it, it is up to the establishment. No bigger dog lover around than i, but i am not always in favor of it. A case where a owner has the choice of leaving the dog in a hot car or sitting with the dog at outdoor cafe, well, better for the dog to sit in the open air cafe.but,the ground is still gonna be awfully hot. What if someone trips over it, or god knows what could happen... a fight with some other dog, or deciding to lift it's leg? Personally, in cases where I had my dog along, i;d do what i think is reasonable for any dog owner to do, get food at a deli, or take out from a restaurant, find a place to eat in a park, or eat in the car.If your girlfirend, wife, or friends can't handle it, then you've erred by bringing the dog, or you have the wrong cohorts.....Cool weather, if there is no risk of your dog getting stolen, if you must eat in a restaurant while your dog is with you, leave the mutt in the car. But, only if you can eye your car the whole time...People need to use their noggin, and so many don't.

Considerations for dogs are great- Freddie used to let me bring Moe into Tinker Street, but, I never brought him in except during off hours, just a few people in the joint. Dogs in stores and restaurants, well, alot can happen


Entered at Wed Aug 22 02:49:21 CEST 2012 from (173.13.177.137)

Posted by:

Peter V

Location: Carmel

Subject: Cultural question

Nothing to do with music. They say Britain is a nation of dog lovers, but I've seen nothing like the doggieworship evident here. Dog shops everywhere, dog bereavment cards and to cap it all, people walking dogs into food stores which is illegal in Britain. In Safeway in Carmel we just saw a couple with the dog on the baby seat of the shopping trolley, which we found unbelievably disgusting behaviour … even the two dog lovers in our party of four were shocked at people using a seat intended for tiny babies as a resting place for a dog's bottom. Is this just California? We've seen it in San Francisco, Half Moon Bay, Santa Cruz and Carmel (dogs in supermarkets) or is it general in the USA? I'm genuinely interested inthe answer. You can't take dogs into restaurants or cafes in Britain either, or into 90% of hotels. So to us this is weird. I'm not knocking dog owners, just a cultural comparison interest.


Entered at Wed Aug 22 02:43:53 CEST 2012 from (173.13.177.137)

Posted by:

Peter V

Reading Rolling Stone (without buying it) for Dylan's comments on Tempest which turn out to be one column, though noted on the front cover as a feature. Bob repeats the point abut The Tempest being Shakespeare's last play, but says his album is Tempest not THE Tempest so different.

Bob might be the Shakespeare of our time (I think he is) but he should check the original. Old Will wrote at least three more as I said a couple of weeks ago, though he had collaborators.


Entered at Wed Aug 22 00:35:16 CEST 2012 from (184.66.178.72)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Dylan the professional

Bill M: Just when you think you have perhaps had all the thoughts about something you always have had an interest in for decades, someone like you comes along and disturbs that security. Thank you. I have never considered or thought to much about the high-level professionalism that must be inherent in anyone to lead a crew of musicians both on stage and off and do this for long and extended periods of time. I certainly did not think about Dylan in this regard. You are absolutely on the money! When one looks back at the decades of concerts for protracted periods of time, even with management and support, once you are up on that stage delivering the goods, there has to be a professional expert leader. It is clear from the time that he stopped the solo act and 'went electric' that he was a true leader with ability. No one could have almost seamlessly pulled off what he has both before and after the Neverending Tour without that ability.


Entered at Tue Aug 21 22:41:18 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

DAvid P: Thanks for the post. Listening to the live stuff, I never cease to be impressed, not just with the power of the music, but with Dylan's leadership ability. Can't have been easy for him to keep everybody pumping away at that level, far from home, in front of not entirely supportive crowds. A bit of trouble with the drummers of course, but at least none of them self-destructed.


Entered at Tue Aug 21 22:32:04 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Dylan 1965-66

Coincidentally, yet apropos to discussion here today, this morning I was listening to a CD-R that I burned awhile back. It features the mono LP version of "Highway 61 Revisited", the scorching live 1966 version of "Ballad of a Thin Man" (sourced from an "Eat the Document" DVD), the live Liverpool version of "Just Like Tom Thumb's Blues" (from the B-side of the 45 single of "I Want You") and, last but not least, the original 45 single version of "Like A Rolling Stone", which was cut much hotter the the album versions. I've found this CD-R is a good way to getting the juices flowing in the morning!


Entered at Tue Aug 21 20:21:38 CEST 2012 from (64.105.104.78)

Posted by:

Pat B

I believe jeff noticed this DVD first.

So far, the footage is the Pennybaker stuff from the 1966 tour and the Woodstock rehearsal space circa 1969 (RR on the Epiphone). The sound is not synced and the music is some anonymous version of Knockin on Heaven's Door--certainly not by Dylan or the Band. Not one note anywhere of anything by either Dylan or the Band.

The very first sentence is inaccurate; the electric tour started in 1965.

It kind of reminds me of the Mickey Jones and Winston Watson DVD's.


Entered at Tue Aug 21 19:58:18 CEST 2012 from (85.255.44.135)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Subject: New DVD

Thanks, John. This one had passed under the radar. And it looks legitimate, i.e. not a bootleg/pirate thing? Don't know if it brings anything new to the table, though. Haven't seen a content list yet.


Entered at Tue Aug 21 19:05:54 CEST 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Never mind.


Entered at Tue Aug 21 18:32:35 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: like a rolling train

Since it was the 1966 live version I had Bob and our guys doing "Like A Rolling Stone" cranked up this morning. Loud enough that Mickey Jones' slow rolls sounded like separaate freight trains passing through. The one after "juiced in it" had an extra bounce that suggested that a few of the cars were empty; good, but I still preferred the longer one after "used to it". For some reason it made me think of the effective bit of phasing you hear on "Itchycoo Park".


Entered at Tue Aug 21 18:14:06 CEST 2012 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

mike h

Web: My link

The Band & Vassar Clements backstage in San Fran.


Entered at Tue Aug 21 16:26:59 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Serenity / Calvin: I'm amazed that William Wisdom lasted as long as he did, what with Cabot Cove being Murder Capital USA on a per capita basis. As the only people left in town, Jessica would probably have had to kill him herself if the scriptwriters hadn't sent her offshore for the final season or so.


Entered at Tue Aug 21 15:58:48 CEST 2012 from (24.252.145.194)

Posted by:

Calvin

Serenity, William Windom was a regular on Murder She Wrote. But a lot of fans remember him as James Thurber guy, in both the 1960s TV show and a Theatre Version he did for years. Funny Stuff,


Entered at Tue Aug 21 14:00:18 CEST 2012 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

mike h

Web: My link

The Band backstage in Nagoya, Japan ('96).


Entered at Tue Aug 21 02:11:00 CEST 2012 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Web: My link

Subject: RIP celebs, Chuck & John oldie

We lost 3 celebs this weekend. Phyllis Diller[95],died smiling in her sleep; director, Tony Scott,suicide[unoperable brain cancer]jumped from bridge; William Windom,[88], actor. Appeared on "Murder, She Wrote" [I think!!] May they all RIP.

Hope you guys like my link. Check out the others too. Oh, the memories they bring. I've seen Chuck Berry live when he was here with Bill Haley, many moons ago...

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxo


Entered at Tue Aug 21 02:09:42 CEST 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Web: My link

Found their web site. I have no idea of what the quality would be like; but they have some good titles. I don't know.


Entered at Tue Aug 21 02:05:46 CEST 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Web: My link

Link to previous post.


Entered at Tue Aug 21 02:02:39 CEST 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Dylan Band DVD

Amazon are advertising an upcoming DVD release from Bob Dylan & The Band. It's called "Down In The Flood.... Associations and Collaborations." The label makes me a little nervous. It's called "Sexy Intellectual." Huh? That's the way it reads.


Entered at Mon Aug 20 23:42:43 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Pope, out of the question. President of The U.S., not out of the realm of reality..I doubt the man is that much of a masochist, but Reagan did go from Hollywood to politics, eventually, TheWhite House. The Boss has far greater appeal to the masses than Reagan ever did as an actor. Ya never know...but he is building steam.....


Entered at Mon Aug 20 19:06:10 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: In lieu of flowers in your hair...

Bill M: Can't say that I've ever encountered the slimy creatures, which are nothing to sneeze at :-)

Ollabelle participated in "The American Beauty Project" tribute to the Dead. Link above to their wonderful cover of "Brokedown Palace".

Speaking of San Francisco -- Scott McKenzie died Saturday.


Entered at Mon Aug 20 18:21:06 CEST 2012 from (74.108.30.165)

Posted by:

Joan

Web: My link

Nice to hear from you again.


Entered at Mon Aug 20 18:05:59 CEST 2012 from (129.98.207.165)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Bob F.--Garcia Tribute

Got to watch the entire 4 hours from TRI studios.Best to leave the jamming to Jerry,but song-wise this was extremely well done.


Entered at Mon Aug 20 17:11:12 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: in the footsteps of the fisherman ...

Peter V: Our guys sang about LA in their very first record, "Uh Uh Uh" - "Down in LA you know they got everything ..."

David P: Speaking of things you can't make up, Atlanta came up in a news story over the weekend. Something about some scientists whose specialty is the study of the local species known as the Snot Otter. Ever encountered one?

And keeping with our aquatic theme, perhaps one of those overly refreshedmen is a closet fan of the Move, who enticed his colleagues with "Let's go for a walk upon the water, let's go for a stroll across the sea ..."


Entered at Mon Aug 20 16:59:18 CEST 2012 from (67.111.71.6)

Posted by:

peter v

I carry a 'sit on' keyboard which means at least I can use proper punctuation. Without it you find "she is" is easier totype than "she's" and "did not" than "didn't". It will change the language. Many will just miss the apostrophe.

San Francisco bookends The Band, doesn't it? I was humming Shoot Out in Chinatown all day yesterday. As far as I know, prior to Dylan they never played the West Coast.


Entered at Mon Aug 20 16:47:40 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The Not-So Sacred Harp

"Three years I waited patiently
'Till he returned with the harp from the Sea of Galilee..."

In the news here of late is the story that the FBI is investitaging an incident last year that occurred during a "fact-finding tour" of Israel by some Republican lawmakers. It seems that a half-dozen U.S. freshmen congressmen, after imbibing in alcoholic beverages, decided to take a late night dip in the holy site of the Sea of Galilee. One particular congressman admitted to jumping in naked. Some said they were merely "cooling off", while others cited the religious significance of the waters. None apparently admitted to attempting to walk on the water. As they say, in the news of the strange department, you can't make stuff like this up.


Entered at Mon Aug 20 16:21:01 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: addendum for Al

Al E: Just catching up with the weekend paper, where I find this article, "All the papacy's men: Seving God's highest servant" (see link). Looks promising, though I'm afraid you're out of the running for the job as tweeter. A 140-character limit? Ha!


Entered at Mon Aug 20 16:17:29 CEST 2012 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC
Web: My link

Apropos to the Band/Dead discussion, here is "Jerry's Gone" by Tom Pacheco, with some sweet harmony vocals from Rick (& backed by most of the 1990s Band).


Entered at Mon Aug 20 15:51:00 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Nice to hear from NB. Obviously rusty, but most welcome!

Al E: Bruce'd have to change his name, just like Karl and the Ratzinger guy did before him. He probably gets to chose it himself, though. If it doesn't have to be Latinish, Pope Born-To-Run would reflect an interest in Native American culture. There have been married popes, but the wives all get sent to convents, I believe. Pity Patti.

John D / Peter V: Yes, posting from a hand-held is a pain, and dealing with typos is the worst part. Mostly I hang on until a desktop is available; otherwise, the typos get left in.


Entered at Mon Aug 20 15:25:48 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Workingman's Ramble

Another further connection with the Grateful Dead is that Phil Lesh, along with his sons, have appeared several times at the Midnight Ramble. In 2010 Phil also performed with Levon & his band in San Francisco. On the Festival Express DVD, at one point, Levon can be seen watching the Dead perform from the side of the stage.


Entered at Mon Aug 20 14:10:57 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Bob F: Cheers for that mate.

Jeff: Why stop at merely US President? He's a left footer. So why not Pope too? Don't think we've ever had a Pope Bruce.

:-0)


Entered at Mon Aug 20 13:50:44 CEST 2012 from (76.64.160.91)

Posted by:

Northern Boy

Location: Bracebridge, Ontario. (no longer just beyond Hope, B.C.)

Have just purchased tickets for Blackie and The Rodeo Kings at the Orillia Opera House. I'll no doubt be thinking of our pal Steve a few times throughout the evening. I've been well and I hope you've all been well as well. NB.


Entered at Mon Aug 20 13:42:41 CEST 2012 from (76.64.160.91)

Posted by:

Northern Boy

Location: Bracebridge, Ontario. (no longer just beyond Hope, BC.)

Just purchased tickets for Blackie And The Rodeo Kings at the Orillia Opera House in November. I'll no doubt be thinking of our pal Steve a few times during that evening. Hope you've all been well. NB.


Entered at Mon Aug 20 08:18:40 CEST 2012 from (12.36.234.142)

Posted by:

Alex

RIP Richard, Rick and Levon. You guys were three of the coolest guys ever! May your voices join the choir of angels.


Entered at Mon Aug 20 02:17:41 CEST 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: Garcia Tribute Concert

Jed, these videos from the Garcia Tribute Concert 'Move Me Brightly' with the remaining members of the Dead are a lot of fun to watch. I'm not a real big fan of the jams but I love many of the Dead songs and I can listen to Jerry sing 'Sugaree' all day long.


Entered at Sun Aug 19 22:19:25 CEST 2012 from (24.218.16.94)

Posted by:

Dave H

I think the Dead is the only artist to have been covered by three former members of the Band, at least on record. Garth recorded "Dark Star," Rick recorded "Ripple," and Levon recorded "Tennessee Jed." The Garth cover in particular was sort of a surprise, but it turned out to be quite an interesting take on the song.


Entered at Sun Aug 19 21:27:11 CEST 2012 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Dennis

Which crew? GD or Band?


Entered at Sun Aug 19 17:20:25 CEST 2012 from (67.111.71.6)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: iPad

John, it seems you are Ok if you correct immediately by deleting back a letter at a time. Trying to insert and delete later seems to cause the freeze. SO while I'm in iPad mode, I just won't go back and correct the minor typos ("bag" was "back" below).


Entered at Sun Aug 19 17:17:48 CEST 2012 from (67.111.71.6)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Grateful Dead

The connections are multiple. Garth is fond of doing Scarlet Begonias and Dark Star, for example. The bonding seems to have been good in Festival Express. Robbie was not on the train at that point, and was the one who had run down West Coast bands in the Rolling Stone article, saying they couldn't play. The others didn't seem to have any prejudice once they met up. What interested me about tyhe Monopoly gane was the assessment of album quality can be seen in the prices onthe "streets" which have become albums. The company who makes it are in Seattle and they do about ten specific Dog opoly's too … Bulldogopoly, Muttopoly, Frenchopoly.

San Francisco is a good place to sell the GD one, and the cards (as shown on the bag cover) look funny. Go to Jail becomes Get Off The Bus. It would be fun to do a Bandopoly but propbably not enough market. I bet there would be for a Dylanopoly though. The $400 street has to be Blonde on Blonde.


Entered at Sun Aug 19 17:17:22 CEST 2012 from (68.172.215.87)

Posted by:

Dennis

Location: West Saugerties
Web: My link

Subject: Quick Jed Response

Yes, Jed, a very strong Band/Dead connection: as part of the crew, we were there at the last shows....didn't imagine at the time they were to be the last shows. Take care all...


Entered at Sun Aug 19 16:32:33 CEST 2012 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Anyone Grateful

Jerry Garcia and the Grateful Dead were huge Dylan/Band admirers,over the years covering their tunes.Further,Workingmans Dead and other songs were clearly influenced by The Band.Any Deadheads out here who are also rabid Band fans?Anyone see the influence The Band had on Garcia? Also,Levon's rambles featured some fine Dead tunes.Phil as a guest at rambles seems to make perfect sense!


Entered at Sun Aug 19 16:28:18 CEST 2012 from (173.252.30.247)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Subject: street meat

Couldn't resist posting this. After I stopped laughing I tried his wares. Commendable.


Entered at Sun Aug 19 16:13:06 CEST 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY
Web: My link

Subject: Springsteen at Fenway

Mark, Al Edge, I think you might enjoy this link.


Entered at Sun Aug 19 14:11:12 CEST 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Peter V / iPad

Yes Peter. I have had many problems; not only on this site; but others; when attempting to send post. Freezes up on me. Cursor flashes; but won't let me type.


Entered at Sun Aug 19 05:23:32 CEST 2012 from (98.212.59.89)

Posted by:

Jennie "jendog"

Location: A Wanderer

Subject: thank you- I am grateful

Thank you- to all you wonderful music folk- for giving me so many great memories and words to listen to and to HEAR- thank you to all the gifted players of instruments and players of words. My life has been so enriched. Keep on keeping on-and my motto- Live Life Out Loud. Peace--


Entered at Sun Aug 19 02:01:44 CEST 2012 from (67.111.71.6)

Posted by:

Peter V

When I say we watched our neighbour's one channel TV, I didn't say they let us in the house. We huddled inthe garden in the rain, and if we dug the garden for them, they would open the curtains enough to let us glimpse the picture. For years I thought TV was silent.

In San Francisco, I spent ten happy minutes examing Grateful Deadopoly. It was designed by someone with exactly the same view of their albums as me. The $400 card is Amerian Beauty, the $350 is Workingman's Dead, then the next set has Live dead and Live in Europe 72. The counters are an amp, a guitar, a family dog and a bus. Pity it's too bulky to take back.


Entered at Sat Aug 18 21:49:13 CEST 2012 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Web: My link

Subject: Beatles..

Happy 50th Anniversary to the BEATLES..

This is a good link for Beatles' fans...

PETER V.: Not an advert, but go to askleo.com.. One of the best guys you will find on the net to answer your PC problems.

CYA soon xoxoxo


Entered at Sat Aug 18 20:40:52 CEST 2012 from (24.164.173.243)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: the depths of Ulster County

Subject: You had it made, sonny

ONE CHANNEL!!!!...???? LUXURY!! When I was a lad we used to walk into town and work at the rifle range for minimum wage, balancing apples on our heads for the marksmen who secretly depised us and I think, in the case of my cousins, purposely shot low. Now I'm the last survivor in my family and to this day I hate applesauce, especially with red sauce sprinkled on top.


Entered at Sat Aug 18 18:25:05 CEST 2012 from (71.184.199.161)

Posted by:

Tim

Location: Boston
Web: My link

Subject: Rick and Levon, plus The Band @84 photo's

Not sure if there are new to this site or not, but nice pics from back in the day.


Entered at Sat Aug 18 17:43:07 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Location: i'd vote for him ... why the fuck not

Subject: Tramps like us, baby we were born to run for....

AL, it occured to mee that Springsteen might have a real chance of winning a Presidential election here, if he were to run....No joke...People are fed up all the way around, if The Big Man was alive and was the VP candiate , or would have been in The Cabinet, i think The Boss could ....Man on a mission.....What's he got up his sleeve? 2016?


Entered at Sat Aug 18 17:29:19 CEST 2012 from (67.111.71.6)

Posted by:

The Moonstruck Ones

Location: San Francisco

Subject: West Coast Tour

The Moonstruck Ones Here we are on the road in San Francisco. Ray has been explaining the musical superiority of LA bands based on the influence of session guys, which I thought rich coming from a guy who worked with Jim.

Pete spent the day at City Lights Bookstore regaling admirers with tales of Ginsberg and Ferlinghetti. We dragged him away to Haight, and the only American cab driver I've met in years told us we were 45 years too late, and that Janis had slept on his floor. Pete found the Anarchist Collective Bookstore and urged insisting we play for free in Golden Gate Park. We opened with Where Have All The Flowers Gone (Ray does a great organ solo) to a few hirsute twenty-somethings who thought it was 1966. After that number one said he had plenty of flowering tops. I decided these lads were gardeners, because they kept talking about weed. Pete said bindweed was a major problem in a garden and that fresh mint could run riot in a herb bed. I fear they didn't understand.


Entered at Sat Aug 18 17:20:42 CEST 2012 from (67.111.71.6)

Posted by:

Peter V

Tried to post from my iPad. I did two long attempts, made a typo and when I tried to correct it, the GB submission form froze. Anyone else had that?


Entered at Sat Aug 18 17:05:34 CEST 2012 from (67.111.71.6)

Posted by:

Peter V

Sky Arts? Luxury! When I was a lad we had one channel on the TV and that was it. Not that we had a TV, but the neighbours up the road let us watch it on Saturday nights for the Dave King Show. I'm appalled at lining Murdoch's greasy pockets.


Entered at Sat Aug 18 15:56:56 CEST 2012 from (83.249.111.104)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Prog / "sadavid"

Thanks "sadavid" for the link. - In Finland some of prog bassists had a classical music education from Sibelius Academy. They played even in symphony orchestras. Some say that it was easier to get in to bassist classes than violin classes. In Sweden a few prog rock profiles still play in studios and mainstream TV shows. Some have sold their souls and are now "loved by the whole nation" (a Swedish term used by newsmen after their death).


Entered at Sat Aug 18 09:28:12 CEST 2012 from (124.170.202.234)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: The Alympix...

Oh, London: what have you done? Sydney has been absolutely broke since 2000... much like the Monorail on the Simpsons - it looks flashy, but is disastrous. Stop lining the pockets of those fascists...

Always great to see Brian May in full form, though...


Entered at Sat Aug 18 04:18:26 CEST 2012 from (208.120.38.3)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Thanks BEG, as I said, no worries. Other than that (ouch) hope you are well. :)


Entered at Sat Aug 18 04:17:23 CEST 2012 from (208.120.38.3)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC
Web: My link

Subject: Setlist for Jimmy Vivino w/Garth Ramble -- 8/10/12

If this link works, you'll see the dream setlist of Band songs that Jimmy, Garth & friends played at the Ramble last week. (If not, go to Levon's Facebook page & scroll until you find the setlist image.) Looks like the vast majority of the first three Band albums were played, plus Garth solo improvs!


Entered at Fri Aug 17 22:35:47 CEST 2012 from (184.144.104.25)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Jon L and others. Someone from the GB got hacked and now two of my email accounts have been hacked. Luckily a lot of the email addies are old. Apologies to all.....I did not send anyone an email lately. Either check with me or delete! :-(


Entered at Fri Aug 17 20:15:14 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: PV and anyone else with Sky Arts

A heads up in case you don't catch in time my earlier post re the Hard Rock highlights show featuring Bruce and Paul Simon amongst others - it's repeated tomorrow night at 11pm.


Entered at Fri Aug 17 20:14:06 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: and now for something pretty much the same ...

I wish the Germany vs Greece Olympic quarter-final had been more like this.

Landmark: You may be on sooner than you think. Stay tuned.

sadavid: Good choice. One of my favourite albums, and definitely my favourite Thompson work.


Entered at Fri Aug 17 20:00:25 CEST 2012 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: dueling accordions

Reel folke rocke - John Kirkpatrick's accordion does call-and-response with Richard Thompson's skirling Strat(?) on the long outro to this song. Also some nice mandolin work, and I think a little dulcimer.


Entered at Fri Aug 17 19:58:17 CEST 2012 from (70.28.32.74)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

Bill, no worries. You bring the scotch, I'll bring the smoked meat. We be fine.


Entered at Fri Aug 17 19:44:32 CEST 2012 from (108.54.247.103)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: OLympics

I thought I was the only one in Olympics withdrawal. It was kind of spoiled because all the news median would have "spoiler alerts" and then talk about it in vague terms that let you know what happened. It was pretty silly. You watch even knowing that Michael Phelps won another medal.

I do wish they would make their coverage a little less UScentric. It would have been interesting to see more and know more about some other athletes.


Entered at Fri Aug 17 19:42:45 CEST 2012 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon L

BEG, if you're out there, got some spam from your email account cc'd to myself, John D and others. (No problem here, just a heads-up.)


Entered at Fri Aug 17 18:14:45 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Olympic howler

Shit. What a missed opportunity!!

Danny Boyle, Sebastian Coe & Coe up shit creek, completely clueless and all the time there was Bill M vegetating by his PC just waiting for the nod to make the Games a real success

Never mind Bill there's always the Mind Games!

:-0)


Entered at Fri Aug 17 17:44:44 CEST 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Bill M's Comment

Bill M, what do you mean by "our posts"? Is their a Guestbook cool kids table that your sitting on? I don't think I've ever responded to one of your posts in the past so obviously I'm not keeping "close track" or interested in what your writing. So what is your problem buddy?


Entered at Fri Aug 17 17:28:29 CEST 2012 from (70.28.32.74)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

My favourite moment of the closing ceremonies was Eric Idle singing "Look On The Brighter Side Of Life". What a perfect number to close the games.


Entered at Fri Aug 17 17:06:46 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Born To Win / Born To Wun

Fred: Two more great examples! Just imagine how much more meaningful it would have been for many of us if, instead of having a couple of nationalists drone on about what to watch for in the next segment, we got to see the Python crowd, Mr Bean, etc., perform their version of the 'sport' about to be shown?

Come to think of it, in the non-Olympic years, maybe the troupe could occupy its time by opening for people like, oh, Bruce Springsteen. Imagine Michael Palin in a toga, singing the songs of Bwuce, or for that matter any other high-wanking wocker?


Entered at Fri Aug 17 16:44:47 CEST 2012 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Bill M: there is a Pythonesque element that exists in the Olympics in the form of synchronized swimming & rhythmic gymanstics (and figure skating/ice dance in the winter games) or more specifically the "meaning" or "symbolism" attached to the routines.


Entered at Fri Aug 17 16:34:34 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Fred: I like the pirates idea! In fact, I think the British, in planning the games, missed out on a great opportunity to take advantage of their cultural heritage make the games more overtly Pythonesque. (I must note that there was some of it. My wife watched a bit of the opening and said that the Bond/Queen thing was ludicrous, "just like a skit on that British show you like" - meaning Monty Python.) I mean, imagine the Pythons playing badminton (though the Chinese did do a pretty good imitation of Mr Bean)? Or, better still, beach volleyball?


Entered at Fri Aug 17 16:24:39 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Bob F: Do you keep close track of all of our posts, or just Peter V's? If the former, then your brain must have a special Al Edge annex.


Entered at Fri Aug 17 16:16:50 CEST 2012 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Oh the Japanese were really miffed when baseball (and to a lesser extent) softball got tossed from the summer games. The powers that be keep trying to get these sports reinstated. Personally, as much as I love these sports, I believe they should stay out of the games. Plus I'd make the mens basketball (and hockey in the Winter Games) like the footie: Under 23s only. And for all the sailing events: have pirates involved. : )


Entered at Fri Aug 17 16:12:26 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: The tempest doth rage all their eyes are on thee

They look to thy shining sweet star of the sea.

Wow. Some review that Bob. Cheers for that. She hyperbolises even more than me. Epic, epic and epic - to name but three epics.

:-0)

Sounds...er...epic. Cannae wait. Think I might just be investing in a copy.


Entered at Fri Aug 17 16:06:14 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Dame Vera

Subject: Japan and togger

Has it ousted baseball Fred?


Entered at Fri Aug 17 15:05:12 CEST 2012 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: An Olympian post of Al Edge proportions (the short program)

Vera, er, I mean Al: If I watched the state run TV network then I got a fairly balanced view of things (naturally the announcers went a bit nuts when Japan won any kind of medal....but they also did the same when Bolt won his or Mo Farah won his) The private networks, well they were very nationalistic (not the announcers but the in-studio staff, but they're always like that). I don't think that, generally speaking, the Japanese were too upset by having China get more medals....I think they knew it was going to happen before things started. I'm sure there may have been some isolated cases of deluded right wing nutbars who thought that wouldn't occur and were ticked off about such, but on the whole it was the opposite. What really got the locals in a tizzy was that the Judokas (especially the men) did not do well (compared to what was projected before the Games started). That and also how the men's football didn't medal....losing to S. Korea is always "painful" (The South Koreans were more motivated than usual---I mean beating Japan, at any sport, is their raison d'etre--- but this time their men's team had the additional motivational factor that if they brought home a medal they'd be exempted from military service) One thing...that US women's football/soccer gold is a tainted medal. I say this as a proud (during international sporting events) Canadian, and as a fan of the Japanese women's football team. Grrr. : ) Oddly the Japanese media didn't say a peep about how they "wuz robbed" by poor officiating during the gold medal match.


Entered at Fri Aug 17 14:52:15 CEST 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY
Web: My link

Subject: Tempest

Great link on Expecting Rain of a first listen review of that "declining" artist Bob Dylan's new cd Tempest. This preview from Hot Press was written by a woman. Amazing since we were recently told on the Guestbook that woman don't listen to Bob Dylan anymore.


Entered at Fri Aug 17 14:32:46 CEST 2012 from (83.249.111.104)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Suspicious package #2

Normally, in the fifties you couldn't get any maps of Soviet Union. When we travelled to Soviet in 1957 we had the detailed maps from Finnish Armed Forces which my father had used as officer during the war against Russians. It was not popular on the border. - A good tread. Who started it and why?


Entered at Fri Aug 17 14:12:04 CEST 2012 from (83.249.111.104)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Suspicious package / Specially to WEBMASTER

I didn't bother to let my mini-pc, with the famous penguin on the cover, x-rayed separately. They opened my bag. Bad Police asked: "Why didn't you let your computer x-rayed separately?" Good Police looked at the penguin and then looked at me most pitifully. "It is not a computer", he said, "it is Linux". Bad Police: "OK, carry on!"


Entered at Fri Aug 17 12:57:28 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Ha ha - Hey Fred

You wouldn't be laughing if you heard me singing 'We'll Meet again" with me trouser legs rolled up and a knotted hankie on me head!!

What was your coverage like over there Fred? Did you get the British slant or was it more balanced coverage? What about our bikers eh!!

I don't suppose your good lady's countrymen are best pleased with the Chinese success huh.


Entered at Fri Aug 17 12:47:10 CEST 2012 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Hey Vera Lynn in trousers... : )

At least you were in the proper time zone while watching the Olympics. I altered my sleeping pattern to watch the events live and now I'm having a wee bit of trouble readjusting to "civilian" life. Good thing I'm on vacation.


Entered at Fri Aug 17 12:26:09 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Olympic Withdrawl symptoms

Ha ha. Us too Rog.

Haven't weeped during the national anthem for at least 6 days now!! Before London 2012 I just felt scouse and had done ever since Thatcher fucked us up. Since that opening ceremony and the flood of heroic efforts from our amazing athletes I'm a reborn patriot - like a modern day Vera Lynn with trousers!

:-0)


Entered at Fri Aug 17 11:47:47 CEST 2012 from (94.172.128.127)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Brum

Subject: Ta Al

Thanks Al - set to record... Didn't know what to watch since the Olympics ended...


Entered at Fri Aug 17 11:44:36 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Muscle Shoals will never die

Go slay 'em Brucie lad

:-0)


Entered at Fri Aug 17 11:32:31 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Pete Viney alert [and anyone else who can get Sky Arts]

Hard Rock Calling highlights show that will debut on Sky Arts on Friday 17th August at 9.00pm.

Full line up:

Bruce Springsteen- 'Thunder Road'
Paul Simon - 'Diamonds On The Soles Of Her Shoes'
Lady Antebellum - 'We Owned The Night'
Christina Perri - 'Arms'
Christina Perri - 'Jar of Hearts'
Jimmy Cliff - 'The Harder they Come'
Tom Morello -'Ease My Revolutionary Mind'
Cold Chisel - 'Khe Sahn'
Iggy & The Stooges - 'I Wanna Be Your Dog'
Soundgarden - 'Fell on Black Days'
Soundgarden - 'Rusty Cage'
Bruce Springsteen- 'Shackled and Drawn'
Bruce Springsteen -'Because the Night'
John Fogerty - 'The Old Man Down The Road'
Punch Brothers - 'Movement And Location'
Alison Krauss - 'Daylight'
Alison Krauss - 'Paper Airplane'
Lady Antebellum - 'Need You Now'
Paul Simon - 'Late in the Evening'
Paul Simon - 'Graceland'
Bruce Springsteen- 'We Are Alive'
Paul Simon - 'The Boxer'
Paul Simon - 'You Can Call Me Al'
Bruce Springsteen & Paul McCartney - 'I Saw Her Standing There'
Bruce Springsteen & Paul McCartney - 'Twist and Shout'


Entered at Fri Aug 17 10:21:18 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Bill M in patronising post shock!!!!!

:-0)


Entered at Fri Aug 17 10:18:10 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Jeff

Go get that ticket and enter the raffle.

Just feckin go, man. I implore you.

:-0)

As for what's left to spring from the guy's loins in the future. Sure is an interesting hunch of yours and reflecting on it as things stand I guess there's more than an even chance of something special still to come.


Entered at Fri Aug 17 07:08:19 CEST 2012 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Hard to get excited about a documentary that gets a major fact wrong in its first two words. Plus the fake music was awful. Plus a doc about the 60's with photos from 74?


Entered at Fri Aug 17 06:54:03 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Web: My link

Subject: Down In The Flood

Sept 25 release.

Anyone know if this is just a compilation of interviews that were made public previously , or is this new, previously unreleased stuff?


Entered at Fri Aug 17 04:02:03 CEST 2012 from (173.252.30.247)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Subject: Lovin Arms

I went to a Pamela Morgan show tonight. God, I've loved that woman for so long. Pam sings only traditional and original songs so this one caught me by surprise. I know it as an Etta James song but this is the best I can find on Youtube by Millie Jackson. The writer is one Tom Jans, fairly obscure but a collaborator of Mimi Farina at one time.


Entered at Fri Aug 17 03:58:38 CEST 2012 from (65.95.93.46)

Posted by:

Bill M

Mark: PULEASE don't try to keep up!!


Entered at Fri Aug 17 03:51:46 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Garth delights in telling accordion jokes.

Al - you've got me hankering to go see The Boss. i dunno, maybe it's me, but i think he's got another, greater materpiece to go. Hard to top Rosalita, Born To Run, some of those songs from back then, but i think there is another, hard to imagine, but deeper and bloodier statement to come even.

I think there is somethng in there on it's way out, or trying to find it's way out.Maybe he needs someone to work with , maybe he doesn't.He always wrote alone before. But something is a brewing

.Sadavid - sounds like you may have been up "isolated" or "secured" whilst your bag was rummaged through. Once is enough, eh?
You may have the distinction of being the first GBer to spell my posting name correctly. Some , I could understand. Like Westie. He couldn't spell properly if his life depended on it. Where is the old fucker anyway....i sure hope he didn't drown...

Al, of course, i don't know, but i;d like to think Springsteen has a different sort of greatness in him that he hasn't reached yet.i know that's asking alot.stuff like The River is pretty damn wonderful in a straight ahead way. And i;d like to see more of those kind of human artistsic stuff out of him.But i;m really hopjng there is some hard , bloody, real, deep, yet not overblown stuff to come. Stripped bare emotion, none of the grandeur, none of the over poetics, just straight to the point bare bones shit.


Entered at Fri Aug 17 02:57:23 CEST 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: CD Life Topic (Again)

So tonight (in my iTunes collection) I decide to listen back to Bob Dylan's Bootleg Series Vol 1-3. I decide to listen (for whatever reason) to the alternate version of Idiot Wind. Suddenly the track begins to skip madly through the song. Static sounding and then skipping. Again, I have to ask the question. How many of these precious music CD's that I own, actually play perfectly anymore. I don't know. This has now happened on 4 different occasions; with different CD's. These are mint CD's; but again I question the life of these things. I had to download an iTunes version of the song to complete the album. Very upsetting.


Entered at Fri Aug 17 01:12:21 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Bruce Fenway Night 2

Mark - thought you might enjoy re-living the night courtesy of a fellow attendee from one of the forums who clearly derived a similar joy to yourself from what went down

It was night 2 in a city, a beautiful summer night but rain was on its way, it was a ballpark, it was Boston. All that – and, who knows, something more, created a very unusual evening.

Was it “epic”, “the best show since xxx”, “better than xxx”..? Who cares! Every night we get to see Bruce and the ESB play is a treat. Depending on what’s going on with the band and what’s going on for each of us personally some nights are more significant, more intense, more exciting. But every once in a long while the whole thing goes in a totally unexpected direction – even for the faithful who watch every set list - even for the band - and last night was one of those nights.

Overall comments:

• Don’t know, yet, how far from the original set list Bruce was – but we do know that 2/3 of the songs changed from Night 1 to Night 2

• Bruce kept throwing out changes in direction. This always seems to get the band focused and intense. It is harder work - but they really seem to enjoy themselves more.

• To me, the core of the band seemed particularly engaged and intense from the get go and only got more into it during the show. Roy – who usually seems calm and cool to me - was playing hard – pounding the keys. Steve was way into it (or at least as into it as he gets). Max – particularly late in the show – was grinning and singing along as he tried to keep the train on the tracks. It is hard to underestimate how much his steadiness is the backbone of the band working. Nils was onboard – although he didn’t have a major part in the night. All of this seemed particularly intense during the “core” songs like Badlands, Darkness, Backstreets.

• For me, the most interesting thing was that the show balanced complete fun with total intensity… Usually Bruce shows (at least for me, anyway) seem to be one or the other.

• All in all, Bruce was clearly in a spontaneous mood. LOTS of mugging, lots of setlist changes, lots of energy.

• As others noted, some of the rarities were lost on the less knowledgeable (e.g. non-insanely-fanatic) members of the crowd. That made the show somewhat less accessible to them. It sure made it fun for us!

Take Me Out To The Ballgame – Bruce conducted the crowd into a big sing-along as he arrived on stage pantomiming throwing a pitch a few times.

Thunder Road (Bruce & Roy) – Bruce intros saying they used to do it this way a long time ago. It was beautiful and, to my ears, a very romantic rendition of the song.

Hungry Heart – Crowd, of course, goes wild. Yeah, we can all be jaded about it – but this one works for newbies and old hands.

Sherry Darling – Ahh… now we’re into fun AND rare. Audience totally missed the “make some party noise” instruction from Bruce… oh well. I THINK this was an audible.

Summertime Blues – At this point it becomes quite clear that this night is going somewhere unusual.

Girls in Their Summer Clothes – Bruce is unsure the band remembers this – schools them on cord changes for a moment. Now we’re deep into the “summer” theme.

We Take Care of Our Own – OK, just a reminder that this IS the Wrecking Ball tour. The song was fine. I assumed we were going to go back to a more usual WB concert structure at this point.

Two Hearts – Always a fun song, Steve and Bruce seemed to be having a ball. No clue as to what was coming.

Wrecking Ball – Yup. OK, we’re back to a WB concert. I really like this song and like its growth from a song about a stadium to a metaphor for aging. Crowd reacted again to “where Giants play the game”… didn’t seem as big as Night 1 – but I could be wrong. Bruce non-apologized again .

Death to My Hometown – For me, this is where the “fun” show gave way to the “intense” show.

My City of Ruins – A beautiful song. Somehow Night 1 seemed more powerful.

Knock on Wood – Great sign from the crowd. These are the ones I like – great songs – classics or just cool numbers – that the band member probably kinda know… so the question is “can they pull together and pull it off?”. Bruce says something about any horn player should know this. The band works it out for a few moments and then BAM into the song. Sounds like they’ve been playing it for years.

Does This Bus Stop at 82nd Street? – A fun song with a great percussion break-out in last night’s performance. But something else really struck me… Jake.

[Slight diversion into a Jake commentary: Before Jake and the horn section’s addition to the lineup there was discussion about the possibility on BTX. Some people were outright hostile to the idea. I, like many others, were skeptical that it could work. Then Bruce made the announcement and we took a collective gulp and thought – a) Bruce know what he’s doing, b) Bruce knows Jake, c) Bruce knows his audience… so we’ll see. As the concerts began, it was clear that Jake was talented and had perspective that this was about Clarence and he needed to work really hard to play the role without it being about himself. It was also clear that the guy could blow the horn and was doing so in a great and appropriate way. Audiences embraced him. (I wonder if Bruce had any doubts before the first big roar of approval or if he just knew). But Jake’s playing was “conservative”… trying to play the parts, play them well, and do Clarence proud. Last night was my 4th show of the tour… and the two Fenway shows were the first in a while. But when Jake stepped up to play the solo on Bus Stop I heard Jake himself for the first time. It was jazzy and relaxed and, I don’t know, youthful. Perhaps it was the loose energy of the night. Perhaps it is Jake starting to own bits and pieces of the songs. Perhaps I’m totally misreading it… but that was what I saw.

Thundercrack – Great long intro. Bruce started by saying “we’re going to go even further back”. He talked about opening for all these other bands. He ran down a long list and looked over to Gary (the only remaining band member from “back then”) for what he was missing. He talked about how no one remembers the opening act so they came up with all these complex songs to try to become memorable and then used his past line of this being the shot stopper before there was a show to stop. He mused about whether anyone would know it and then said something about this being Boston so he figured we would. (Nice props, Bruce!)

Frankie - A knockout surprise for the fanatics. A nice pop tune for most of the people there.

Prove It All Night ('78 intro) – GREAT! There’s a reason fanatics want to hear this. Of course it is “rare”… but it also just phenomenal. BTW – Steven SMOKED the guitar solo at the end. Absolutely smoked it… with Bruce egging him on. Obviously most folks didn’t know they were seeing something rare… but they knew they were seeing something intense and cool.

Darkness on the Edge of Town – Nice. Always.

Working on the Highway – OK, now we’re back to playful.

Shackled and Drawn – Both nights Bruce lead the audience into a thumping rhythmic beat before starting the song. It gives the song a good jump-start although there’s an odd transition from the audience to the band. I think this is a terrific song and Cindy’s duet with Bruce at the end is nice and powerful.

Waitin' on a Sunny Day – I could completely do without this song and the vamping with children doesn’t do much for me. That said, I give Bruce credit – it works for the overall audience every night without fail. Tonight seemed not to find a child to pull up on stage so – IIRC – he kinda passed the mic around to different audience members to sing a phrase (or was that another song). During this song the rain started to drip a bit.

Backstreets (with Dream Baby Dream interlude) – Now we’re back to intensity and the interlude worked beautifully. For fanatics, we knew we were seeing something new (or pretty new... has he done this before?). For every else… just a good, intense performance.

Badlands – More intensity.

Land of Hope and Dreams – I love this song. Wherever the show has been, this is pointing to the future with hope.

* * *

Who'll Stop the Rain (acoustic) – By now we’re all pretty wet (although it never really poured). So out comes Who’ll Stop The Rain… except it is a solo acoustic version that really harkens back to its origins. It seemed to me it was sung rather sadly. It ended into a very smooth intro to…

Rocky Ground – Michelle Moore had been intro’d with the band, so it was likely this would be played. Man, this is pretty and man can she sing. I can’t say I could tell what the newbies thought – but it does work.

Born to Run - Lights up, encore time. Raining steadily but who cares. I guess the surprises are probably over.

Detroit Medley – Nope. Surprises not over. I know this isn’t a HUGE rarity – but I believe this was a first for me. Band just ripped into it.

[Aside from the bus trip home. I sat next to a couple. We made it clear that we’d all been to the show, started chatting. The woman then told me that the guy she was with grew up with Steven. I’m pretty sure this was all real… we got to chatting and it turned out that he and Steve had been in bands together when they were teenagers. They had gone separate ways. He had never gone to see Bruce before because of his regrets at having missed the ride. (Although his real non-musical career sounded pretty interesting, too). But one of the things he and Steven had put together was a medley of tunes by Mitch Ryder and the Detroit Wheels. It survives intact today as the Detroit Medley.

Dancing in the Dark – Gotta do it for the non-fanatics and, of course, it worked in the rain.

Quarter to Three – Bruce came out to fetch this sign from the crowd. Looks at it. Does the whole too tired to go on bit. Steve comes with the sponge to revive him. At this point a little boy (maybe 5) from the crowd (who Bruce had been mugging with all night) came wandering all the way up from the runway to the main stage. Steve hands him the sponge and he helps to revive Bruce who then carries him back to the family. Was this totally staged? Totally spontaneous? I have no idea – but it was cute as hell… and I don’t like the kids’ sing-along part of “Waitin’”. Of course, the song itself is great. He asked the backup singers if they knew it – pretty sure they said “No” and he said “Well, fake it then!”. Crowd sing-along worked, too. You could tell that these old-time songs really worked for the old-time band members. The grins were huge.

Tenth Avenue Freeze-out – Such a great song. Bruce had clearly scripted what he wanted to say tonight – talking about ghosts and how they inhabit our lives and places like ballparks. As best I could tell, he had the crew tape what he wanted to say to the stage – so he didn’t have to hang out reading from a prompter. Bruce included Johnny Pesky in the tribute – with the foul pole and his #6 lit up. Sadly, I have to say that the full message didn’t really get through. I think a lot of the audience missed the reference to Clarence and Danny. (Just tough – rain, always hard to understand spoken words from the PA, lots of context to absorb, the lighting of Danny and Clarence’s spots only works if you really understand who stood there and what they meant). Then, into the song – great as always. Interesting moment when Bruce’s timing was off on the lyrics as he got to “Now this is the important part”… he got half-way through the sentence and realized he was going to miss “The change was made uptown”… so he skipped “the important part”. Interesting only in that it is SO rare that timing is off on ANYTHING in a Bruce show.

American Land (with Ken Casey) – A fun energetic end to the night. Props to Ken – it was pretty clear he had learned the lyrics by heart and he just poured out the energy.

I suspect Twist & Shout had been planned but got cut because the fireworks that became part the song on Night 1 went off as we all exited the field soggy, tired, and happy.

I had a newbie with me last night. He's a generation younger and this isn't his kind of music. He definitely came away understanding why people LOVE Bruce. I also told him multiple times that nights like last night are what happens when you have a GREAT group of people who know their work individually, who trust one another, and who are really in sync. You get a TEAM at its peak. You get a TEAM that can do almost anything. I know I've only experienced that kind of peak in my own work on a few occasions. I know that's exactly what I saw on stage last night.


Entered at Thu Aug 16 20:13:20 CEST 2012 from (65.217.161.25)

Posted by:

Mark

Location: Maine

Subject: Al Edge

Al was able to evoke more of the passion of the show with his response than I was able to evoke after attending the show.....there is a reason I am far more "lurker" than "poster" on here..... :)

Al,

If you are a Darkness-era live fan, last night was the night. The Prove It All Night into Darkness and Backstreets into Badlands combos sounded more like 1978 than anything I have heard since. While everyone has their favorite period, mine will always be the '78 "attitude", and last night was clear attempt by Bruce to channel that "attitude" into those four songs. Much of the show was light, loose and fun.....those four songs were from a different place than the rest of the show. For somebody who wasn't around for the Darkness era, it was as close as I will get to what they must have felt like at the time.


Entered at Thu Aug 16 19:40:34 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Bruce at Fenway night 2

Absolutely delighted for you Mark. Just wish I could have been there for both nights.

Just reading the Boston Globe review and through the various comments on Greasy Lake and BTX it seems you had the sort of night I was trying to give the nod about to everyone on here about a month or so ago.

And the thing is he's feeding off this rare rock 'n' roll communion consisting of himself, the band, the songs and the fans so voraciously, so instinctively, so riotously whilst all the time retaining such a focussed command that I'm sure by the later shows it'll actually get even better - if that is superhumanly possible.

:-0)

The man truly is on fire. Simply astounding. Never less than inspirational on the stage, for this tour it is now as if he's possessed, summoning up some magical spirit of rock 'n' roll [anyone seen him at the crossroads?] rarely if ever before witnessed. No matter. Whatever it is that's inspiring him to these unfeasible heights, it is certainly something that is becoming unmissable for anyone who cherishes the art form.


Entered at Thu Aug 16 18:22:10 CEST 2012 from (65.217.161.25)

Posted by:

Mark

Location: Maine

Subject: Bruce at Fenway Park

I know we have a group of Springsteen fans here, and I wanted to pass along a quick report from Night 2 at Fenway Park last night. I wish I had the ability to channel some of Al Edge's passionate writing style to describe the event, but all I can say is that is was an amazing night designed for the diehard fans, not the masses. Deep cuts, rare fan favorites, arrangements not seen stateside for 30+ years and more energy than men half his age made for a show that made you think it was still 1978. While nothing can replace my memories of many, many Rambles, this particular show reaffirms what a great night of music can do!


Entered at Thu Aug 16 18:21:26 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

sadavid: What I used to have problems with back in my travelling days was my sewing kit, which was housed in a Keens Mustart tin, back in the days when tins were metal. Looked kinda suspicious inside too - a jumble of thread and needles and a deconstructed darning mushroom. And why would a guy be carrying this?, I'm sure they wondered.

Re accordions, my first meeting with Garth was like living an accordion joke. Four of us in a small room off the bar where he would soon be playing. One says, "I'd better go check your stuff, Garth". Garth says, in his slow drawl, "Oh, you don't need to worry about anybody stealing an accordion."


Entered at Thu Aug 16 17:41:24 CEST 2012 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: reed rage

PutEmUp(Friend0: suspicious package, indeed.
I occasionally used to put a harmonica in my carry-on bag, but no longer. Something about those little Hohners gives them a highly alarming x-ray silhouette.


Entered at Thu Aug 16 16:44:01 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Web: My link

accordion news story


Entered at Thu Aug 16 16:22:09 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Only a lad.

Mike C: Thanks for that clip. Was surprised at the Oingo Boingo connection.

As for prog (Prog Spring is a clever title, eh?), looking back, it might be seen as a Darwinian outgrowth of psych - after acid and its casualties had fallen by the wayside and more advanced musical abilities had come to the fore. Much of it is surprisingly listenable even now - or maybe especially now, when it is not associated with the doings, sayings and tendencies of highschool and college classmates.


Entered at Thu Aug 16 16:10:31 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: The Day That Elvis Died

My choice of video of the day in commemoration of the 35th anniversary. Elvis & his TCB band live at MGM studios in 1970 with "Little Sister / Get Back" jam.


Entered at Thu Aug 16 16:10:16 CEST 2012 from (67.111.71.6)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Nice

It's a very good article on The Nice. I saw them at least three times.


Entered at Thu Aug 16 15:48:35 CEST 2012 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC
Web: My link

Subject: Ronnie Hawkins and Levon TV appearance -- 1959!

Only a fragment, but this is pretty cool. See link.


Entered at Thu Aug 16 15:41:28 CEST 2012 from (74.176.224.158)

Posted by:

Mike C

Web: My link

Subject: Raging Piano

Some Garthian ivory tickling from the Raging Bull soundtrack, with Richard on drums.


Entered at Thu Aug 16 14:49:15 CEST 2012 from (69.156.29.144)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Garth Hudson of The Band chats with then-tourism minister Anne Swarbrick at the Capitol Theatre in Windsor, Ont. in July 1993, as then-mayor Mike Hurst and local blues fan Dino Casagrande look on. Hudson was born in Windsor. (The Windsor Star /Ted Rhodes)


Entered at Thu Aug 16 14:44:38 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

No vinyl for me ovr the last few days - just CDs. Mostly a recently acquired Louis Jordan best-of (can't get enough of "Choo Choo Ch-Boogie", a lyrical wonder) and "You Heard Them Here First" (see link), a comp that includes our guys' "The Stones I Throw" AND the Rising Sons' "Candy Man" - meaning there's no need for me to keep the otherwise not-terribly-interesting Rising Sons CD that I mentioned the other day. I'm sure our esteemed webmaster is a proud possessor of "You Heard Them Here First" because it includes early records by both the Band and Warren Zevon (when he was half of Lyme and Cybelle). Plus there's great stuff by the Rockets (Crazy Horse) and the Hoochie Coochie Men (Rod Stewart and John Baldry).

Oh yes, another one is "Early Black Swing: The Birst of Big Band Jazz, 1927-1934", which I keep for the two tunes by Jimmie Lunceford and his Orchestra - so clearly tied to the later jump blues of Louis Jordan and, most interesting to me, Frank Motley and the Motley Crew, who brought the music to Toronto.


Entered at Thu Aug 16 07:32:14 CEST 2012 from (99.141.87.67)

Posted by:

Adam

A big anniversary this week: 40 years ago, The Band released "Rock Of Ages".


Entered at Wed Aug 15 20:54:40 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Vinyl Siding

In heavy rotation on the turntable this week:

The quintessential "RL" Capitol green label LP pressing of "The Band" mastered by Bob Ludwig.

Recently acquired "The Boz Scaggs Sampler" LP. This compilation, from around 1976, was a promo only release on Columbia white label.

James Burton & Ralph Mooney -- Capitol promo 45 single version of "Corn Pickin'" b/w "The Texas Waltz".

Jan and Dean -- Liberty 45 single version of "Dead Man's Curve" b/w "New Girl in School".

"The Best of the Beach Boys" Capitol U.K. mono LP


Entered at Wed Aug 15 16:29:41 CEST 2012 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: "The Brief Rise and Inevitable Fall of the World's Most Hated Pop"

David Weigel's series of articles on Prog Rock.
The host-site servers seem to be sickly, but worth persisting if you have a taste for lark's tongue in aspic & suchlike . . . .


Entered at Wed Aug 15 14:36:34 CEST 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Susanna Hoffs new record

Susanna Hoffs has a great new cd out called Someday. A great collection of original songs that capture the feel of 60's pop music. I was wondering if anyone else from the Guestbook is enjoying this new music?


Entered at Wed Aug 15 02:59:11 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

David- Richie is on his way to Nashville, possibly there now, to record. Dan Dugmore is on the session....public internet knowledge is all this is.


Entered at Wed Aug 15 00:41:18 CEST 2012 from (24.218.16.94)

Posted by:

Dave H

Bill: I wondered myself, so I looked it up. According to John Einarson's book on the Springfield, Bruce Palmer was arrested on drug charges 4 times while a member of the band. Bust #2 occurred in New York in January 1967 during the recording sessions for "Mr. Soul" and resulted in Palmer being sent back to Canada for 4 months, causing him to be absent for most of the Buffalo Springfield Again sessions. The "Hollywood Palace" footage posted here was taped on January 20, 1967, just after the rest of the band had returned from New York--hence the improvised solution to the problem of the missing bass player.


Entered at Tue Aug 14 21:58:59 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Dave H: Being busted and deported may well have been the problem on that occasion, but I believe that Bruce was busted just once, though he was likely shown the door more often. A big problem for young Canadian males looking to work legally in the US at the time was that a green card came with a draft notice, or at least a very good chance of getting one. So it was better to quietly cross the border and hope you don't get noticed. Young was okay for medical reasons; Martin was okay because he'd served his time on first arriving the US in the early '60s. On that score, Albert Grossman did a great job of keeping his charges out of the US army, and I'd love to know how he managed it.


Entered at Tue Aug 14 21:39:20 CEST 2012 from (136.167.102.118)

Posted by:

Dave H

Pat: I think that's because Bruce Palmer had been busted (one of many times) and deported, so they gave their roadie the bass and told him to stand with his back to the camera. (They were miming the music anyway.)


Entered at Tue Aug 14 21:20:24 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

And here's a link to another Buffalo Springfielder leading his band through a British-invation-influenced number. That's likely Sneaky Pete Kleinow on rave-up guitar. By this time Dewey Martin had graduated from being a rockabilly drummer in Ottawa, to being a guest vocalist with Larry Lee and the Leesures (courtesy his old Ottawa chum, Andy Wilson - mentioned two weeks ago a couple times), to being an aspiring C&W singer in Nashville, to being a hired-gun drummer for Roy Orbison and others, to a leading light of the Seattle rock scene. I have to guess that he and Sneaky Pete moved down the coast together to hook up with the Dillards.


Entered at Tue Aug 14 20:51:26 CEST 2012 from (64.105.104.78)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

Another Springfield performance with a shy bassist--evidently their road manager.


Entered at Tue Aug 14 20:41:11 CEST 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: John Martyn

Rainy day here is Toronto. Grey day and a little depressing. Listening to John Martyn and Levon singing Rock Salt & Nails. Been a long time.


Entered at Tue Aug 14 16:32:03 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: George Harrison on the Band, baby

I stopped in at a local leave-a-book/take-a-book table yesterday and walked away with the "Get Back" booklet that came in a box with the first pressing of the "Let It Be" LP. (I got it when it came out, but foolishly dumped it years ago.) Here's George: "The Band: the reason all those people are singing different lines is they all want to be the singer, but where they're all singing together it gets like discipline where nobody is crowding anybody else out. You dig, baby"


Entered at Tue Aug 14 16:22:54 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Nowadays Richie Furay Can Still Sing Beautifully

Buffalo Springfield reunion at 2010 Bridge School benefit concerts.


Entered at Tue Aug 14 09:51:22 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: P & P

P & P (post and packing) is profitable … when we were looking at book / DVD distributors, the first point at every one was they would deal with all p & p. They said consumers never consider it until too late. I ordered some headphones on Thursday lunchtime and paid £7.99 for "next day" delivery. Friday? No they don't process orders that quickly. Saturday then? No, that's extra. Monday late afternoon is Thursday's "next day". In fact the small print says that they fulfil the contract if they delivered by Wednesday.


Entered at Tue Aug 14 02:11:04 CEST 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Handling & Shipping

Ya just gotta love it. I bought a used book on Amazon today. How much was the book? $0.08 cents. Hey it's a old book from '89. Then I got the final bill from Amazon for my 8 cent book. $12.57!!! What??? Handling and shipping of course. Sorry; but I just had to share it with you.


Entered at Mon Aug 13 22:52:35 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: the Consuls

If you want to know what the young Robbie would have been playing onstage in '59, the Consuls' setlist would surely have included both sides of their first single, both sides of which are included in the Little Caesar and the Consuls comp at the link above (tracks 1 and 2). Recorded in Buffalo in February '59, just before Robbie joined. The photo shows drummer Peter Deremigis and guitarist Gene MacLellan, both of who would leave the group along with Robbie to form the Suedes with pianist Scott Cushnie.


Entered at Mon Aug 13 22:37:17 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Pat B: Not Palmer, for sure, but I'd say the nose isn't prominent enough to be Messina. Maybe it was road manager Dickie Davis (?), who admitted to sittin' in for Bruce on occasion.

Peter V: You didn't mention Furay's dorky turtleneck, which was pretty bad to start with but which he made worse by rolling it OVER the jacket! As for Dewey, I'm sure he always overdressed (for a drummer) in the event he was called upon to be the lead singer some day. Unfortunately he almost never was, despite having the best voice and the most prior recording experience at the mike.

sadavid: A fascinating observation. No doubt true of most of us of that generation but surely not our esteemed PM, who is still stuck with the attitude of the six-year old: I wanna think / say / do everything just like my Dad.


Entered at Mon Aug 13 22:14:18 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Buffalo Springfield

Sartorially speaking … well, there was no doubt in my mind that Stills was the best singer … BUt … the hat. Pristine. New. Definitely a bad idea, Neil; Young's Val Doonican / Andy Williams style knitted wool sweater is worse. And Dewey Martin's jacket and tie is appalling. No wonder the British were so successful, cravats and all!


Entered at Mon Aug 13 22:08:40 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Asylum Island Discs

I recently acquired a UK import LP copy of "Planet Waves" on the Island label (licensed by Asylum Records). Of course, in the early '80s Columbia bought the rights to the Dylan/Band collaborations originally released on Asylum label. I also have the Asylum (U.S.)45 single from the "Before the Flood" tour of "Most Likely You Go Your Way..." that features The Band's "Stage Fright" as the B-side.


Entered at Mon Aug 13 22:02:58 CEST 2012 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: lavage de cerveau

Bill M: there's been a spate, lately, of op-eds decrying the woeful state of Canuckistanian economic productivity.

Now look at the messages encoded in the CanCon prevalent during our business leaders' mid-'70s formative years:

Materick: "I don't mind wasting my time . . . ./ I got sunshine and red wine."
Lighthouse: "Sitting stoned alone in my back yard / Asking myself why should I work so hard."
BTO: "People see you having fun just a-lying in the sun . . . ./ We love to work at nothing all day."

Coincidence?


Entered at Mon Aug 13 21:58:38 CEST 2012 from (64.105.104.78)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

Looks like a camera shy Jim Messina playing bass.


Entered at Mon Aug 13 20:52:47 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Asylum had a good-sized hit in Canada with Ray Materick's "Linda Put The Coffee On", which was engineered by Daniel Lanois, I believe. Ray was/is based in Hamilton, but hails from Brantford, where his older brother had been in a couple sub-Hawks band circa 1960. By coincidence, I was chatting with a friend about him this very morning, though the focus was the powerful "Seasons Of Plenty" (see link) from his first album.

Dunc: If I had the ear of BARK, I'd push them to cover this song. Very much in the Willie P vein, as is "Linda Put The Coffee On" for that matter.


Entered at Mon Aug 13 20:37:06 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: When A Minor Is Not Just A Chord

Send lawyers, managers & money, get me out of this...

After performing at the Monterey Pop Festival in 1967 Laura Nyro caught David Geffen's attention. She was successful in having her earlier management & recording contracts voided, as they'd been entered into when she was still a minor. She then signed a management deal with Mr. Geffen and subsequently signed a recording contract with Clive Davis at Columbia. Years earlier, Mr. Davis had first made a name for himself as a young lawyer working for Columbia Records in the successful renegoiation of Dylan's recording contract. One of the issues was that Dylan was a minor when he signed his original contract with Columbia. News had already leaked that Dylan was jumping to MGM records, but that might have just been a ploy by Albert Grossman for leverage at the time. Helping to keep Dylan on board at Columbia was a feather in Mr. Davis' cap.

Another female musician who signed with Clive Davis at Columbia after her appearance at Monterey with Big Brother & the Holding Co. was Janis Joplin, through the help of Albert Grossman. After signing a management deal with Mr. Grossman, he helped extricate Janis & her group from their earlier recording deal with Mainstream Records by arranging for Columbia to buy out the contract.


Entered at Mon Aug 13 19:27:11 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

In these days of mobile phones one feels Geffen's justified ire at Davis for taking a phone call. Nowadays that has just become the norm . See the Polanski domestic comedy "Carnage" for excellent examples of mobile phone rudeness!


Entered at Mon Aug 13 19:07:38 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Pickin' Up More Pieces

And I almost forgot Jim Messina, the multi-talented producer/engineer/bassist/guitarist/singer, who helped "assemble" the tracks for the Buffalo Springfield's "Last Time Around" ATCO album, after the group had essentially split apart. He then joined Richie Furay in forming Poco. I wonder if he's technically been part of the Springfield's contractual arrangement also?


Entered at Mon Aug 13 19:04:59 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: While it would have made sense for EMI's Manfred Mann to have appeared in the US on Capitol, as they did in Canada, but I think they were on Ascot in the US. Later stuff was on Mercury on both sides of the border. The Beatles were always on Capitol in Canada, aside from the Tony Sheridan stuff that MGM put out to take advantage of Beatlemania.


Entered at Mon Aug 13 19:00:19 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Business in the Asylum

The same sort of fuss happened with Asylum in Britain. Geffen had been a meteoric success as an agent, working with Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young and Laura Nyro. He had signed a young Jackson Browne to a management contract, and while Browne was singing in audition for Clive Davis at Columbia, Davis took a phone call mid-song. Geffen stormed out, incensed. That was the impetus to start Asylum with CSNY manager Elliot Roberts on a 25% share. Half of the finance for the label was provided by Ahmet Ertegun’s Atlantic label, already part of the new WEA conglomerate.

But they did a distribution deal with EMI, so while Asylum was part of WEA (in 1972 Warner bought Geffen's half), it was pressed and distributed by rival EMI. There was a lot of that going on in Europe!


Entered at Mon Aug 13 18:41:24 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Musical Chairs and a Bass Player To Be Named Later

In addition to the Furay for Nash trade, Columbia's Clive Davis also owed Atlantic's Ahmet Ertegun a favor after Stephen Stills' appearance with Al Kooper on the "Super Session" album released by Columbia. Ironically, years later CS&N's former manager David Geffen lured Richie Furay away from Poco to his Asylum label to team up J.D. Souther and Chris Hillman. In a double-switch, Timothy B. Schmit, who'd replaced Randy Meisner in Poco, would later join the Eagles, who recorded on Asylum, when Mr. Meisner left that group.


Entered at Mon Aug 13 18:03:30 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Bill, on Reaction, it was one of a little group of labels that Polydor (and Philips … part of the same group) made a deliberate decision to press and distribute thus breaking the EMI / Decca / Pye stranglehold on the UK market.


Entered at Mon Aug 13 18:00:26 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The deals are muddied with Atlantic. Though Warner-Seven Arts bought them in 1967, they had just signed a long UK distribution deal with Polydor, so the parent labels were distributed by Pye, but Atlantic by Polydor. This stretched on after Kinney bought Warner Bros-Seven Arts and Elektra in 1969, and formed WEA and started their own UK distribution … the Polydor pressing and distribution deal ran till late 1971 for Atlantic. Levon & The Hawks weren't on ATCO in the UK, but the (to me) more prestigious straight Atlantic label … which was then still Decca pressed. Confused? You will be …

The Animals were on EMI's Columbia label (nothing to do with CBS's Columbia label, which is why the CBS brand was used in many countries … EMI's Columbia had got there first). Manfred Mann was on HMV, also an EMI label. It figures that both would be Capitol in the USA, as EMI owned Capitol … hence The Beatles from EMI's Parlophone.

But an interesting question posed by a record executive in the late 60s. Say The Beatles had signed to independent Oriole in 1962, or stayed with the German Polydor label, then still a very minor player in the UK. Or say Dylan had signed with Vanguard instead of CBS … or even Folkways or Elektra (as it was back then). Would they still have got where they did? Would talent have "outed"? This is a record label guy justifying his existence of course. The opposite view is that Parlophone (The Beatles) was only EMI's third label, after Columbia and HMV in prestige and sales. But even so, it was part of EMI, with access to their distribution and manufacturing. And Vee Jay didn't manage success with The Beatles in the USA … it was when Capitol realised that it all took off. By around 1967 there were distribution deals for independents with bigger labels, but back in 1962, there were only four major players in the UK (EMI, Decca, Philips, Pye), with CBS joining them as number five as late as 1964 (until then they were Philips distributed). CBS were independent just in time for Dylan's real commercial take-off here in late 64 … Philips hadn't put in the same effort.

Even years later, independents still suffered with the majors. Gordon Haskell tells the sale of his independent release of How Wonderful You Are. It was taken up by Radio 2, and suddenly they were looking at pre-Christmas orders in the hundreds of thousands, and a #2 chart placing. He tells the tale of how the majors suddenly demanded a much larger cut in order to press the quantity required.


Entered at Mon Aug 13 16:59:16 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Thanks David P. I didn't know the purchase was as early as that. I wonder if that made Warner the owner of Levon and the Hawks' three (?) ATCO recordings, or would those have been licence deals?

In other news, I picked up the Rising Sons' CD over the weekend. I'd borrowed it from the library a few years ago, but was disappointed because nothing stacked up against their one legitimate release, a 1965 45 of "Candy Man", an effervescent marvel that can be heard at the link above. I believe that's Ry Cooder singing lead, with Taj Mahal interjecting here and there. I'm getting to like the rest of it more, though.


Entered at Mon Aug 13 16:28:01 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Bill M: Neil Young didn't need an escape clause, as Reprise's parent company Warner Bros.--Seven Arts bought Atlantic in 1967.


Entered at Mon Aug 13 15:55:45 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: Your list of big 'counter-culture' acts on big labels reminded me that one wrinkle that needed ironing out before C&S could add N to the mix was paying off Epic, to whole Nash was signed (as a Holly). I believe the payment took the form of Richie Furay (signed to Atco as a Buffalo Springfielder) and his new chums, Poco. Or something like that. But how did Neil Young escape Atco to go solo with Reprise?

While I knew that Hendrix was on Track in the UK, I had no idea of Cream being on Reaction (Stigwood's label?). I think Atco and Polydor when it comes to them. By the way, the Animals were initially on Capitol in Canada, though maybe for just HOTRS. Of the othr UK groups you've mentioned of late, Manfred Mann was on Capitol too, and the Spencer Davis Group on Stone.


Entered at Mon Aug 13 15:26:01 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Labels

The oft told story is that Maynard Solomon at Vanguard and Moe Asch at Folkways were not interested in signing the young Bob Dylan. In reality, maybe they didn't formally reject him, but rather they both failed to recognize his potential early on and failed to offer him a contract right away. It should be noted that, before he signed Dylan, John Hammond had also brought Carolyn Hester and Pete Seeger to Columbia. Dylan first gained Mr. Hammond's attention while playing harmonica during a Columbia recording session for Ms. Hester.


Entered at Mon Aug 13 13:41:54 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Labels

Vanguard … the box has Dylan’s stunning Newport version of North Country Blues immediately followed by Joan Baez’s Farewell Angelina. I was reading a book on The Clash at the weekend, and it had the controversy over them signing to CBS in 1977 … ‘the death of punk’ it was said at the time. There are accounts of the folk community being shocked when Dylan signed with CBS / Columbia, believing Vanguard was his natural home … the label with the credibility.

There is this major label v boutique label mood hovering over the 60s and 70s. Was it better to be a big fish on a small label (The Small Faces on Immediate, Cream on Reaction, Hendrix on Track, Traffic on Island … then with a staff of four, among them Muff Winwood as new head of A&R), or a minor part of the big label? Big labels come out better in chart books, but if you take (say) 1965, Decca in the UK released 260 singles. It’s easy for an artist to get totally lost and fail to get any marketing attention among five singles a week. On the other hand, the big labels were adept at taking over the counter-culture in the 60s … Jefferson Airplane on RCA, The Byrds on CBS, Grateful Dead on Warner Bros, Steve Miller on Capitol, The Band on Capitol, The Mothers of Invention on Verve (i.e. MGM), Eric Burdon on MGM, Neil Young on Reprise, CSNY on Atlantic.

Vanguard and Elektra had similar beginnings and experimented with some very unusual material, but Elektra got into the major league (and became part of WEA), helped by astute signings like The Doors and Love. Phew! Did I write that? But it’s true.


Entered at Mon Aug 13 03:34:30 CEST 2012 from (65.95.95.111)

Posted by:

Bill M

A couple months ago I picked up an early '60s LP by "the Folksingers of Washington Square", a group of six singers and musicians that included both Sandy Bull and Bruce Langhorne.


Entered at Mon Aug 13 00:30:37 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

It could also be that Serpent Power (truly dire) sets up a negative mind frame in the listener. The outstanding track among the Vanguard psych CD for me was Cristo Redentor … Charley Musselwhite & Harvey Mandel.


Entered at Mon Aug 13 00:27:13 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Vanguard

The history of Vanguard in the UK is quite complex … they went through Top Rank, Pye, Philips / Fontana and RCA in the UK in a short space of time. I see the early psych stuff which is totally unfamiliar to me (and a couple of collector friends also) came around the time they were launching their own imprint here … one Sandy Bull and two Circus Maximus LPs on their own imprint are rated at £25 in Rare Record Guide which indicates rarity. The only disc you ever see from that period is Country Joe's Fixing to Die. On the other hand, the folk stuff on disc two and early disc three was all readily available and well-known, virtually all of it on Fontana in the UK. Joan Baez must have been their best selling UK artist right through, all Fontana, as were The Rooftop Singers for their biggest UK hit.

A lot of psych / prog stuff doesn't anthologise well … it applies to Harvest, Deram, Polydor prog and Vertigo CD anthologies also, because it's so diverse that it doesn't make a consistent or coherent compilation. The Vanguard blues (disc 1) flows well as a disc, as does disc 2.


Entered at Mon Aug 13 00:06:54 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

If you were interested in music in the 70s and were in the northeast, or Nothwest of the U.S., you couldn't avoid some familiarity with Sandy Bull's name or music. Four years ago,I went on a call for window treatments, in Williamsburg, Brooklyn.One of the new fangled overpriced, poorly constructed condos. The last name is Bull.He was a young guy, late 20s, early 30s. after hellos, I had to ask him if he ever heard of a musician named Sandy Bull.Well, he was Sandy's son. Was so knocked out that I knew his dad's name and music, that he went through valises till he found something that had just been released and gave it to me. He had a couple guitars there, had lived in NAshville alot growing up, was friends with the offspring of a lot of name players, some of whom were making names for themselves. The Hannah/McKuen kids were some, one of them had been in the Mavericks. Anyway, he was in high finance, whihc had been the family business till Sandy came along and wanted no part of it. The approx 2 years I was back in Brooklyn I was running into musicians and industry people left and right. I had taken the job selling window treatments cause it would allow me to run home and take out the old mutt often duribg the dayt.It was his last hurrah, and I was more concerned about taking care of him , than anything elsem, especially running a business. But it still seemed as if i couldn't go out the door without music hitting me in the face.Another call, the guy and his wife had just bought the condo, he had just been fired from his job in Miami, was a big shot at Live Nation. So as the music industry crumbles it finds itself being swept into the now silver plated dustpan that is Williamsburg, Park slope ( the extended version), Gowanus, Brownsville and East New York. May as well throw Crown Heights and Prospect heights i there, if they haven't yet been annexed, it is just a matter of time. It's amazing the amount of transformations that neighborhoods can go thorugh in 50 or 60 years.These places are on their second or third change.


Entered at Sun Aug 12 21:37:20 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Sandy Bull

I'm judging only by Gotta Be Juicy and Easy Does It on the compilation … as I said, I've never heard of him. It's not so much dire, but it's certainly not Airplane, The Dead or Steve Miller Band level either.


Entered at Sun Aug 12 18:04:24 CEST 2012 from (72.78.44.61)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love
Web: My link

Subject: Sandy Bull

Sandy Bull wasn't dire. He was an extremely talented and experimental multi-instrumentalist and composer who was often linked with other guitarists such as John Fahey and Robbie Basho. In addition to guitar, he played banjo, oud, and pedal steel. Years before it became popular to do so, he created his own backing tracks to perform to. I was lucky enough to see him when he was one of the surprise guests at a Rolling Thunder Revue show in Hartford in 1975. Circus Maxmimus was a short-lived NYC band from which emerged one Jerry Jeff Walker. Above is a link of Sandy Bull playing Carmina Burana on frailing banjo.


Entered at Sun Aug 12 09:39:20 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

And in fact Manfred Mann were based in Gosport early on … that must have been in my mind yesterday.

On Circus Maximus, I'd never heard of them. The two on the Vanguard anthology are Negative Dreamer Girl and Lonely Man. But disc three starts off strongly with Dylan, Baez, The Tysons and Odetta, then the psych stuff which follows was unknown in the UK … Serpent Power? Sandy Bull? You'd have to say that Vanguard did not get the best of the genre.


Entered at Sun Aug 12 09:12:17 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Covers

I added Stevie Nick’s Just Like A Woman to my Dylan covers playlist … which had me listening to Manfred Mann and Ritchie Havens versions. The only one of the three I would be likely to select apart from the original of course, is the Manfred Mann, though Van Morrison & Chris Farlowe did a great live version one time I saw Van. Manfred Mann stand with The Band and The Byrds as the most successful cover artists for Dylan … they did a few good ones and did more commercial versions (not necessarily a bad thing) … If You Gotta Go, Mighty Quinn, Mrs Henry, You Angel You. And the Coulson, Dean, McGuiness, Flint album of basement covers “Lo and Behold” was great too. In an interview somewhere, McGuiness said they had first British shout on the Basement acetate (having had two hits with Dylan material, plus With God On Our Side on an EP, I assume), and chose well in grabbing Mighty Quinn.


Entered at Sun Aug 12 04:33:15 CEST 2012 from (65.95.95.111)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Muff driving with the Hawks

In his '69 "Rolling Stone" interview, Dylan talks about Steve and Muff Winwood taking Dylan and group to look around a haunted manor near Birmingham.


Entered at Sun Aug 12 04:24:19 CEST 2012 from (124.170.202.234)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: JQ:

I'd put, at least at first, Jawbone... though often the hardest songs to play are those that seem most simple...


Entered at Sun Aug 12 02:11:21 CEST 2012 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Degree of Difficulty

Hi Pat Brennon, or anybody - Is there a Band song that is the most difficult to play? Singing aside, a song that took them, as 5 individual players, to or near the upper limits of their abilities.

Perhaps Garth knows no limit?


Entered at Sat Aug 11 23:41:15 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Olympic Pool

Al: The talk of the 60s Gosport band was in my mind as I watched the 10 M diving Olympic competition this evening. It’s difficult to work out how the divers score, but it seems the worst thing you can do is splash on entry.


Entered at Sat Aug 11 22:00:06 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Thanks, Bob. I have "Street Angel" too, but it's hard to remember it all. Stevie's "Just Like A Woman" just added to my Dylan covers playlist.


Entered at Sat Aug 11 17:17:29 CEST 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Fleetwood Mac/Dylan Connection

Stevie Nicks performed with Dylan, TP and The HB's in Australia, 1986. She also recorded 'Just Like A Woman'.


Entered at Sat Aug 11 17:09:39 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: There must be some way out of here

Aahh, of course. Good old Connie. How could I forget. Old Tutti Frutti herself. Maybe not to everyone's taste but if only for her cover of 'Hunting the Ferret' she more than merits the title of leg end. Wonderful. Cheers for the nod Moonies!!

Crazy man!

:-0)


Entered at Sat Aug 11 16:25:09 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

The Moonstruck Ones

Web: My link

Subject: Mixed-up Confusion

Definite confusion, Al. The Muff Divers were from Gosport (near the New Forest, but not in it), and featured Muff Winwood on bass shortly after leaving The Spencer Davis Group. The Divers were three ex-frogmen from Gosport naval base. Their concept album was based on the Commander Crabb incident (see link) in 1956, when a British frogman sent to investigate a Soviet ship in Portsmouth harbour was never seen again, and it’s believed the Russians captured him. It was called “Catching Crabb” by The Muff Divers. The Poole group you mention was much later, in the punk era, and their female vocalist was noted for her shaven head and foul language. She was Irish. Connie Lingus? I think that was her.

Oh, some news about The Bad Poets, the seminal early band mentioned by Bill M. The rare EP “Really Meaningful Pomes (sic) About Life” is due for reissue on the coat tails of the TMO reunion. It is being repackaged and retitled as “RAP with the “BAD” Poets” on Def Jam. I advised against printing the lyrics on the sleeve, but long ago sold all the rights for 25p

I worry about scanning, rhythm, rhyming, spelling and over-use of exclamation marks, but otherwise they’re not too bad. As Ray used to say “Badder than anything Jim ever wrote.”


Entered at Sat Aug 11 15:57:29 CEST 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT and LvdB

Location: VIctoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Wind Circus Maximus

'Wind' (Circus Maximus) epitomizes for me the 'new sound' of FM radio in the latter 60s. It brings back a special warm feeling for me as I listen to it and reminds me of the feeling of personal freedom (out of the parental clutch) that I experienced at that time. This reaffirms for me the emotional connection I have to some music. The Flamigos 'I Only Have Eyes For You', Dylan's 'Like A Rolling Stone', Billy Joel's 'Piano Man' and others evoke a variety of sensitivies. The warmth of the 'Wind' is palpable. Thanks for reminding me.


Entered at Sat Aug 11 15:53:00 CEST 2012 from (83.249.111.104)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic elegance

Subject: Fred is dreaming!

Fred, you are only dreaming when you say:.."the end for communism..." You see, French revolution has not ended yet, so how in earth communism which came even later in its modern form?


Entered at Sat Aug 11 15:25:43 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: The Beavers?

Was that the same Beavers that went on to spawn the New Forest's very own Muff Divers? Can anyone recall whether Pete eventually became a Muff Diver? Or am I getting confused with Poole's Carpet Munchers? Memory's going here. Help! :-0(


Entered at Sat Aug 11 10:49:42 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

The Moonstruck Ones

So often Pete got TMOs excellent media coverage through inadvertent choice of words. There were thousands of letters to the BBC when he was interviewed at the time of the release of “The Beavers in Carnaby Street” during The Beavers 60s tour there (which I saw, little knowing that in such a short time I would be bandmates with Pete). Anyway, The Beavers always had great support from Vanguard Records and there were window displays at HMV and other record stores. The interviewer had asked ‘So what do you think of Swinging London and all those miniskirts?’ Pete replied “I love it here. You can see the beavers in Carnaby Street everywhere.’

Original LP copies of “The Village Green Development Society and Progress Association” now go for upward of £100, being The Moonstruck Ones most critically acclaimed, but rarest album. It’s being prepared now for 192 bit SACD release pressed on pure platinum CDs, with accompanying 300 gram vinyl LP. This carries a warning to ensure that your turntable is adequately supported to take the weight. Most reviewers focus on Ray's organ solo, but few mention the bass guitar part, where one note was played at high speed for the full duration of the solo, a feat of endurance that deserves mention in the R&R Hall of Fame. No loops were used, and a careful analysis of the repeated note shows it inexorably going out of tune as time passed. It was all done live, so there was no possibility of retuning,

Dlew is quite right. There was a lot of criticism of the programme I remember. We wanted to remind people of Pete’s earlier work, you see. The problem was fuelled by the cover, which was plain, but with the words “Did you see The Beavers? If you want more pictures look inside.” The initial sales were unprecedently high, but the number of returns hit 90% as disgruntled concert-goers demanded their money back.


Entered at Sat Aug 11 08:56:07 CEST 2012 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: The Moons...

DJs at Radio America would play their music, letting the people under the yoke of Soviet oppression get a taste of what was wonderful and possible in the West. The famous Russian blocking signal "aka The Russian Woodpecker" was powerless to stop the music coming though. Eastern bloc teens began to let their hair grow long and started defying the authorities. This was the beginning of the end for communism and the Soviet state.


Entered at Sat Aug 11 08:16:55 CEST 2012 from (124.170.202.234)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Subject: My favourite moonstruck ones album

The village green development society and progress association. Songs such as ' I can't do that, it an health and safety issue' and 'knock it down for tricky tacky houses' capture a spirit of Britain. With a 25 minute ray manzarek keyboard solo on "there mightn't be perception, but we love those doors' the albums disappointing sales were more than made up for the shoddy parking and poorly presented programme of the live tour.


Entered at Sat Aug 11 06:45:48 CEST 2012 from (97.96.7.89)

Posted by:

Paul

Location: Chicago

Dylan played with John McVie at a May 1965 session in England, as part of Mayall's Bluesbreakers. Nothing resulted, but there's a Dylan-Fleetwood Mac connection, FWIW.


Entered at Fri Aug 10 22:31:30 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: I have a soft spot for Circus Maximus's "The Wind", which was an FM hit here in the early '70s. Jerry Jeff Walker, as I expect you know. I do agree that fuzzier can be better, comparing old vinyl to reissues.


Entered at Fri Aug 10 22:01:40 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: But seriously …

I had a drive today and took "Vanguard Records & The 1960s Musical Revolution". Disc 3 has a powerful start with Dylan's North Country Blues (live at Newport).

It's remastered and on my loud and good in car system, the enhanced fidelity did no favours to Ian & Sylvia Tyson. On both Early Morning Rain and Four Strong Winds, the double bass was too loud, and the higher fidelity revealed fumbles and "weak pressings" on the strings. Overall it's a great bass part, but it sounds better fuzzier on vinyl. That's a general point about remasters.Is clearer necessarily better?

Another issue is that in their attempt to go psychedelic, Vanguard certainly signed some crap. When Country Joe stands out as "good" you know the rest is dire … Sandy Bull, Circus Maximus, Serpent Power, Notes From The Underground.


Entered at Fri Aug 10 21:53:38 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

The Moonstruck Ones

"The Beavers At Carnaby Street" is one of Pete's most popular albums.


Entered at Fri Aug 10 20:40:49 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Taj Mahal: Bacon Fat

Coming from Sony/Legacy later this month is a 2-disc compilation "The Hidden Treasures of Taj Mahal 1969-1973". Disc 1 contains previously unreleased studio recordings from that era, including a cover of Dylan's "I Pity the Poor Immigrant". Disc 2 presents a complete 1970 concert recorded at Royal Albert Hall in London, including a live version of the Robertson/Hudson composition "Bacon Fat" previously covered on Taj's 1969 "Giant Step" album.


Entered at Fri Aug 10 18:22:26 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

With Seeger in mind I checked out Youtube for "Dig A Hole" by the Hans Staymer Band - an excellent example of the use of banjo in rock and roll (in this case played by the great but overlooked Ed Patterson). Not only did I find the song, but some kind soul has uploaded the whole LP, meaning you also get to hear a cover of "W.S. Walcott Medicine Show" (at 11:05). I highly recommend checking out "Mama Can't You Hear Me Call" - try 19:30 when it starts to get intense and the Blossoms have really gotten going on background vocals.


Entered at Fri Aug 10 16:46:34 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Don't forget the Band connection with Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers. Robbie Robertson produced the latter group's recording of "The Best of Everything", which included vocals from Richard Manuel and keyboards from Garth Hudson. It was included on the 1985 MCA album "Southern Accents". If I recall correctly, the song had been recorded earlier in the '80s and Robbie reworked it, with overdubs including Richard & Garth. It was originally intended to be included on the "King of Comedy" soundtrack, but Petty's label at the time, MCA, wouldn't license it for the Warner Bros. soundtrack.


Entered at Fri Aug 10 16:31:03 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

JT: Secret is how they like it because it started out in the host's livingroom, I believe. They've since moved to a bigger house with a special concert room. I've never been.


Entered at Fri Aug 10 15:41:57 CEST 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT and LvdB

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Bill M: Its amazing that a place like Peter's Players exists so close to TO and that it is (to me so far) a secret. I looked at the people who have graced that stage/theatre and it is impressive. The ticket prices are high but I guess the numbers of people that can be accomodated is low. We have been to the Duncan Garage and to Hugh's and other small venues and much prefer these to the barns and arenas. Have you been to PP?


Entered at Fri Aug 10 15:22:57 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: Robbie Robertson tribute show

In other news, today is the kick-off of a 10-day run of what appears to be a musical tribute to the life of Robbie Robertson - at Harbourfront in Toronto. See link.

Also, totally coincidentally, what should roll in but the news that the Manzarek-Rogers Band will be playing tonight at a venue called Peter's Players in cottage country north of Toronto. Who is this Rogers guy, and is he capable of reaching the poetic depths plumbed previously by Morrison and Viney?


Entered at Fri Aug 10 15:05:06 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Dunc: Sorry to hear your dinner news. She might come around if you make a point of dropping the guests' names in conversation every now and then.

Also, are you sure it was the Poets you saw in the '60s, or the Bad Poets, Peter V's old band before Ray recruited him into the Moonstruck Ones? Apparently Ray was really avant garde and preferred bad poets as writing partners. To your question about Yonge Street - Seeger did play here at the helm of an earlier, folkier incarnation, Pete and the Overcomers. Ronnie Hawkins had them up onstage a couple times, but only because he liked to make ribald jokes based on their name. He put his foot down when his own musicians wanted to move in the same direction, though: "Those guys wanted to play too much folk music for me."


Entered at Fri Aug 10 09:01:39 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Band of the Hand

Absolutely correct on backing. See link. It was a single and unusually on the MCA label. I bought a copy at the time. Stevie Nicks is among the backing vocals which may be the only Fleetwood Mac - Dylan connection, or maybe I can't think of any more. The 45 turns up surprisingly often at record fairs, perhaps because most Dylan singles were ignored as fans bought albums, and only a few had unique B-sides. But Band of The Hand you had to either buy the single, or the full OST on which it's the only Dylan track. There's even a 12 inch single which turns up too.


Entered at Fri Aug 10 06:01:42 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

A musician is in a trendy urban area for a week long gig. He arrives a day early , and having just finished a two day drive he picks a likely, comfortable looking restaurant to have dinner in. Waiting for his appetizer, he realizes that he left his car unlocked with the accordion in the back. He rushes out to lock it, but is too late. His car is full of accordions.


Entered at Fri Aug 10 02:47:48 CEST 2012 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

A quick google search tells me the movie was entitled "The Bad of the Hand". I can honestly say that I never saw this particular flick.


Entered at Fri Aug 10 02:44:05 CEST 2012 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Band of the Hand

Joe J: I think it's the title track (from the soundtrack) of a movie done in the 80s, can't remember the title (I'll have to google it). I remember taping this song off the radio. Now there's something may be considered a dying art (or dead already)...taping songs off the radio.


Entered at Fri Aug 10 02:39:09 CEST 2012 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Taking an Olympic break, getting caught up on GB doings

On summer break, too. So let me now play catch up before I return to getting my daughter's room ready before she gets home from university...

Book to take on a Desert Island: have to be something visual. So out of the following (The Wonderful World of Alber Kahn, The Sports Illustrated The Hockey Book or my 1974-1975 Panini Calciatori sticker album)...I'd choose the The Wonderful World of Albert Kahn, but just barely.

6 dinner party guests: having trouble boiling that down to 6 but have chosen the place to eat...an ordinary family run trattoria, preferably in the Emilia-Romagna region of Italy...good eats. : )

The Dylan "debate": Did I ever post my Dylan story? I may have, if memory serves me, so I'll spare you all the recurrence of the boredom you were afflicted with the first and won't repeat it. : )

Adam: I echo the sentiments that have been already posted--wonderful.

The Moon Struck Ones: just another in a long line of boy bands. : )

Now back to the Olympics....then on to the cleaning. : (


Entered at Fri Aug 10 02:27:09 CEST 2012 from (173.252.30.247)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Subject: Band of the Hand

MSO's indeed. I had to go back a week to find out WTF was going on.

Link is to a Dylan song with the Heartbreakers/Wilburys?? One of his harder rocking songs and certainly one of his best performances from that era. I don't believe it's on any recording.



Entered at Fri Aug 10 00:41:27 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

The Moonstruck ones

Ah, Wikipedia only goes up to June 2012. It was in July that the "offer you can't refuse" (in seven figures) brought about that long-awaited fraternal reconciliation. The "lads" in the band are practising furiously for those Japanese 80,000 seaters, and several are having acupuncture for arthritic hands. They have stipulated four separate dressing rooms (known by the road crew as "the little boxes") and Ray and Peter communicate via Pete. Pete has had twelve banjos made up in different colours to save continually retuning which deafness does make hard.

The Adele and Springsteen he admits to. The Dylan may indeed be true but he refuses to comment, the links to his alleged work on the Christmas album lost him bookings in Red Lions and Harvester Restaurants the length and breadth of Dorset.


Entered at Thu Aug 9 23:18:37 CEST 2012 from (109.151.55.50)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: The Mooners

I've done a bit of googling, but have only got so far.

It seems that Ray and Peter were brothers, their surname was Mooner, giving rise to the band's name.

However after the first album's success, Ray Mooner was headhunted by a band called The Doorsteps, but had to change his name to Manorak because Mooner was not hip enough.

Peter Mooner seemingly left the The Moon Struck Ones and moved to Poole where using his share of the sales of the first album bought a strip of land and built luxury houses on it and is now very wealthy. (there was a documentary on this that we all saw in Britain so there could be some truth in this)

The other two members of The Moon Struck Ones retain the name of the band and play the cabaret circuit.

Sadly the brothers have never spoken to this day, which is a family trait in Britain. Pete Mooner still plays pubs along the South coast where it is often remarked his talent is wasted.

It may be that Pete Mooner has produced recent albums for Bruce Springsteen, Dylan and Adele.


Entered at Thu Aug 9 22:36:46 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

The Moonstruck Ones

Subject: White Riot

Buck Trent was an inspiration for his stage attire, and I've never seen a finer neck scarf. Pete told us that shortly after his vain attempt to get into The Beavers, he was in the city of Stoke-On-Trent. After a particularly fine banjo solo, he yelled "Buck Trent!" in excitement, and due to poor microphone clarity caused a minor riot.

Ah, the Palais de Danse. There's nothing the bass guitarist likes better than the complexities of a 12 bar blues.


Entered at Thu Aug 9 22:20:30 CEST 2012 from (109.151.55.50)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: The Moon Struck Ones

I saw the Poets at the JM Ballroom.

But I'm exceptionally surprised you knew about the Palais. What I remember is I saw Lou Christie at the Palais de Danse and I remember a gang fight broke out at the back of the ballroom. I remember Lou singing his one hit three or four times because he ran out of songs.

However the late sixties were strange times. Because a year or two later I saw Fleetwood Mac, Chicken Shack and The Moon Struck Ones at the Palais. Andy Lothian jr had moved with the times. I was wearing different clothes, people were listening to this new music called the blues and the crowd were well behaved and academic.

Many of the musicians felt happy because they were playing music they had always wanted to play. Again, the banjo was the highlight of The Moon Struck Ones' performance for me. It's coming back. The banjo versions of 'The Midnight Special' and 'Kindhearted Woman Blues' were tremendous.

Bill M. I can see where you're coming from. Robbie may have been influenced by that banjo player. But, what made the banjo player special was the accompanying keyboard interweaving in and out of the bluesy banjo. Did this influence the Band?

How would the Band get to hear in Canada the Moon Struck One versions of these songs? This begs the question:Did the Moon Struck Ones play Yongue Street, Bill?

Perhaps BEG will find a picture of Robbie with the Moon Struck Ones.

PS..Bill. Wife cancelled dinner party when I suggested she cook for us!


Entered at Thu Aug 9 20:31:56 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: To move the conversation away from music, Pretty Boy Floyd was also known as Little Pink Floyd. As far as I know, neither he nor Big Pink Floyd made it into the Beavers despite their best efforts.


Entered at Thu Aug 9 20:23:03 CEST 2012 from (64.105.104.78)

Posted by:

Pat B

You've made me go back to my TMO boots, including the early stuff when "da Pete's" were in The Beavers.


Entered at Thu Aug 9 20:07:41 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

The Moonstruck Ones

The late 60s in Britain were confusing times for TMSOs. Pete had seen The Pretty Things on Top of The Pops, and then he saw that our support was a young band called P.Floyd. This lit up lights for Pete, and he decided they were called the Pretty Boy Floyds after his favourite song. Anyway, I remember them coming into the shared dressing room, and he said with a smile, ‘Welcome to the Pretty Boys.”

Th Pink Floyd stayed to themselves after that, and Ray was as usual tinkering around writing on the Vox while Pete was tuning up. In a reference to Newport 65 and his attempt on Mr Dylan’s wires, he said “If you keep playing with your organ, I’m going to get my chopper out!” Ray explained that it just such an event that had caused his previous lead singer such problems in Miami.

By this time the lads in Pink Floyd were not looking “in the pink” at all. I believe this is the incident they refer to in “Be Careful With That Axe, Eugene.”


Entered at Thu Aug 9 19:44:05 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Buck Trent on electric banjo

When I was a kid living in Gainesville, Ga. I discovered the old Porter Wagoner show on tv. His band, the Wagonmasters, featured Buck Trent on electric banjo and he used to play some of the wildest licks on that hybrid instrument, at times sounding like a pedal-steel.


Entered at Thu Aug 9 19:35:37 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Dundee

I’m trying to think back, Dunc. Would that have been Andy Lothian’s Top Ten Club at the Palais? Was it in South Tay Street? If so, yes. That was the one with the Dundee Horns. We did In The Midnight Hour, Knock on Wood and Hold On I’m Coming as we always wanted to play stuff that no one else ever did. It was that night that Pete suggested changing the Vox for an electric piano, as Pat noted.

Pete’s version of Hold On I’m Comin’ is lost to posterity, but the link takes you to our good friends Run C&W who did exactly the TMSO version after Pete taught it to them. It's nearly as good as ours.


Entered at Thu Aug 9 19:25:18 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Toronto

Dunc: I'm not surprised you were impressed with the leads the guy was playing on banjo. Robbie Robertson saw them here in an earlier incarnation and immediately restrung his instrument in an effort to achieve the same sound.


Entered at Thu Aug 9 19:12:19 CEST 2012 from (109.151.55.50)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: The Moon Struck Ones

I think I saw The Moon Struck Ones at a dance in Dundee in the 1960s. I did see the Poets and The Alex Harvey Band at dances because bands in the beginning in Scotland had to 'provide' music for dancing. I'm not sure, but I do remember a band where the lead banjo playing was outstanding. Did the Dundee horns guest with the Moon Struck Ones or is my memory going? Great picture.


Entered at Thu Aug 9 18:26:15 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: Yes - big and impersonal, like all aspects of most big-city Dutch hostels that I encountered. I certainly wasn't noticing the lyrics at the time - just the trance-like quality of the melody at that point. Had exactly the same reaction waking up years later to the ticky-ticky sound of Bruce Cockburn's "When A Tree Falls".


Entered at Thu Aug 9 18:24:15 CEST 2012 from (64.105.104.78)

Posted by:

Pat B

Of course, TMO's picture shows Ray Manzarek after he ditched the Vox Continental at Pete's request and began using the RMI Electric Piano.


Entered at Thu Aug 9 18:13:45 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Depeche Mode

I don't know about waking up to that line, Bill. Was the Youth Hospital on a dormitory basis?


Entered at Thu Aug 9 16:05:38 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Bob Dylan's Greatest Hits

Finally received my pre-ordered copy of the new Audio Fidelity gold-CD reissue of "Bob Dylan's Greatest Hits", after about a month of shipping delays. The problem was in distribution to the various retail sellers, as the initial limited edition of 5,000 copies sold out quickly with pre-orders. After first listen I can say that it was worth the wait, as these songs never sounded better.


Entered at Thu Aug 9 15:50:42 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: Thanks for reminding me that it was Dave Z who provided that brilliant photo of the Moonstruck Ones. Still one of my very favourite moments in my life on the GB; top 10 for sure. Re the Doors cover, if Guthrie was in the band and offered to sing it, I'd simply fire Woody.

Re sensory associations with certain songs, hearing "Everything Counts" by Depeche Mode reminds me of being a youth hostel in Rotterdam in '83. It was very institutional and played loud pop music as an alarm clock at 8:00 am. Still, it was pleasant waking to the trance-ish line that goes, "The grabbing hands grab all they can, for themselves, after all".


Entered at Thu Aug 9 13:02:59 CEST 2012 from (124.149.56.158)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Subject: Hey Adam

Good job. Congratulations! You show a lot of promise. That's a terrific interview. Find your own writing rhythm - its in there... Apart from that minor thing, I'm in awe of you, my man.


Entered at Thu Aug 9 09:52:52 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

The Moon Struck Ones

Web: My link

We thought we’d share extracts from the rest of Pete’s interview (see link).

Q: What first brought you together?

A: As you can see from Mr Zuck’s group photograph, we all suffer from quite severe neck problems, which is why our bass player wears a cravat with Deep Heat on it. We met in a chiropractor’s waiting room.

Q: Isn’t banjo, Vox Continental, bass guitar and drums an unusual line-up for rock?

A: Indeed. I was worried about the Vox Continental myself. Drums were the first human musical instrument, then strings and primitive wind followed. There is a human dimension to banjo, bass and drums. Keys are a different stage of technology … I include harmoniums. The manufacture of keys brings us forward thousands of years, let alone adding electronics.

Q: I see. But don’t you need the organ for some of your repetoire?

A: Light My Fire suits a sprightly banjo part well (he demonstrates. He’s correct). That’s a key song for us. First there’s the invitation to the communal campfire (Come on, baby, light my fire) and it’s nightime (try to set the night on fire) then there’s the spreading out of the power of folk singing to change the world from its campfire origins: night commonly means the dark passages of the history of capital which must pass away (no time to wallow in the mire), so “night” equals “the world” which will be enlightened (i.e. We can set the world on fire). And it’s going to happen now … the time for hesitation’s through. Woody would have been proud to sing that song.


Entered at Wed Aug 8 21:05:44 CEST 2012 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: see her soon

Bessie Smith died in September, 1937 at age 43 or so, after a car crash on Highway 61. Her funeral was held in Philadlphia on October 4.

Bessie's gravesite remained unmarked for thirty-three years. A tombstone was placed on the site August 7, 1970 -- paid for, in part, by Janis Joplin (shortly after her Festival Express tour of Canada with The Band et al.).

Janis died less than two months later, at the age of 27.


Entered at Wed Aug 8 20:44:11 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: The Mauds

Many thanks for the kind thought. I'm going to order it on amazon and have it sent to my son's address.

The link takes you to "Soul Drippin'" by The Mauds.

Thanks too for the link, DP … I never knew about that Grace Slick / Linda Perry combination. I'll be in Sausolito so will look in at her gallery if it's still there.


Entered at Wed Aug 8 20:35:46 CEST 2012 from (72.230.109.86)

Posted by:

Bashful Bill

Location: Minoa, NY

Subject: Paddle faster - I hear banjos........

Actually, Ned Beatty went on to have a fine career in both movies and TV, after delivering that fine performance.......


Entered at Wed Aug 8 16:53:02 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Vinyl Siding: Knock Me Out

Linda Perry, a former member of 4 Non Blondes, has carved out a very successful career in the music business since leaving the group. I remember getting her first solo LP "In Flight" when it was released in 1996, mainly because it featured a duet with Grace Slick. Check out the link to that song, "Knock Me Out", a powerful performance by both singers, and one of Ms. Slick's last recordings.


Entered at Wed Aug 8 16:25:28 CEST 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT and LvdB

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Mauds

Peter: Being the 'world citizen' to which we would like to aspire (sharing ideas and music around the world) we went to Ditch records and Lyles in Victoria during our lunchtime walk- an almost daily occurrence here in Vic (2 excellent record stores and the last 2 in Victoria of any real worth and they both ARE pretty good), I went yesterday to look for Mauds to send to you prior to your trip to US. Unfortunately, they did not have anything. I was disappointed. It looks as if Amazon or some local record store in NYC may be your only avenue. I must admit I had not heard of them despite my existence in the 60s.


Entered at Wed Aug 8 10:59:27 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Great article, Adam. It's hard to get good material and to do so requires listening and prompting well to bring people out, which you have done. Many thanks.

4 Non Blondes … so much about music is memory and context. I remember this one fondly. There was an ELT educational conference in Poland in November 1992, in a hotel / centre way out in the forest. It snowed about two feet the first night, and it was a good conference because no one could move so had to attend everything. "What's Up?" was played non-stop in the evening, with everyone shouting out the line about "praying for revolution" … the Berlin Wall had only fallen three years earlier and there were 250 young teachers. The whole CD album was the soundtrack, but the single was hugely popular and they all knew the words. Because there were no deliveries, all the beer and wine had been drunk by the second night, and when I hear "What's Up?" it's the third night drinking gin and Fanta, all that was left. (I tried gin and Coca-Cola at one point, but that was beyond disgusting). When I got back, I bought the CD.

So music can bring back tastes and smells. Any others from you guys?


Entered at Wed Aug 8 10:15:46 CEST 2012 from (109.151.55.50)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Adam and other

Thank you very much for all the work on the article, Adam. I really enjoyed reading it.

I always appreciate the articles on the website that people have put a lot of time into and I'm able to access them for free. I'll put in a shout here for Peter Viney who is always willing to give time, share his knowledge and love of the Band with us in Britain.

Recently I paid a couple of pounds for a John Martyn interview on kindle. I was looking for a book on him and came across it. I then searched other subject areas and the e article is definitely becoming a 'new' means of communication and avenue for writers. I wonder if PSB has looked into this. I feel the avenue is Kindle. I buy many of my newspapers on Kindle now.

Enjoyed the debate on Dylan. You have to go to a concert knowing that songs will be reworked. I think many of his 'new' songs are excellent. I'm thinking of my ten year old twin granddaughters who when they get into the car select the appropriate channel to listen to music. They really loved Adele's version of 'Make You Feel My Love' which I think is a great song.

George Harrison said that the public were unfair to Dylan in that new songs are now allowed time to bed in and that some of his recent work was right up there with his best. I think the bad time with Dylan was before he got help with alcoholism.

'Mississippi' particularly the version on Disc 1 of 'Tell Tale Signs' would be right up there in Dylan's greatest songs.


Entered at Wed Aug 8 09:50:15 CEST 2012 from (99.141.61.107)

Posted by:

Adam

Bill - I also really love the photo. It is a previously unpublished photo from John Scheele. When I asked him about using a photo from his archive, he was so generous and supportive. I was thrilled to have it for the article.


Entered at Wed Aug 8 05:42:26 CEST 2012 from (72.230.109.86)

Posted by:

Bashful Bill

Location: Minoa, NY

Subject: Garth pics

the one which Jan has on the What's New page, with Garth playing a piano, has always been my favorite Garth pic. too me, it's ethereal. But, the one that Jan has on the homepage may replace it as my fave. Beautiful.........


Entered at Wed Aug 8 01:18:20 CEST 2012 from (99.141.61.107)

Posted by:

Adam

Reminder: check the news page for my new article "Garth Hudson's Diamond Jubilation". Thank you to everyone who responded with kind comments, and I'd love to hear what everyone else thinks. Thank you!


Entered at Tue Aug 7 23:32:04 CEST 2012 from (86.162.166.131)

Posted by:

Simon

"What's Up" certainly deserves to be covered ... by a trillion tons of concrete.


Entered at Tue Aug 7 23:18:02 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

The Moon Struck Ones

Part of our sunny personas is taking requests. What's Up by 4Non Blondes will be OK. None of us are blonde, but we've bought Pete S a nylon MM wig and he's willing to give it a go, as non-blondes being blonde will be ironic. We like that song.

Remember our mottos: we start on time; we play any requests we can in the key of A (preferably – other keys require advance notice); we only play halls where people can see us; we sell ice-cream in the interval at reasonable price; we will autograph CDs of "Little Boxes Goes Electric" at a mere $1 extra.

Must hurry … I need to check our Fruit Of The Loom 110% cotton T-shirts delivery with choices of three slogans: "I Was Stung By A Snake", "We're Made of Tick Tacky" and "Won't You tell Me Your Name."


Entered at Tue Aug 7 22:17:52 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

John D: Speaking of living down that scene -- the character actor Bill McKinney, who portrayed the "mountain man" who attacked Mr. Beatty, passed away last December. All the obituaries of course led with the mention that he was best known for that role as the sadistic mountain man who sodomized Ned Beatty in "Deliverence".


Entered at Tue Aug 7 22:11:41 CEST 2012 from (86.162.166.131)

Posted by:

Simon

Subject: The Moonstrucks

Can I request a cover? How about "What's Up?" by Four Non-Blondes. Doesn't actually contain any singing, at least not as most people understand it.


Entered at Tue Aug 7 21:37:51 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

The Moon Struck Ones

Subject: Squeal Like A Pig

Even though we (TMSO II) intend playing Duelling Banjos we won't be doing any vocalisations in deference to the sensibilities of our audience. We've tried "The End" as banjo plus voice, but it's sounding thin. We'll have to work on it.


Entered at Tue Aug 7 20:29:37 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: Thanks for the update. As the other Pete has said, quoting the good book, there IS a time to refrain from singing. For example, "The End" works best as an instrumental don't you think?


Entered at Tue Aug 7 20:26:21 CEST 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Beatty

David, I heard stories that Beatty had a real hard time living down that scene.


Entered at Tue Aug 7 19:25:21 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Duelling Banjos

Recently at the Fox Theatre here in Atlanta they had a 40th anniversary presentation of the film "Deliverance". The movie, mainly filmed in northeast Georgia, was based on the novel by the late poet/novelist James Dickey, an Atlanta native. The film has also inspired a line of T-shirts depicting two men in a canoe with the caption "Paddle faster, I hear banjos". Those who recall the Ned Beatty scene in the movie are no doubt aware of the fear those words invoke.


Entered at Tue Aug 7 19:12:40 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

The Moon Struck Ones

The Moon Struck Ones II

As you guys will know, none of us in TMOs are motivated by money, which is why the Japanese Baseball Stadium Tour was motivated purely by a love of sushi, not by the (admittedly massive) mountains of yen on offer.

Rehearsals are going well, apart from a minor incident when Pete appeared with an axe and went for my bass lead, but once I got rid of the 16 cabinet Marshall stack and agreed to use a Fender practice amp, he calmed down a lot.

The set list had to bring in everyone’s greatest hits. Light My Fire and Hello I Love You I like very much. We Shall Overcome, Turn Turn Turn are going well (in spite of my objections to “in your face religious content” in the latter.) My own song book is more problematic. We used Louie Louie as the theme for one of my videos and I can play it reasonably well. My best known video has I Heard It Through The Grapevine and the bass part is a tad beyond my capabilities, but Ray’s offered to use bass pedals while I mime. We’ve all tried “The End” and it was agreed that as I have the worst singing voice I should do it. I’m nervous about that. Rather slyly I thought of a cunning plan and have persuaded all that Little Boxes should be reserved for the encore. If it’s like the last gig, we won’t get an encore, but we haven’t told Pete that. He has a touching faith in us.


Entered at Tue Aug 7 18:45:24 CEST 2012 from (64.105.104.78)

Posted by:

Pat B

I had no idea that Chicagoan Ray Manzarek played keys in TMO.


Entered at Tue Aug 7 18:18:43 CEST 2012 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: TMO II

Bill M: a reunion would be SO COOL !!!!!

I still have the poster up in my bedroom (and hey, is Pete wearing Pete's little scarf?? ;))


Entered at Tue Aug 7 16:55:27 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: next, a full Moonstruck Ones reunion

Peter V: Nicely put. It's obvious from the political courage he displayed that the banjoist is none other than Pete Seeger. It's nice that you two have overcome your differences and become pals.


Entered at Tue Aug 7 16:24:26 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

And when they took the piano players, I said nothing for I don't play piano. Then they came for the accordion players, and I said nothing, for I'm not an accordion player. Then they came for my pal's banjo … so he started playing "Duelling Banjos" and they went pale and ran away at high speed.


Entered at Tue Aug 7 16:17:57 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

sadavid: First they come for the pianos, then they come for the piano-players - as Elton John foresaw so many years ago.


Entered at Tue Aug 7 15:38:18 CEST 2012 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: the ebony & ivory market

The trees and elephants can sleep peacefully; like the "phonograph record," the "piano" is merely a historic construct, without relevance and (except to small numbers of fetishists) unmarketable in The Modern World. See [My link].

"Abandonment often becomes the only option."


Entered at Tue Aug 7 15:23:43 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Vinyl Siding: "Knock on Wood"

The song of the day, following the annoucement of the Gibson Guitar settlement, is the Eddie Floyd / Steve Cropper classic. As Mr. Floyd demonstrated on the record cover -- it takes an ax to build an ax. (See link)


Entered at Tue Aug 7 15:10:32 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: say it ain't so, Simon

Peter V: Re cycling, same here. 'Social engineering', which you mentioned, is the key concept. Build it and they will come: we'll see in coming decades just how well that works out.

Speaking of Shoeless Joe, I read online this morning that Canada's triatheletic superhero (and flag-carrier), is out because he smashed his bike into a guardrail before he'd even gotten his shoe on. ?? I don't understand.

Pat B: Re the Mauds, Touchdown - and a fancy two-point conversion! (They didn't let Robert Lamm sing did they?)

I'm not sure why, but I followed the V-F badminton match over the weekend, the one with Bob D as the birdie. One thing that must be said is that neither team would ever be sent home for not giving it their all.

Re the Band (remember them?), I was listening to my Sly and the Family Stone compilation and realised that it wasn't so much "Life" that our guys mashed up with "Autobahn" to create the long instrumental segment tacked onto the end of "Mystery Train" on "Moondog Matinee" but "I Get High On You" - especially the instrumental break.


Entered at Tue Aug 7 14:54:27 CEST 2012 from (184.144.110.110)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Robbie Robertson & Galactic - Going To The River


Entered at Tue Aug 7 14:39:26 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Ebony & Ivory

Violating exotic wood? Disgusting. It sounds like the Ronnie Hawkins Rolling Stone Interview (the “goats” one). It’s a confusing issue. Guitar fret dots could be ivory up to a certain date. It seems any post-1947 piano with ivories to tinkle and imported into the USA could be impounded and destroyed. Shame about that 1948 Steinway … and no elephants will be resurrected when it’s destroyed.

I can see that there has to be a long enough margin for importers not to be able to claim that ebony and ivory is older and living in perfect harmony, and the vast majority must sympathize, but I do feel sorry for the vintage guitar shop guy who must technically breach rules all the time. The cut off dates (1973? 1989? I think ) are strict. What’s odd is that environmentalist like Sir Paul should sing so cheerfully about having a piano with ebony and ivory on it.

As pressure groups go, animal rights and cyclists are the ones that seem the most organized and most successful. We have miles of unused bike lanes here. The millions spent on the “Weymouth link” for the Olympics built a five mile long dedicated bike lane. When I drive to Wimborne twice a week I have to cross an ancient stone humpback bridge which is disconcerting if a truck is coming the other way. So a couple of years ago, we suffered closures for a year while a cycle / pedestrian bridge was built alongside it at huge expense. The thing is, I’ve never seen a cyclist on it. They stick to the old road, because in one direction you have to cross the traffic from the cycle bridge to get back onto the road, something that struck most of us immediately. The logical thing was to build a second full road bridge next to the old narrow one, and use one bridge for each direction as in many rural areas, and you’d have room for a cycle lane each way. But the social engineering “we should all cycle” lobby pressed for a separate bridge because they’re anti-car. Which they never use. I fear that Team GBs Olympic cycling successes will make it much worse.


Entered at Tue Aug 7 01:14:32 CEST 2012 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Luckily we heard from John Boehner on the subject.


Entered at Tue Aug 7 00:57:17 CEST 2012 from (173.33.65.25)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: Gibson Guitars..

Gibson Guitar acknowledges exotic wood violation, agrees to pay penalties

By Erik Schelzig, The Associated Press

NASHVILLE, Tenn. - Gibson Guitar Corp. avoided a criminal prosecution after the instrument maker acknowledged its importations of exotic wood violated environmental laws.

Nashville-based Gibson agreed to pay a US$300,000 penalty, forfeit claims to about US$262,000 worth of wood seized by federal agents and contribute US$50,000 to the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation to promote the conservation of protected tree species.

"The agreement is fair and just in that it assesses serious penalties for Gibson's behaviour while allowing Gibson to continue to focus on the business of making guitars," U.S. Attorney Jerry Martin said in a statement.

Gibson didn't immediately respond to messages left Monday seeking comment. The privately held company is considered one of the top makers of acoustic and electric guitars, including the iconic Les Paul introduced in 1952.

Gibson's decision to co-operate with the federal Lacey Act banning the import of endangered wood products stood in contrast to a publicity campaign mounted in protest after agents raided Gibson facilities in Memphis and Nashville.

Republicans and tea party members had rallied behind CEO Henry Juszkiewicz at the time he denounced the raids as overzealous federal regulation that threatened American jobs.

"We feel totally abused," Juszkiewicz said immediately after the August 2011 raid. He vowed at the time the company would "fight aggressively to prove our innocence." Soon afterward he was invited by House Speaker John Boehner to attend a joint session of Congress in which President Barack Obama delivered a speech on jobs.

A few weeks later a company spokesman claimed that a federal agent had "lied" in affidavits claiming the CEO knew the wood seized by authorities was illegally imported.

Those affidavits supporting the search warrant that authorized the raids alleged that shipments of imported Indian ebony and rosewood were given false labels to circumvent import restrictions.

The settlement says a Gibson employee learned during a 2008 trip to Madagascar — the source of some of the ebony wood that was seized — that it was illegal to import unfinished wood and sent a report about it to his superiors, including company President David Berryman.

The exotic woods used in such guitars are considered integral to the sound. And artists who have played Gibson instruments range widely from Chet Atkins and Maybelle Carter in country to Pete Townshend of The Who and Eric Clapton in rock to Larry Carlton and Paul in jazz.

George Gruhn, who owns a vintage guitar shop in Nashville, said he wasn't surprised that Gibson officials accepted the settlement to avoid a costly trial.

Gruhn said the resolution of the Gibson case doesn't ease his concerns about the Lacey Act, which initially halted the trade in endangered wildlife goods, like ivory, but in 2008 added rare woods to the import ban.

"The problem is that virtually every instrument prior to 1970 contains Brazilian rosewood," he said. "Even on a Gibson LGO, which was their cheapest student guitar."

Justice and Interior Department officials said in a September letter that those who "unknowingly possess" an instrument made from illegally imported materials don't have a criminal problem.

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxo


Entered at Mon Aug 6 21:04:51 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Mauds

There are a couple of US Mauds compilations. I'll be in the USA soon, so I might order one from amazon directed to a hotel. The interest started when I found a 45 of The Mindbenders doing "The Letter" and said I couldn't believe it would rate with the Boxtops … we got talking about The Boxtops and the seller mentioned The Mauds, and I was assured I'd love Soul Drippin'(which was £5 for the UK single). I did.


Entered at Mon Aug 6 19:38:25 CEST 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT and LvdB

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Ticket prices are no reflection

Some of the best shows we have seen recently (in the Victoria and Seattle area) were available for very low prices.( Dan Bejar (Destroyer), The New Pornographers, Dandy Warhols and many others ). Ticket prices are clearly not a reflection of talent, creativity, or excellence. Leonard prices are way up there and I think Dylan's are relatively moderate.


Entered at Mon Aug 6 19:10:02 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Nipping at your ears

And Dylan uses the pseudonym of Jack Frost for production credits.


Entered at Mon Aug 6 18:56:20 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

TOM PETTY … thanks for the link. I saw the video, and thought it fine, but nothing explosive nor did a collaborative album result. And it’s not Before The Flood, or The Last Waltz, is it? I’m very fond of Tom Petty and thought the Travelin’ Wilburys a peak for Dylan at the time. I never said Tom Petty was dissing Dylan … he was just recounting (with a fond smile) that there were things that were hard to do. Like picking up on an unexpected song.

Daniel Lanois … it really is different strokes. Oh, Mercy would be my favourite 80s album. I have three Dylan playlists in iTunes … a long list, a short list and a cover version list. Ring Them Bells, Man In The Long Black Coat, Most of The Time, What Good Am I, Disease of Conceit all make the short list of 103 essential (to me) songs. And are all in a row on the album too. I like Daniel Lanois’s hypnotic stuff framing his voice. Just listen to The Man With Long Black Coat.

Al Kooper … he lists “New Morning” as a production credit in Backstage Passes. I like New Morning very much too, because again the musical backing is interesting… I like it more than Planet Waves, in fact because in spite of some strong songs that sounds thrown together too quickly. I apologize … I had read an interview about Kooper working with Dylan where he sounded like he’d been the producer. I didn’t check. He should have been. Was he asked once and declined? I’m trying to recall where he was talking about it. He also mentions (in Backstage Passes) the poor sound mix on the late 90s open air show he did with Ronnie Wood backing Dylan.

On production, two albums I disliked were World Gone Wrong and Good As I Been To You. Was there any “production”? I’m sure that’s different strokes too.

The South West Bar Band reference was to the last decade’s reliance on a four piece, Excellent players, but not unique like Javier Mas with Cohen, or Bakithi Kumalo, Simon’s bass player … or Levon. If you’re into 60s / 70s soul, you’ll agree that finding a first rate band for gospel is not hard in the USA for an artist at that level. OK, he got one. He could have picked up one just as good at Stax, Motown or Philadelphia International to name but three … and they had enough in reserve for it not to have upset their production schedule.

On ticket prices, £85 last time is high for the UK … I saw The Civil Wars, The Decemberists, The Unthanks, Simone Felice last year all for under £25 in standing venues. OK, they’re not of the stature (but they all gave amazing shows). When I saw The Decemberists they were number one in Billboard with The King Is Dead, and they sold out first morning too. They have a decent track record now, and are definitely past "up and coming" to "arrived." Glenn Campbell was about £50. £85 is £20 more than Paul Simon in 2011, who has a band three times the size to pay, and a meticulous sound mix to make it all sound right. Not that I saw that because he caught flu at Glastonbury and cancelled. The only one to hit Dylan prices was Ringo Starr, but that was seated (and didn’t sell out). I didn’t go but heard it was brilliant.


Entered at Mon Aug 6 18:51:02 CEST 2012 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Peter V.'s Opinion of Dylan

Sometimes we try to hard to prove our point.Thus we might pile up more "evidence" to defend our opinion resulting in an appearance of simply sticking to our point for the point of sticking to our point.Particularly when one's point is opinion which can never be proven to be fact.Always entertaining nonetheless.


Entered at Mon Aug 6 18:47:59 CEST 2012 from (64.105.104.78)

Posted by:

Pat B

Ah a fastball right down the middle. Jimy Rodgers formed the Mauds in Chicago in the mid-60's. They were one of the few proponents of blue eyed soul in a town packed with white boys mimicking either different eras of the British Invasion or garage rock. They were championed by Jim Sohns of the Shadows of Knight who had a local hit covering Gloria. The Mauds first hit was a cover of "Hold On, I'm Comin'" and they had a semi national hit with a cool little piece called "Soul Drippin". The latter featured what was to become Chicago's horn section and keyboardist--the name of their band at the time was The Big Thing.

I hired the Mauds for my high school's senior prom.


Entered at Mon Aug 6 18:43:01 CEST 2012 from (65.95.180.3)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

For those of you who don't have the soundtrack to "Any Given Sunday".....Here's Robbie's "Carry Me".


Entered at Mon Aug 6 18:39:46 CEST 2012 from (65.95.180.3)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Here's Glen Silverthorn and Levon again.

ElmoCombo a solid sound at Port Dover’s Norfolk

Glen Silverthorn For The Expositor
Wednesday, April 25, 2012


Entered at Mon Aug 6 18:37:03 CEST 2012 from (65.95.180.3)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Going through photos.....So much fun this night of experiencing...Levon Helm & the Barn Burners, Jeff Healey's Night Club, Toronto, Ontario, 09.19.2002.

Photo of Levon, Richard Bell and the one who played with Rick Danko in 1961 in the Starlights from Brantford, Ontario.....and who Mc'd the Rick Danko Tribute in Simcoe, Ontario....Glen Silverthorn.

Playing with Dylan....Larry Campbell and Levon sharing war stories?????

"Music is food for the soul, food for the heart.
You've got to have a happy heart.
Without music, your soul goes suffering."
Levon Helm


Entered at Mon Aug 6 17:36:06 CEST 2012 from (72.78.44.61)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love
Web: My link

Subject: Producers

Al Kooper did not produce Dylan at any time after the '80s. He played on three tracks on "Under The Red Sky." Kooper has never ever been listed as a Dylan producer, though he told me he actually produced "New Morning."

Don Was ended up being one of Dylan's worst producers. Not only did he get a not great sound in the studio, he failed to understand a simple principle, and that is Dylan works best when he has the same crew of musicians in the studio for the sessions. Was brought in different people every day.

Dylan's "gospel" band was one of his best bands. I don't know what you're talking about with this South West bar band stuff. It's hard to argue with a rhythm section of Tim Drummond and Jim Keltner, not to mention Spooner Oldham who was followed by William Smitty Smith and Al Kooper. Fred Tackett is a great guitar player.

Dylan has shown in recent years he is his own best producer. He got a way better Chicago sound than Lanois did with all this tape loops and atmospherics. And I wonder to this day what the album would have sounded like if Duke Robillard's guitar parts had remained intact and not replaced by Lanois' guitar.

And sorry but no way is Dylan's audience 75/25% male. I've only been going to Dylan concerts for 49 years. Dylan's ticket prices are fairly low especially compared to a lot of other acts of his stature, and frankly a lot of his audience (while I don't) prefers to stand.


Entered at Mon Aug 6 17:20:56 CEST 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F

Location: Hudson Valley, NY
Web: My link

Subject: Tom Petty article from American Songwriter

If anyone is interested in how Tom Petty actually felt about playing with Dylan, please see my link.


Entered at Mon Aug 6 17:05:22 CEST 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Bob Dylan and Tom Petty and The HB's

Peter V, again when it comes to Dylan you just don't know what your talking about. The tours he did with Tom Petty were a tremendous success. I saw a ton of those shows including the ones in England in the fall of '87. I remember everyone who attended those shows loving them. Tom Petty and all of the HB's including Mike Campbell, Stan Lynch and Benmont Tench have done hundreds of interviews where they talked about how much they loved playing with Dylan. I guess you didn't read any of those. Did you see any of the shows he did with Tom Petty or are you just basing your slam on the video? Maybe you didn't like the video because he did 'In the Garden' from Saved?


Entered at Mon Aug 6 16:54:19 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Early electricity

Only "Mixed Up Confusion" sounded very rocking though … Corrina Corrina was very tastefully applied electric … and Mixed Up Confusion was released as a single, but not in Britain … Dutch import copies turned up regularly. I remember the debate (shock, horror) when piano turned up on "Another Side of Bob Dylan". The folk club thought that a step too far.

Two finds in recent weeks were a couple of British mod classic B-sides … What's News Pussycat by The Cryin' Shames and Too Too Good by the Paul Stewart Movement. Both are VERY heavily influenced by 1965 Dylan. What's News Pussycat is an amazing rip off, but fun. I've linked it above … you should try it!


Entered at Mon Aug 6 16:42:34 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

One for Pat B and Bill M … At the record fair on Saturday we were talking about The Boxtops, and the guy said "I've got Soul Drippin' by The Mauds in." I had never even heard of it, but was persuaded to give it a try. I noticed "arranged by CTA" on the label, and it does have the Chicago horn section on it. The Mauds was a joke on "The Mods" as they thought an English person might say it. They were a Chicago band … none of their compilation CDs ever released here. I thought they were very good.


Entered at Mon Aug 6 16:41:23 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

JT: Yes, Dylan went "electric" earlier during the "Freewheelin" sessions in 1962. He recorded "Corrina, Corrina", "Mixed Up Confusion", "That's All Right Mama" and "Rocks and Gravel".

Thanks Adam for your article on Garth.


Entered at Mon Aug 6 14:34:31 CEST 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT and LvdB

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: 'Take the load'

That's 'take the load off Fanny' but in my early morning stupor, I misspoke.


Entered at Mon Aug 6 13:53:22 CEST 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT and LvdB

Location: VIctoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: "And now for something completely different..."

It was a beautiful day (as many have been of late) in Victoria yesterday. We had just finished cleaning the garage and dumping so much 'stuff' onto the front of the street and giving it away (and it was taken in hours) and we decided to drive up to Sidney by the Sea (1/2 hour away) for dinner at a seaside pub, outside). Windows wide open, sun shining, 29C and no humidity, perfect, and on came 'The Weight" and there we were, singing at the top of our lungs, 'Take the weight off Fanny"... it was glorious.


Entered at Mon Aug 6 13:41:39 CEST 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: VIctoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: 'ike a blow to the head or a smack in the teeth'

The 'folkies' felt the same way in 65 when Dylan 'went electric' (though electricity was evident before 65 if you listen to the albums. It just wasn't pervasive yet. As I noted, I felt a personal affront (ridiculous in retrospect, but emotional reaction to creativity is part of the experience) in 79. The implication is that the lyrics are so far from the usual and like a religious automaton, regurgitated in a mindless way - so far from that previous Dylancreativity that it became offensive. I can understand that reaction. I liked the Petty period and thought it worked well and stands up to scrutiny today. I think that the criticism against the Dead collaboration is overstated; I thought so then and still think so. The struggle to write songs, something that came so easily to Dylan in the early days, is part of the art of Dylan and makes his work of the last 3 albums so much more meaningful and appreciated. I don't think we're done yet. Too much is being read into 'Tempest' and Shakespeare's last play and all that. Like Leonard, stay tuned... there is more to come.


Entered at Mon Aug 6 09:37:46 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I think it’s an interesting debate, so I hope no one thinks (or maybe not everyone thinks) that I’m like a dog with a bone. Thanks to Jon for supporting the view that audiences are 75/25 male. I believe that Dylan cares what the audience reaction is, but go back to 1965 … he delights in disapproval and always has. I don’t think there’s any sign of a desire to be liked, something he shares with Van and Neil Young. I’ve also noted that he delights in younger audiences … he said as much when my son saw him play at Northwestern … it was one of the things reported back. I also think every performer delights in younger audiences. It’s a given. But the largest number of under 40s I’ve seen for any of the older group (Dylan / Simon / Cohen) was Leonard all three times. No one else got anywhere near the number of women under thirty.

I discovered Dylan before he went electric, in my folk club days. I saw the horror when he went electric, when he went Nashville, when he did Self Portrait, when he painted his face white (that was a sign of some disturbance), when he formed the Street Legal band.

I liked the playing and tunes on Slow Train Coming, but the lyrics were starting to worry me. They were crass. But Saved was like a blow to the head or a smack in the teeth. How could the man who wrote Visions of Johanna be recycling born-again gobbledeygook secondhand?

He bought me with a price

Freed me from the pit

Full of emptiness and wrath

And the fire that burns in it.

He’d got old time religion apparently, but vengeful religion of the nastiest kind. I listen in vain for irony. After all even the rhymes are inane. I thought for a moment I detected in it Are You Ready:

Have I surrended to the will of God

Or am I still like the boss

But guessing from the tours, it was sincere. That for me was a cut-off. I’ve bought and listened to every album since. Some I like a great deal, some like Real Live and Dylan & The Dead are turkeys. But the “trust” never recovered from Saved. He took a severe dive in my esteem.

That brings me onto bands. There is no great virtue in assembling a bunch of musicians who can play gospel well. You can find them anywhere in the USA. Go to “Crazy Heart” the movie, where Jeff Bridges’ Kris Kristofferson-like character is stumbling around playing in bars. Every pick up bar band is brilliant, and you think, “Hang on …” but people assure me that in the South-West most bar bands ARE brilliant. Which is why it’s not hard to find a professional four piece who are very good, and more importantly flexible.

Dylan’s later attempts at collaboration haven’t worked … the Grateful Dead, Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers. On the surface Tom Petty’s band was the most likely to succeed in filling The Band’s shoes as every guy there was creative and musically brilliant. I got the video of the tour, and it didn’t gel. Tom Petty discussed this in an interview and said how hard it is when he might call from a list of 140 songs … or rather just start playing and expect you to follow. The example Tom Petty gave was Australia when Dylan started and they tried to stumble in, but didn’t recognize the song which turned out to be Da Doo Ron Ron. It had never been mentioned in advance.

Strong producers post 1980 … Daniel Lanois, Don Was, Al Kooper … did manage to get a more interesting musical palette to a degree, but the evidence is that doesn’t interest him much. When it happens, Blonde on Blonde, Desire, Street Legal, it’s because the right guys were hired. Some of my favourite later performances are with the Traveling Wilburys, when there are people of stature around him.

There are two contrasting approaches. Simon and Cohen spend months or years crafting their lyrics, and take over the same attention to detil to musical arrangements. The evidence is that Dylan can just produce lyrics almost at will … and does so better than anyone on the planet. But I think that facility leads to an attitude to the music. OK, that's what he does. But listen to Visions of Johanna. It doesn't have to be throwaway.

In the end, I think he does have arrogance in his attitude to audiences. £75 and £85 to stand in a deep recession is a lot of money. For that the least you can do is start on time. A final straw for me was on the money-grabbing aspect was talking to gallery owners about how his mass produced prints at huge prices are wiping original work by young artists. They’re not bad, but they’re not fantastic either. I’d hang a couple if I could afford them, but most I wouldn’t.

Lest you think me totally anti-Bob, I went back to the shop in Bath and bought the print of Bob (1965 Bob) playing Fender Jazz Bass last week. I can see it from where I type!


Entered at Mon Aug 6 05:45:14 CEST 2012 from (208.120.38.3)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Subject: Dylan live today

As always, I read the Dylan debate with interest. I've seen him live just about every one of the last 15 or so years, and most (though not all) of those shows are some of the music highlights of my life. The debate seems to have started with the male/female breakdown of his audience... I'd guess it's been about 75/25 from the shows I've attended. More interesting to me though is the age range of his shows... I'd say if anything the average age has gotten younger, which IMO is a remarkable thing for a 71-year-old artist. I've been surrounded by people that weren't alive when Oh Mercy came out, let alone Blonde on Blonde or Freewheeling... and Dylan seems to respond to that shift by playing a lot of his current material (witness his very interesting recent statement regarding his brief tour of China, where he notes with pride the younger audience and their interest in his recent songs).

Dylan and his touring band have a unique sound, kind of a garage-band punk attack on his songs with elements of blues/folk/country/rockabilly/what-have-you... while bits are borrowed from different sources, I haven't heard anyone else remotely like it. His voice is as ragged as it's ever been, I do get that, and even given his old-bluesman voice he did have a wider and more expressive range 5-10 years ago. But most shows I've been to, the feeling and passion have been there, and the audience has left happy. It would be a valid and equally interesting direction if Dylan went the 'mature folkie' way that Peter V suggests, and arranged concerts more like Cohen or Simon as he describes; that too is a show I'd love to see. But there is something special about the shows he is choosing to put out, even with their flaws.

(As an aside, PSB gets it right -- live performances of "Forgetful Heart" of the past two years are the answer to which of his current performances equal the best of Simon/Cohen/etc. They are arranged with care, deeply moving, and the highlight of any show. Though in fairness, I did read a review referring to that song as "Dylan's attempt to write a Leonard Cohen song". ;)


Entered at Mon Aug 6 05:23:14 CEST 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: VIctoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Nothing wrong

And what's wrong with being in the family appliance business. Its a living. I always saw The Never Ending Tour as 'opening up the store ' for 100 or more times a year. The service is excellent and the products are at a very high level.


Entered at Mon Aug 6 03:44:08 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Things to look forward to. Garth is starting to talk about these things like The Institute for public consumption. This is agood thing. For years I've been saying Garth is the guy to tell The Band Story truthfully & completely. I don't know that he will, or if he does how much he would address, but,Garth has a precision calibrated machine for a mind.


Entered at Mon Aug 6 03:40:43 CEST 2012 from (99.141.61.107)

Posted by:

Adam

Thank you everyone for the kind comments. I hope you all enjoy the article, as I tried my very best. Thank you.


Entered at Mon Aug 6 00:26:29 CEST 2012 from (184.66.102.90)

Posted by:

BONK

Location: SaltSpring Island/Cabbagetown

Subject: Adam

Thanks Adam! I'm starting to think that Garth should write the ultimate Band book. But I'm thinking he'd be too polite.


Entered at Sun Aug 5 23:40:28 CEST 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Mea Culpa

For personal reasons, I did what I will not do again if I can help it. I ignored the work of a superb artist because I was not partial to its content. This was the period 1979-1981. So I missed Dylan by choice of 20 April 1980 ( a truly remarkable performance at Massey Hall in Toronto in my view now). That type of closed minded choice is something I now abhor. I did not suddenly become enlightened. It was the gradual understanding of the place of the musician as aural artist that finally 'hit me'. I have appreciated 'Covenant Woman 'as a beautiful love song and think of "I Believe in You" as a superb piece. Like all pieces in a composer's work, there are some lesser works (or how would anyone know what is exceptionally superb). Despite this, I cannot find 'Pressing On' or 'Saved' dire. I should note that when Greil Marcus asked "What Is this s..t (regarding "Self-Portrait")?" my reactions was "What's the problem and why so angry?" He wanted Dylan 65-67 over and over again as did so many. Dylan's lesser works are better than most others best. "Street Legal" is getting a second life after being derided by many in its first. I'm not trying to convince anyone about anything and I understand the critics, who called 'Saved' bombastic but I disagree (now).


Entered at Sun Aug 5 22:11:29 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

But "Pressing ON" and "Solid Rock" ARE crap in any objective view.


Entered at Sun Aug 5 22:10:31 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

It could be my failing memory, Bob, a frequent problem, but when did I "knock" Blood on The Tracks? I prefer "Desire" and "Street Legal" (unlike most reviewers) but I really do like "Blood on the Tracks"?


Entered at Sun Aug 5 22:05:45 CEST 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Dylan

JT, good post and your right about constructive critical commentary. However, the day Dylan starts doing the things Peter V is suggesting is the day I hope he retires. Dylan is the original Song and Dance Man he's not a monkey with an organ grinder. Also, as a Dylan fan thing about the great music he has made since 1979. Slow Train, Pressing On, Solid Rock, Shot of Love, Every Grain of Sand, Jokerman, Sweetheart Like You, Don't Fall Apart on Me Tonight, Dark Eyes.....I could go on for hours. According to Peter V that's all crap! I also remember him knocking Blood on the Tracks. If Dylan had a few more fans like Peter V, he'd still be in the family appliance store!


Entered at Sun Aug 5 21:53:39 CEST 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Adam's Article on Garth

Adam, great job!


Entered at Sun Aug 5 21:47:05 CEST 2012 from (99.141.61.107)

Posted by:

Adam

Joan, thank you so much! My experience with Garth has been amazing. He is a true genius, and talking with him has been the highlight of my life. I learned more from him than I did with 2 years of college, and that goes far beyond the content of the article. Thank you so much for reading!


Entered at Sun Aug 5 19:40:02 CEST 2012 from (108.54.247.103)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Adam

Adam, Terrific job on the Garth article! I really enjoyed it.

To the rest of the GB, check the "What's new" page if you haven't already, Adam's article is great.


Entered at Sun Aug 5 18:06:54 CEST 2012 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Peter,Dylan,NorthWestCoaster

I enjoy Peter's critique of Dylan.Understanding a different perspective forces me to be able to understand and explain my own opinion,which differs from Peter.It ultimately is a subjective matter,this so called judgement we do of art.As I mentioned earlier,the mystery of the Dylan experience appeals to me,thus enabling me to enjoy just about all of his work.I also delight in his sense of humor and unpredictability.His voice "sucks" as many felt it always has,but I always viewed it as a distinct instument and enjoy it a lot.His harmonica playing as well.Now I see his "performance" style as a visual instrument and a part of the whole experience.His long time habit of generally not engaging the audience creates great anticipation and excitement for me once he finally speaks.Always a touch of humor.Sometimes you got to look closely!But,different strokes for different folks.We all got opinions and that's nice. And,NortWestCoaster,must be beautiful to listen to The Band by the sea,and from your neck of the woods.Id imagine the music might take on a different character in different parts of the world.


Entered at Sun Aug 5 15:28:15 CEST 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: 'Negativity don't pull you through'

I don't see constructive critical commentary as negativity. I am not certain that 'could so so much better' is on the mark for 2012. This IS Dylan 2012. Arrangements are sharp and played and performed well on most occasions. I never felt that Dylan degraded his songs in performance. There is an implication that he doesn't care. I don't believe that for a moment. He cares very much and he doesn't have to speak to an audience to prove it. I have seen enough concerts and know when someone is just going through the motions. That is NOT Dylan. So I return to the idea that what is presented may not be to everyone's liking for various reasons. It was so in 1965-66; it was so in 1978 and it was so in 1979-80 and that has not changed. The reason may be different for each set of concerts for the concertgoer. But I think that to doubt Dylan's commitment to excellence is to misunderstand this performer. "I'm a song and dance man" was not a frivolous comment. That is what Dylan has done for many years and it is his reason for continuing. It is what he is and it is reflected in what he does, thugh there may be little dancing, except in his creativity. So I for one welcome the constructive criticism and will continue to perceive Bob Dylan as a performer of commitment who respects his audience and delivers his songs with honesty in 2012.


Entered at Sun Aug 5 13:35:40 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Steve Cropper

When I saw Steve Cropper a year ago, it was at a local community theatre, run by volunteers. They were saving up for a digital film system (I watch films there once a fortnight too). Steve Cropper gave a long appeal for us to put spare change in the collection pails on the way out to help towards the refit, and thanked the volunteers by name. As I say, I go there every couple of weeks anyway and say a few words to the volunteers. They said Steve Cropper was the most pleasant gentleman ever to grace their stage.


Entered at Sun Aug 5 13:30:55 CEST 2012 from (83.249.106.36)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries
Web: My link

Subject: My Visiting Card

Mainly to newbees: For ten years ago I had a GB Visiting Card. "My link" is my current gb card. (Ah... Nothing special.)


Entered at Sun Aug 5 11:56:31 CEST 2012 from (83.249.106.36)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Female Dinner guests

As a socially non-competent person I have only two guests - so far! 1.) NorthWestCoaster's Dog, 2.) Guestbook Rosalind. - Without saying too much I can tell that the food supplier has the second name "Pal" but - fortunately - the drink suppliers have the first names "Ernest and Julio"!


Entered at Sun Aug 5 10:09:59 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The morning story …

This guy loved music all his life, and when he died he found himself outside the pearly gates. A kindly guy in a long robe patted down his pockets, removed thirty-five quid, gave him a card ticket and told him to walk that way, but reminded him that no recording devices nor photography were allowed. Puzzled, he walked along a corridor and found himself in a large warehouse with a flat floor, full of people. More and more pushed in, and he stood there for half an hour. The lights went out and Fanfare for The Common Man blasted out of the PA. He listened through it. It finished, it was still dark, but nothing happened for another ten minutes, except in the crowd someone spilled beer down the back of his leg. Eventually a few musicians filed on the stage in the distance. By standing on tip toe he could just see their heads. The women next to him, a foot shorter, were simply staring at the smelly armpits of the men in front of them. The musicians picked up their instruments and a wizened, unshaven old man hobbled up to the microphone, and everyone shouted in excitement, then the old man sat down at some keyboards and he couldn’t see him at all. The man started croaking in a horrible gravelly voice. They played several numbers, and though the backing musicians were clearly pretty good, every song sounded exactly the same as the one before. A guy tapped him on the shoulder, ‘At least he’s not playing guitar. Last time the worse bit was when he stood up and played electric guitar. He took the solos though it was obvious that the other two guitarists on stage were far more adept than him. Be thankful for the keyboard.’

The material puzzled him. The words sounded like hugely significant extracts from the soundtrack of his life, when he could catch them, but the tunes had gone altogether. There were lines that cried out for a melody … I ain’t gonna work on Maggies Farm no more … wears an Egyptian ring it sparkles … brains in a pot they’re beginning to boil … you gotta a lotta nerve to say you are … can this really be the end? … you build your big bombs … wish I was back in the city … do you, Mr Jones? … it’s all new to me, like some mystery, could even be like a myth … your long time curse hurts … I’m all used up and the fields … in every grain of … the girls all say you’re a worn out star … you know you only used to get juiced in it … there must be some way out of here …

But there wasn’t. Some way out of there. Finally he turned to an angel wearing an orange shirt with SECURITY emblazoned on it. ‘Sorry,’ he said, ‘who is that?’

The angel turned to him, ‘Him? Oh, that’s God. But some days he thinks he’s Bob Dylan.’

*******************

So I’ll explain. That was my 2006 review that I never used … even the set list is correct. I will put it up now, I think. If you go to forums on Dylan, the naysayers are way outnumbered by the defenders. That’s because they’re Dylan forums. I still remember the furore here when someone criticized a late Rick concert.

It’s like you’re a teacher and the brightest kid in the class hands in illegible scrawl because they put no effort in. This is why I get so worked up about Dylan. It’s “could do so much better.” All three links yesterday had a purpose.

The Cohen one showed what you can do with an old voice with little power left by brilliant amplification and using backing singers to do the melodic choruses. That was in a 20,000 seater. Do check out the vocal sound again. Dylan could do that.

The Paul Simon “Sounds of Silence” shows that sometimes just being alone with an acoustic guitar (and good amplification, outdoors with 80,000 people) can be way more effective than trying to shout yourself hoarse over loud backing.

The Paul Simon “Diamonds” shows what happens when you get truly stellar backing musicians, and also that unlike the Cohen, which was tightly arranged and orchestrated, you can still hang loose, give musicians space and sound good.

That was the purpose of the comparisons. In Dylan’s case, there’s no point trying to do the 60s stuff unless you invest in the support singers and the high quality amplification. I’d rather he stuck to the last three or four albums, which were written for the cracked shot-away voice in the first place.

The other comparison is that both Cohen and Simon played the same venue. Both sold 3300 tickets immediately … I believe Cohen was the fastest ever. Neither thought of doubling capacity by removing the seats to get 5500 in. Both started exactly on time. So my intention is not negativity. It’s real pain that he presents himself so badly except to the deeply converted for whom he can do no wrong.


Entered at Sun Aug 5 02:31:04 CEST 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Peter V, I guess I just don't understand your constant negative Dylan comments. If you haven't liked anything he's done since 1979 why not just let it go. Also I don't understand the constant need to compare one great artist to another. When I go see Dylan or Paul Simon or Bruce or Neil Young I never feel the need to build one up by knocking the other one down. Why deprive yourself the oppurtunity to enjoy all this great music? I just don't get it.


Entered at Sun Aug 5 02:05:00 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

John D.,of all those folks, the only one I've had dinners with was Garth. No doubt you have too, and no doubt there are a lot of other people here who have. And dozens of lurkers who have over the years. .Garth likes to eat, and talk. He is a unique and wonderful dinner companion. That, and his musicality and life's experiences is why he shows up in 3 of my 4 guest lists. Of course, in the very first grouping, he is the guest of honor.


Entered at Sun Aug 5 01:56:04 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Peter,of course you may.

Jon D. that may have been the best steak dinner you ever had :-). Anyone I know who knows Cropper, speaks very highly of him as a person. And one guy who has been a guest in his home, says he is the most hospitable host and regular guy going.


Entered at Sun Aug 5 01:47:34 CEST 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Put em Up

I had the pleasure of having a one on one dinner; with Steve Cropper a few years ago. Went to their rehearsal and he asked me what I thought was the best Steak House near by. I told him and he said, "Good. Why don't you join me then?" Found out he was a wine connoisseur. A wonderful southern gentleman; much like Levon.

Also had drinks with Ronne Hawkins, Steve Cropper, Duck Dunn and Eddy Floyd another time. Ronnie was nice enough to introduce me to them; as he did with Levon; back in the 60's.


Entered at Sun Aug 5 00:40:06 CEST 2012 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: 6 Dinner Guests

Buddy Guy,Garth Hudson,Bill Walton,Phil Lesh,Keith Richards,Wavy Gravy.


Entered at Sat Aug 4 23:13:07 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Jeff, I'm deeply honoured. Can I sit between Leonard Cohen and Joss Stone with Paul Simon opposite?


Entered at Sat Aug 4 23:05:07 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Diamonds on the Soles of Her Shoes 2012

Paul Simon … crowd footage, but just listen to that bass player. Incredible.


Entered at Sat Aug 4 22:43:29 CEST 2012 from (72.78.38.132)

Posted by:

PSB

Subject: What!?

Yes Peter, I've seen Leonard Cohen in concert, though not the recent tours and he was great. Paul Simon, I am not interested in. The last time I saw him was in '99 and I had to sit through one show and thankfully the order of performers was reversed on the next show, and I did not stay to see it. I liked the Graceland tour though not the Graceland album, but the best song of the night (that Simon did) was Sounds of Silence.


Entered at Sat Aug 4 22:40:28 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Six

Bob Dylan

Leonard Cohen

Paul Simon

Garth Hudson

Joss Stone or Joan Osborne

Peter Viney


Entered at Sat Aug 4 21:43:06 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Hyde Park 2012

Link is to Paul Simon in Hyde Park two weeks ago doing The Sound Of Silence as an encore. Watch it, watch the Leonard Cohen link below on "The Future" then link to a recent Bob Dylan performance in the same class. Or remotely in the the same class. I'd love to see it.


Entered at Sat Aug 4 20:03:18 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutemUp(Friend0

Subject: Dinner , yet again

Edgy

Bruce Springsteen

Garth Hudson

Clive Davis

Rihanna Giddens

John Simon

Al, I just couldn't think of having dinner with Bruce without having you along.


Entered at Sat Aug 4 19:55:02 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: 6 otherr dinner guests, different night

Woody Allen

Chris Rock

Mary L. Blige

Steve Cropper

Steve Freund

Mos Def


Entered at Sat Aug 4 19:44:19 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Not a competition, but …

The link is to Leonard Cohen "Live in London" … the one that's on the DVD. Do check it out as part of the discussion … and watch right to the end for the point about relating to an audience. This was in front of 20,000 people at the O2 arena and the other 19,999 were as delighted to be there as I was. It has everything … music, lyrics, and notice the two lovely bits of "theatre" on white people dancing.


Entered at Sat Aug 4 19:34:21 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Six Living Dinner Guests,

U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts

U.S.Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

John Simon

Mary Martin

Garth Hudson

Robbie Robertson



Entered at Sat Aug 4 19:27:48 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Correction: Eliza Carthy wasn't "full of women" rather "there was a large percentage of women." You see, she booked in at Poole as part of her tour, then she got steamrollered by Dylan booking in at Bournemouth, just seven miles away, double the capacity by taking out the seats, on the same night. Totally screwed her show's takings, and considering there's only a couple of shows a month, a shame. Ah, well, they all screwed her dad by stealing his arrangements (I include Paul Simon on that one.)


Entered at Sat Aug 4 19:18:44 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Peter, everybody knows what they’re talking about. They just have dfferent subjective impressions. Have you seen Leonard? I saw the last tour three times. Neither he nor Paul Simon do facsimile recreations of their hits … see the Uncut piece on Sounds of Silence I quoted. Actually McCartney doesn’t either, going for a more urgent aggressive delivery a lot of the time (which I don’t like that much). The difference is that Cohen and Simon have sufficient (paid) firepower on stage to be able to do whatever they want. They’re the only two I’d put at Dylan’s level in lyrics, and while being the runners-up for years, in the last (twenty?) they’ve outstripped him. Listen to “Old Ideas” to see how you can frame an ageing voice. The night Dylan played here recently, I went to see Eliza Carthy instead. It was full of women, people we knew. The Eliza Carthy audience had made a choice.

OK, take Bruce, Van, Paul Simon, Leonard Cohen, James Taylor, Paul McCartney and Bob Dylan. I hope I haven’t missed anyone who should be in that company. There are others, like Joni, but they don’t tour. Not one of them “need the money” (well, Len did a couple of years ago). They tour because they want to, love it, feel compelled to or possibly in one case because they’re like a hamster stuck on a never-ending wheel.

In various ways they relate to audiences. Bruce and Paul McCartney exude joy at being there to the audience. It’s the “I’ll go on all night if they let me” approach. Paul Simon, Len and James continually express their gratitude at their reception, with little bows and thanks. Both Paul Simon and Leonard use the East / South Asian ‘namaste’ hands together greeting continually. It may be false memory, but I can see James Taylor doing it too. Now there’s a degree of acting … on night forty of a tour you can’t really be overwhelmed by grateful surprise that the audience love you, as they did the previous thirty-nine too. But I’m sure they really do feel it, and in the worst case scenario (I want a mighty crap as soon as I get out of here followed by a hot shower and a pizza from room service) they at least pay the audience the respect of bothering to show their pleasure.

Van’s an odd one. Some of the time he’s clock-watching, terrified of doing 91 minutes when he’s contracted for 90. On the other hand he gives it full throttle while he’s up there, he has a great band, and I have seen the rare sudden two and a half hour show (and the band look surprised when that happens too). Van barely relates to the audience.

The audience are thrilled when Bob deigns to mutter something, but don’t expect it. There’s no eye contact, very little interaction with his band on a personal level, very few smiles.

Feck knows what the motivation is. It’s powerful whatever. Maybe it’s “if I stop I’ll drop dead.”

The only younger people (i.e. under forty) near me in 2006 expressed a great thrill when one number started. “Ya! Ya! Like A Rolling Stone! Jolly Good!” In fact it was Positively 4th Street. They tried to sing the How Does it Feel chorus. Easily confused when it doesn’t have the tune of either!

Dylan’s songs mean a great deal to me and have now for very close to fifty years. That’s why I can’t stand seeing them pissed on.


Entered at Sat Aug 4 19:00:50 CEST 2012 from (72.78.38.132)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love
Web: My link

Subject: What!?

Bob F and JT are the ones here who know what they're talking about. Dylan still attracts a wide range of people, old and young, men and women. His audience is not more male. That is one of the more ridiculous things I've heard. One thing I noticed at the last couple of concerts I saw, I didn't have to tell people to stop talking.

No one was happier than me when Dylan finally went back to a small band set up without the backup singers. And it was even better in the late '90s when Larry Campbell and Charlie Sexton joined him on harmonies reminiscent of the group this site is about.

Unlike Paul McCartney and Leonard Cohen (since these two were mentioned) he is not trying to recreate his hits as they were. Arrangements are always evolving and changing, which is one of the main reasons heavy duty Dylan fans to to the shows. And every once in a while they revert back to something approximating the original arrangement.

For the past 20 years what Dylan and his band have been about is exploring American music, and pretty much all of it. Dylan's saw tour of Europe saw a major change, a return to using a real grand piano. Whether that continues (and it probably will), we'll find out in a few days.

A Dylan concert is not about doing the exact same show every night and it is not about playing the hits though a few are always in there and it's not even about playing the latest album. Usually when there's a new album, the songs are often worked in slowly, and sometimes they're not even played in the same arrangement as on the latest album. For instance "Forgetful Heart" from "Together Through Life" debuted live in arrangement featuring acoustic guitar and violin, an arrangement far superior to the album version and became an instant highlight of the set.

You don't go to see Dylan to see some nice pleasing show that's going to evoke youthful memories. You go to see him because you never know what he's going to do and which song he might pull out.


Entered at Sat Aug 4 18:56:16 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Jed

LOL. Now that's the kind of comment this GB has been lacking since the days of dear old Serge.

Love it Jed - utter shite like - but love it all the same.

:-0)


Entered at Sat Aug 4 17:30:15 CEST 2012 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Dylan's Motives and a sentence on Bruce

Always enjoy the assumptions made in regard to Dylan's alleged motives.Is it belligerence or merely habit? So true that his art has and does evolve.The whole manner of dress,choices about phrasing,little changes of lyrics,tunes at times unfamiliar,choice of instruments and notably,the performance "stance" and emotive gestures are all either conscious and deliberate or something else(?).The mystery is part of what draws me back time after time. As for Bruce,consistently loud,in your face,boring, and pedestrian.


Entered at Sat Aug 4 17:13:40 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Another Record Fair today … I found "On A Night Like This" in a French picture sleeve for £2 (scan sent to Jan), and The Turtles "It Ain't Me Babe" EP … so I'm still picking up Dylan.

I bought "Uncut" and sat down just now to read the review of Paul Simon in Hyde Park. It hits straight on this discussion:

Andrew Mueller:

The Sound of Silence is an audacious and ironic selection to begin the encore. Simon, alone with an acoustic guitar, deliberately croons around the familiar melody and rhythm of the song, as if determined to forestall a mass singalong. Dylan does this too, more likely out of plain cussedness, and for that reason it often comes across as pointless belligerence. With Simon, it seems more like a gentle urging to listen to the song again, as if for the first time: it's a stunning moment, and the clear highlight of the night. (END QUOTE)

The "pointless belligerence" exactly sums up what I feel. But the division among listeners is crystal clear and fascinating. It's not an "I'm right, you're wrong" one either but it's rare to see such opposite views.


Entered at Sat Aug 4 16:07:41 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: The man with the sand in his tonsils

Good post that Jerry. As Sly used to sing - and as you rightly say - Different Strokes for Different Folks.

Speaking for myself I did actually reach the end of my own sensibilities with those tow terrific pieces Love and Theft and Time out of Mind. That was as far as the gravel road and voice to match could take me without me clenching my teeth as I listened but I do appreciate that Dylan's lyrical genius is no doubt still intact and that some can still derive enormous pleasure from what he's had to offer since despite the gravel.


Entered at Sat Aug 4 15:54:09 CEST 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Dylan controversial

As always, in all aspects that are Dylan, he remains controversial. The shows are usually delivered with purpose and show Dylan for what he is today. I have always damned the notion of the artist continuing to deliver what the fans of yesteryear remember and want for eternity. The artist evolves and with that evolution comes new creation. The voice is a cause for concern only because it can occasionally grate. But the delivery is and remains honest and sincere. Pleasing to the ear is something we all would like when we hear a performer and there is a set of boundaries to achieve that. Tom Waits and some others, including Dylan of late, make that achievement difficult for some. It comes down ultimately to personal tastes. The creativity and the desire to strive for creativity continues and the band often delivers. Bob Dylan does not come to the stage with the intent of Springsteen or Cohen. Bob Dylan stages Bob Dylan in 2012 and presents HIS songs with honesty and commitment to HIS art in 2012 with a band that reflects that art. We all have our personal preferences in what we want to and hope to hear and experience when we go to a concert. I don't think we should doubt the intent and commitment of a man who has been doing this since 1960 and is still doing it. I am thankful that he is 'still out there' keeping on and developing that art. He does it for himself and we are the beneficiaries.


Entered at Sat Aug 4 15:53:40 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Bruce and Right wingers

Joan - I'm assuming your consternation is how can someone with right of centre political affiliations possibly connect with Bruce. I've read similar sort of comments from time to time on the Springsteen forums and they are invariably from American fans. So it does seem to be a concern for Americans yet I'm sure it's something that doesn't even register on the richter scale with folks over this side of the pond.

That said, when you reflect on it I can see why it might well have a prominence with you guys since so much of Springsteen's songwriting and public preaching - especially post Nebraska - has a concern for the American victimised/underdog/impoverished seaming through it so it does sort of beg the question - how come the connection for the 'I'm all Right, Jack' brigade.

Maybe it's that music is just so unique and amazing!!

:-0)


Entered at Sat Aug 4 14:37:09 CEST 2012 from (68.171.231.83)

Posted by:

Bill M

Has anyone mentioned a tempest in a teapot? Anyway, Peter V, your focus on the electic guitar was hardly fair to Bill S, a dab-hand on the lute.


Entered at Sat Aug 4 14:16:57 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Shakespeare's In The Alley

As I said, Bob … there is a huge split in reaction. Take a look at Ticketmaster's Dylan page of live reviews … you seem to get either five star or one star. That's how I find people react. I'm in the one star camp. You're in the five star. That's just the way it is. In the 90s there were a lot of women. In both 2000s shows I saw, very few. That's just the UK, but that's how it was.

BUT I reckon Bob could beat Shakespeare in an electric guitar playing contest.


Entered at Sat Aug 4 14:16:07 CEST 2012 from (83.35.83.89)

Posted by:

NetBioTux

Web: My link

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Entered at Sat Aug 4 14:08:34 CEST 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Dylan

Based on a Dylan show you saw in 2006 and a couple of shows your friends have seen since then, you have determined that Dylan's audience is becoming more male. Therefore Bob Dylan's career is in decline. Do you have any idea how silly that sounds?


Entered at Sat Aug 4 12:44:15 CEST 2012 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Dylan

Dylan's band is superb.His performances are engrossing and interesting to hear and see.Strings and backup singers would help his sound a lot,but I'm satisfied with the music as it is.The album will be tremendous based on the 2 songs I've heard and yes indeed,his voice is more serviceable in the studio.All a matter of personal taste,but I still cherish every musical utterance by Dylan.Perhaps some time off and heavy gargling of honey/lemon in hot water might help the voice!


Entered at Sat Aug 4 10:50:31 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Tempest tos't

The Tempest was Shakespeare’s last wholly-satisfying, non-collaborative play, but Two Noble Kinsmen, Cardenio and Henry VIII were to follow. So The Tempest was a better title for (complete the gap:…………………). It’s also the play with the most about music. Does he see himself as Prospero or Caliban? That is the question.

Prospero is usually portrayed as an old man with a white beard, which may be how Dylan sees it, but the one I saw at Stratford this year cast Jonathan Slinger, who is forty. The text figures with that age … Prospero was cast away with his three year old daughter who is now fifteen. Shakespeare was also only forty-four when he wrote it, but he only had four years left (which spared us stuff like the Christmas album, I guess).

Cardenio was “recreated” by the Royal Shakespeare Company last year using bits from the then contemporary translation of Don Quixote (from which the plot is taken) to fill in the missing pages. The result was a amazingly good. Cardenio (or Double Falsehood) has been included in the Shakespeare text series now (see link to my review). The original bits were a collaboration with the younger John Fletcher. So in Dylan terms, maybe The Tempest is the last solo piece, but we then we’ll have the Rick Rubin series stretching through the next decade!


Entered at Sat Aug 4 01:44:09 CEST 2012 from (124.171.28.130)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Subject: Tempest

There's talk that Tempest is so named because it was Shakespeare's lasts album, and it's Dylan's way of saying this is his last album. As dylan has a reputation for doing exactly what's expected of him, there's no way this could be wrong, right?


Entered at Sat Aug 4 00:45:17 CEST 2012 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Dylan live

I saw Dylan also in 2006, in Seattle. And it was terrible. However I thought the band was good and they seemed to be giving it their all. That wasn't my first Dylan concert bust; there were 2 others in the 90's - and they sucked too. I like his studio voice very much and I'm sticking to his studio recordings only -


Entered at Sat Aug 4 00:15:00 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

… to clarify … I'm not suggesting Dylan should have a string section and horns … but when you're a band leader, like Dylan or McCartney, with an eye on the profit margin, there is an inclination to praise the virtues of a four piece band. Then you go and see someone with eight or nine … or more. The range and variety and textures are so much greater. Have you seen Leonard Cohen's band? And three wonderful backing vocalists make one hell of a difference on the choruses.


Entered at Sat Aug 4 00:06:09 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The ear of the beholder

The last time I saw Dylan was 2006 (which I didn't review because I couldn't think of anything positive to say at all), but I have many friends for whom Dylan can do no wrong, and who go every time he comes here. They all agree that his audience gets more male, a comment I see often. There are CDs on open sale of every show nowadays. The last one I bought was The Roundhouse 26th April 2009. Two friends with "trusted ears" were there and assured me it was the absolutely best show in years. The evidence of the CD to me is that it was so dire as to be near unlistenable. I mean listen to a live Tangled Up In Blue from 2009 and then listen to Blood on The Tracks.

However what's amazing is looking at online comments on shows. You get people saying a show was truly dire and people at the same show found it sublime.

I persist. I bought the Christmas album! I'll buy Tempest. I suspect I'll listen twice, get out Blonde on Blonde, John Wesley Harding, Desire and Street Legal and listen to them instead.

And "good for 71" really doesn't count. Leonard Cohen is seven years older. Paul Simon the same age. Both can still sing.

On bands, not only are Cohen and Simon's bands "better" they're also clearly "more expensive" not only because of numbers either, but they are larger ensembles. Paul Simon has the Graceland pair on bass and guitar. You can't get better than that. I think McCartney makes the same error … a perfectly serviceable band, but when you play the Queen's Jubillee in front of a global audience of millions, you should spend out on real string sections and horns, not a synth track.


Entered at Fri Aug 3 22:52:29 CEST 2012 from (68.198.167.170)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Dylan

Peter V, for years you have been saying you don't go to Bob Dylan concerts for various reasons. Off the top of my head I remember you saying Dylan can no longer sing or play, his band wasn't as good as Paul Simon's, the sound wasn't any good, you didn't like the venues, Dylan was greedy, you didn't want to stand, his best stuff was before 1979...etc. Therefore, I'm curious where you got the idea that Dylan's audience is becoming more male. The truth is Dylan's audience grows younger every year and is evenly mixed with males and females. At least the shows I've seen. Also, every critic who has heard the new Dylan record is raving about it. We all should be in such "decline" at 71.


Entered at Fri Aug 3 22:46:45 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Tempest

Of course I'll buy it (then moan his voice is shot). I'm reluctant to pre-order because when you do, on the Monday of release (here) there'll be a DeLuxe edition with four bonus tracks, or a DVD or even merely a nice card HMV slipcase at no extra price, and if it's the four tracks extra one you end up with both copies. I've been caught before. I'll wait till the day and go to a decent record store to check what versions there are.


Entered at Fri Aug 3 22:18:07 CEST 2012 from (184.66.178.72)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Tempest Dylan

With all this Springsteen talk, I want to say how much I am looking forward to Tempest/Dylan (not 'The Tempest') now that I have read first impressions from those who have heard it. The way it sounds, he can still 'write em'. Enough said. I've got mine on order.


Entered at Fri Aug 3 21:54:48 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: I Pity The Poor Immigrant …

None of it's new to Bruce … remember when the Reagan campaign thought "Born in the USA" was some kind of anti-immigrant patriotic diatribe?


Entered at Fri Aug 3 20:44:24 CEST 2012 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Fanny!! And that other one too!!

PV - I recall when John Simon was talking knowingly about the new Band and that the drunks would shout "Play the Weight, Play Chest Fever". I thought he hadn't really witnessed that because it was always Fanny to the masses I believe. And then that other 3-Dog Night song they play too -


Entered at Fri Aug 3 19:21:31 CEST 2012 from (108.54.247.103)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Bruce Fans

I really like Bruce.. I've seen him a couple of times, and he is always great. One thing that slightly disturbs me is Chris Christie, the very rotund governor of New Jersey, is a huge fan of Bruce's. I don't like Christie's politics and neither does Bruce, but I guess it goes to his vast appeal.


Entered at Fri Aug 3 17:59:51 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Fanny!!!

I guess another thing about Scandinavian audiences is you're less likely to get someone shouting out "Fanny!!!" (Band members) or "Radio!!!" (Van audiences) or whatever Springsteen audiences yell (it should not be the actual title of a song, so maybe "Runaway American Dream!!!) between each and every song accompanied by loud whistles. With Bruce though, they're more likely to actually get it. I never saw Van sing Caravan in 30 years of regular attendance, but someone yelled for it every time. Maybe he should follow Irma Thomas who said "They pay to get in, I'll sing what they ask for" in a recent interview.


Entered at Fri Aug 3 17:52:43 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Atlantic "City" has city in its name, too.


Entered at Fri Aug 3 17:37:29 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Bruce's favourite gig

PSB - certainly was Philly when I first seriously latched onto him which was at the time of The River album. Were you aware Jon Landau has caused riots amongst some of his diehards over here by citing Scandinavia [as PV alluded to] as the ultimate favourite venue for the band. His fans in Italy and Spain are not best pleased to find they're now second in the pecking order. Now if he'd only come just once to Penny Lane land I'm sure we'd change his mind for him.

:-0)

Jerry. Sure hope you can make it to see him. I read somewhere last night that there's Toronto tickets available just now. Might be worth a try. I've linked a Gothenberg video from the other night to whet your appetite.


Entered at Fri Aug 3 17:10:05 CEST 2012 from (72.78.42.57)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love

Subject: Christgau on Bruce

I guess things have changed. I thought it was you hadn't seen a Springsteen concert until you'd seen him in Philly the city that recognized him first.


Entered at Fri Aug 3 17:02:06 CEST 2012 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Web: My link

Subject: Americana Music Festival, Sept 12-15

The Americana Music Festival in Nashville, TN this September will feature tributes to Levon, with Amy, Teresa, Larry et al performing. See the link...


Entered at Fri Aug 3 14:44:51 CEST 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT and LvdB

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Springsteen

I have never seen Bruce Springsteen. I have tried but whenever I have managed to be in the same city where he is performing, tickets are sold out before I have a chance to get them. My experience has been the recordings, studio and live. I cannot agree more with your comments. He is getting better with age. The life and the power of the performance is awesome (I dislike the use of this word in today's world but it absolutely fits like a glove here). I will try to get there this time if I can. This band, led by a true leader of the pack, deserves all the accolades. I think Springsteen understands his art and what it means to his patrons and those who appreciate it. He delivers!


Entered at Fri Aug 3 12:03:49 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Edgy :-0)

Subject: The significance of the Christgau take on Bruce

There's been a few decent attempts recently that attempt to understand quite what is happening with the Springsteen phenomenon that has evolved into something unique over this summer across Europe. Christgau sort of gets it but the fact is nailing it with the written word is really an impossible objective in the face of what Springsteen has been laying down across this neck of the woods which has been extraordinary beyond mere words.

As you all may be aware from the obsession I've more than hinted at on here I've been following events as closely as you might expect from someone who is utterly captivated by the man.

I have to say if I had the money and freedom I would have spent the entire summer following Bruce around Europe. A fair number of his devotees have done just that. It seems from reading their perspective [which on the one hand is by definition balnced and imbalanced at the same time :-0)] the Madrid, Barcelona, Milan, Dublin, Gothenburg and Helsinki events topped a remarkable series of performances.

For my part I had merely two fixes each lasting around 3 and a half hour one of which [the manchester performance] appears to have come close to if not quite matching the ones I've listed.

As it is I've managed a modicum of compensation for the subsequent cold turkey I've felt by devouring all the reports of like minded devotees as they poured out their awe and wonder as each night's performance strove to top the one preceding it until he topped the lot with his astonishing 4 and a half hour marathon at Helsinki - the longest show he has ever given.

Quite what is taking place I'm not altogether sure but it will not surprise me if this tour does not go down in rock history alongside some that we on this GB have held dear to our hearts for so many years.

If I had to encapsulate what I have witnessed this time out and how and why it differs from the previous 30 or so Springsteen performances I have seen over the years I would say that faced now with his own mortality following the passing of so many of his closest friends the tour has evolved into Springsteen's very own an affirmation and testament of the pivotal place rock music occupies in the lives of so many ordinary souls.

Springsteen has always been true to such a purist ideal of the music he is consumed by yet this latest album which has expressed so emotionally the artist's revulsion at the evil that has taken place across the globe these past few years has been welded onto huge swathes of his back catalogue into a peerless live and living exposition of rock music at its most vital, its most current and and above all its most emotion wrenching.

My reason for posting all this is to implore anybody who cares for what is unquestionably a dying art form but perhaps feels they have already seen all it has to offer to catch what may well turn out to be its last stand as it returns to your American shores. You will be rejuvenated by what you experience. Of that I am certain. The man is unique and deserves an audience that matches his incredible spirit and devotion to the genre.

:-0)


Entered at Fri Aug 3 10:10:36 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: More Bruce

A further thought … younger audiences might be prompted by older English teachers. On round-ups of songs teachers like to use when teaching English as a Foreign Language, "The River" is consistently popular … it has been for twenty years too.


Entered at Fri Aug 3 09:47:08 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: NKOTB

Just for fun … link to my NKOTB review (and look at memory … five men became three earlier today)!


Entered at Fri Aug 3 09:40:19 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Reviewers, lyrics and concerts

I like Christgau’s pithy summaries a lot. I don’t think I’ve ever bought a record “because Christgau liked it” though. This is an important aspect of reviewers. Richard Williams in the early 70s led me to Link Wray, Little Feat, and many others. I’d buy if he gave a record five stars. His move into sports writing was rock’s greatest writing loss.

On the other hand, if Chris Welch liked it, I knew I probably wouldn’t. Welch’s style established more British rock cliché’s than any other writer. I blame him for the “failed to trouble the charts” cliché and many others. Andy Gill in the Independent was reliable but sometimes it was stuff I admired (Mercury Rev, Flaming Lips) rather than stuff I actually played often.

On the Springsteen concert in Denmark there are astute observations. I’ve heard many British musicians quote Scandinavia as their favoured place to play … they always add “and Holland” because to a foreigner, Denmark and Holland are very alike. The level of English is high, but because it’s a second language, people tend to check the lyrics, which leads to greater appreciation (as well as the ability to sing along). A disproportionate number of British musicians are married to Scandinavians, Dutch or German women.

When I was doing training courses for non-native speaker teachers of English, I used to use a section of the Live Aid broadcast on accents. They did a round up of British regions with a reporter saying a few words in every region of Britain + Ireland. Then they switched to Amsterdam. My question was “Which reporter spoke the clearest English?” Without exception, non-native teachers chose the Dutch reporter. Yes, he had a Dutch accent, but he was striving to be clear. Everyone else was striving to assert regional identity with strong local accents. This greater clarity in English works for Scandinavia too (check out Abba) and is why so many were singing along at the Springsteen concert. If you look up lyrics online, you often find yourself in cyber-Germany, cyber-Holland or cyber-Scandinavia. And here we are in cyber-Norway, which hadn't struck me when I started typing this paragraph.

The male-female balance is one I’ve often mentioned as critical to a good concert. He says 54% women … I don’t know if that came from ticket sales or counting the nearest 100 people … it’s not “just over 50%” but a precise 54%. Not 55. Not 53. You couldn’t do it from ticket sales … if I buy two tickets, you might guess from my name, but you won’t know about my companion. And at rock concerts just counting people could lead to error. It can be hard to tell. He may be bullshitting with fake accuracy.

But the best concerts are those with close to a balance. Try a Steve Vai concert … fecking dreadful rubbish, and way over 90% male. Lots of men? Screaming guitar solos and the long drum solo. Artists with a slight female balance have given the best “large” shows I’ve seen in recent years … Paul Simon, Fleetwood Mac, James Taylor, Jackson Browne. Bob Dylan is now getting way more males … and that wasn’t true in the mid-90s. I see it as a sign of his decline. k.d. lang had vastly more female, but was brilliant. There were only three males out of 20,000 when I saw NKOTB, and the other two were holding hands. That wasn’t brilliant, though my daughter loved it. BTW, that’s an example of “bullshit accuracy” reporting.


Entered at Fri Aug 3 02:31:31 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Edge Street

Edgy, that might be the first piece of christgau's writing that i actually enjoyed reading....I must admit, that many moon ago, he alienated me when i was but a wee 13, 14, 15 and 16 year old lad. His writing was far too pretentious, and I;ve barely managed to attempt to read him through the years. I made this exception in your honor. A good report on an important artist.I must add though, that i saw a recent photo of Bruce with a pile of earrings and too much jewelry etc, sorta off putting......Chrsitagu's mention of a theoretical pairing of Bruce and Questlove is a damn good idea..... I 've found The Roots interesting for a while (they manged to invigorate RR, and that is no small feat), and would like to work with them myself....I've got a few rap/hip hop/assorted genres combos type tunes put away.....


Entered at Fri Aug 3 02:30:05 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: Edge Street

Edgy, that might be the first piece of christgau's writing that i actually enjoyed reading....I must admit, that many moon ago, he alienated me when i was but a wee 13, 14, 15 and 16 year old lad. His writing was far too pretentious, and I;ve barely managed to attempt to read him through the years. I made this exception in your honor. A good report on an important artist.I must add though, that i saw a recent photo of Bruce with a pile of earrings and too much jewelry etc, sorta off putting......Chrsitagu's mention of a theoretical pairing of Bruce and Questlove is a damn good idea..... I 've found The Roots interesting for a while (they manged to invigorate RR, and that is no small feat), and would like to work with them myself....I've got a few rap/hip hop/assorted genres combos type tunes put away.....


Entered at Fri Aug 3 02:08:02 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Christgau's 'Damascus' moment

...or should i say his re-awakening

Singing Along With Bruce

A superstar has become a symbol, and his Danish fans know it

By Robert Christgau

"They say you've never really seen a Bruce Springsteen concert until you've seen one in Europe," proclaimed David Brooks in a deeply silly June 25 New York Times column long since dismantled by the bloggerati. But when I witnessed a European Springsteen concert myself a few weeks later, the show was so remarkable it occurred to me that maybe Brooks wasn't just jiving about what "they" say. So after I got home I asked around, and although a few knowledgeable old-timers had never heard such a thing, others agreed. Prominent among these were Miami Steve Van Zandt and Jon Landau, Springsteen's oldest bandmate and longtime manager, respectively.

Landau didn't mince words, emailing: "he simply is more popular both on records and live in Europe than he is in most of North America." Van Zandt was cagier, explaining to Rolling Stone's Andy Greene that European audiences participate where American audiences observe, and trend younger, especially on the summer festival circuit Springsteen favors: "I mean, we played to 90,000 16-year-olds the other night at Roskilde. It was amazing. I'm not exaggerating." Since it so happens Roskilde was where I saw Springsteen myself, I can attest that Van Zandt was exaggerating, slightly - about the 16-year-old part, not the amazing part. Roskilde estimates the Springsteen crowd at 85,000, topped in its 42-year history only by Prince's 90,000 in 2010. Festival ticket holders average 21 or 22, and the mean age of Springsteen's audience was further raised by the grownups who made most of the 5,000 day-pass buys and the misguided young saps who chose Bon Iver two hours into Springsteen's three-hour set.

To someone peering into Roskilde's controlled-access pit from the stage, maybe everybody looked 16. But not much of any crowd of 85,000 enjoys pit proximity - most festivalgoers depend on the Jumbotron, which at Roskilde was so well-edited that video-to-audio delay was imperceptible and stage business always accounted for, and the sound system, which provided clarity if not presence a soccer field away. Having sidled in at middle depth two songs late and then edged forward for an hour, I got a close look at sizable swaths of crowd, dominated by attentive fans in the 28-to-42 range. It was in part to be with such fans that I kept advancing. Further back, the younger onlookers were often what the Brits call liggers, casuals given to jabbering through the music - music that, as I had failed to anticipate, was very nearly transcendent.

I was one of Springsteen's earliest critical enthusiasts, and I've never stopped admiring him [Al Edge disagreement on this - Christgau clearly did stop admiring Bruce as is evident fom his writings of the last 25 years - but no problem - it's never too late]. But I haven't been a full-bore fan since the late '80s, and had only seen him once as my enthusiasm waned: in 2000, at Madison Square Garden, where the woman next to me groused about a bottleneck-blues rendition of "Born in the U.S.A." and 10,000 thick-waisted nostalgia victims boogied clumsily to funkless show drummer Max Weinberg. So although I was glad to see Springsteen again and considered his 2012 album, "Wrecking Ball," his best since "Tunnel of Love" if not "Born in the U.S.A.," I wasn't especially psyched - which is sometimes best, isn't it?

You don't need me to tell you how dedicated Springsteen remains to his music, his fans and the vitality of his performances - nor, I hope, that he's sometimes sententious and always mortal. If you do, please go find "We Are Alive," the just-published Springsteen profile by another outsider named David, New Yorker editor David Remnick, which only magnifies Springsteen's heroism by squarely addressing his imperfections, including many that haters harp on and a few that are seldom discussed. Clearly the Wrecking Ball Tour represents a revitalization if not a new peak for him. Remnick believes he's rising to the challenge of an onrush of deaths and life crises, especially but far from solely the loss of saxophone colossus Clarence Clemons, who at Roskilde was honored in a long video montage. But Remnick acknowledges that the righteous anger Springsteen unleashes in "Wrecking Ball" may contribute too, and that's how it felt to me.

Bruce Springsteen didn't attract 85,000 celebrants to a temporary campground 20 miles from Copenhagen because his politics are more redolent of Scandinavian capitalism than of the dog-eat-dog monstrosity Americans are stuck with. He attracted them because he isn't merely a superstar, he's a symbol - not of America, but of an American music that changed world culture. By dint of integrity and longevity, he's transmuted himself into the embodiment and reigning master of a rock 'n' roll now in its late maturity. How could it be, Brooks asked in feigned bewilderment, that massed European youths could shout out "Born in the U.S.A." when they were so manifestly born somewhere else? The main answer - duh - is that those are the six catchiest notes one of the world's greatest songwriters has ever put back-to-back.

There are subsidiary answers, however. The 26-song Roskilde set began unrepentant with the chestnuts "No Surrender" and "Badlands," embellished the subcanonical "Two Hearts" with a Bruce-and-Steve take on Marvin Gaye and Kim Weston's "It Takes Two," and then switched gears into three bitter new songs: the sarcastic "We Take Care of Our Own," the defiant "Wrecking Ball" and the Gaelic threnody "Death to My Hometown," which explicitly blames bankers for the deindustrialization Brooks pretends is as natural a fact as the disintegration of the union movement he finds so bothersome. Still pretty far back, I watched the 20-something woman in front of me first listen hard and then start to mouth choruses, especially the one that went "Death to my hometown." She knew which U.S.A. Bruce Springsteen thought he was born in.

By walking in on "Two Hearts" I missed only two songs of a set whose force and clarity bowled me over with my mind intact. By the time Springsteen's Marvin & Kim tribute with Little Steven was over, I'd realized that he was projecting joy where Jack White gave off mere ego, and somewhere into the three bitter "Wrecking Ball" songs that followed I was a convert all over again. Having seen Springsteen many times when he was young and brimming over, I'm here to testify that the 62-year-old's performance was just as inspired. I still wish that when the Roots were called out for "The E Street Shuffle" ?uestlove Thompson had been ceded Max Weinberg's chair. But between the depth of Springsteen's songbook and the depth of his commitment, my attention didn't wander for a second, and Weinberg's ineluctable pounding helped. As befits Bruce s most compelling album in decades, anger and disillusionment were never far away even as he provided the celebration the crowd had paid for. Positive and negative were fused, and fans seemed to know it even when he climaxed with the anthems they craved, "Born in the U.S.A." to "Born to Run" to "Glory Days" to "Dancing in the Dark."

The most memorable of these fans was a woman in her 30s who knew the words. Like most of the women at Springsteen's show, she was with a man. But that's not usually how Roskilde worked. When I looked over the stats back home, an odd one stuck out: 54 percent of attendees were female, 46 percent male. Anyone who frequents rock shows in America will think that can't be -- except with someone like Merrill Garbus, guys always outnumber gals at rock shows. Well, not at Roskilde. All weekend I was moved and invigorated by the female posses roaming the grounds and making themselves felt as groups at every concert except the hip-hop showcases and presumably the metal sets I avoided. They were the ones who visibly cared about the lyrics and had a bead on the beats, and seldom did they forget where their elbows ended and the old man next to them began. Even the guys were less territorial than in the States -- Danes are polite. Nor do I believe for a minute that Scandinavia has conquered sexism. But it appears to have made some progress, thus benefitting everyone -- cf. health care.

As the material lightened again - "Spirit in the Night," "E Street Shuffle" - and then darkened again, my brain was engaged with scarcely a stray thought by a vast songbook I hadn't been paying enough mind of late. Springsteen played seven grim selections from the new album, but plenty of upful stuff as well, including a "Twist and Shout" repeated until the dot of midnight, when he vacated the stage so Danish heroes Mew could prep their 1:30 show. Between the new ancestors-as-ghosts song "We Are Alive" and "Twist and Shout" came five straight sing-along anthems, climaxing with the Clarence-dedicated "Tenth Avenue Freeze-Out" and preceded by "Born in the U.S.A.," "Born to Run," "Glory Days" and "Dancing in the Dark."

I ended up occupying one spot for an hour as the crowd pushed tighter. Once again a woman stood in front of me, a little older this time. Often at Roskilde, it was women who seemed to care about lyrics, and this one didn't just croon the choruses. "Born to Run"? "A runaway American dream." The supposed potboiler "Dancing in the Dark"? "I ain't nothing but tired, I'm just tired and bored with myself." "Born in the U.S.A.," I swear? "I had a brother in Khe Sanh/Fighting off the Viet Cong." So what I took away from my particular European audience is this. One problem with that Madison Square Garden audience was that it felt smug - aware of Springsteen's complications, but certain that he'd sweep all troubling thoughts away.

The Roskilde fans weren't born in the U.S.A. But they never forgot how contradictory it is, and they loved Bruce Springsteen more for remembering that too. So do I.


Entered at Thu Aug 2 20:41:46 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Taxi Driver Redux

Lately it's been hard to avoid seeing the latest i-phone television commercial in which Martin Scorsese is once again a passenger in a taxi cab in Manhatten. This time round, instead of giving instructions to driver Travis Bickle, Mr. Scorsese engages with Siri the annoying voice generated phone assistant. Are you talking to me, Siri?


Entered at Thu Aug 2 20:36:30 CEST 2012 from (70.28.32.74)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

Great picture of Garth on the front of the site.


Entered at Thu Aug 2 19:52:32 CEST 2012 from (108.54.247.103)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Garth

Birthday wishes to Garth,


Entered at Thu Aug 2 19:39:04 CEST 2012 from (70.28.32.74)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

Thank you David. It was also fun seeing other scenes of her from other films.


Entered at Thu Aug 2 18:34:42 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: When Rodney Met Sally

Landmark: Here's the link to the scene where Sally Kellerman recites the last lines of Molly Bloom's soliloquy. You have to scroll down to the 16th picture frame and click on the one with the Back To School -- Hot for Teacher title.


Entered at Thu Aug 2 17:21:19 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: By the shores of Gitche Gumee

David P: Starting Ulysses at the end is the most intelligent thing to do, short of not starting it at all. Marilyn was clearly no dunce.


Entered at Thu Aug 2 17:18:36 CEST 2012 from (70.28.32.74)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

David, the only line I recall is "Shakespeare for everyone!". Mind you, as I think back, I am remembering the exchange with Sam Kinison when he is goading Rodney Dangerfield about the Korean war. Wait! Now I remember Rodney Dangerfield sticking the palms of his hands under his armpits to make fart noises while on the diving board. And Burt Young crushing the napkin dispenser.

Ahhh, he was better in Caddyshack.


Entered at Thu Aug 2 15:50:54 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: ...yes I said yes I will Yes.

In that photograph of Marilyn Monroe reading James Joyce's "Ulysses", it should be noted that she is reading at the end of the book. One could speculate that she was taking in Molly Bloom's soliloquy and imagine her years later delivering those lines with breathless intensity at Lee Strasberg's Actors Studio. Film buffs may recall the scene in "Back to School" when Sally Kellerman brought those lines from Joyce to life for Rodney Dangerfield and later helped him with Longfellow :-).


Entered at Thu Aug 2 14:32:05 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: While Donovan's "Cecilia Of The Seals" would be perfect for Bardot, my guess is that, considering the international bevy that her husband has invited, Mrs Dunc will be serving up bagpipes - both in the form of haggis on the plate and in the form some of the fiercer highland fighting songs over the stereo. You didn't mention her, but you are counting on her being there, aren't you Dunc?


Entered at Thu Aug 2 13:44:51 CEST 2012 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

mike h

Happy b'day to Garth!


Entered at Thu Aug 2 13:44:41 CEST 2012 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Birthdays

Thinking of Jerry Garcia on what would have been his 70th birthday yesterday and of Garth Hudson on his 75th birthday today.


Entered at Thu Aug 2 09:07:16 CEST 2012 from (75.34.49.213)

Posted by:

Adam

A very happy birthday to Garth Hudson!


Entered at Thu Aug 2 04:23:15 CEST 2012 from (110.84.207.69)

Posted by:

http://www.nikejerseyschina.com/

Location: fozhou
Web: My link

Subject: authentic nfl jerseys

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Entered at Thu Aug 2 02:25:31 CEST 2012 from (173.33.77.84)

Posted by:

Serenity

Web: My link

Subject: Jerry Garcia poem by David Crosby

A nice tribute to Jerry from David Crosby.

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxo


Entered at Thu Aug 2 00:10:35 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

Subject: Menu

Will give this serious thought, but I always hated cigars, and almost never drink spirits, well, maybe a, gin martini about three times a year. Maybe music in the background should figure.


Entered at Wed Aug 1 22:20:15 CEST 2012 from (70.28.32.74)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

Great story Peter M.

Peter V. While I earlier submitted my list on who I'd like as dinner guests, dare we try and plan appropriate menus for a 4 course meal including wines, cigars, and digestifs? It may seem like overkill now but it may get us through a rather slow news day, later on.


Entered at Wed Aug 1 22:05:49 CEST 2012 from (184.66.178.72)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: IQs

A quick perusal of the (mis)information present on the internet at various sites notes that BOTH women had IQs in the 160s.


Entered at Wed Aug 1 21:57:24 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

If the Daily Excresence said it, I'd assume it's wrong. The article was accompanied with a pic of Marilyn Monroe reading Ulysses. If you're THAT clever you wouldn't bother.


Entered at Wed Aug 1 21:27:37 CEST 2012 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: what big brains you have

Peter V: the _Daily Excres_ got it wrong -- it was Jayne Mansfield who claimed the 163 IQ.

Still interested?


Entered at Wed Aug 1 20:55:17 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Seven women on my mind …

Six women is a good call, though I suspect as the lone male, one might get excluded fairly quickly. As pointed out, if Jane Birkin and Brigitte Bardot are there, DO NOT PLAY JE T'AIME … MOIS NON PLUS. Brigitte did the original, begged Serge not to release it. Having asked Marianne Faithful and others to record it instead, he settled on Jane Birkin.

But if the reincarnation allowed bit is there, I'd like to add Marilyn Monroe. I was out today and the only newspaper in the café for breakfast was the Daily Excess (Express) and I read that Marilyn tested on IQ tests at a whopping genius plus 163. That would be intimidating for me, but she clearly had well-honed techniques for not letting men get over-awed by her intellect. Well, unless they were Arthur Miller.


Entered at Wed Aug 1 20:15:40 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: A Whiter Shade of Accordion

Link to video of Garth's old friend Jo-El Sonnier taking the accordion in new directions.


Entered at Wed Aug 1 19:54:57 CEST 2012 from (83.249.106.36)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Subject: Dunc, NO!

Brigitte and Jane at the same dinner table.


Entered at Wed Aug 1 19:38:24 CEST 2012 from (76.111.161.75)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Subject: Ma 'Tite Fille

Landmark, I have some personal experience from 25+ years ago of "Ma 'Tite Fille" by Buckwheat being an excellent song to keep the beat while performing CPR. Used to work with a cardiologist who would call out, "Gimme some 'Hot Tamale Baby'... now take it down to 'Pine Top Boogie Woogie'... now make it 'Tite Fille'!". Other members of the crash team would look at her like she was out of her mind. When she was happy with the rhythm, she'd call out "Yeah you right!". This was in a hospital setting and I saw quite a few saves using this technique. Funny thing is, when I'd mention this to zydeco musicians, (including Buckwheat's band") almost NONE of them wanted to hear about "the song that brings back the dead".


Entered at Wed Aug 1 18:28:46 CEST 2012 from (86.90.41.140)

Posted by:

Eric van Dorland

Location: The Netherlands

Subject: question about songs played pre-show at "The Wall" in Berlin July 21st 1990

Dear Band fans, I'd like to pick your brain and call upon your extensive knowledge. I was at Roger Waters 'The Wall' gig, 22 tears ago, July 21st 1990 in Berlin. I clearly remember that Levon, Garth and Rick (and perhaps someone else?) played a couple of tunes in the afternoon, before the show started. So did the Hooters and The Chieftains. I am not able to find any information about the pre-show performances, and would very much like to know which songs were played. I know it's been over twenty years, but I'm hoping someone has a recollection or documentation of some sort.... Cheers, Eric


Entered at Wed Aug 1 17:35:30 CEST 2012 from (83.249.106.36)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Charlie Young's link

Good to see ol' CHARLIE in gb once again, even if a "French visite". Thanks for the link.


Entered at Wed Aug 1 11:32:37 CEST 2012 from (96.20.158.81)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

These days I have rediscovered Buckwheat Zydeco, whom I was lucky to have seen at a free open air concert at the Jazz Festival a few years back. As well, "Ma 'Tite Fille" is a rousing enough tune for the treadmill.


Entered at Wed Aug 1 09:47:11 CEST 2012 from (109.151.55.50)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Accordion

tThanks John D and Adam.

Store sounds great Bill M.

Followed up all accordion leads on You tube. Thanks.

At weekend bought Eric Bibb's Louisiana album. I noticed he met the Louisiana musician at a Transatlantic session in Scotland. Great musicianship.

Bought a Transatlantic sessions album - some GB regulars on it Emmylou, McGarrigles. So accordion playing in the collection increased.

Behind on lists. Six ideal dinner guests - Bridget Bardot, Claudia Cardinale, Joan Collins, Michelle Pfieffer, Jane Birkin and Sophia Loren. Notice the international look to the list.


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