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Levon Helm: Ramble at the Ryman

The Band: Three of a Kind

Robbie Robertson: How to Become Clairvoyant

Garth Hudson Presents a Canadian Celebration of The Band

Levon Helm: Electric Dirt

Garth and Maud Hudson: Live at the Wolf

Pulse

Dirt Farmer

Elliot Landy's Woodstock Vision

The Band Guestbook, July 2013


Entered at Wed Jul 31 19:55:05 CEST 2013 from (80.3.71.222)

Posted by:

Ian Woodward

Web: My link

Subject: You Are What You Eat

I was looking something up on-line and one thing moved to another and so on (you know easy it is to get sucked into this sort of thing) and I came upon this.

http://blog.wfmu.org/freeform/2007/04/you_are_what_yo.html

If you haven't seen it before, you might be interested to read it.


Entered at Wed Jul 31 19:20:29 CEST 2013 from (80.3.71.222)

Posted by:

Ian Woodward

Subject: UNCUT and the 1969 Isle of Wight concert

The latest UNCUT (September 2013 masthead date but out today) has a preview of Dylan's ANOTHER SELF PORTRAIT. I haven't read the whole article but someone sent me some scans. There is largish sidebar about the recording of the Isle of Wight in which it says, for example, that Levon's vocal contribution to the chorus of "Highway 61 Revisited" seems to have been picked up on overhead mikes and that Levon must really have been shouting the words out. I have paraphrased the piece but that's the sense of it.

I wonder if there could ever be an official release of The Band's set from the Isle of Wight Festival. Couldn't that be a bonus disc in some release or other?


Entered at Wed Jul 31 18:46:43 CEST 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Remote Recording

A remote truck was also used for recording at Woodstock in 1969. It was located behind the stage. Eddie Kramer and Lee Osborne engineered the recording using two 8-track recorders synched together. The multi-track tapes were later mixed at Atlantic under the supervision of Eric Blackstead. And we've yet to get a proper release of The Band's full set at Woodstock.

Years later Elliot Mazer helped engineer the recording of The Last Waltz, where a Wally Heider remote truck was used (see link).


Entered at Wed Jul 31 18:07:42 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Actually the "no cell phones" is wrong. We had two-way radio contact between lights at the back of the hall and the stage back in 1967. I'm sure they would have had that … and with no radio mics or radio jacks, there was nothing to interfere with. Mind you, the speakers might have picked it up. We used to have a flat (apartment) near a taxi rank, and sometimes a voice would come through the speakers right in the middle of listening to a record.


Entered at Wed Jul 31 18:03:08 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: IOW Recording

What Berkowitz said about the remote truck:

QUOTE: There are no cell phones. Basically you've got a couple of guys stuck in a truck, hundreds of yards away from the stage. It had to have been madness. They had to have been awake for three days straight, and they're recording with no tangible connection to the stage or the board or what's going on. You know: how many people are playing, where are the mics, who else is set up at the same time, what time do they play, how long do they play for, are they going to move around, when is the guitar solo coming? It's a true testament to Glyn Johns and Elliot Mazer, who did the original recordings, that they got it all. UNQUOTE

Into track four of "Saved" as I write. It's just irritating me. Back to Peter Bellamy in a minute, I think on the reissued CD set of The Young Tradition. Bob, who knew him well, would approve, I think.


Entered at Wed Jul 31 17:50:46 CEST 2013 from (70.31.48.71)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Some people have an epiphany and they keep them to themselves or to a small circle of friends and families…..it could be a conversion to a vegan lifestyle or beauty of Buddhism….artists, on the other hand, with record or book deals have a platform and an incentive to just churn out product so sometimes lifestyles are written about and recorded – often before they are fully formed or have had time to settle………..I loved Slow Train Coming and sat out the next two……….By the time Infidels was released, Bob had clearly sorted out whatever it was that he felt needed airing……………..”Every Grain of Sand” came out of Shot Of Love and I believe Bob met his wife Carolyn Dennis as well………….John Lennon’s little arc with the Maharishi that started with tipsy wonder and turned to so quickly to disillusionment is another case in point……………


Entered at Wed Jul 31 17:41:56 CEST 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Isle of Wight

As I mentioned last week, Glyn Johns and Elliot Mazer recorded Dylan and The Band at the Isle of Wight in 1969. They would have been in the remote truck that Peter mentioned. Mr. Mazer had previously worked with Albert Grossman and The Band, and had helped John Simon record Janis Joplin's "Cheap Thrills" album in 1968. It was through his work at the Isle of Wight that later led to Glyn Johns being brought in to help mix "Stage Fright."


Entered at Wed Jul 31 17:28:19 CEST 2013 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Saved

Lyrics are IMHO,another example of Dylan's contrarian nature.Messing with people's religious heads must be thrilling to Bob.And,I agree,the lyrics are simply ridiculous and therefore quite funny.The music,however,is superb.


Entered at Wed Jul 31 17:22:57 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

On "Saved" I find the lyrics so deeply offensive and dumb, that I can't get past them. I have tried.


Entered at Wed Jul 31 16:00:55 CEST 2013 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: On the precipice again

Can two or three songs give an album some credibility? I'm taking a chance here. I might be skewered, but, so be it. It won't be the first time or the last. If you re-examine the songs on 'Saved" there are contributions there that are fine songs. If the subject matter were slightly altered, I believe (appropriate for this comment) that what we have here is a more than acceptable album. Reviled by some, I don't feel strongly that this is a bad album as I listen to it again. I too was taken aback significantly when this album came out but it was the degree that affected me. I noted in the past that I passed on Massey Hall 1980 April when Dylan did one of his truly great shows in my view. I understand that subject matter affects perceptions and can cloud appreciation. I suffered from that affliction as I had done in the past regarding other performers. I'm over it now. There are many Dylan albums that I would choose ahead of 'Saved' but Dylan's least effective efforts are better than much of what has been released. 'Saved' does not deserve to be pilloried. "In The Garden" and "Covenant Woman" alone save it from oblivion. I listen to the melodies, listen to the performance and the fervour, and in this case, don't get overly excited about the lyrics. Now that is a different approach for Dylan material (lyrics usually first to be thoroughly digested).


Entered at Wed Jul 31 16:00:43 CEST 2013 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Subject: Re: The Mountain

Thanks for that, Mark! Great to know. It's truly one of my favorites.


Entered at Wed Jul 31 14:20:52 CEST 2013 from (24.39.33.90)

Posted by:

Mark

Location: Maine

Subject: The Mountain

Without access to our notes and setlists to confirm how many times, I do remember The Mountain being played and sung by Levon at The Ramble. If my memory serves me well, it would have been in 2006 and 2007 as Levon was starting to get his voice back, and the LHB were trying out new songs and styles as Levon got stronger. I believe it was played during the "acoustic" portion of the show when Levon come out from behind the drums and play mandolin and guitar at center stage.


Entered at Wed Jul 31 13:38:59 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Another Self Portrait

UNCUT follows up its issue on The Band with a focus on "Another Self Portrait" interviewing Al Kooper, Charlie McCoy and Steve Berkowitz. Berkowotz describes unearthing the 8 track Isle of Wight master recorded hundreds of yards away in a van by guys who couldn't see the stage.

QUOTE: "(In Highway 61) it sounds pretty clear that there are only overhead microphones over Levon Helm. And Levon sounds like he's having a pretty good time: he's hollering along with Bob, and you can really hear him - and I don't think he even had a vocal mic at the time. I think it's just these overheads picking him up, because he's singing it, screaming it out so loud. It has fantastic life to it, so any distortion or bleeding makes no difference, because these guys are just rocking." END QUOTE.

Just a short quote. you will need to get the magazine. I can't wait to hear it. He also says the LP release is mastered in 1971 analogue style, the CDs digitally. He says the vinyl release will sound of its time.

So we need the full box set. In both CD and vinyl versions.


Entered at Wed Jul 31 11:33:15 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I remember well the intensity of the ire that “Bringing It All Back Home” raised at the folk club. I loved it, though he was being so very careful to split the electric and acoustic sides. But an album that included Mr Tambourine Man, She Belongs To Me and It’s All Over, Now Baby Blue? Let alone It’s Alright Ma and Gates of Eden? I can’t say Outlaw Blues or On The Road Again would make a Bob Dylan Top 200 though. So you were wrong about Bringing It All Back Home. I was right about Saved and have never recovered my earlier feeling that if Dylan did it, it must be good.


Entered at Wed Jul 31 10:46:16 CEST 2013 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Dylan (Jed)

First Dylan album I "hated" was Bringing It All Back Home. I'm happy to beat Peter V and his Saved with several decades.


Entered at Wed Jul 31 10:41:46 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Running order

I wondered about changed running orders. I discussed this with a musician friend about something else years ago. He explained that when you sequenced an album in the old days when people listened through an LP side, as well as dynamics and mood, there are subtle things like the key a song is in and how well it connects to the next song. In live shows that doesn't matter, because there are usually a few seconds of tuning up, switching instruments etc that break it up. However, when you come to assemble a live album you usually cut all that stuff out, so you're back to a short gap between tracks, or even making it sound straight in. So then that might come back into play when sequencing. Also you might listen to the tapes and think "Why did we do that then?" We should have done it later / earlier / after that song. And of course it can be changed.

However, in the CD era, I'm not sure how worried anyone would be as tracks are increasingly selected and skipped.


Entered at Wed Jul 31 05:49:22 CEST 2013 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Old Habits

Thank you for your comment Roger. We all got to keep on as best we can.

Joan, your a sweet heart. I'm sure I'd like to meet you to give you a hug.

Mike! .....gawd damn it.. Susan signs! the pay checks around here, and I guarantee you.....hers is bigger than mine:):):)


Entered at Wed Jul 31 05:26:44 CEST 2013 from (208.120.36.230)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Sebastian, just curious re the Live at the Academy set. What is the thinking behind reordering the original Rock of Ages tracks on the first two discs? Is the new order more faithful to how they were actually played? (It's strange to think that the set no longer begins with Don't Do It, for instance...) Thanks for any insight.

Kevin, "absolutely" re the Dylan show, just need to write up my thoughts. Stay tuned. :)


Entered at Wed Jul 31 05:01:30 CEST 2013 from (99.141.55.146)

Posted by:

Adam

Sebastian -

Thank you so much for your work on "Live At The Academy Of Music 1971". Please thank your dad for taking an active role in producing quality Band archival releases!

Also, a question I must ask. You stated that more video footage existed, but that the corresponding music reels have been lost. Since all four shows were recorded on multi track audio, couldn't a specific track be synched to the corresponding silent film? I assumed that's what was done with "Don't Do It" from A Musical History.

Thank you once again! I can't wait to buy the deluxe set.


Entered at Wed Jul 31 04:26:23 CEST 2013 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Let's Be Clear...

In the majority of cases, when a performer releases and album of new music, that performer will often highlight a number of the songs from that album. But when Bob Dylan releases an album and has had 3 others in the past 10 or so years, people get upset because not enough 'greatest hits' are played. People get upset when the songs get reworked. People get upset because the performer fails to acknowledge the audience with empty banter. (Kevin, absolutely right on). Let's be clear. Bob Dylan can present whatever songs he wishes in a concert. That LARS hasn't appeared of late is a choice he makes. That 'The Weight' and Suzy Baby shows, that Warren Zevon is remembered, that the 1952 Black Vincent is covered, that Blind Willie McTell gets an outing periodically, that Visions is beautifully performed (in Toronto)... that is all the magic of Dylan. I suggest a broader view of Bob Dylan. Perspective is the key. This is not Bob Dylan's greatest hits. Those who want that should stay home. Those who want to hear a creative man doing what he does in 2013 (reworking, blues-rock, the state of the older man in a world where youth presides, and so much more) and are willing to 'take a chance' that something special will happen, as it so often does, will keep coming. That's how 100 shows a year happen, folks. Its not an accident.


Entered at Wed Jul 31 01:57:03 CEST 2013 from (24.114.27.233)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Jed

.......and let us not forget "The Hat" at TLW.


Entered at Wed Jul 31 01:50:28 CEST 2013 from (24.114.27.233)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: On the subject of Bob......

Jon........How did you like the show? I know you were hoping for The Weight but wondering what your impressions were.


Entered at Wed Jul 31 01:19:41 CEST 2013 from (208.120.36.230)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Subject: Re: Levon Top 10

Agree with Ben, The Mountain is an incredible song! I was surprised that one never (as far as I know...?) got a live airing from Levon at the Rambles. (Unless I'm mistaken, it was played a single time at a Ramble but songwriter Steve Earle took the vocal.)

I was noodling around with a Levon Top 10 a little bit. Honestly, I find his recent run of albums so satisfying that I rarely revisit his 70s work. If you take his Band songs out of contention, a Top 10 from me is going to come almost exclusively from Dirt Farmer and Electric Dirt.


Entered at Wed Jul 31 01:04:33 CEST 2013 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: To tempest or not to tempest

Sorry,I left one recent criticism out-when Tempest was released there was a lot of moaning that only one or two songs were played from the album.Now that he plays songs from Tempest he's accused of playing too many new songs from Tempest.Geez,if I was Bob,paying attention to all these critics my head would swivel around till it exploded.LOL.


Entered at Wed Jul 31 00:56:19 CEST 2013 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Dylan

Dylan was criticized(& in no particular order) for going electric,self portrait,the gospel tour,not playing his hits,playing too many of his hits,not talking to the audience,mumbling,changing his singing voice at various times over the past 50 years,compromising his values(those we assume he has) in China,Renaldo and Clara,Masked and Anonymous,Chronicles,for not writing Chronicles 2,his religious choices,his political choices,his drug or alcohol use or lack of it,his choice of instrument,and my personal all time favorite -his voice.Obviously,I'm leaving out a lot more,what amounts to,a long career of critics and angry fans bitching about everything he's done.The irony of all this is his critics are relentless because they hold him in such high esteem.I've loved it all-even the Christmas album-it truly sucked-and that was its beauty.Bob is so significant we keep hearing these critics over and over and over again-they care deeply and like every generation of Dylan's critics they are pissed or accepting that Bob will not do it their way,my way,our way-only his way.To this day I find Bob's contrarian nature(no sing alongs gonna happen here!) entertaining and amusing,all part of the Bob package.


Entered at Wed Jul 31 00:49:40 CEST 2013 from (72.82.163.186)

Posted by:

Ben

Peter, I added my comments to the toppermost site. The Levon album that I've listened to the most is "Dirt Farmer" as I have a burned copy in the 6 disc cd changer in my car. It's a remarkable album that can stand right next to the Band's first 3 albums. I remember the first time I listened, I was stopped in my tracks by "The Mountain". Levon's vocal on that track just ripped through me.

I really hope that "The Midnight Ramble vol. 3" will see the light of day sometime in the near future.


Entered at Wed Jul 31 00:36:26 CEST 2013 from (70.31.48.71)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Worth it for some....

To add to what JT has noted.....I saw Bob Dylan back to back Toronto and Montreal in November 2012……..almost ½ the show was changed one night to the next and both were great…not many performers offer that and his presentations of “You Ain’t Goin Nowhere” and “Visions of Johanna” in Toronto were beautiful……..The “never ending tour” has been running for OVER 25 YEARS now and yet you still have people constantly saying how disappointed they are and how they will never go back. Granted, there have been some very rough patches – namely his admitted ( used to be a pre-recorded announcement over the PA that opened the shows ) “fog” years 89-92 if memory serves ( ending just after that 40 year in show-biz debacle ) and some very poor choices of venues along the way…….but all in all a beautiful ride and those who stand up in pubs telling the world that they will never go back……..fine…they may well have been burned along the way…but more than likely they never really wanted anything other than “greatest hits Bob” and someone to go home with muttering “Oh how nice it was to have him say a few words”……..At Toronto in 2007 I think it was…..ACC show with Foo Fighters opening……Bob talked about remembering Toronto and spending time with a band called “The Hawks”….nice touch and all but not nearly as good a show as last year where he said nothing as usual. This is something that has never bothered me as I cannot stand having performers at a rock show talk to the crowd……….”How are you feeling Cleveland?” “I am fine but I can tell you for sure that the guy next to me NEVER HAS BEEN!”


Entered at Tue Jul 30 23:56:16 CEST 2013 from (96.54.178.226)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Worth it

Peter: I don't deny anyone their right to decide not to go to hear a performer anymore if it is no longer to their taste to see that performer because of what their recent experiences have been. My point was directed more at the reviewers (professionals) but it could apply to others as well. I don't want to repeat myself but I will. It is a privilege for those of us to go and hear Dylan, even if disappointment is the end result. I agree that with Suzy Baby and The Weight, it was not. These were excellent. There are many other excellent performances by Dylan. I saw him twice in 6 weeks in later 2012 and was less enthralled in Vancouver and delighted in Toronto. The reasons could have been many, including the sound system. I agree that Leonard Cohen is 'on his game' and wonderful almost every time out and those kinds of reviews have not occurred for Leonard Cohen. I read comments by those at Dylan shows who say diametrically opposite things about the shows to what some reviewers have said. So, at the end of it all, despite any objections, I am happy to go and hear Bob Dylan any time and if I suffer disappointment, so be it. He has earned that commitment in my view.


Entered at Tue Jul 30 23:54:40 CEST 2013 from (70.31.48.71)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: jh - Updates.......Thank You.

A bit like Christmas Morning with these gifts of updates.......do check out the Stephen Lewis update/article on Richard Manuel called "Life is Brief"......very nicely done.


Entered at Tue Jul 30 23:18:45 CEST 2013 from (85.255.44.134)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Subject: Finally...

...some updates of this site!


Entered at Tue Jul 30 22:48:57 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Region codes

Interesting. Possible … but the default setting for music DVDs / DVD-Audio is "Region 0" … that is, not region encoded. The smaller demographic means most avoid region coding, as I do with the DVDs I publish.


Entered at Tue Jul 30 22:39:09 CEST 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Peter V: Could it be that the region code for the DVD is complicating a UK release?


Entered at Tue Jul 30 19:39:53 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

BTW, amazon.co.uk has the picture with "IMPORT details to be announced" so not lined up for a UK release yet. For British readers, SPIN in Newcastle who always stock any Band connected releases are already advertising it.

SIMONE FELICE … the current band has an Australian and a guy from Woodstock. He seems to do Britain, Ireland, The Nerherlands, Australia … though one show was advertised in California last year. You need to get him to Canada. He lives near Woodstock, so not that hard a trip.


Entered at Tue Jul 30 19:36:39 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Live at the Academy

Thanks too, Sebastian. I'm guessing the 5.1 is DVD Audio like TLW and MFBP? Or is it SACD? I assume the first because more systems support it. There was another 5.1 system advertised recently … I have a feeling that was Blu Ray 5.1.

I can play either … just interested.


Entered at Tue Jul 30 19:33:31 CEST 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Dylan: From A Buick 6 Revisted 48 years later...

Forty-eight years ago yesterday Dylan recorded "Tombstone Blues", "It Takes A Lot To Laugh, It Takes A Train To Cry" and "Positively 4th Street." A day later he recorded "From A Buick 6." In honor of today's anniversary, link above to an alternate version of the latter song, which appeared on the first stereo pressings of the "Highway 61 Revisited" LP.


Entered at Tue Jul 30 19:20:26 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Sebastian

Thank you Sebastian.


Entered at Tue Jul 30 19:16:12 CEST 2013 from (74.108.29.147)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Norm

I would expect nothing less from Susan, After all she is a strong woman, She would have to be to put up with then likes of you, :-) Time to spend more time on Rockin Chair


Entered at Tue Jul 30 19:15:50 CEST 2013 from (98.149.168.95)

Posted by:

Sebastian

Disc 5 has 2 never before seen videos from the concert. They had more video footage BUT the music reels that accompanied that footage has been lost. The rest is 5.1 surround sound mixes which if you have the sound system for are really cool.


Entered at Tue Jul 30 19:14:34 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Simone Felice

Peter, it seems he is in England all the time. He was supposed to come here; but cancelled.


Entered at Tue Jul 30 18:58:19 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Forever Young?

I couldn’t agree more on Dylan being the greatest contributor to popular culture of the 20th century in popular music. That’s taken as written. On Saturday though, we were waiting half an hour in the pub downstairs for Simone Felice to start, and we assembled a group of about seven or eight talking about past concert experiences. One person (not me) said “But I’d never go to see Dylan again” and got unanimous agreement. So a lot of people, all of whom have seen Dylan several times, feel it’s no longer worth it.

In fact, I pointed them to this Guestbook and told them to seek out Suzie Baby & The Weight, both of which I would love to have seen. But isn’t that becoming the exception rather than the rule? It was so good and surprising seeing him trying to engage the audience. But it is unusual.

No one has ever commented on a Leonard Cohen being subpar in the last three years.


Entered at Tue Jul 30 18:40:23 CEST 2013 from (70.30.114.231)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Looks like you've forsaken the rockin' chair, Normie, you old salt. You may want to consider dusting off your old handle now that you're a working stiff once again. And BTW, is your "first mate" now your regular first mate while at sea? If so, you might want to consider paying her a decent wage. (Just a thought.)


Entered at Tue Jul 30 16:38:48 CEST 2013 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: I Can't Help It If I'm Lucky...

John: Your reminder of our conversation provoked me into writing this. I'm fed up with all the negativity about the current Bob Dylan. As always, there are some stellar performances and some that are average or subpar. That is true for many if not all performers whether its music, a stage play or whatever. However, Bob Dylan goes out 100 or more times each year and performs and we are so fortunate that he still wishes to do this. We have the opportunity and the privilege of hearing the greatest contributor to popular culture (in this genre) in the last 50 years. May he live and prosper and continue to follow his muse.


Entered at Tue Jul 30 16:01:17 CEST 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Vinyl Siding: Classic from the Past

I've been listening to my old Mercury LP copy of "Heat Treatment", a classic 1976 album from Graham Parker and The Rumour. After not listening to this album in years, I'd forgotten how great it was. Check out (link) the cut "That's What They All Say", a Dylanesque snarling attack featuring a swirling organ and pinched harmonic lead guitar that may remind you of another group.


Entered at Tue Jul 30 14:16:46 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Thanks, Ben … do post that on the comments on Toppermost. exactly what they're looking for. I'd forgotten When I Get My rewards … it's good to use Comments to lengthen the list. By the way, getting it to ten is hard!


Entered at Tue Jul 30 14:09:23 CEST 2013 from (92.236.128.33)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham UK

Subject: Keep On Running

Nice One Norm. Liked your post.

Dlew and other Antipodeans, Leonard Cohen has just announced dates for OZ and NZ. Presale via the fan club begins tomorrow (UK time so much earlier where you are). Public tickets on Friday.


Entered at Tue Jul 30 14:07:23 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: p.s.

Just to note that Levon always looked good through the years. Even till the end. That clip just made me so happy that I was alive to hear the music of the original 5. JT and I were talking about how lucky we were and are to be alive during this renaissance in music.


Entered at Tue Jul 30 12:36:04 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Adam Slippin' & Slidin'

Adam thank you very much for that video. I have never seen it before. When it comes to "a look" of a person, I always felt the round glasses, hairstyle etc. was Robbie looking his best; during that period.


Entered at Tue Jul 30 11:33:31 CEST 2013 from (72.82.163.186)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: Levon Helm toppermost

Peter, I think that your choices were solid. I would have included "When I get my rewards" from "Will the circle be unbroken vol 2" and "Rock, salt and nails" with John Martyn.

I also disagree with your take on the RCO ALL Stars material. I would definitely include something form the studio album. I feel it's a very solid album and has never really gotten it's due.

I've always thought that you could compile a great lost Band album by compiling the best tracks from RCO and Rick's album. They were both released during the post production of The Last Waltz and feature guest appearances by the other Band members.

I would also include something from "Souveneir" I've always enjoyed that cd. Maybe Levon's cover of Java Blues. There are lots of interesting possibilities.


Entered at Tue Jul 30 10:17:45 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Toppermost: Levon Helm

The Toppermost site follows The Band & Robbie Robertson selections of ten tracks with Levon Helm today. Do take a look and comment / dspute / scream that favourites have been missed. That's the idea.

Yesterday was Frank Zappa … also a major topic for discussion. I selected the three Band / Robbie / Levon sets.


Entered at Tue Jul 30 08:42:44 CEST 2013 from (92.18.189.101)

Posted by:

Solomon

Subject: Rock of Ages

Only two songs are noted as being archival film clips from December 30, 1971. I think these are the two songs filmed by Howard Alk and Murray Lerner of King Harvest (Has Surely Come) and The W.S. Walcott Medicine Show. Thanks adam, I haven't seen the Slippin' & Slidin clip for a few years now.


Entered at Tue Jul 30 01:34:16 CEST 2013 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacifc Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: John Mayer tribute to JJ Cale

Another BIG piece of our life gone. Just back from the sea, to find we have now lost JJ Cale. He was huge.and I'm sure everyone knows. This will be a kick in the nuts for EC. He had no trouble admitting JJ was an idol..and so it goes.

Hi Joan....well you're same age as my Susan. You would not believe that little woman. She came out on the tug with me this last trip. Although it was sunny and beautiful, we had some nasty Nor-west winds....which happen some times in the summer when it's really hot.

So we load some equipment in Port Hardy, 5 pieces.....2 big excavators, a rock truck, rock drill and shop truck. We get to the site to unload, and we got quite a bit of wind. I get my tug alongside the barge and get secured. Get the ramp down and ease into the ramp at the beach.

Now I got to get up there and unload this stuff myself, 'cause it's 05:00 in the morning and no one is there. We have portable radio phones. Suz is at the controls of the tug. I get up there and flash up the equipment and run each piece ashore. If the barge is getting side ways at all, I call Susan on the phone and say, "give me 10 degrees starboard rudder." When she has it there she comes back, "10 degrees starboard". I can't believe that little lady, she is great.

I get a piece of equipment off, then I'm flat out running down the barge, jump in another and run it off. We had it done in less than an hour. As I'm backing the barge away, she standing beside me looking at me. She says, "How long do you think you can keep running up and down like that."

Well, I had to think about that. I said, "Well I sure in hell want to sell this gawd damn outfit so we can go and play, but as long as I can keep on runnin' I'm going to. I'm afraid if I stop I'll probably seize up!"

Anyway, y'all watch and listen to young John pay some great tribute to ol' JJ Cale......gonna miss that old boy. Hope yer all good. Hello to every body. Bill, Kevin, John, Lars, Jerry...that gawd damn Mike, Sadavid, Brown eyes, Joisey goil....and all the rest a yuz.


Entered at Tue Jul 30 00:59:33 CEST 2013 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Adam/Slippin'

Thanks Adam,for posting that outstanding version of Slippin' & Slidin'. Who else but The Band would have Robbie on blistering lead on the one hand,and Garth playing a thrilling and unique to R&R organ lead on the other.Kinda like stinging rock followed by Bach hunkering down for a nifty lead.Watching Rick off in his own musical world is fascinating and Levon's singing drove the engine while Richard was banging out hose ole R&R chords.A treat-thanks again.


Entered at Tue Jul 30 00:08:33 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Disc 5 Academy of Music

Since Sebastian is working on the package, this might be a good time to ask you Sebastian; if all the tracks listed; on (Disc 5) the DVD are in fact video footage of each song and not just still photography of each track. Thank you.


Entered at Mon Jul 29 22:42:06 CEST 2013 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

They aren't very clear about what is on Disc 5, but it appears only two songs have associated footage. The disc label says they are 5.1 surround mixes.

Adam, it appears Garth has a Yamaha YC-30 next to the Lowry--note the last few seconds. That's a first.


Entered at Mon Jul 29 22:09:25 CEST 2013 from (24.39.33.90)

Posted by:

Mark

Location: Maine
Web: My link

Subject: Live at the Academy Music 1971

After at first being appalled that Amazon knows enough about me to create an ad on a non-music website suggesting three separate new releases for me that I will probably purchase......I clicked on the above link. I may have missed this in skimming some of the discussion here, but to my eyes this looks like a full DVD of performances. Does anybody else think the same after seeing this ad?


Entered at Mon Jul 29 21:50:00 CEST 2013 from (75.34.59.41)

Posted by:

Adam

Web: My link

Subject: The Band "Slippin' And Slidin'" May 1971

This is a super rare video that I just posted on YouTube. This is from French TV, the full 3 minute cut. Recorded on my birthday!


Entered at Mon Jul 29 21:36:04 CEST 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: J.J. Cale

Rare footage of J.J. Cale performing "Crazy Mama" at Leon Russell's Paradise Studio. Check out the old Harmony guitar that he customized. He does a great job replicating the wah-wah slide part that Mac Gayden played on the original Nashville studio recording.


Entered at Mon Jul 29 21:01:14 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Mick Farren RIP

Mick Farren collapsed on stage during a gig and died on Saturday. Mick Farren & The Deviants were his band, but he's maybe best-known for his journalism and novels (of which I've read a few). RIP.


Entered at Mon Jul 29 19:33:43 CEST 2013 from (70.226.203.74)

Posted by:

Zavadka

Location: Illinois

Subject: Dawes

Actually Dawes is very much more like The Band than Mumford and Sons IMO; quite diff vibes. Both are outstanding bands but have to give a great edge to the vocals of Taylor Goldsmith.


Entered at Mon Jul 29 18:39:32 CEST 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Levon and Bobby Keys

In his autobiography and recent interviews, Bobby Keys has mentioned that, during that time hanging out with Levon and the other musicians at Leon Russell's home studio, Levon turned him on to blues harmonica players, including Little Walter, and had an important influence on his approach to playing sax.


Entered at Mon Jul 29 18:30:42 CEST 2013 from (96.54.178.226)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Mumford and sons

I'm glad to see your comments, Sebastian, regarding Mumford and Sons. They support the tradition of the Band very well and do it with dignity and do it well. They should be evaluated on their own merit. As I have said here in the past, comparisons do no one any good and are invalid. In my view, if they like the Band and admire the work of the Band and they want to say so and if someone thinks that their views and support should be confirmed in writing and in reports, so be it. It is a good thing however that we all here don't agree on everything. If we did, it sure would be boring.


Entered at Mon Jul 29 18:26:32 CEST 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: R.I.P. J.J. Cale

Another iconic musician has passed. After he left the Dylan tour in 1965 Levon crossed paths with J.J. Cale out in L.A. In a 1996 interview with Lee Gabites, Levon described his involvement with the group of musicians that became known as the "Oklahoma Mafia.":

"Well, at the time, Leon Russell and J.J. Cale had created the first home studio. They took Leon's house there, in North Hollywood, and took out a couple of bedroom walls and made a fine little home studio. Leon was the producer and Johnnie Cale was the engineer and they would both play instruments too. They were producing the Shindig Show and the house band was called the Shindogs, that was Delany Bramlett, I think, playing bass or guitar in that band, and some more of the Oklahoma guys. So we would go over and hang out at Leon's and Leon and Johnnie Cale kind of big brothered the rest of us, and kept us from getting into any more trouble than we did. Bobby Keys was around and Junior Markham, Carl Radle of course, a lot of guys from the Tulsa, Oklahoma area was around during that particular time."


Entered at Mon Jul 29 18:04:16 CEST 2013 from (98.149.168.95)

Posted by:

Sebastian

Subject: Mumford

I often read such negative things about Mumford and Sons. I wonder why. They're really nice guys, playing their own instruments, writing their own songs, giving great live performances... Levon sure liked them. My dad does too. I can't figure out the hostility. Nice to see a mainstream band that is so appreciative of The Band's music and pay homage to them as well.


Entered at Mon Jul 29 16:54:47 CEST 2013 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: BARK and Colin Linden

With BARK, Colin Linden does have other commitments in the near future. There was one scheduled last week in Alberta (Hinton) but Colin was with Dylan that night. I'm not sure what happened to BARK but I doubt they played. I couldn't find an answer on line. It was a multiact evening of a 2 or 3 evening weekend.


Entered at Mon Jul 29 16:52:03 CEST 2013 from (70.53.46.122)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Suzie Baby was beautiful as was the first performance of The Weight………I would advise against watching Bob and friends second go at it. A shambles it was with Peter Wolf joining in……anyhow, I’ve said enough on this subject in the past…


Entered at Mon Jul 29 16:38:02 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Sexton-Linden

I've heard that Colin has some Blackie dates to cover.


Entered at Mon Jul 29 16:32:19 CEST 2013 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Sexton

John: It is indeed Charlie Sexton on Suzie Baby.


Entered at Mon Jul 29 16:02:25 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Sexton

JT is that Sexton playing guitar, standing next to Bob; on Suzie Baby? Whoever it is, I got a sore neck watching his head movements.


Entered at Mon Jul 29 14:48:40 CEST 2013 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Other lives too

From my reading, Charlie Sexton was booked for another engagement at Stubb's.


Entered at Mon Jul 29 14:38:38 CEST 2013 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Colin Linden returns to Dylan tour

After a return of Charlie Sexton to the Dylan tour, last night in Camden N.J., it was Colin Linden on lead guitar again.


Entered at Mon Jul 29 14:19:17 CEST 2013 from (171.159.192.10)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: Ain't in it for my Health DVD

Thanks for the update John D. I am really looking forward to seeing this on DVD. I'm more interested in this, than the Live at The Academy box set. I hope there will be some additional footage on the DVD.

I wonder if the Midnight Ramble Vol 3 that was announced lat year will ever be released or if it will become another in the list of Band related projects that is scheduled and never released. The others being The Band at Mountain Stage, Rick Danko solo album(with bonus tracks), From Bacon Fat to Judgement Day.

Maybe it's a Canadian thing. Neil Youn's Archives box set was announced and delayed for many years before being released. Hopefully, From bacon Fat to Judgement Day and some of these other releases will eventually come out.


Entered at Mon Jul 29 10:09:17 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

On reviewing, the Van Morrison magazine “Wavelength” always had a setlist for every review, which is a discipline, and for fans of a singer, tell half the story. It can be quite hard to do … at Simone Felice we were in the front row, the stage is less than a foot high, and we were four or five feet away at most. You can’t make any notes at all obviously. But when the set is in two parts and there are two of you, you can remember it and write a list in the interval, then do the same at the end. Sometimes a title won't come to mind, so if it's not coming, I remember a memorable phrase, and I can then find it afterwards. It's OK with Simone Felice, but it can be hard with a band I've listened to mainly in the car, so you know songs, but not titles, because you're not looking at a CD sleeve. It's also hard with people who give songs titles which don't appear in the chorus.


Entered at Mon Jul 29 09:59:36 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: "ballad"

Many thanks for the kind comments, JT. I added a paragraph this morning, because a friend questioned my description of Simone Felice's songs as "ballads." My friend was thinking "Can't Help Falling In Love," I think. Here's the added paragraphs to avoid having to read it all again.

Let me check the word 'ballad.' I don't mean 'slow romantic songs.' Much of what he does is a ballad in the folk song definition of the word: a narrative, a story, often involving tragedy. This is why Bob Dylan called his song The BALLAD of Hollis Brown. Some of Springsteen's work, like The River and Highway Patrolman are classic ballads in this original sense. Much of Simone Felice's work is too. Simone Felice draws on his early life as source for material, and explains the background on stage to some of them. Tonight he explained the personal story behind Dawn Brady's Son. Last time I saw him, he explained the story behind Stormy-Eyed Sarah. He was talking about growing up in a 'shitty town' in The Catskills and someone called out (ironically) 'Like Winchester!' and his wry smile and raised eyebrows in response said it all (You don't know the half …). Winchester is the edge of London commuter territory. Wealthy, historic, quaint, sedate cathedral town with one of Britain's oldest elite public schools. Though having said that, Winchester has its scary underside, as everywhere does.

The footstomping rhythm on stage, which Jon Boden of Bellowhead also does in Spiers and Boden shows (using an amplified footboard in his case) is part of that folk tradition. I've been immersing myself in traditional English folk, and the older singers were fond of accenting with a studded boot heel on the stage too. None with quite Simone Felice's vigour perhaps.


Entered at Mon Jul 29 05:45:56 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Ain't In It For My Health (Levon Helm) DVD

Will be released; on October 8th; according to Amazon.com


Entered at Mon Jul 29 05:29:35 CEST 2013 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Excellent writing by Peter V

The review of Simon Felice (by Peter V.)again demonstrated excellent ability to give the reader a sense of what happened at the concert with all the bases covered and discussed. I welcome these reviews. As I said before, there are many who do this as a profession (review performance) who could learn a thing or two. Thank you.


Entered at Sun Jul 28 17:07:11 CEST 2013 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Media, journalism

Social media is not media and not even very social either. I don't use it. I communicate with rabbits birds and dogs.


Entered at Sun Jul 28 04:18:58 CEST 2013 from (66.61.15.219)

Posted by:

Calvin

I feel for the journalists though-I truly do. In the world of social media they are becoming less and less relevant. Scared if they arent "first on the scene" they are pointless. To be the Entertainment Editor of your Newspaper/Magazine/Radio Station/TV Station and be the 38th person who tweets out a celebrities death is akin to saying what you do has absolutely no merit.

Me? I find smart and lucid evaluations of current situations that concern me of great value. Ive read dozen of articles talking about who the next Fed Chair should be, social media can never do that. A newspaper article, when done correctly, on a current issue is almost always better than a TV Version as TV is designed for short bursts of information.

Currently Cleveland, Ohio-where I live is about to become for the first time since 1878 a town without a daily newspaper as the Plain Dealer goes to 3 days a week.

The media, even decent media, is stuck between a rock and a hard place. I dont like the idea that news is changing-but frankly, it seems that traditional media is damn near dead-and we are suppose to informs ourselves.


Entered at Sun Jul 28 02:33:20 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Web: My link

Subject: Yet another angle.

OK I'm done. Thanks for letting me self indulge.


Entered at Sun Jul 28 02:30:02 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Web: My link

Subject: Dylan sings Vee Different Angle

Once the camera person settles down a real nice angle of Bob.


Entered at Sun Jul 28 02:15:36 CEST 2013 from (24.114.27.30)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: On second thought........

.......link of the day! We've had some beauties this year and especially just this week with Bob doing "The Weight" and the link which included Bob's touching introduction to "Suzie Baby" that John posted yesterday......that one really stayed with me.


Entered at Sun Jul 28 01:54:09 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Simone Felice

Review of Simone Felice at Winchester tonight. This guy gets better every time, and every time it's different.


Entered at Sun Jul 28 01:22:37 CEST 2013 from (24.114.27.30)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Tangled Up In Blue

Thank you Pat.....Link of the year! I can not think of another re-working that he has ever done that comes close to this. Stripped and beautiful.


Entered at Sat Jul 27 22:11:12 CEST 2013 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Garth and Maud

Thank you, Richard, for linking these photos. They are inspiring. I just purchased NATURALLY (J.J.CALE) again on vinyl.


Entered at Sat Jul 27 21:36:48 CEST 2013 from (65.96.2.135)

Posted by:

Richard Wall

Web: My link

Subject: Garth & Maud and band in Japan

Link above is pictures from last night's show at the Fuji Rock Festival. They were the final performers of the night, preceded by Daniel Lanois. Next stop, two shows on Tuesday in Osaka, then two more on Friday (Garth's birthday) in Tokyo.


Entered at Sat Jul 27 21:05:59 CEST 2013 from (208.120.36.230)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

I'm off to see Dylan + Wilco/Beck/Ryan Bingham tonight. Fingers crossed for The Weight...?


Entered at Sat Jul 27 20:57:24 CEST 2013 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

Two Dylan shows from Paris 1978 just posted on ROIO. Linked a startling version of Tangled Up In Blue.


Entered at Sat Jul 27 19:25:38 CEST 2013 from (74.108.29.147)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: JJ Cale

Sad to hear about JJ Cale. He had some of the best "driving music" RIP


Entered at Sat Jul 27 19:15:34 CEST 2013 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Even worse...social media

If I have trouble with the press in this regard, I am even angrier about the social media spreading information that is swallowed up whole by too many. Apparently, this was the case with the J.J.Cale story. Now I'm really irate! This is not the first time People get hurt.


Entered at Sat Jul 27 19:07:13 CEST 2013 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Journalism?

The evolution of the J.J. Cale press story is problematic for me. I have a great deal of concern about journalists 'not doing their homework'. A day or two earlier, someone noted that J.J. Cale had died. This apparently was picked up by the press and carried. Then (as joe j suggests) it was noted that it might be a hoax (like many before). Then last night an official announcement appeared on J.J. Cale's website. We need the press but with all the technology around today, rumour is not enough. Journalists should check their facts before. That it was not carried widely in the press 2 days ago is reassuring, but nevertheless... it was announced and some already believed it to be true before his death actually occurred (the information so far anyway)


Entered at Sat Jul 27 18:00:55 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: J J Cale

Cale's death was confirmed in a statement on his official website, which said: "JJ Cale passed away at 8pm on Friday 26 July at Scripps Hospital in LA Jolla, CA. The legendary singer-songwriter had suffered a heart attack. There are no immediate plans for services."


Entered at Sat Jul 27 17:18:20 CEST 2013 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: The reports of ....

If they are premature, then someone on J.J. Cale's website made a terrible mistake.


Entered at Sat Jul 27 17:16:46 CEST 2013 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Not to mention...

And for outstanding creativity and impact on the art which is called music: "Music From Big Pink" and "The Band" (the Brown album).


Entered at Sat Jul 27 17:14:58 CEST 2013 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: And yet another reason; an idea

J.J. Cale's death ( a true legend and a fine musician with an excellent body of work) got me thinking. I am not a fan of the Grammy Awards. Another reason. Sometimes and too often excellence is overlooked. So here's an idea. An award or two each year for overlooked work. "Blonde on Blonde should get a Grammy". "Naturally" should probably get a Grammy. And so many more....(?Revolver, Exile on Main Street, and the list goes on). Honour the best work like there is honour bestowed on the total body of work by a performer.


Entered at Sat Jul 27 17:12:27 CEST 2013 from (96.30.173.135)

Posted by:

joe j

It's been suggested that reports of Mr. Cale's death are premature.


Entered at Sat Jul 27 17:03:15 CEST 2013 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: J.J./Dylan/ROA

First off-J.J. was an original,a true musical legend.I loved his songwriting,guitar style,and his work with Leon Russell and Clapton.He will be missed. Regarding Dylan-glad Charlie is back-it adds to the guitarist confusion,all a part of the Dylan touring fun! That Bob spoke so nicely about Vee was super cool,but I'd still love his concerts,as I have for years whether he talks to the audience or not.I'm there for music and as long as he continues to appeal to me musically that's all I ever want from him.BTW,Warren Haynes sat in with Wilco and Peter Wolf sat in with Dylan-nice! Keeping The Weight in the setlist is alo a treat.To repeat myself and as someone else here suggested the ROA release is repetitive and thus ridiculous.I agree that a good bootleg series would be most welcome.


Entered at Sat Jul 27 16:26:20 CEST 2013 from (97.81.222.55)

Posted by:

Jimmy Nelson

Web: My link

Subject: 'The Weight'

This song never ceases to amaze me. Another good write up in this weekly series on The Band ...


Entered at Sat Jul 27 16:07:43 CEST 2013 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: This is sad news

JJ Cale passed away at 8:00 pm on Friday July 26 at Scripps Hospital in La Jolla, CA. He was a legend among musicians, it is said, and yet so many did not even know him. He won a Grammy for a later work but "Naturally" was his best work.


Entered at Sat Jul 27 15:45:05 CEST 2013 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: The Weight again in Hoboken NJ

Dylan in Hoboken N.J. last night: 14. The Weight (Jim James, Jeff Tweedy and Peter Wolf on guitars and vocals). With Charlie Sexton back in the band for this show.


Entered at Sat Jul 27 14:58:26 CEST 2013 from (72.82.185.4)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: Duplicate perfformances on Live at the Academy

I've just re-read the press release for the box set and I realize now that a large number of performances are duplicated 3 times in different mixes on this set. That is pretty ridiculous. I hope that going forward that Robbie and Capital will focus on releasing some of the great shows that have been bootlegged over the years. "Roosevelt Stadium" would be my pick for a top quality live show that should be available. A band "Bootleg series" would be nice, and there are plenty of shows to choose from.


Entered at Sat Jul 27 12:37:42 CEST 2013 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: I Threw It All Away

I just sold most of my vinyl LPs and CDs. Of Dylan I kept only Blonde, Nashville, Self Portrait, New Morning, John W Harding and Christmas Album. Of The Band Big Pink and Brown only. - And yes, I Threw It All Away is a nice little song.


Entered at Sat Jul 27 08:56:16 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Suzie Baby

Phew. Wish he was like that when I've seen him. Maybe it's being in his home state. Great intro, though I wanted to shut the guitarist's noodling around up and hear it more clearly. That sort of audience interaction makes a show come alive and seem more personal. Watching two five star shows last week, Van Morrison and Bellowhead highlights it. Van, like Dylan usually, doesn't talk to the people at all. Jon Boden has a couple of interesting, humorous or explanatory lines for each song. I like a bit of chatter.

Also the song is done very well. Many thanks for the link.


Entered at Sat Jul 27 05:33:01 CEST 2013 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Don't forget the T

Take the T from JT and that will correct Elson to what it is (or isn't) - Elston. Sorry (typo)


Entered at Sat Jul 27 05:06:40 CEST 2013 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Elson Gunn

Thanks John D. I actually heard this on day 1 after the performance. It is really good and heartfelt. Its great to hear it again. Its a reminder (like so many recent performances as the tour proceeds) that Bob can deliver big-time.


Entered at Sat Jul 27 04:39:33 CEST 2013 from (101.164.0.90)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Subject: John D

Beautiful rendition, improved further by Dylan's graceful and classy introduction. Thank you so much for posting.


Entered at Sat Jul 27 04:39:00 CEST 2013 from (72.196.148.158)

Posted by:

Calvin

Ya know, I love Rick-but I gotta to agree about the Weight sing along on his later solo shows Peter-Ive probably got about 40 live shows of Ricks, and it sort of humorous to hear him tell the audience he is going to "play to the cows come home" And that "this is the best sounding crowd Ive ever heard" every single night. Amazing thing is it sounded genuine every time. But sort of Hokey.

Still, I saw him every chance I got.


Entered at Sat Jul 27 04:03:59 CEST 2013 from (101.164.0.90)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Web: My link

Subject: Review of The Beatles In Mono by Andrew hickey.

A book, in my view, every Beatles fan should own.


Entered at Sat Jul 27 03:42:22 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Web: My link

Subject: Bob Dylan Sings Bobby Vee / LOOK OUT JT!!!

OK JT. Get ready!!!! Listen to Bob pay homage to one of the people that helped him in the early days; when Bob actually sings Suzie Baby. He does a great job and shows his respect for Bobby Vee. Very touching.


Entered at Sat Jul 27 03:42:17 CEST 2013 from (71.184.199.161)

Posted by:

Tim

Location: Boston
Web: My link

Subject: Rick at Caffe Lena 1988

an audio file from an upcoming album. Rick performs It Makes No Difference.


Entered at Sat Jul 27 03:12:52 CEST 2013 from (99.141.52.191)

Posted by:

Adam

Subject: more Rock Of Ages thoughts

I'm attempting to understand the logic behind the tracklist, and some of it does actually make sense when you look at things a certain way.

Discs 1 & 2 are all the original album takes, and all the reissue bonus track takes. "Strawberry Wine" and "Smoke Signal" were missing tapes at the time of the 2001 reissue. "Smoke Signal" was found and released on 2005's A Musical History. "Strawberry Wine" is being released here for the first time. By using the same album takes and bonus takes again, it pretty much confirms that the very best takes were selected in the first place. The theme of Discs 1 & 2 is "the best version of each song performed during the residency". Although the track listing/setlist for the discs is totally new and not in any way related to the original Rock Of Ages LP or original shows, maybe that's not such a bad thing. After 40 years of listening the ROA LP tracklist, it's an interesting idea to offer a fresh perspective and completely different running order. They did the same thing for The Last Waltz CD box set, although not quite as much. The original album will always be preserved, but the box set offers a different perspective.

Discs 3 & 4 are the complete New Year's Eve show. These discs ARE in the original concert order... which really explains why Discs 1 & 2 were not! To have Discs 1 & 3, 2 & 4 in the same running order would not be very exciting. So because NYE is the actual concert experience, there is no need to make Discs 1 & 2 faithful to the original concert. Discs 1 & 2 are a compilation of the best takes of the residency. Discs 3 & 4 document in what order the shows actually went down. And I do disagree that offering the full New Year's Eve show is a lazy cash decision. I think if anyone were to reasonably say which individual show would have the most special, notable, and exciting "atmosphere", it would be New Year's Eve. It's pretty reasonable that if any of the four shows were released in full, it would be NYE. 7 tracks (not including Dylan) were used on the original album, leaving the NYE show to feature 70% unreleased Band performances. The Dylan appearance never interested me much. My guess would be that they wanted Bob Clearmountain mixes for the Dylan tracks (Discs 1 & 2), but also had to included it on any complete release of New Year's Eve (Discs 3 & 4).

As for Discs 1 & 2 being mixed by Bob Clearmountain, and the "Soundboard Mix" New Year's Eve being mixed by Sebastian Robertson and others, I think the intent was to create a difference in sound and perspective. The Clearmountain tracks might have a more polished, clean and powerful sound to them. Then maybe the Sebastian Robertson tracks will have a more basic, raw, "less is more", straight from the master tapes sound to them. Although it is named the "Soundboard Mix", it's clear that this is not a rough as-it-happened two track mix, but a new mix from the masters. And Sebastian has stated the "Strawberry Wine" was oddly not played on NYE, the reason for it not being on Disc 3.

The DVD only having 2 film clips is disappointing, but what can you do? It is very, very odd and frustrating that "Don't Do It" from A Musical History is not included here, collecting all 3 videos from ROA in one place. But it is still officially released. To only have 3 videos, the songs themselves are thankfully great choices. I just hope they have done everything possible to locate any footage for this, and that more is not "discovered" sometime down the road yet again.


Entered at Sat Jul 27 00:29:53 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

My greatest bootleg regret was Watkins Glen, a double LP set at Virgin in Oxford Street, for yes, they sold slightly concealed bootlegs. It was too expensive for me. Never seen a copy since and I don't think there is a picture here either.


Entered at Sat Jul 27 00:23:03 CEST 2013 from (96.54.178.226)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Spanish Leather

I first saw GWW (Dylan and the Band) at Sam's on Yonge St. in 1969. It was out in full view. I had no idea what it was. I never saw anything like that again for about 2 years until I was vacationing in the southern USA and saw a bunch of these. This was a revelation!! Read all about it in Clinton Heylin's book.


Entered at Sat Jul 27 00:13:57 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: TMQ bootlegs

Just seeing the "revised" TMQ logo I'm transported to Petticoat Lane Market in 1970 and a white card sleeve with a sticker. The trouble with TMQ is that bootleggers bootlegged each other, and so you never knew if it was a genuine TMQ boot, or a pirate version of TMQ boot … if that makes sense.


Entered at Fri Jul 26 23:48:59 CEST 2013 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Thanks Dave H for the clip. I like it all, but especially Dylan's ragged contributions - likely as true to the original original, given his proximity to the conception. Never liked the Grammy version - because of Brittany mostly.


Entered at Fri Jul 26 21:54:57 CEST 2013 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Hmmm. Isis (Rolling Thunder live)...Jokerman....Mississippi.


Entered at Fri Jul 26 21:40:56 CEST 2013 from (70.53.46.122)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Pat B: Three early requests …………“Let Me Die in My Footsteps”, “Angelina” and “The Groom’s Still Waiting at the Alter”………after all, it is a fortunate man who gets to rhyme January with Buenos Aires.


Entered at Fri Jul 26 21:25:43 CEST 2013 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Kevin J, btw we had one rehearsal but folks were expected to arrive prepared.


Entered at Fri Jul 26 20:49:01 CEST 2013 from (80.3.71.222)

Posted by:

Ian Woodward

Subject: Isle of Wight CD

I suspect that the "someone" was in Dylan's office.

In the NO DIRECTION HOME CD (Bootleg Series Vol.7), the registration number of the limo in the photograph was changed to "1235 RD" (= Rainy Day Women # 12 & 35) from the genuine one. This must have been done late in the process because I was sent advance details of the release and the registration plate was originally unchanged.


Entered at Fri Jul 26 20:47:58 CEST 2013 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

A doc about Steve Gadd.


Entered at Fri Jul 26 20:43:06 CEST 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Isle of Wight

Elliot Mazer and Glyn Johns recorded Dylan & The Band at the Isle of Wight.


Entered at Fri Jul 26 20:36:27 CEST 2013 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

Kevin J, his name is Paul Bolger and he's something of a jam band icon in these parts. btw, we're doing the same thing with Dylan Aug. 7.

Ian, someone at Columbia has quite the sense of humor.


Entered at Fri Jul 26 20:17:33 CEST 2013 from (80.3.71.222)

Posted by:

Ian Woodward

Web: My link

Subject: Isle of Wight CD

I don't know if anyone has commented on this but, if you look at this Amazon page ....

http://www.amazon.com/Another-Self-Portrait-1969-1971-Bootleg/dp/B00DY951RQ/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1374222303&sr=8-1&keywords=dylan+bootleg+series+10

.... and pass your cursor over the image to "expand" it, you can see that the Isle of Wight CD is presented as a TMQ bootleg except that it is Trade Mark of Equality, rather than Trade Mark of Quality.

What Audio Sonic" means, I don't know.


Entered at Fri Jul 26 18:57:35 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Americana Awards: The Weight

While I agree on Rick's verse being very special in Band versions, absolutely, but in concert solo, Rick used to piss all over The Weight, turning it into an audience singalong with little vocal from himself. I have a few cassettes of that and it's awful.

By the way, the guy wandering about aimlessly looking weird, is I think, T-Bone Burnett.

I enjoy anyone having a go at The Weight. Brittany Howard's done it elsewhere too. See link … this time with Amy Helm, Teresa Williams and Larry Campbell, Emmylou Harris, John Hiatt, Bonnie Raitt and Richard Thompson and it's lovely because they make the effort to find something new. Richard Thompson's solo helps the "What if he HAD joined The Band?" question, then Bonnie finishes the solo. Brittany gets the "Crazy Chester …" verse and, well, "There's a Southern accent …" and it adds to her performance. Then Bonnie at the end does the last verse.

Yes, way, way better than the Grammys. But I'll watch a bar band play it and be pleased they did. Spooky Tooth used to do it superbly live, back in the late 60s.


Entered at Fri Jul 26 18:47:34 CEST 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Weighty Issue

In one aspect Dylan must appreciate the many recorded cover versions of "The Weight", along with the licensing rights, as he owns the publishing.


Entered at Fri Jul 26 18:41:54 CEST 2013 from (70.53.46.122)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Jed nails it on the Grammys version of The Weight. Not sure there is much else to say. Except I did watch is live and so this is not a dissection of a YouTube viewing after the fact. I railed against it the next day at this GB. Unlike Jed, I admit to going a little overboard at the time to make a point! It upset me though. Not likely The Band will ever again have one of its songs presented in front of such a large audience and a sacred song was turned into a bad Glee rehearsal with messy beards, bad singing and a wandering guitarist. Bob Dylan sent shivers up my spine by just nailing one word “:Dog”….and anyone who has ever performed The Weight knows – it is “not the Springtime as most think but rather it is the Fall…that is when the harvest comes in”……..sorry lost in a momentary Band hallucination………….anyone who has ever truly loved The Weight knows it is the Rick part that makes or breaks a cover and it is not down to imitation ( no one alive or dead has ever been able to match his voice of innocence ) it’s just a feel that you get or you don’t. I hate to see great songs walked all over by performers who should know better.

Interesting there was an event put on by Pat and friends right around the same time where they covered – I think 20 or 25 Band songs – and with less planning and likely less rehearsal and it was beautiful from start to finish. They brought a guy out to do Dixie and he didn’t sound like anyone in The Band but it moved me because there was a touch and a feel and that is all you can hope for when paying tribute………Live one-offs are a totally different thing but look to Wilco for knowing how to convey feel.


Entered at Fri Jul 26 17:57:51 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Thanks, Jon. The other one then, is if anything connected remotely to The Band gets played, should I stand up, shout "Levon!" then fall over?


Entered at Fri Jul 26 17:31:55 CEST 2013 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon L

Peter, as someone who is always the beeree, never the beerer, I'm going to say no.


Entered at Fri Jul 26 17:00:24 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

If he asks for requests do you think I should shout out "Fanny!" and spill beer over the guy in front? I believe this is traditional at such events.


Entered at Fri Jul 26 16:53:37 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

On the previous link, Simone Felice comes in at 3.01s. We are seeing him tomorrow evening.


Entered at Fri Jul 26 16:39:12 CEST 2013 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Mumfords again: Covering The Weight and others

To flog an overworked horse: I have spent some time in the last 24 hours listening (as many of us have) to a) Mumford and Sons b) The Weight covers. I have to disagree with those of our contributors who do not value these efforts. I like them and though they do not approach the feel and sensitivity or create the nuances of the original, they are good in and of themselves. The Mumford group is very good. They can be 'near the Band' in my view any time. Be clear. The Band is NOT replaceable. The pedestal that these covers and these bands place The Band on is clear and vital for continuity. And the desire to hear other covers by these groups of THE BAND songs is desirable, Kevin. I agree.


Entered at Fri Jul 26 16:30:29 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: The Weight en masse

Agreed, Solomon. Mumford & Sons have youth and enthusiasm in their favor. Link is to the version with Dawes, Simone Felice et al last year. All good clean fun.


Entered at Fri Jul 26 16:14:11 CEST 2013 from (92.18.162.3)

Posted by:

Solomon

Web: My link

Subject: Big Easy Express

Wouldn't we all rather have Mumford & Sons headlining festivals ? Mumford & Sons are going around praising and introducing The Band to younger people. It sure as hell beats some rapper headlining festivals in the summer of 2013.


Entered at Fri Jul 26 15:31:26 CEST 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Rock of Ages

Adam: Sometimes clues can be found in notes from the engineers written on the master (mixdown) tape boxes.


Entered at Fri Jul 26 15:09:34 CEST 2013 from (99.141.52.191)

Posted by:

Adam

Again, taste aside, "Mumford & Sons" has no business being near The Band.


Entered at Fri Jul 26 12:54:08 CEST 2013 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Link to people who think they have heard everything.

I heard this unusual way of playing rock the other week. Violinist is a scotchman, Dunc!


Entered at Fri Jul 26 12:34:47 CEST 2013 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Weight

Just listened to Grammy's version.Musically way too busy and lacks that elusive feel to it.Yes,It was sung ok,but the instrumentation was somewhat overwrought.The full Dylan version(thanks for posting all of it) has that organic feel,a superb band,and Bob's unique interpretation and powerful phrasing.The song sings itself,whereas the Grammy version clunks on and is relieved to make it through.More of a talent show version.


Entered at Fri Jul 26 11:56:38 CEST 2013 from (86.167.250.140)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland
Web: My link

Subject: Various

Thanks for the links to The Weight. Really enjoyed it. Only ever seen it played live once. That was by the Swedish Willy Clay Band. Garth played on their album.

When Wilco toured Europe, they were supported by The Hazey Janes. Two of the members of this Scottish band are the late Michael Marra's children.

Have my Byrds top ten posted on Toppermost. Looking forward to comments. So difficult to leave off so many great songs.

The link is John Martyn and David Gilmour with beautiful guitar playing. \


Entered at Fri Jul 26 09:55:09 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: The Weight at The Grammys

My curiosity was aroused by Kevin's distaste, so I just re-watched it. Mavis Staples? Brittany Howard? Mumford & Sons? What's the problem?

I thought Elton's piano playing was great because it wasn't directly derivative. In the vocal honours, Brittany Howard of Alabama Shakes outdoes even Mavis Staples (age being the difference) and Mavis has performed that song since it was first released, let alone the TLW version. Mumford & Sons do verse 3 well, by using the two vocalists together. Elton rolled it to the end, but had actually sat out of the limelight for the first four verses, apart from his intro. OK, both Mavis and Brittany "over-soul" it a tad, but it's a live performance, designed to be experienced right now as you watch.

It's not designed to be one to dissect on YouTube, and not every bit is pitch perfect, but if you'd been in the hall on the night I think it would have been excellent. It's linked.


Entered at Fri Jul 26 03:22:24 CEST 2013 from (24.218.16.94)

Posted by:

Dave H

Web: My link

Glad everyone's enjoying Dylan and friends doing The Weight. I found a slightly better clip that includes the whole song (link).


Entered at Fri Jul 26 01:17:37 CEST 2013 from (96.54.178.226)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Heavy

"The Weight" was made for Mr. Dylan. The scales of justice are well served by this rendition. It brought a smile to my face too. Maybe they will try other Band songs in future concerts. Maybe Colin will suggest it. (This Wheel's On Fire, I Shall Be Released would be appropriate but true Band songs of later vintage would be welcomed).


Entered at Fri Jul 26 00:46:44 CEST 2013 from (99.141.52.191)

Posted by:

Adam

No problem, John! Thanks for asking.


Entered at Fri Jul 26 00:25:55 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Adam

Adam, thank you so much for the in depth answer. Very insightful. Thanks again.


Entered at Thu Jul 25 22:52:52 CEST 2013 from (70.53.46.122)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Well Jon…..in less than 24 hours you have me foregoing the new ROA for two more golf shirts and wanting The Weight for everyone……if you have a case for Elton John and “friends” doing The Weight at the Grammys………I am jumping off the nearest bridge! I will be scarred for life by that horror show that night.

Thanks to Dave H……….surprisingly good sound and I give a pass the great Wilco on just about everything…..just a pity that a band that good ( as David P’s link below demonstrates on Neil Young ) that covers songs so well would not delve a little deeper with a Band like The Band…….all said, I loved hearing Bob sing the song. Best I have felt all day in fact……Music heals and as the wise Garth once said….


Entered at Thu Jul 25 22:52:22 CEST 2013 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Weight/Dave H

Thanks for the link.I really enjoyed that a lot.


Entered at Thu Jul 25 22:35:28 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Jon Lyness nails The Weight … a verse each, a great chorus for everybody to join in. Just listen to the audience going for it on that Smartphone link.. Surely Bob is taking “Crazy Chester followed me …” He should know it, owning part of the publishing. OK, no one gets the guitar intro perfect, except Robbie, but you can get a version out of it. Wish I’d been at the Dylan / Wilco version.


Entered at Thu Jul 25 22:24:10 CEST 2013 from (99.141.52.191)

Posted by:

Adam

John D - My comment about taking Phil Ramone's comments with a grain of salt...

I just meant that over the years, there have been a few statements made. They seem to have been repeated so much, they became iron clad. Phil Ramone made those comments when... in the early 1990s? So that's almost 20 years after the LP was released. He used the word "soundcheck", then for years everyone was saying ROA was not recorded at the shows, but at a souncheck with no audience present. Then fans figured out he meant "soundcheck night", meaning one of the concerts leading up to the anticipated New Year's Eve show. So judging by the dates on the new tracklist, Ramone was correct when he said most of the recordings were from December 30, while also incorrectly saying that nothing had been used from New Year's Eve except Genetic Method.

And what about Robbie's comments in the ROA reissue liner notes? He said at one time "80% of the album was from NYE"... again proven false by the dates on the new tracklist. More tracks from Dec. 30 were used, then on New Year's Eve.

So I just meant that the phrase Rob Bowman used - "At this point in time, nobody is really sure what tapes were used for the original album" - is the most accurate statement. Both Phil Ramone and Robbie made statements about the dates, and both seemed to be off.

But I am not an expert, I just did some research on my own and tried to figure out what makes sense. It's very confusing, actually. I do not have any information from Garth about ROA or the new release... in fact, I wanted to ask him about "Live At The Academy" and see what involvement, if any, he had.


Entered at Thu Jul 25 22:07:09 CEST 2013 from (136.167.102.150)

Posted by:

Dave H

Web: My link

Here's an audience smartphone recording of the Dylan/Tweedy/James cover of The Weight from last night's show. The first verse is missing on the recording but Bob sings the Crazy CHester verse and everyone sings the last verse together.


Entered at Thu Jul 25 21:25:09 CEST 2013 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Subject: Re: The Weight

Aw Kevin, I get where you're coming from but geez... IMO The Weight is unbeatable as a live cover. It's an exceptionally well-written song, but doubles nicely as a fun boozy singalong that everyone in the audience at least half-knows. How many Band classics can you say that about? I love seeing different performers trade verses...which is appropriate to the sense of community in the lyrics... and it works especially well as an encore with everyone on stage, given that the song has ample space for each musician to take vocal turns, instrumental solos or what have you. So there... Just give in already. :)


Entered at Thu Jul 25 21:05:34 CEST 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Kevin: Wilco fearlessly performed the "Broken Arrow" suite, complete with the "Mr. Soul" intro, a while back at the Musicares tribute to Neil Young. A risky choice but they pulled it off brilliantly.


Entered at Thu Jul 25 20:53:07 CEST 2013 from (96.54.178.226)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: The Point

The plot is followed and the point is made.


Entered at Thu Jul 25 20:57:14 CEST 2013 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Web: My link

Subject: Early Christmas

Nick Lowe has a Christmas album coming out in November and you can hear the whole thing (today only I think) here. I think it sounds great and very original to boot!


Entered at Thu Jul 25 20:51:00 CEST 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Rock of Ages

In the digital realm, it will be hard to beat the recent Mobile Fidelity hybrid-SACD version of RoA. I haven't heard the MoFi 2-LP vinyl counterpart, but I do have the original LP-set mastered by Bob Ludwig at Sterling Sound. That pressing, with the Capitol red label, can be identified by the "RL" initials and "STERLING" etched in the run-off area of the records.


Entered at Thu Jul 25 20:43:41 CEST 2013 from (70.53.46.122)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Let’s try and follow the plot here. We were not discussing covers on albums or tribute albums but at live settings. When Bob did a little tribute to Leonard Cohen in 1987, her chose the then unknown “Halleluiah” not Suzanne, recently he belted out a nod to Gordon Lightfoot – again picking a lesser known Lightfoot song ……In just about every case that a performer nods towards the Beatles or Stones, Dylan or Kinks – live -, rarely if ever will it be Like a Rolling Stone or Satisfaction or Hey Jude or Lola or You Really Got Me…..invariably they will steer clear of the band or performers signature songs……………….With The Band, just about every Tom , Dick and Harry picks The Weight and the results are not pretty…….Of course there are plenty of exceptions, the great Allman Brother recently did a beauty but that wasn’t the point………………….As mentioned, I know why it is done….just pointing out that it irks me a little.


Entered at Thu Jul 25 20:08:25 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Lurking among those covers, near Ferrante & Teicher probably, is James Last doing Dixie.


Entered at Thu Jul 25 20:06:54 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Dennis, I was about to link that too. Jerry Garcia, then Phil Lesh & Friends liked to cover The Band. Last year, Simone Felice & Simi Stone were doing a heartfelt "I Shall Be Released" in tribute to Levon, as well as an Atlantic City that owed more to The Band's version than the original.

The Weight has by far the greatest number of covers, but it had half a dozen as soon as it came out. Dixie, Cripple Creek and This Wheel's On Fire have large numbers of covers. This Wheel's on Fire has major hit covers … Julie Driscoll, Siouxsie & The Banshees, and major Byrds album.

I don't think many people look at Band songs and say to themselves, "Hmm, I could improve that" or "I could do something with this in my style."


Entered at Thu Jul 25 17:59:12 CEST 2013 from (96.54.178.226)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Nazareth

I wouldn't be surprised if Dylan participated in more than one verse. As for 'Driftwood', you are no doubt right about Colin Linden and the others likely knowing the material. The effort would be getting together to make sure they've got it right. Before I give a lecture, I always rehearse and I'm not appearing almost nightly before many thousands.


Entered at Thu Jul 25 17:23:35 CEST 2013 from (70.53.46.122)

Posted by:

Kevin J

JT: I like to think that at the band meeting yesterday afternoon, just after Bob gave his approval to having Tweedy and company join him on stage and do a Band song ( no small feat that ) that Colin Linden jumped in and offered “Acadian Driftwood” rather than “The Weight”……..For those in the know of Colin Linden, he and his band can play them all and play them all well but they do a particularly great job on ‘Acadian Driftwood”……….Wouldn’t it have been nice……….all that said, I am looking forward to hearing Bob sing “I pulled into Nazareth….”


Entered at Thu Jul 25 16:55:03 CEST 2013 from (24.161.12.36)

Posted by:

Dennis

Location: Just down the road from Big Pink in West Saugerties, NY
Web: My link

Subject: Band Covers

Been checkin' out this site since around 1995, it's very extensive.

You may wish to check out the link above for covers of The Band, Jan's put together quite and extensive list. One of my fav's is The Theme From the Last Waltz, covered by Ferrante & Teicher; never heard it, but....

Coming up this Sunday, the 28th, is the 40th anniversary of my personal favorite Band show, Summerjam from Watkins Glen, NY. This was a very unique show in both the songs played and The Band's stretching out of those performed.


Entered at Thu Jul 25 16:17:43 CEST 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Rock of Ages

The Band is credited for producing the album. Phil Ramone, along with Mark Harman, engineered the recordings. Mr. Ramone also mixed the tracks and therefore had intimate knowledge of what tapes were used.


Entered at Thu Jul 25 16:13:46 CEST 2013 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Effort

Kevin: Right on the money, again. It doesn't bother me as much as perhaps it does you, but I do wish other songs would receive attention. It takes effort to learn a song as you know and then rehearsal. "The Weight" is a gimme.


Entered at Thu Jul 25 16:10:38 CEST 2013 from (24.114.27.30)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Does it bother anyone else that it appears "The Weight" is the only song of The Band that any other musician ever covers? Almost always done terribly as well......Yes, Yes....I know why they do it ( ease, audience recognition, etc. ) but notice how musiians almost always show imagination when covering the likes of Stones, Beatles, Dylan, Who, Kimks by staying away from the obvious big hits and shinning a light on some less appreciated gems.........To make matters even worse, The Weight has been so regularily massacred in recent years by just about everyone who has performed it that I am at the points where I wish for a 10 year moratorium on hearing it live.


Entered at Thu Jul 25 15:35:26 CEST 2013 from (24.114.27.30)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Cover Heaven

...and here is a set list from a Wilco concert in June where they only played one Wilco song and 26 covers..........Tweedy has taste......dig the choices:

1. “The Boys Are Back in Town” (Thin Lizzy cover)

2. “Cut Your Hair” (Pavement cover)

3. “In the Street” (Big Star cover)

4. “New Madrid” (Uncle Tupelo cover)

5. “Dead Flowers” (The Rolling Stones cover)

6. “Simple Twist of Fate” (Bob Dylan cover)

7. “Ripple” (Grateful Dead cover)

8. “Who Loves the Sun” (The Velvet Underground cover)

9. “And Your Bird Can Sing” (The Beatles cover)

10. “And Your Bird Can Sing” (The Beatles cover) (Repeat)

11. “Psychotic Reaction” (Count Five cover)

12. “Tom Courtenay” (Yo La Tengo cover) (with Yo La Tengo)

13. “James Alley Blues” (Richard Brown cover)

14. “Waterloo Sunset” (The Kinks cover) (with Lucius)

15. “Waterloo” (ABBA cover) (with Lucius)

16. “(What’s So Funny ’bout) Peace, Love and Understanding” (Brinsley Schwarz cover)

17. “Marquee Moon” (Television cover)

18. “Happy Birthday To You” (Mildred J. Hill cover) (to Pat Sansone)

19. “(Don’t Fear) The Reaper” (Blue Öyster Cult cover)

20. “Cinnamon Girl” (Neil Young cover)

21. “Get Lucky” (Daft Punk cover)

22. “Surrender” (Cheap Trick cover)

23. “Color Me Impressed” (The Replacements cover) (with Tommy Stinson)

24. “Kingpin”

25. “Thank You Friends” (Big Star cover)

26. “The Weight” (The Band cover) (with Lucius)

27. “Roadrunner” (The Modern Lovers cover) (with Yo La Tengo)  


Entered at Thu Jul 25 14:43:26 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Adam, just wondering?

Adam writes: "If December 30 was considered the "soundcheck night", than Phil Ramone was correct when he said the majority was from Dec. 30. But then, he was also incorrect when he said nothing was used from New Year's Eve except for Garth's solo. Even though he produced the record, personally I always took his quote with a grain of salt."

I'm sorry Adam; but just wondering. Why would you doubt Phil Ramone? Is this information you got from Garth; otherwise I don't know how anyone would know that who wasn't there. I found your comment of interest. You'll have to forgive me; but as an interviewer of over 45 years, I just had to ask.


Entered at Thu Jul 25 13:12:35 CEST 2013 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: The Weight

Surprise! Virginia Beach. 24.7.13 'The Weight.' Bob Dylan sings verse one. Then others sing the other verses. Audience sing along.

The Weight (Bob on grand piano, Donnie on pedal steel, Stu on acoustic guitar, Colin Linden on lead guitar, Jim James and Jeff Tweedy on acoustic guitars)


Entered at Thu Jul 25 11:50:21 CEST 2013 from (72.82.185.4)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: Remastering

I'm the opposite of an audiophile. I have a $100 shelf system and $50 boom box, that I listen to cd's on. I do have about 5000 cd's, so for me it's about the music and not the nuances of the mastering. Many "audiophiles" seek out the original cd releases from the mid 80's. Some of those early cd's (Bowie RCA) go for big bucks on ebay.


Entered at Thu Jul 25 10:53:06 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Princely names

Article on my blog on choosing names for princes. I'd had enquiries from ELT teachers so wrote it, but some here may be interested too.


Entered at Thu Jul 25 08:14:15 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Live at the Academy

They had to change the title … if you look on amazon, or Google, a musical of the same title appears first. Yes, I'll buy Live At The Academy. It's law of diminishing returns. A £500 hifi sounded twice as good as a £250 hifi. A £1000 hifi was a 10% improvement on the £500. A £2000 was a 1% improvement on the £1000. Well, roughly! So extensive remasters are bought seeking a small improvement, not a revelation.

I agree that Royal Albert Hall, or any venue at the peak of the 1971 tour would be more interesting. The addition of horns for some of RoA was fantastic, but it would be good to have the basic show of that year too. Generally bands sounded crap in the cavernous hall until they fitted large hanging sound baffles 15 or 20 years ago. That shouldn't affect a soundboard multi-track if ever there was one. THe bootleg is poor sound, great performance. Reading Record Collector yesterday, I saw news of a huge multi-CD set of King Crimson's "Red" which said four of the CDs will be taken off the band's soundboard CASSETTES. As I mentioned a few days ago, stuff taken off soundboards for a band's own interest and reference were not going to be multi-track tapes … cost of pro tape as well as technical complexity meant there was no need to.

So the existence of "soundboard" tapes does not indicate that there are good quality recordings out there. But, as Al will tell you, "Nebraska" was recorded on the humble cassette.


Entered at Thu Jul 25 04:40:24 CEST 2013 from (74.78.175.69)

Posted by:

Far East Man

Location: Rockport, ME

Subject: Down South In New Orleans

I'm still on this great Band trip. I found a video of DSINO on You Tube. It's fun to watch - you can hear Levon belt it out but you never see him. Richard on drums, Dr. John on guitar! The late great Bobby Charles on stage - not sure if I ever saw him perform. Goodnight all....


Entered at Thu Jul 25 02:43:44 CEST 2013 from (99.141.52.191)

Posted by:

Adam

The biggest difference I expect we will hear on Discs 1+2 will come from the new mixes, done by Bob Clearmountain, from the multi track tapes.

Those discs are not really "remasters", but completely new mixes done with current technology.


Entered at Thu Jul 25 02:34:55 CEST 2013 from (208.120.36.230)

Posted by:

Jon L

Hmm, that's interesting. Has remastering technology changed a lot in the dozen or so years since the previous remasters came out, such that one would hear a difference? (Not being snide; I am genuinely curious.)


Entered at Thu Jul 25 01:40:57 CEST 2013 from (72.82.160.231)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: Live at The Academy

I share the disappointment in the track list for this box set. I did read that there will also be a 2 disc release for around $20. So, that might be a good option for people who want to hear the new mastering, without the expense of the box set.


Entered at Thu Jul 25 01:11:10 CEST 2013 from (99.141.52.191)

Posted by:

Adam

An official recording of "Strawberry Wine" (the sole unreleased track on Discs 1+2), the complete New Year's Eve performance (70% unreleased... 7 tracks appeared on the original LP), and the 2 tracks of DVD footage make this essential for me. But I do agree that the price should be considerably lower.

If the dates on Discs 1+2 are correct, the original ROA album and the 2001 bonus tracks are a pretty even overview of the four shows recorded.

4 tracks from December 28; 6 tracks from December 29; 8 tracks from December 30; 7 tracks from December 31.

If December 30 was considered the "soundcheck night", than Phil Ramone was correct when he said the majority was from Dec. 30. But then, he was also incorrect when he said nothing was used from New Year's Eve except for Garth's solo. Even though he produced the record, personally I always took his quote with a grain of salt.


Entered at Thu Jul 25 01:10:01 CEST 2013 from (64.134.243.109)

Posted by:

Joe Frey

Location: Albany, NY

Subject: Live at the Academy

Both Jon and Adam make good points, albeit in different directions. When you look at Another Self Portrait - deluxe edition, you get 4 cds of non-repetitive tracks. Contrast that to Van Morrison's 5 cd/blue ray version of Moondance, were you get just about every take of every song with one or two additional tracks(in the tradition of many jazz reissues). Now with Live From the Academy you get every or most (not sure) of the entire engagement but you get repetitive tracks because of the desire to provide the NYE show in its original format, you have to be faithful to the original release (disc 1 and 2 but not in the same order) and you now can "cherry pick" tracks and provide them in surround sound format. My litmus test has always been "how often will I pull this off the self to listen to it." Its not a matter money - I certainly have spent a college tuition on music, it really is a matter of time. I am interested what other GBs think. Joe


Entered at Wed Jul 24 23:07:33 CEST 2013 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Disc 5, ouch. Well, that kinda seals it for me then. (Still keeping a candle lit for Royal Albert Hall '71...)


Entered at Wed Jul 24 22:50:15 CEST 2013 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: More on Academy

Kind of disappointed.Duane Allman,the Allmans(brothers and sisters),the Dylan boots and Another Self Portrait and other boxsets(inclcuding one of my favorites,A Musical History)have been or appear to be creative,full of energy and surprises.Academy is primarily,as others have said,a repeat of the remastered box with the bonus disc-which I love! Seems no need for this,and I feel badly as I really want Band releases.Also,the DVD,if I'm understanding correctly,is not video,but enhanced sound of the cd.If one doesn't own the remastered cd,might be well worth purchasing this.


Entered at Wed Jul 24 22:48:04 CEST 2013 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

David P, a friend of mine is Barry Mann's nephew. He's been to his home in LA where he's listened to the original demos of all his hits.


Entered at Wed Jul 24 22:45:47 CEST 2013 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Jon L, it looks as though Disc 5 is audio surround sound of the songlist plus two more videos from the show, sso it's not a lot of new footage.


Entered at Wed Jul 24 22:30:25 CEST 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: If Walls Could Sing

In addition to the Brill Building, another nearby building at 1650 Broadway became an integral part of the "Brill Building Sound." This is where the younger songwriters hung out. The list would include Neil Diamond, Phil Spector, and "Big Seven" teams of Doc Pomus & Mort Shuman, Carole King & Gerry Goffin, Burt Bacharach & Hal David, Jerry Leiber & Mike Stoller, Neil Sedaka & Howard Greenfield, Jeff Barry & Ellie Greenwich and Barry Mann & Cynthia Weil. I highly recommend Ken Emerson's book "Always Magic in the Air: The Bomp and Brilliance of the Brill Building Era" on the subject.


Entered at Wed Jul 24 22:15:10 CEST 2013 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Subject: Re: Live at the Academy

I can appreciate that the release of the box set is a labor of love for those involved, but I don't know that I'll be the first one lined up to buy it. After all, this is the third CD release of a series of concerts I've already bought twice now (Rock of Ages, Rock of Ages remastered w/bonus tracks), and I've been pretty happy with the previous reissue. At a glance Discs 1+2 and 3+4 of the new set contain pretty much the same setlist, no? I guess I'm not a completist at heart, so unless I'm missing something I'm not sure how much I'll listen to multiple performances of the same tracks across different nights. (The Genetic Method would be an exception, as I'm sure Garth played it very differently each time & it could be fun to compare across multiple nights, but it appears it's the same performance on both discs.) Thoughts?

The Disc 5 DVD would seem to be the truly new and exciting addition... and it does look generously packed with footage... but even so, not sure if I'm inclined to buy a $90 set to get it. :(


Entered at Wed Jul 24 22:07:14 CEST 2013 from (70.53.46.122)

Posted by:

Kevin J

The Brill building was one of the first places I visited on my first visit to New York. I just stood outside and thought about all the great songs that were created inside. Last year I was at the Chelsea Hotel and thought the same thoughts – plus a few others! Weird how some of the real Halls of Fame are not the actual ones. There was a restaurant in Montreal right beside the legendary Montreal Forum called “Texan” that was considered by many to be the unofficial hockey Hall of Fame. I felt sadder when that place disappeared than I would if the real Hockey Hall of Fame were ever to be abandoned. Nice to see Paul Simon still has an office in the Brill building.

ROA: Blessing is the right word as that album is special to me. I just want great sound - or the best possible. Video would have been a surprise and most welcome but I take it not to be - at least not more than 2or 3.


Entered at Wed Jul 24 21:46:14 CEST 2013 from (74.108.29.147)

Posted by:

Joan

Web: My link

Subject: Brill Building

The Brill Building is looking for tenants


Entered at Wed Jul 24 21:38:06 CEST 2013 from (99.141.52.191)

Posted by:

Adam

Regardless of issues many fans seems to have with the new release, I'm buying the deluxe regardless. It's an automatic buy, I have to have it and just the fact we're getting any release at all is a blessing.

But I do think an honest fan discussion of "what's new" on the set is healthy. Disc 1 & 2 contains the album tracks and 2001 bonus tracks. In the 2001 liner notes, it said that the bonus tracks were the "best versions" from the four nights. So their decision to use those same versions must mean that opinion hasn't changed, and that those bonus tracks really are the best versions and were selected right.

I see now that the repeat of tracks from New Year's Eve is inevitable. The full NYE performance is the bonus... but it just so happens that 11 of those tracks were selected as takes for the album/2001 reissue.


Entered at Wed Jul 24 21:20:04 CEST 2013 from (63.140.181.119)

Posted by:

Joe Frey

Location: Albany, NY

Subject: Live at the Academy

Adam raises some interesting issues about the new release. I would be interested in the thought behind the need to repeat 11 songs. Maybe Sebastian, who was involved with the project, will weigh in. Joe


Entered at Wed Jul 24 21:14:54 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Hyacinth Bucket (aka Bouquet)

I'd forgotten that one. Yes. We are afflicted with Quaint Hotels in Britain!


Entered at Wed Jul 24 20:21:39 CEST 2013 from (74.108.29.147)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Van Dyke Parks/ Peter

From the few tracks I listened to off his new album It reminds a little of Garth's Beautiful Old

Peter have you ever seen the Episode of Keeping Up Appearances Your Quaint Old Hotels reminded me of the Episode when Hyacinth insists on buying a house in the country. What they end up with is 4 flights up,under the eaves tiny apartment in a castle. A lot of fun ensues.


Entered at Wed Jul 24 20:08:20 CEST 2013 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

mike h

Web: My link

Subject: The Band riding a fire truck into Stanford Frost Stadium (06/26/76).

Greil's brother, Steven Marcus, shared this pic of The Band (Garth in the fire truck's cab), Robbie & tour mgr Larry Samuel just behind the cab, & Richard & Rick towards the very rear of the truck. Temps reached 105 F in the shade & the guys sprayed water on the crowd on the way in.


Entered at Wed Jul 24 19:51:19 CEST 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Levon & Garth & Los Lobos

Levon made a guest appearance on two songs from Los Lobos' 1990 album "The Neighborhood." Garth later played on two songs from the group's 2004 album "The Ride."


Entered at Wed Jul 24 19:28:56 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Kevin, do cut and paste that on the Toppermost comment … alternative lists or favourites are exactly the discussion they wanted to get going.

Band-like … I have bought SO many albums on reviews that said "Band like". Two, very early on, so not counting as contemporary, were Link Wray (1971) and "Really" by J.J. Cale … both I think linked to The Band by Richard Williams, and both purchases that have proved well worth it. Bruce Hornsby & The Range were reviewed as Band like, which they were, and look at all the later connections.

Yes, I bought The Gourds. Last time we did this one, someone suggested Los Lobos "Kiko & The Lavender Moon" album which was fair too. Mumford & Sons? Not that much, but they have their own virtues.

Sometimes you have to look to mood rather than a style … on stage Bellowhead can really hit a "Rag Mama Rag" vibe, but in an English way, plus the horns, fiddles, guitar etc kind of work.


Entered at Wed Jul 24 19:17:13 CEST 2013 from (70.53.46.122)

Posted by:

Kevin J

David P: Perfect! Funny thing is I never think of Jason Isbell with that group of “new bands that worship The Band” but he is someone that could have fit in then and has a growing catalogue of strong songs now. Love the guy and that link.

Solomon: Thank you. The very thing that keeps me here is the type of musical suggestions that you just tabled. Always appreciated.


Entered at Wed Jul 24 18:54:50 CEST 2013 from (70.53.46.122)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: RR List - Play along kids - it won't hurt any of you to admit publically you actually like the guy who changed all of your lives!

LINKED: Golden Feather" Live

Interesting on the Robbie Robertson list of songs….sticking to the same albums, on the 1987 debut, my favorites are “Showdown at Big Sky”, “:Sonny Got Caught By The Moonlight” and “Broken Arrow”. On Storyville, I would take “Shake this Town” and “Night Parade” and on HTBC, I believe “Straight Down The Line” and “Right Mistake” to be the two strongest songs. I agree on “Between Trains” and Music for Native Americans is a masterpiece that I find hard to pick any one or two above the others. If pressed, “Golden Feather” and “Ghost Dance”.


Entered at Wed Jul 24 18:47:10 CEST 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Kevin: In answer to your question, for me one group comes to mind, Jason Isbell & the 400 Unit.


Entered at Wed Jul 24 18:42:11 CEST 2013 from (92.18.160.164)

Posted by:

Solomon

Web: My link

Subject: Music

Above link is the August edition of Uncut Magazine. Forty-five years on, the story of an album that changed the landscape: Music From Big Pink. Kevin J - have you tried The Gourds album called Bolsa de Agua ? or any solo stuff by Kevin Russell. The Mums would never be so popular without the music having a nice glossy sheen on it. I think these boys are to Folk music what the Eagles were to Country music.


Entered at Wed Jul 24 18:13:10 CEST 2013 from (70.53.46.122)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Could this fit on Stage FrIght?

Mumford and Sons: Not a fan either……but association like this really works in this business. How many people in the 60’s and 70’s were turned on to the old blues guys thanks to Clapton, Beck and Page and others constant homage to them on record and especially in print………….The problem with so many of these young bands that name-check The Band is they may get and even copy aspects of the “gentle” side of The Band but they apparently know nothing or are incapable of getting anywhere near the “gritty” side of where The Band came from. Almost all are absent of truly great songs as well………..even buffoons like the highly derivative Oasis had two or 3 songs that could well have made it on to a Beatles album. Wilco excepted, I have not heard one other Band loving new band that could place a single song on any Band album. Has anyone else?


Entered at Wed Jul 24 17:52:55 CEST 2013 from (24.124.96.66)

Posted by:

Dexy

Web: My link

Subject: Woody Guthrie's childhood home

Above link is to a Kickstarter page for a friend who is planning to restore Woody Guthrie's childhood home in Oklahoma. Same guy recently did Johnny Carson's.


Entered at Wed Jul 24 17:50:58 CEST 2013 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: taste, genius, popularity

The Social Scientists have confirmed what we knew all along: the popularity of any work of art has much more to do with happenstance and buzz than with the intrinsic quality of the work . . . .


Entered at Wed Jul 24 17:29:59 CEST 2013 from (86.167.250.140)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Peter, Toppermost

You've got me playing my Robbie albums just now. I'll comment once I've played them.

I've spent the last two days babysitting, then when relieved of duties playing Byrds' tracks. I've got my twenty favourites now down to ten for Toppermost. Coming soon.

Off on annual hol on Saturday.


Entered at Wed Jul 24 16:54:21 CEST 2013 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Taste

Taste (or enjoyment) in music, like taste in art, is hard to define. In this case, the music or painting or sculpture may be of the same genre or form, and yet for a hundred different reasons an individual may not appreciate it. That is the beauty of creativity for those of us lucky enough to be exposed to it. For me, Mumford and Sons carries on a tradition in fine form. For others, not so much.


Entered at Wed Jul 24 16:17:47 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Mumford & Sons are often described as "Band-like" and are great fans of The Band. They're a good band. What they really need is a producer to stop them using the same structure on every single song. The tunes differ nicely, it's just they have a fixed arrangement pattern. I think it's a reasonable move to link the Band to new generations of fans. Why not? Everyone is being rediscovered. If people listen to Mumford & Sons praising The Band and it makes them listen, wonderful. Mumford & Sons are extremely popular.


Entered at Wed Jul 24 15:40:08 CEST 2013 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Subject: Re: Van Dyke Parks

David, thanks for the link. I've been getting started on VDP recently ... have had Orange Crate Art (collaboration with Brian Wilson) on rotation in the past month or so. He is a fascinating character and I'm really liking what I've heard of this new release. I think Garth fans here will appreciate some of the whimsy and offbeat instrumentation in these songs.


Entered at Wed Jul 24 15:18:17 CEST 2013 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: _The Rise and Fall of a Super Freak_

The Rick James story in 8500 words.

Published 2003, i.e. less than a year before the story ended.

Cameo appearances by Helm and Hudson.


Entered at Wed Jul 24 15:17:19 CEST 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Van Dyke Parks

Looking for something new & different in music -- check out Van Dyke Parks' "Songs Cycled". His first full solo project in over two decades was released yesterday. See link for review and song streaming.


Entered at Wed Jul 24 14:09:47 CEST 2013 from (99.141.52.191)

Posted by:

Adam

You can see from previous posts that I have been nothing but positive about the ROA release, but there are disappointing aspects for sure. For one, the repeat of all the material from the 2001 reissue, as well as the number of repeated material in this new set itself. Plus the lack of more DVD footage. Why wouldn't "Don't Do It" from AMH be included here with the other videos?

And not to be super negative, but I really can't stand "Mumford & Sons". Who cares what they think of ROA? They really do not belong anywhere near The Band in an archival release like this. And I don't think anyone in their demographic would buy this just because of that involvement.


Entered at Wed Jul 24 13:26:14 CEST 2013 from (78.149.133.124)

Posted by:

Sparks

Web: My link

The discography of the Band is awesome. So many releases; is there anyone out there that owns the entire discography?


Entered at Wed Jul 24 12:58:56 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Blind Willie

Thanks Willie. Typo. You are 100% sir!


Entered at Wed Jul 24 11:29:31 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Robbie on "Toppermost"

The Toppermost site (linked) has Robbie Robertson as today's selection of ten (selected by me). Recent days include The Beatles and Steeleye Span. Do add comments!


Entered at Wed Jul 24 06:56:28 CEST 2013 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Phil Ramone on RoA: "That album, as it exists, is the -- what we call the soundcheck night and if you listen carefully -- what the evening was planned to do was that the next night which was gonna be New Years Eve, was gonna be THE album. Well, the only thing we ever used from that was Garths solo."

So the "soundcheck night" was Dec. 30, but assuming the track list is correct, Phil was incorrect.


Entered at Wed Jul 24 06:21:08 CEST 2013 from (99.141.52.191)

Posted by:

Adam

So basically, Discs 1 & 2 contain the original album takes and bonus tracks from 2001 reissue, in a completely new order and remixed. Discs 3 & 4 are the complete NYE show, 11 songs of which were chosen as master takes for the original album. DVD with 2 songs footage.


Entered at Wed Jul 24 05:53:50 CEST 2013 from (99.233.66.183)

Posted by:

Blind Willie

Location: Toronto
Web: My link

Subject: John D - Dylan ACC

John - see link above. Dylan played the ACC in 2001, 2006 and 2012. Is it the November 8, 2001 show at the ACC? Most of the evening were acoustic songs with Larry Campbell and Charlie Sexton singing harmonies. My second favourite Dylan concert of 25. The best show was Dylan and The Band 1974 at the Montreal Forum.


Entered at Wed Jul 24 05:05:27 CEST 2013 from (99.141.52.191)

Posted by:

Adam

Web: My link

There is now a tracklist on Amazon for "Academy 1971". I have to say, I'm a bit shocked. It appears that Discs 1 & 2 are compilations of recordings from the 4 nights... but are songs from the original album those takes? Or new unreleased takes? Also, no information is given as to the tracks' relation to the ones that appeared on the 2001 two disc reissue. Are any of those tracks on this?

Discs 3 & 4 is indeed the full New Year's Eve show, but there are 11 tracks (!) from the first two discs that were from Dec. 31... and they are repeated again here! Likewise, Bob Dylan's encore performance is included on the Disc 2 compilation... yet repeated again in full on the second New Year's Eve disc!

There is new DVD video footage of "King Harvest" and "The W.S. Walcott Medicine Show"... but not the previously released "Don't Do It" video from A MUSICAL HISTORY.

All of these comments are under the assumption that the current info on Amazon is official, of course.


Entered at Wed Jul 24 04:49:01 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Location: Toronto otherwise known as Trawna

Subject: Larry Campbell / Charlie Sexton

In 2003, I went to see Dylan at the ACC and for the first time saw Larry Campbell and Charlie Sexton playing with Bob. It was the most enjoyment I had; since Bob played with The Band. I've had the pleasure of getting to know Larry through Levon; over the last 5 years and he just might be one of the greatest journeyman musicians I have ever met. Name the stringed instrument; or fiddle and Larry knocks it out of the park. He is also very humble for a man of his talent.


Entered at Wed Jul 24 04:38:59 CEST 2013 from (99.141.52.191)

Posted by:

Adam

Web: My link

Subject: "Live At The Academy Of Music 1971" info from Amazon

"During the final week of 1971, The Band played four legendary concerts at New York City's Academy Of Music, ushering in the New Year with electrifying performances, including new horn arrangements by Allen Toussaint and a surprise guest appearance by Bob Dylan for a New Year's Eve encore. Select highlights from the concerts were compiled for The Band's classic 1972 double LP, Rock Of Ages, which peaked at No. 6 on the Billboard 200 and remains a core album in the trailblazing group's storied Capitol Records catalog.

For the first time, all four of the concerts' multi-track recordings have been revisited for 'Live At The Academy Of Music 1971,' a new 4CD+DVD collection. The expansive new collection features new stereo and 5.1 Surround mixes, including 19 previously unreleased performances and newly discovered footage of two songs filmed by Howard Alk and Murray Lerner. 'Live At The Academy Of Music 1971' takes a deep dive into The Band's historic shows for a definitive document of the pioneering group's stage prowess at the apex of their career. Live At The Academy Of Music 1971 is presented in a deluxe, 48-page hardbound book with previously unseen photos, a reproduction of Rolling Stone's original Rock Of Ages review by magazine co-founder Ralph J. Gleason, an essay by The Band's Robbie Robertson, and appreciations of The Band and the set's recordings by Mumford & Sons and Jim James of My Morning Jacket. The collection's first two discs feature performances of every song played over the course of the four concerts, and the New Year's Eve soundboard mix on discs 3 and 4 puts the listener in the room for that entire legendary night: Uncut, unedited, taken straight from the master recordings and presented in full for the first time. The set's DVD presents the tracks from discs 1 and 2 in 5.1 Surround, plus Alk and Lerner's filmed performances of 'King Harvest (Has Surely Come)' and 'The W.S. Walcott Medicine Show.'

The stereo mixes for the first two discs and the DVD's 5.1 Surround mix were done by Bob Clearmountain, with the stereo mixes for discs 3 and 4 helmed by Sebastian Robertson and Jon Castelli, assisted by Ryan Nasci. The collection was mastered by Patricia Sullivan at Bernie Grundman Mastering. The concerts were originally recorded by Phil Ramone with Mark Harman.

Additional Disc Information: (Disc 3) New Year's Eve At The Academy Of Music 1971 (The Soundboard Mix)/(Disc 4) New Year's Eve At The Academy Of Music 1971 (The Soundboard Mix)/(Disc 5) Live At The Academy Of Music 1971 in 5.1 Surround Sound."


Entered at Wed Jul 24 04:18:57 CEST 2013 from (74.78.175.69)

Posted by:

Far East Man

Location: Rockport, ME

A shout out to John D. Would you please email me @ fitzncole@gmail.com. Thank you.....


Entered at Wed Jul 24 00:22:41 CEST 2013 from (96.54.178.226)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: It takes 2 to tango

A comment regarding artists sitting in on other artist's performances and golden opportunities. 1) Both artist must want to do this. 2) Who knows what water has gone under those proverbial bridges from the time to this time 3) Maybe the artist left the venue before the thought occurred to anyone 4) these things are usually not planned 5)one or more of the above. When an artist does sit in with another, sometimes magic occurs. I do agree that it would be nice for the concert goers for such magic, especially with the history that these people had together in the 60s and 70s. Alas!!


Entered at Tue Jul 23 23:30:23 CEST 2013 from (96.54.178.226)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Colin Linden :Guitar for Dylan

Yes. It was mentioned here the morning after the replacement (for Charlie Sexton) occurred in Toronto on July 15. All fine guitarists. Reasons have been speculative and never confirmed. No big surprise for Dylan to keep his reasons to himself.


Entered at Tue Jul 23 23:07:32 CEST 2013 from (70.53.46.122)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Jon............funny...and consider.......

Lucinda Williams on touring with Bob Dylan and Van Morrison – otherwise known as the Grumpy, Grumpier and Beautiful tour:

“I had this fantasy that we’d all hang out,” she said. “Nothing could’ve been farther from the truth. Nobody talked to each other. Van’s band was unhappy, never sure if they’d get fired one day or the next. Same went for Bob and his band.”


Entered at Tue Jul 23 23:05:03 CEST 2013 from (99.141.52.191)

Posted by:

Adam

Exciting news about Garth sitting in with Chicago's own, Wilco. Garth has done this before... first at the Newport Folk Fest in 2004 (where he is completely absent from the sound mix on the audience tape), then again at Massey Hall in October 2004. That was the best one, and a nice recording exists.

Was it mentioned that Colin Linden is now playing guitar for Bob Dylan? After Duke Robillard got fired, Charlie Sexton filled in a few dates, and Linden has been playing ever since Canada on the tour. Dylan completely wasted an amazing opportunity to have Garth sit in with him as well that night. In 2008, at the same venue, Dylan also shared a bill with Levon and didn't play with him either. What's the deal? It seems the only Band member to do that was Rick in 1997.

I am pretty certain Larry Campbell won't be re-joining Dylan's band. He had SO much more input, freedom, and producing duties in Levon's group, and now that he's gone, I'm sure we can count on Larry to continue leading the Dirt Farmer and Midnight Ramble bands.


Entered at Tue Jul 23 22:43:54 CEST 2013 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Kevin: "Of course, the pay days are likely good..."

I dunno... rumor has it Bob pays in blood. (And not his own.)


Entered at Tue Jul 23 22:38:01 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Quaint hotels

A rant added to my blog (see link) on Quaint hotels.


Entered at Tue Jul 23 22:25:39 CEST 2013 from (70.53.46.122)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Larry Campbell’s departure from the Dylan band really affected things in live shows for a long while…….I commented at the time how notable – for me anyway – his absence was. However, Bob’s current presentation is so light on guitar that I would have to think it would not be much fun to step back into. Of course, the pay days are likely good. I think Larry’s contributions to Dylan’s recordings and creativity during his 7 or 8 year association ( minor golden period it was ) is also something that is underrated……so might be good all-around if he does return.

Dylan finishes this leg of his tour with a series of concerts at Royal Albert Hall…….the dreamer in me would like to see Robbie Robertson join him for that.


Entered at Tue Jul 23 21:45:43 CEST 2013 from (85.255.44.134)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Subject: hm...

Nah...


Entered at Tue Jul 23 21:06:45 CEST 2013 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: Thanx Mike

MIKE: Thanx so much for understanding my way of being friends...I do appreciate your response...xoxoxo


Entered at Tue Jul 23 20:49:41 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Grupo Lokito

Also a review of Grupo Lukito, an eight piece "Congolese band with salsa rhythms" added. Even if not intrested in the band (who are brilliant) you get to see the 19th century Garden Stage at the Larmer Tree.


Entered at Tue Jul 23 20:38:54 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: KT Tunstall

Review of KT Tunstall at the Larmer Tree on Sunday added. Linked here.


Entered at Tue Jul 23 19:39:26 CEST 2013 from (70.30.114.231)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: Serenity

There must be some mistake, Vi. You never offended me. In fact, I'm probably unoffendable. Just an old reprobate trying to spread joy and happiness across this screwed-up planet. I hold you in the highest regard.


Entered at Tue Jul 23 18:19:58 CEST 2013 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: NORM & MIKE

NORM & MIKE: My deepest apologies if I have offended you both in any way..I never meant to do anything but to show my friendship and thinking of you..MY feelings are hurt, but I will get over it. If SORRY isn't enough, then "so be it".

BONK: I needed that!! Thanx for caring...xo

Take care, all xoxoxo


Entered at Tue Jul 23 10:16:11 CEST 2013 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: GH and Wilco

thanks for posting those clips. I have often thought that Wilco are the Bob Dylan and The Band of the 21st century. Take a look at the Ashes of American Flags DVD. Tweedy looks bit like Dylan at the Isle of Wight. I saw Wilco with Mavis Staples here a few months back. The highlight was Mavis doing The Weight. After that she shouted "Levon Helm" twice - to huge applause.


Entered at Tue Jul 23 04:05:18 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: ROA / Academy of Music

This has long been one of my favourite Band albums and; under the category of "Live", one of my favourite Live albums of all time. Hearing Garth perform The Genetic Method/Chest Fever; on New Years Eve has stayed with me all these years; since its initial release. What really intrigues me is the DVD. I, along with many have hoped that there was video shot that night and I think a couple of videos have surfaced; over the years. I would hope the entire concert is on DVD; unlike the original Last Waltz; where songs were absent; in the film; because of technical problems. The child in me wants it now. The anticipation; however makes it sweeter. All five were so strong; over those nights at the Academy.

One summers night in 2002, my wife and I sat in Garth and Maud's music cabin; down the driveway; from the main house; just outside of Woodstock. Garth talked and played for us; until the early hours of the morning. I have never forgotten that night and how blessed I was to be there.


Entered at Tue Jul 23 02:48:24 CEST 2013 from (99.141.52.191)

Posted by:

Adam

I couldn't be happier that a 5 disc deluxe "Rock Of Ages" is being released. It definitely seems like The Band's camp wanted a well produced, high end, multi disc set on the market like many, many other artists from the '60s and '70s are now releasing. The Band absolutely deserves to be side by side in the public eye with those releases. The "A Musical History" box set (and reissues) showed that archival studio material was available, but that project released about 60 tracks of rare/unreleased material from 1967-1978. These deluxe editions usually focus on one album release... such a project for Band studio albums probably couldn't be done, as the cream of the outtakes have been released and all that material from one particular album doesn't exist. So "Rock Of Ages" was the logical choice to expand, with the multiple nights of music, the DVD footage, the extensive photographs, all with The Band at a creative peak in live performance. And I think it's intentional that this release has a different identity than the original "Rock Of Ages". "Live At The Academy Of Music 1971" is almost to "ROA", what the Grateful Dead's European 1972 archive releases are to the original album "Europe '72".

That said, I am very hopeful that this set will sell, and that a Band archival live release series will continue with Royal Albert Hall 1971. Maybe that could be released down the road, providing fans who don't want the huge box set with an alternative.


Entered at Mon Jul 22 23:50:44 CEST 2013 from (184.66.137.72)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Perspective on 'Canamericana'

It has been interesting to read the comments and excitement surrounding the release of the Acamdemy concert. Isn't it affirming of the music created by these 5 superb musicians that 42 years after the concert was held, it is as interesting and fresh to listeners who were around then and to younger people as well. There are many bands now who do what they do because they emulate the style and musical form of The Band. The interest in what has been called "Americana" (maybe it should be called "North Americana" or "Canamericana") is there with the music of Dylan, MMJ, Wilco, the National and so many others like Mumford and Son, Avetts, Bellowhead continue the tradition. There are so many genres but the creation of this one and its persistence in the musical interests of so many is cause for jubilation and joy.


Entered at Mon Jul 22 22:34:06 CEST 2013 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Academy of Outtakes really is a superb set. I don't know what the availability of the disks is these days, but I was able to purchase it pretty quickly when it first appeared. It's now widely available on download sites and the entire set is on Youtube.


Entered at Mon Jul 22 22:03:59 CEST 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Academy All the Way: The Genuine Rock of Ages

Pat: Yes, using the title Live at the Academy not only avoids confusion, but also dodges the potential for a copyright / trademark dispute. That leads one to wonder if Capitol let any rights to the "Rock of Ages" title expire? However, when The Band expanded box set is released, no doubt many reviews will reference the original "Rock of Ages" release, leading to confusion in the Google/Bing world. And then there's the previously released bootleg "Academy of Outtakes" (see link).


Entered at Mon Jul 22 21:43:36 CEST 2013 from (74.78.175.69)

Posted by:

Far East Man

Location: Rockport, ME

Subject: Chest Fever

I've been confused for the last couple of days, trying to figure out if I'm an old fart, a young fart, or a middle fart. I'm only 48. I got rather emotional a few minutes ago when I followed David's link to Chest Fever. I've never heard Garth play live. I used to go to lots of shows. I imagined myself at the Wilco show and hearing that organ and knowing it was the one and only Garth. What a beautiful sound - I'm still letting the tears flow. I think I'll head back and check it out again.


Entered at Mon Jul 22 20:41:57 CEST 2013 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

David P, looks like they have avoided that confusion by not calling it RoA, although middle age farts can confuse anything.

I'm with you 100% on Royal Albert Hall 71. Look Out Cleveland on AMH is the best thing on there.


Entered at Mon Jul 22 20:06:53 CEST 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Rock of Different Ages

As a brand name, the theatrical production and subsequent film version entitled "Rock of Ages" has muddied the waters. No doubt the young farts, expecting glam rock music, will be confused when the expanded version of The Band's "Rock of Ages" is released.


Entered at Mon Jul 22 19:49:01 CEST 2013 from (74.108.29.147)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Ageism

OK Norm you have got me beat by 3 years,however I'm very pleased to have made it this far. I can only hope for more. My Mom was only 62 when she passed away.. At the time I thought that was "old". Now that I have been there and passed it I know she was so young. Ah, the arrogance of youth.. a


Entered at Mon Jul 22 18:31:06 CEST 2013 from (70.53.46.122)

Posted by:

Kevin J

As I have said before, we here were all Twitter before Twitter and Facebook before Facebook……and this Band GB is better than both….far better in my opinion………The scratch is that when interacting with people that you largely do not know personally then sometimes things can go sideways and you just have to accept that and try to correct it the best you can. One bit of housekeeping before moving on though - and it’s for Ray…………….When a person steps in it and then stands up and acknowledges his wrong and apologizes to those he offended as I did….then that person has stood up……..period end of story……to saunter over and pile on after the fact is very bad form. It’s worse than that actually but in the spirit of politeness, I’ll leave it at that.

Safe trip Norm and as always you strike the right balance of wisdom and humour….as does our pal Mike Nomad always.

DVD Recommendation: Genius Within: The Inner Life of Glen Gould……………………..5 stars….not just for the sophisticates ….this is great on all levels and I think would be appreciated by all here. Genius is a word over used to such an extent in our culture these days….it applies here.

Finally, rip up that membership card Joan! You are too elegant to ever be associated with that word…….I have written thousands of jokes in my day and not once dipped into the “bathroom humour” area. I don’t like reading them, I can’t stand watching them in movies or listening to people pass time on radio trying to entertain people with them….the very lowest rung of the comedy business………….which makes that phrase I used the other day even more careless upon reflection……………We’ll move on and do the best we can around here and hope we all live our lives well.

Filled the tank today, spent $$88.50 and thought hmm…….almost new ROA….and to think this expenditure will likely be drained way going up and down Bayview avenue and to outlet malls on the weekend in search of cheaper golf shirts!


Entered at Mon Jul 22 18:15:57 CEST 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Whatever happened to The Band live at Royal Albert Hall 1971 release that Sebastian mentioned a couple of years ago?


Entered at Mon Jul 22 18:03:52 CEST 2013 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Sorry, I missed the "Old Farts" fued. Well, maybe I'm not. That's the problem with age--my mind doesn't work anymore.


Entered at Mon Jul 22 17:05:42 CEST 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Garth also joined Wilco on "Long Black Veil" (link above).

Sadly, the original engineer for the "Rock of Ages" recordings, Phil Ramone, passed away in March.

John D: A copy of the Groscourt/Capitol contract was filed as an exhibit in Levon's lawsuit against the ad agency BBDO Worldwide, Inc. over the use of "The Weight" in Cingular ads. As with many courts, you can electronically access filings in the New York court system.


Entered at Mon Jul 22 16:49:31 CEST 2013 from (72.78.49.15)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love
Web: My link

Subject: Garth with Wilco

Mr. Garth Hudson appeared with Wilco last night as opposed to his old boss on the Americanarama tour. The link is to a video of part of Chest Fever where of course Garth is unmistakable. You can't see him, but you sure can hear him.


Entered at Mon Jul 22 16:36:52 CEST 2013 from (68.171.231.84)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: in defence of Kevin J

Fred: Two 2013 golf shirts, still sealed and stored responsibly, are bound to be worth big bucks in twenty years. Even more if they're not using that little alligator logo anymore.


Entered at Mon Jul 22 15:59:08 CEST 2013 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWeestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Clothes they were wearing

At the age of 60+++++ I have started new University studies: fashion, yes, FASHION - in a cultural and social context. I didn't even know they do such things nowadays. I sit there among twentyfive women and try to look cool.

I have seen the clothes of these five men in Woodstock in the late sixties with new eyes."Unstyled", at least to say. Or carefully styled? Did everyone look this way up there? Has anyone seen an article of The Band and fashion? If not, I'll do it... manana.

Poor ol' Rockin' Chair. First latte (Bill M) and now fashion ;-)


Entered at Mon Jul 22 11:26:49 CEST 2013 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

thanks Dunc, things are settling down now. We are used to quakes here but the last few days were a bit different than the norm. I did go to Scotland once - in the middle of winter - and loved it.


Entered at Mon Jul 22 10:38:00 CEST 2013 from (101.164.0.90)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Web: My link

Subject: I don't check in for a few days....

Guys, play nice. Kevin, I'm not talking to you in this instance. \ Meanwhile, some jimi Hendrix on mandolin.


Entered at Mon Jul 22 09:41:24 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Bellowhead

My review of Bellowhead, closing the Larmer Tree Festival last night linked.


Entered at Mon Jul 22 05:45:23 CEST 2013 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The last word

Yeah!.......I agree with you Mike. I think Kevin is just fine. He owes no apology for his thoughts on the subject that was in debate.

However, I think the same of John Donaby. He is a gentleman, and very long standing important presence in the broadcast and music industry. If I was to give an opinion at all, (and I am not taking sides in any way). I don't believe that Kevin is responsible in any way for who posts, or is absent here.

We all have our lives to live that take us away very often, so I don't think that can be attributed to any one here.

It's the same as Serenity's remark, our "man talk" is driving the ladies away........bullshit! The ladies here have put up with us for years, and joined in. Joan's last comment is confirmation. (Joan, your a doll, you old fart!)

I wonder Joan, I know it is rude to ask a lady her age, so I won't. I'll be 69 next month. (I think you knew that because you send me birthday wishes.).......So! do you have me beat???

I'm to sea tomorrow....... I didn't have an available deck hand, so Susan is coming with me. That means, I have to "tow the line". and that's no pun !

In these, "golden years" for many of us, I just wish you all good health and happiness with whoever you are with. We've come this far, and the interaction here has been a very happy and comfortable part of my life, (with all of you, including the fresh words of the young ones like, Ari, and Adam). So please, carry on. It is all worth while.

Consider when you slip a disc in the player, and what we have the pleasure to listen to. Many, many times I watch that concert in Calgary and watch those five fellows sing and play, "Rockin Chair". It wasn't by accident that I named my ship that name. I had the good fortune to meet a man like Lars Petersen. We shared some memories of the sea. Then you need to understand, what this site that Jan Hoiberg has had the patience to keep alive has meant to many of us.

I'm sure in hell not perfect......but I think the interaction that we have been allowed to maintain here really is perfect.............SO T'HELL WITH ALLAYUZ....I'm GOIN TO WORK:):):)


Entered at Mon Jul 22 05:11:47 CEST 2013 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

A few other sources are reporting the fifth disk is a DVD. That's promising.


Entered at Mon Jul 22 01:06:26 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Farting is unisex. We're having your membership card printed and embossed as I type.


Entered at Sun Jul 21 19:14:43 CEST 2013 from (74.108.29.147)

Posted by:

Joan

I'm likely the oldest fart here/ Is Old Fart gender free or do we need a term like "Fartette"?

Norm, about the email thing. My email is set to put mail in the "junk" box It solves the problem very easily


Entered at Sun Jul 21 17:51:28 CEST 2013 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: E-mail problems

Just do like George W Bush Jr (and me). Don't use it.


Entered at Sun Jul 21 16:15:38 CEST 2013 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Phew!

Dunc: 60, eh? Good, I've got a ways to go then! : )


Entered at Sun Jul 21 14:52:01 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Send him The Byrds too … you can comment on why you selected ten, and mention the ten that just missed!


Entered at Sun Jul 21 14:50:58 CEST 2013 from (86.167.250.140)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: John Martyn, The Byrds

I definitely will, Peter. I noticed there's going to be a massive box set release related to John Martyn. I think it's the Island years.

And last year's project was twenty best Byrds. Could I get that down to ten? Aaah decisions.

I received a nice e mail back.

Thanks. One thing I have got from the GB is I've become a better listener. Thanks everybody.


Entered at Sun Jul 21 14:09:53 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Dunc, you should ask them about a John Martyn list of ten!


Entered at Sun Jul 21 12:29:20 CEST 2013 from (86.167.250.140)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Van - Toppermost

A good list, Peter, but for me there would always have to be 'Have I Told You Lately' and 'Moondance'. I think both are great songs. I've got about 15 Van albums so there must be some greats I've not heard.

I've seen Van three times - good shows each time.

Every so often when playing Van, I can cringe at a lyric.


Entered at Sun Jul 21 11:54:02 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Singing Drummers

BTW, on the Toppermost Van Morrison, the video link they've selected is the BBC TV broadcast of Raglan Road with The Chieftains, on which Van sings while drumming. I saw him play harmonica, sax, guitar and piano this week, but not drums. I once saw him take the sticks from the drummer and demonstrate how to play Gloria properly though!


Entered at Sun Jul 21 11:49:46 CEST 2013 from (86.167.250.140)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: West of Scotland

Subject: Rod

Hope you are OK with earthquakes. I can't magine what it's like.

Just now we're gettin a sunny summer, three weeks of sunshine so far. The first sustained heatwave since 2006. Great! I live in a rainy environment, where for example, it can rain for what seems the entire summer. Peter gets an extra month's summer where he lives.

But this is a beautiful place and apart from occasional flooding we don't get hazards such as earthquakes, fires (poor Garth), Polar Bear warnings, or permanent winter snow.

I have often wondered if our drinking culture is related to the weather though. How this impacts on music is that if a band in Glasgow does well, the audience give a great response - couple of drinks before concert. Even 85 year old Burt Baccharach was moved by the reaction he got from the knowledgeable Glasgow crowd at the most recent concert I was at.

Hope you are OK with earthquakes.


Entered at Sun Jul 21 11:43:29 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

As it happens, Toppermost's latest ten favourites just went up, and today's list is Van Morrison - compiled by me. Do feel free to comment. I compiled it before this week's show and now I want to add Sometines We cry as duetted by Van and Shana Morrison, but these lists always change!

Also if anyone wants to add a ten, contact the webmaster first to check it's not waiting (Robbie & Levon are both queued up waiting for their day … it's strictly one new list a day), but they're very keen to get submissions from as many people as possible.


Entered at Sun Jul 21 11:29:18 CEST 2013 from (86.167.250.140)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Correction

Sorry, Veedon Fleece


Entered at Sun Jul 21 11:25:47 CEST 2013 from (86.167.250.140)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Fred et al

60, definitely 60.

last five albums played.

Van Morrison - Vaydon Fleece

Van Morrison - Moondance (Still influenced by the GB posts. A truly great album. I really like Wave Length too.)

The Byrds - Farther Along. Paid nearly £20 for this second hand album (played twice), but I'm now complete on the Byrds. The market dominates. Really like the classic Byrds albums.

Neil Young with Crazy Horse - Broken Arrow

John Cale - Paris 1919. Great album. Reread review , Peter, thanks. Was wondering about the relevance of the chosen place names, including my original home town.


Entered at Sun Jul 21 11:17:18 CEST 2013 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

If the Dylan set is to be over $100 then I might pass on that as well. To put things in perspective these releases are of historical interest only. Both were recorded around 40 years ago and music has moved on (not sure if that is always a good thing). That's not to criticise the music in any way but I'm sure the people involved probably released the best they had available at the time. I'd happily pay $30 for either release. What would tempt me with the RoA release is whatever new video may be included. Get Up Jake would be incredible but there's already the excellent Syriana Mosque stuff on YouTube. I'd rather save my money especially when I can buy a much desired resonator for $6 - 700. Sorry to rant - we've had a couple of reasonable earthquakes today so a bit on edge.


Entered at Sun Jul 21 10:20:43 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Do not ask as a refusal may offend …

The e-mail problem we have here is one I can mention, because no one from the GB has ever done it to me. That is friends of Mrs V who send online petitions on various worthy causes, with a request to forward it to ten people you know. This “chain e-mail” is just about the fastest way of spreading computer viruses plus I only sign petitions from sources I know and trust, like the Society of Authors or the Authors Copyright & Lending Society. We are getting fewer because we always say “We run our business from our computers. We cannot afford to get viruses. Please never send us group mailings, petitions or requests to forward stuff.” Cutting and pasting stuff also means that you can inadvertently copy something harmful.

There’s also the point that (given the most recent one) I don’t really lose any sleep about the Ministry of Agriculture culling badgers in Dorset to protect livestock from bovine TB. Every time I drive through rural Dorset there are at least three badgers as roadkill, which while sad, indicates they are very far from being an endangered species. As it was rare to see one ten years ago, I can see the farmers' point that rapid increases in numbers (due to protection) is infecting cattle.


Entered at Sun Jul 21 09:12:03 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Live recordings

We talk loosely about "soundboards" but those just done for interest / reference are probably just the live mix fed into a tape recorder. Stuff that was designed for recording would have a multi-track recording, and as Rob Bowman said in the liner notes to "To Kingdom Come" the 2 CD set where rarities first emerged, all three nights were recorded to compile the RoA album.

Bowman also pointed out that the Watkins Glen intro to Back to Memphis was joined to a recording from "a different location.' I'm sure I recall reviews at the time or interviews, and one said it was from St. Louis … a live show which has not been bootlegged.

So there's stuff out there. If they ran a reference tape of shows for interest in 1966 (which Robbie mentioned), it's likely they continued to do so, though they may have been tossed in a pile somewhere. In the late 70s, if it was just a case of maybe listening to something in the hotel to check it out (but usually not bothering) bands even ran cassettes off the sounboard.


Entered at Sun Jul 21 07:24:53 CEST 2013 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Yup!.it's me!

Now..after some thought Mike, I'm a little disgusted. Vi, doesn't seem to realize that she is quite rude. The sarcastic comment, "sorry to bother you", seems to imply that every one is just supposed to welcome whatever e mails arrive.

To me that is akin to welcoming peddlers at your door, or religious zealots, or whoever wants to feel they have a right to invade your privacy.

Serenity, You should rethink what you are doing. You, DON'T have a right to just keep on "forwarding" whatever cyber junk lands in your mail. Maybe some people see the internet that way. I don't. So now, if we are not friends any more, then.....so be it.

I've always tried to treat you with respect, but I recall you getting yourself in hot water on this site before from posting whatever propaganda you felt was relavent, "to you". So if I don't get any more "forwarded stuff" I'll be happy.

OK, Mike.....wanna step outside!:):):)


Entered at Sun Jul 21 06:48:25 CEST 2013 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: But seriously...

Were Robbie & Garth involved in any way with this new release (apart from obviously being in The Band ergo being on stage for the actual concerts later to be known as ROA)?


Entered at Sun Jul 21 06:46:08 CEST 2013 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: WTF?!?

Kevin J: you spent $150 on 2 (two) golf shirts?!?! That's just plain crazy! : )


Entered at Sun Jul 21 06:44:02 CEST 2013 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: F*ckin' old guys... ; )

Just out of curiousity, what's the minimum age limit in order to become a member of the Old Fart's Club? : )


Entered at Sun Jul 21 04:56:00 CEST 2013 from (70.30.114.231)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Vi, it's all Norm's fault.


Entered at Sun Jul 21 04:17:05 CEST 2013 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The Internet Devil!

Aww get off it Carl...it was a joke fer chrisisake.

Serenity, what you have just said is really stupid. You have NEVER e mailed me and said, Hi Norm how are you, or anything personal. Like a lot of people, you "forward" something, that is interesting to you, and expect that it is going to interest me. I have no reason to want to be disrespectful to you. However, I come home from my tug, and have a mountain of e mails, not only from you, but other people. I'm not going to spend all this time sifting thru this stuff. If that offends you, I'm not even going to apologize. I am not interested in all this stuff. I think you should begin to realize. You have no right to expect me to acknowledge all this stuff or LIKE IT!

Perhaps in your life this is what is important to you. That doesn't mean I have to spend my time to share what you decide I should like. Please.....delete me from your e mails, then when you hit that button, "send to everyone", I won't be part of it. This is not at all to insult you. I don't want all this e mail. I run a business and my e mail is important for other purposes.


Entered at Sun Jul 21 03:10:11 CEST 2013 from (24.108.1.255)

Posted by:

BONK

Location: Saltspring Island/Cabbagetown

Subject: Serenity

I don't know about Norm and Mike, but I'd gladly return your e-mail. But only if you want. It's fun when you get to talk to the faceless on this site as I have many times. Cheers, Carl.


Entered at Sun Jul 21 02:59:22 CEST 2013 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: John Lennon

9PM channel # 33 CNN John Lennon docu..

Hi, guys!! Where have all the gals gone? You all didn't scare them away with your "man" talk did you? Bad lingo is what I mean...

NORM & MIKE: Guess my e-mails aren't wanted either... Sorry to bother you with them...

CYA around xoxoxo


Entered at Sun Jul 21 02:40:01 CEST 2013 from (24.108.1.255)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: Norm

Hey Tugman. You might want to change the last line of your post.


Entered at Sun Jul 21 02:35:01 CEST 2013 from (99.141.52.191)

Posted by:

Adam

The books of A MUSICAL HISTORY and THE LAST WALTZ are beautiful. Love them and enjoy them often. That's not to say I read/love the text often, but a well produced collection of photos and memorabilia is very appreciated.


Entered at Sun Jul 21 02:13:50 CEST 2013 from (70.30.114.231)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Ahoy, Norm. May the barbecue gods be with youse tonight!


Entered at Sun Jul 21 01:24:05 CEST 2013 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Cheap Detective

I just come up from the ship, gotta barbecue Suz and I some ribs.......what do I find. So I got to read all this gawd damn stuff to see what's going on.

Now you guys knock all this gawd damn shit off! This is one old fart that ain't gwan tolerate it. Every body here are much to fine of people not to be able to get past a little squabble.

Now John and Kevin......you guys give each other a hug. I can see the brown eyed babe giving yuh both a kick in the nuts:):):)

Hi Mike! good to see you........notice how Peter always wants to analyze, and explain....I love it.

I got to go to work on Monday......hope you are all having a good weekend. I guess I'm not a real avid collector. I've got enough reading and listening material to satisfy me. The musical history book with 5 cd's and the DVD are my favourite of my collection.........so come together right now......over me!


Entered at Sun Jul 21 00:51:15 CEST 2013 from (72.82.168.81)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: Archival releases fromVan and The Band

I'm a huge fan of both Van and The Band and I have a lukewarm response to these two upcoming releases. I just find it hard to believe that multiple discs of alternate takes and rehearsals for 'Moondance' could be that enjoyable to listen to. If I was programming this set, I would have the original album, 1 disc of alternate takes, 1 live disc from 1970 and possibly a dvd, if there was sufficient footage to warrant one. "

" I'm much more interested in the 'Rock of Ages' box set. hopefully, the track list will be released soon, so we can see what we'll be getting. If I was programming a Band box set, I would clean up and release some of the bootlegs that have appeared over the years such as 'Roosevelt Stadium', 'Live at The Hollywood Bowl' and either the King Biscuit or Palladium show from '76. "

" Compared to many of their contemporaries from the 60's and 70's, their really has been very little live material of The Band released officially. Just Rock of Ages, Before the Flood and The Last Waltz. The Watkins Glen release was a fraud and has been deleted.


Entered at Sat Jul 20 23:55:28 CEST 2013 from (68.171.231.81)

Posted by:

bill M

I doubt that the eight takes of "Caravan" will be simply eight consecutive attempts to nail the song one afternoon. Van tried several sets of musicians to get the right sound for the album. One set was the guys from the Ravens - certainly Sandy Konikoff and Ernie Corallo, and I guess Stan Szelest too. I believe that Van's management company, Schweid-Merenstein (sp?), also handled Garland Jeffreys and John Cale, which is why Sandy and co are on "Grinder's Switch" and "Vintage Violence" as well.

For more than 40 years Toronto's great Pat Little has been said to be drumming on "Caravan" - uncredited. But maybe he'll turn up on one of the out-takes. I suspect that Pat got to know Van through Van's cousin Jimmy Watson, who was the drummer in Kensington Market, who were very tight with the guys in Pat's band in the Yorkville era, Luke and the Apostles. He does a really nice job on the Apostles' "You Make Me High" - which can (and really should) be found on YouTube, as can and should "Big Showdown" by Heaven and Earth, his '71 local "supergroup" that also included Rick James, Denny Gerrard and Ed Roth - and a nice sax break by Bert Hermiston, who had shared the stage with our guys on a number of occasions as a member of Robbie Lane and the Disciples.


Entered at Sat Jul 20 23:30:16 CEST 2013 from (70.30.114.231)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

"Former pals," Kev? Hey, man, you're aces in our book. (He is, right Norm?)


Entered at Sat Jul 20 23:29:22 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Peter/ Ray

OK Peter you find the clubhouse :-). Ray. You can be Sgt. At Arms :-)


Entered at Sat Jul 20 23:26:42 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John d

Subject: Kevin

Thank you Kevin. Now lets just carry on. Have a good remainder of the weekend.


Entered at Sat Jul 20 23:07:14 CEST 2013 from (161.185.157.22)

Posted by:

Ray

I know a few olf farts that would give this guy a club... and they'd make him say thank you when it was all over. Not nice to insult people like that.


Entered at Sat Jul 20 23:04:16 CEST 2013 from (24.114.70.200)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Take a Load Off

John. .....I always liked the Woodrow McCall line about "not tolerating.rudeness in a man"......I have tried to live my life that way....be tough, stand up for yourself , don't ever be wishy washy about things...but at the same time don't be rude or inconsiderate......I have not been perfect in that regard but I have tried and it is a behavior code that I strive to live by............I had planned on taking back what but before I could, I was being sworn at and accused of chasing off friends!

Correct though John........that is missing the point. I am sorry. Sorry to have offended you and others by careless choice of words - on a few occasions. Hopefully, we can get by this............meanwhile I' ll have to do the "Westmount Tip-Toe" out the back door to avoid a battle with former pals Mike Nomad and Norm!


Entered at Sat Jul 20 22:33:08 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

John D, if "old farts" is a category that embraces you, me and Pat B, the I'm proud to be a member.


Entered at Sat Jul 20 22:04:16 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Kevin's Last Post.

Well good on you Kevin. A good defense makes a strong offense. By the way; on just coming back here to comment; on your remarks is not the smartest thing I've ever done; but; on the other hand; they say if you let things stand, you are agreeing with them. I never said YOU keep bob and BEG away. It's general disparaging comments from people that make people disappear. That said. "Old Farts" is about ageism. In your first post it was the "Old Farts" statement that pissed me off. That's when your opinion ceased to be for me. You begin to explain yourself; in your 2nd post and then what do you say, "If all it's to be is the pompous talking to the pompous then what good is that?"

Huh????? Is talking about pricing, pompous? Why can't you just rely on your writing skills? You don't have to disparage people to make your point. If I may let me give you some advice that I was given by my boss. When addressing a situation, address the subject; NOT the man! It was good advice for me. I personally think your a good guy and an interesting writer. I just needed you to know what put me off and it sounds like it will be many years; before you too will understand the feeling. Meanwhile good health and a good life.


Entered at Sat Jul 20 20:57:18 CEST 2013 from (70.30.114.231)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Hey, Kev, ya young punk . . . ya wanna step outside? Normie and me, we wanna clean yer clock . . . providing youse bring it outside. [smiley face goes here]


Entered at Sat Jul 20 20:11:38 CEST 2013 from (24.114.70.200)

Posted by:

Kevin J

For the record, John, bob w and BEG are friends and you are definitley pointing in the wrong direction if you think their scarcity here has anything to do with me......quite the opposite in fact. I have had plenty of disagreements with people here over 10 years and can not think of a single case where I have been intentionally rude....In instances where I thought I might have been misinterpreted - once with you and once with JT - I immediatley clarified.......If you have forgotten that and choose to wrongfully characterize me as some sort of troublemaker so that discussion here will continue free of any challenge or difference of opinion.....then fine but I would think most here would be of the opinion that this GB would be a much lesser place without me.....and without opinions from you and others as well.......If all it's to be is the pompous talking to the pompous then what good is that? If one flippant comment can so enrage people to distort everything I have contributed and stood for here for a decade, then I guess it wasn't worth much of anything at all .


Entered at Sat Jul 20 19:48:05 CEST 2013 from (99.141.52.191)

Posted by:

Adam

Just want to say that I absolutely love the "book presentation" aspect of The Band's A MUSICAL HISTORY and THE LAST WALTZ box sets. These are lovingly made books filled with everything fans could want. Many people feel that they sit on the shelf, lose interest, etc. But I love The Band's box set approach. I take out the MUSICAL HISTORY box set almost every day to enjoy.


Entered at Sat Jul 20 19:12:22 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I’m trying to think where anyone said “these box sets won’t sound good.” But in the interest of peace, harmony and continued discussion, it’s probably better to step outside this discussion.

But in the interests of clear language, a “profanity” really should have a religious element in it. I see some internet definitions call any kind of swearing a profanity, but proper dictionaries retain a religious element. “Fucking” is really an obscenity rather than a profanity, though in the way I used it, I’d say it was “an intensifier” in intent. Last year an English court ruled that the word was now so common, that it is no longer considered seriously offensive, even when, in this particular instance it was used directly to a police officer.


Entered at Sat Jul 20 18:34:18 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Opinion

Your right Kevin. How dare a person over 60 have an opinion here. As I ended my post. "Thinking Out Loud." Life is too precious. I'll keep my opinions to myself in future. I don't know how old you are; but one day I hope you can have a difference of opinion; with someone; without insulting them. No wonder bob w and BEG don't lurk around here very much. It's all yours Kevin.


Entered at Sat Jul 20 18:23:09 CEST 2013 from (24.114.70.200)

Posted by:

Kevin J

.....as is profanity.


Entered at Sat Jul 20 18:10:34 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Also Kevin, though I'm sure it's meant in jest, "Old Farts Club" is on the ruder end of "extremely fucking rude."


Entered at Sat Jul 20 18:08:49 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

To clarify … if someone says "This is 5 great CDs of music. We spent months preparing it. It's $98." That's fine. I don't argue with that. It's the justification by including a bulky item that no one really wants to justify the price that irritates.

Similar happens to me in bookstores like Waterstones. They have a table of paperbacks with a "3 for 2" placard. I only want two of them. But I end up not buying any because I think I'm being overcharged unless I take the"free" one I don't want.


Entered at Sat Jul 20 18:01:45 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I certainly want to read the sleeve notes to both box sets and look forward to it. I can't say I'm desperate to buy a hardback collection of photos though. Much as I liked the pictures of European 7" singles with a previous Bob Dylan, I could live without them, not having looked at them since I first opened the set. And I know that the carrier … a CD … is not what you're buying but the content. But think about the Van set with EIGHT takes of Caravan. Do you really want to hear them? I probably would like to hear them, but only once, and I'd bet you anything the "best" take is the one they put on the original album.


Entered at Sat Jul 20 17:48:57 CEST 2013 from (24.114.70.200)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Blah, Blah, Blah at the GB

This is all too hilarious. The old farts club here complaining before the new ROA is even released that it likely won't sound very good.....that it definitley is priced too high and as a kicker will contain a booklet that you don't want!

In the last day, I spent over $200 on food I can never eat again........over $150 on two average golf shirts.........$50 on a Mordecai Richler book which I most probably will only read once ( perhaps twice ) in my lifetime...........and the same gang here that gets themselves into a tizzy daily over all things sound and quality in music jump up and down pouting about having to spend $98 for a work that people have slaved over for 6 months to a year aimed at a very select audience ( YOU! ). Mind boggling. Given the sales projections on a special release like this, $98-$105 is a bargain.......and I want to read the booklet!


Entered at Sat Jul 20 16:37:45 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

It includes a book you don't actually want too. A CD in a case costs about 75p, or one US dollar if you're pressing over 2000. That is the straight pressing price. I'd guess that if you own the pressing plant and are doing a lot more, they cost a lot less.


Entered at Sat Jul 20 16:31:48 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: CD Prices

So. Another Self Portrait, $105.00 for the full box set. $98.40 for Academy of Music by The Band. Those are American prices. higher here in Canada. My favourite band and solo performer taking me over the $100.00 mark to buy their music. Will I eventually spend the money? Probably; but I feel both prices excessive.

I remember the the ex President of Warner's Canada telling me years ago that the average manufacturing price for a CD was 6 bucks. Hmmm. The average person in Toronto can no longer take their kid to see the Toronto Maple Leafs; because of exorbitant prices. Concert tickets can't be purchased by the average Joe. Now 4 CD's cost over a 100 bucks. Yes I know, it includes a book.

As the Band once sang, "Thinking Out Loud."


Entered at Sat Jul 20 11:37:56 CEST 2013 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: RoA

$95 ??? - not sire if that is US or NZ dollars. Don't think I'll be splashing out on this one. I still haven't bought TLW box set yet. While the extras are always interesting it's hard to justify the cost. I will be getting the Self Portrait release though. I always liked Isle of Wight tracks on the original and can't wait to hear more.


Entered at Sat Jul 20 11:07:20 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Just ordered "Another Self Portrait" (the full thing) but the "Live At The Academy" set isn't on the amazon uk site yet.

15 years ago I started on a book called "Reviled! The Albums Critics Loved To Hate", and the Cahoots chapter is more or less in the library here. It's fascinating to see how many of those "Reviled on release" are getting the full reissue treatment now : Berlin by Lou Reed, Self Portrait, Their Satanic Majesty's Request, Let It Be. I never finished the project, but I might now that ebooks make it easy … it was filed away.


Entered at Sat Jul 20 05:39:43 CEST 2013 from (99.141.52.191)

Posted by:

Adam

The discs on the upcoming ROA, according to the picture, do reveal some things. As Pat said, the first two discs say "Mixed by Bob Clearmountain". Could DISCS 1 & 2 be the "finished production" ROA multi-tracks, including the original album and extra tracks from 2001, all remixed to match together? DISCS 3 & 4 could then be the full New Year's Eve show, with both non-horn and horn section sets in concert order. The DVD does contain more video footage, but how much is the big question.


Entered at Sat Jul 20 04:32:34 CEST 2013 from (24.114.70.200)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: ROA Part IV

I am very excited by the new ROA as the record company released expanded version in 2001 sounded awful. I played it once and almost cried. Expecting miracles at this stage is plain silly but with RR at the helm you just know it will sound as good as it can based on what they have to work with and the presentation will be beautifully done............AND was not the minor miracle we have all been squawking about and dreaming of forever of being FILM of more than just one song........unless, I have missed something - I thought it confirmed that there will be additional film or video of The Band at NYE or at rehearsals?


Entered at Sat Jul 20 03:38:23 CEST 2013 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: Sir Tom Jones

Don't you just love this guy?

The Power and Magnificence of Sir Tom Jones

By Dave DiMartino

And indeed, even today, at the ripe age of 73, Sir Tom still has it and can show it at will.

Most recently, Sir Tom has displayed his talents via a critically lauded album—his 40th, believe it or not—titled Spirit In The Room, a masterful set produced by Ethan Jones sounding every bit as contemporary as the latest albums by artists half a century younger.

Featuring compositions by the diverse likes of Leonard Cohen, Paul McCartney, Paul Simon, Bob Dylan, Blind Willie Johnson and Odetta, among others, Spirit In The Room displays a tastefulness and artistic maturity that few other than Jones could successfully pull off half as convincingly. His vocals—still a bastion of strength, and the asset that has long given him his nickname as “The Voice” in his homeland—remain in top form, his humor and self-awareness have not tapered one iota, and his presence, never particularly small, is, as always, one of a kind.

Y! Music was honored with Sir Tom’s presence in our studios recently—and to say it was one of our most memorable sessions to date would be an understatement. Showcasing the material from Spirit In The Room, and offering up a warm and revealing interview that oozed with the personal charisma and charm that has long been his hallmark, the singer effortlessly dazzled us.

CYA again xoxoxo


Entered at Sat Jul 20 03:24:54 CEST 2013 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: RUSH

Proud Canadians as we are!!

Here's something for you all to read...

Rush, featured on new Canadian stamp..By David Chiu

July 19, 2013 11:40 AM ET

Rush, who were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in April, will be commended once again for their contributions to music – this time at Canadian post offices.

The legendary power trio is among four rock bands, including the Guess Who, the Tragically Hip and Beau Dommage, who will be featured on postage stamps as part of Canada Post's Canadian Recording Artists stamp series. The stamps are due to be released Friday.

Depicted on the Rush stamp is the starman logo, which has been associated with the band going back to the classic 1976 record 2112.

Like Rush, the Guess Who and the Tragically Hip are also members of the Canadian Music Hall of Fame. The Guess Who scored several Billboard Top 40 hits, including "These Eyes" and "American Woman." The Tragically Hip have won 14 Juno Awards and last year released their latest studio album, Now for Plan A. Quebec's Beau Dommage had hit records with their debut and Où est passée la noce? in the mid-Seventies; they later split in 1978, but have periodically reunited.

Recording artists who have appeared on Canadian stamps in the last several years include Joni Mitchell, Paul Anka, Anne Murray, Bryan Adams, Kate and Anna McGarrigle, Robbie Robertson and Bruce Cockburn.

In other Rush news, the band will perform a benefit concert at the Enmax Centrium in Red Deer, Alberta on July 24th, with proceeds going to help those affected by the recent floods in the province. Rush's concert, part of the band's Clockwork Angels tour, was supposed to be held that day at the Scotiabank Saddledome, which sustained damage from the floods, thus prompting the cancelation and change in venue.

CYA soon xoxoxo


Entered at Sat Jul 20 01:26:52 CEST 2013 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

I don't mean to be a downer, but it looks like it's a Bob Clearmountain remix of the RoA multi-track, a soundboard mix of the NYE show, and a surround sound mix of (I would guess) the multi-track. I hope I'm wrong.


Entered at Sat Jul 20 00:10:41 CEST 2013 from (99.141.59.97)

Posted by:

Adam

Web: My link

Subject: ROCK OF AGES super deluxe edition

Now THIS is a super deluxe edition I am anticipating every minute that goes by!!!! Click the link for box set artwork for the 5 disc set "ROCK OF AGES: LIVE AT THE ACADEMY OF MUSIC 1971"!


Entered at Fri Jul 19 23:48:40 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The WB story is in one of the biographies … I'll look it up tomorrow.


Entered at Fri Jul 19 23:47:17 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: David P / Pat

Thanks David. Where DO YOU get all these inside contracts? I take it they are available on line somewhere? Thank you again to you and Pat.


Entered at Fri Jul 19 23:24:23 CEST 2013 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Van probably assigned the rights to his manager to negotiate certain deals, one of which seemed to give away his control of his master recordings.


Entered at Fri Jul 19 22:59:24 CEST 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: You Can't Lose What You Never Had

John: Under the standard recording contracts, the record labels own the master recordings in perpetuity. Occasionally, an artist is able to negotiate a deal to buy the rights to his or her recordings. As an example, the Groscourt/Band contract granted to Capitol:

"The results and proceeds of all of the Artists' endeavors pursuant to this agreement, including the exclusive ownership of all masters, positives and negatives thereof and records manufactured therefrom and the exclusive and perpetual right to use and control the same and the performances embodied therein; the exclusive and perpetual right to manufacture, advertise, sell, lease, license or otherwise use or dispose of such records whether based in whole or in part upon such results and proceeds or to refrain from so doing, in any and all fields of use throughout the world or any part thereof, upon such terms as Capitol may approve; the perpetual right to perform publicly such records and the exclusive and perpetual right to permit public performances thereof in any medium and by any means whatsoever."


Entered at Fri Jul 19 22:33:53 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Yes David; but HOW did he lose those rights? Naivety? Management at the time. I'd just interested in how it happened at the time. This is not a unique story with recording artists over the decades.


Entered at Fri Jul 19 22:29:13 CEST 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

John: It's my understanding that Van Morrison has control of his later recordings, but Warner Bros. still owns the masters of ASTRAL WEEKS, HIS BAND AND STREET CHOIR and MOONDANCE.


Entered at Fri Jul 19 22:00:58 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Van losing rights

Does anyone know how Van lost his rights to his WB years?


Entered at Fri Jul 19 20:12:47 CEST 2013 from (70.50.65.225)

Posted by:

Kevin J

A severe weather warning is in place for Toronto and area this afternoon and it just occurred to me that we have not heard from brown eyed Angelina since the floods……….Hopefully she’s fine……………………….as to that other character that announced he was heading off on a “trail of tenderness”…..well, the romantic in me likes to think he ended up in jail for disturbing the peace! Or perhaps Mongolia for those long lost relatives……or Pat’s backyard for that one day he gets with the Stanley Cup and a discussion of digital vs analog……….I’m going for beers to avoid hail the size of baseballs!


Entered at Fri Jul 19 19:42:10 CEST 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

John D: I know in the past Van the Man has spoken out against i-Tunes, but he apparently doesn't have control over his Bang and Warner Bros. recordings.


Entered at Fri Jul 19 19:16:00 CEST 2013 from (81.108.184.197)

Posted by:

Sian K

Web: My link

love the pics you guys have up here, actually quite alot http://www.pcstilts.co.uk


Entered at Fri Jul 19 19:14:22 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Maybe 1 last time

I happened in the last minute; or so to be on iTunes. I noticed that if you wanted to buy the song "Moondance" it would cost you $1.29. Most songs are 99 cents. I've noticed recently that a move to the $1.29 price is really growing; within iTunes. Is this iTunes acting on their own; or does the artist have a say I wonder.


Entered at Fri Jul 19 19:14:17 CEST 2013 from (81.108.184.197)

Posted by:

pete

Web: My link

im really gald you guys decided to keep the website up, thanks again


Entered at Fri Jul 19 19:07:07 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Moondance 1 mo' time

On the best of Van Morrison Volume 3, I do enjoy the "jazz" version of Moondance.


Entered at Fri Jul 19 18:50:01 CEST 2013 from (70.50.65.225)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Van The Man

The impressive part of Van Morrison’s career is not just that early 5 year golden period that many great artists have but that in an essentially black hole period for many of his vintage 1978-1990 he produced so much good music with none of those silly 5-6 years between albums…….and no artist has ever had an aesthetic recovery of such proportion by just putting on a hat!


Entered at Fri Jul 19 18:31:51 CEST 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Just a few years ago Rhino did a great job reissuing ASTRAL WEEKS, MOONDANCE and HIS BAND & STREET CHOIR on vinyl. Unless I hear that the upcoming 2-disc version of MOONDANCE is a big improvement over the previous CD version, I probably will pass on getting yet another.


Entered at Fri Jul 19 18:04:40 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Moondance

It IS an incredible album. But eight takes of Caravan? The blu-ray is a first for audio, isn't it? So what is it? Improved DVD audio? But a DVD is plenty big enough to get an album on in the highest resolution, so what does the blu-ray add? And is the average 5.1 system as good as a good stereo hi-fi? I mean a lot of hi-fi buffs splash out on audio, but have a "from the box" 5.1 set of speakers.

To buy it is foolish … BUT … well, how much is it?

On Van completists, it's harder to tell than most artists, because Van has chased away the bootleggers generally, so at a Record Fair, you might see 100 boots by Dylan, Led Zep and The Beatles, but none by Van Morrison. most of his CDs chart in the UK immediately on release.


Entered at Fri Jul 19 15:58:18 CEST 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: No More Dancing in the Street in Motown

It was 49 years ago July 31st that Martha and the Vandellas' hit single "Dancing in the Street" was released. The song was written by Marvin Gaye, Mickey Stevenson and Ivy Jo Hunter (who also co-wrote "Loving You Is Sweeter Than Ever" with Stevie Wonder).


Entered at Fri Jul 19 15:53:26 CEST 2013 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Boxed sets

The 2 disc release sounds more palatable to me. I am a big fan of box sets, but the key for me for most performers is not various takes of songs (except for maybe Dylan, Band) but rather unheard takes of songs like "Nobody Knows When Your Down and Out" . If those existed for Van (maybe they do) then I'd sure be interested in a 4 or 5 cd box.


Entered at Fri Jul 19 15:47:11 CEST 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Moondance

For the less dedicated fans there will also be a more economical 2-disc "expanded" version. The first disc will feature a remastered version of the album, with a second disc featuring an alternate version or different take of each song (including a mono mix of "Carzy Love"), along with the outtake "Nobody Knows When You're Down and Out."


Entered at Fri Jul 19 15:45:05 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Van / David P / Peter V

Thanks for the clarification David. It appears that box set will be for Van completest. Are you up for it Peter?


Entered at Fri Jul 19 15:43:12 CEST 2013 from (24.114.70.200)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Black Day in July

News this morning that Detroit has officially declared bankruptcy.....the bailed out auto executives are just hearing the news as they wake up in cities all over the world other than Motown.


Entered at Fri Jul 19 15:36:05 CEST 2013 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Dredging for Dollars

Record companies I am sure do the required research to see if there is a market out there for the product. No doubt 'the committed' will purchase Moondance. However, the majority of us will be content with Van's original recording. For me, that is the case with most performers. I too have my commitments and I understand. If Van doesn't get a piece of this, then that is unfortunate. The music business is often brutal to the creator as time and events (selling rights to music etc) result in releases such as this one (perhaps against the desire of the creator). Will this sell enough for the record company to justify its release? Time will tell. Certainly, there are enough Dylan fans out there to justify 'The Bootleg Series", now in its 10th release. I just don't know if that level of commitment is out there for Van Morrison. Maybe Peter V. can tell us. A wonderful performer, for sure, still attracting a great deal of attention, but are there enough buyers to justify this release? If so, then more to come.


Entered at Fri Jul 19 15:02:36 CEST 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Moondance

Actually, the deluxe 50-track version of "Moondance" is filled with multiple takes of each song, such as "Caravan" takes 1-8. In addition, there are a few remixes and alternate versions. It appears that the only outtake is "Nobody Knows When You're Down and Out." The 5th disc in the deluxe set is a Blu-Ray Audio featuring remastered high-resolution and surround surround versions of the original album.


Entered at Fri Jul 19 14:05:31 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Of course the preceding subject should have read Moondance. Moo dance would be a barnyard compilation :-)


Entered at Fri Jul 19 14:03:43 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Moo dance 50 Tracks

If I understand Pat's post correctly the 50 tracks come from the Moondance album outtakes alone? Did I get that right?

If you told me the 50 tracks would come from the Moondance, His Band & The Street Choir and Tupelo Honey period, that would make me happy. It's hard to believe there are an extra 50 tracks from the album Moondance alone.


Entered at Fri Jul 19 13:47:17 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Van

Well Peter I guess that explains that in the couple of times I've seen him, here in Toronto, he rarely did the WB years live. That seemed to annoy much of the audience. As much as I enjoy what he has been doing for years, the WB period is still my favourite.


Entered at Fri Jul 19 09:02:23 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Van & Moondance

Van has a point. 50 tracks mean scraping the corners of the barrel. Dylan doesn't seem to care historicially about bootlegs and early releases, though Sony do. But Dylan comes from a folk background where people lifted material from others etc. Van started in Showbands … professional musicians, not folkies. He obviously feels "right of paternity" (as it's called in copyright, sorry for gender politics there) and so he should.

Say one of you became the next J.K. Rowling or Stephen King, and suddenly your High School decided to issue a complete collection of the essays you did at school. Tiny print on your enrollment form says it's their copyright. Would you want someone reading your 16 year old opinions on "The Red Pony"?

OK, Moondance was a mature work of genius, but he was very young. I'm sure this is why (apart from Moondance itself) he rarely plays that era live.



Entered at Fri Jul 19 06:53:14 CEST 2013 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Warner Brothers is releasing a 5 CD set of Van Morrison's Moondance album. Over 50 unreleased tracks.

Van's reaction: Yesterday Warner Brothers stated that "Van Morrison was reissuing Moondance". It' is important that people realise that this is factually incorrect. I did not endorse this, it is unauthorised and it has happened behind my back.

My management company at that time gave this music away 42 years ago and now I feel as though it"s being stolen from me again


Entered at Fri Jul 19 01:16:40 CEST 2013 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: Peter Appleyard dead at 84

Hi guys!! Thanx for all the great readings and links..

DAN: Try Robbie's Facebook page and Garth Hudsons' blog..

Updated: July 18, 2013 10:57 AM | By Nick Patch, The Canadian Press, thecanadianpress.com

Famed Canadian jazz musician Appleyard dies

TORONTO - Widely respected Canadian jazz musician Peter Appleyard, a master of the vibraphone who shared the stage with some of his genre's most legendary performers, has died. He was 84.

Appleyard died Wednesday night at home of natural causes, confirmed his friend and manager John Cripton of Great World Artists.

Born in Lincolnshire on the east coast of England, Appleyard became a drummer during the Second World War before immigrating to Toronto in 1951.

He started his own band in 1956 and immediately began lining up commercial work with frequent television and radio appearances including hosting gigs on CBC-Radio's "Patti and Peter" (alongside Patti Lewis) and the CBC-TV program "Mallets and Brass" with Guido Basso. But his career took a pivotal turn in 1972 when a casual conversation with famed clarinetist Benny Goodman — the "King of Swing" — turned into a head-turning position in Goodman's sextet as well as globe-trotting tours for Appleyard.

Ultimately, Appleyard would share the stage with such luminaries as Frank Sinatra, Miles Davis, Oscar Peterson, Mel Tormé and Ella Fitzgerald.

Appleyard was also notable for his own work. He released 22 albums, the most recent of which — "Sophisticated Ladies" — came out last June and featured collaborations with a number of younger Canadian jazz chanteuses, including Jill Barber, Emilie-Claire Barlow and Elizabeth Shepherd.

His last performance was this past May, when he and a group of his decorated friends — including Basso on trumpet, Jane Bunnett on sax and Terry Clarke on drums — gathered for a night of jazz in Appleyard's barn. In 1992, Appleyard was made an officer of the Order of Canada. He received the Queen's Diamond Jubilee award last year.

Appleyard lived on a farm in Eden Mills, Ont.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxo


Entered at Thu Jul 18 23:32:30 CEST 2013 from (97.81.222.55)

Posted by:

Jimmy Nelson

Web: My link

Subject: Another from the Across the Great Divide series ...

I have this bookmarked now. Comes out I see weekly. This week's edition is on "Caledonia Mission," one of my absolutely favorites, both because of Robbie's mysterious lyric and also because of Rick's delivery. Good point about the bass line as well.


Entered at Thu Jul 18 23:14:39 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Danny Brooks / Bill M

Thanks Bill. Your right!


Entered at Thu Jul 18 23:10:13 CEST 2013 from (184.66.137.72)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: St. Vincent

St. Vincent: Very accomplished performer. I have followed her for a while now. Her work with the superb David Byrne is excellent. A saint, an island, and now a wonderful performer.


Entered at Thu Jul 18 22:58:23 CEST 2013 from (70.50.65.225)

Posted by:

Kevin J

J Tull Fan: Thank you….I really appreciate the update as I was not aware of any recent concert or recording activity from him and completely unaware of St. Vincent…..love the name!


Entered at Thu Jul 18 22:28:52 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Standing Room Only

Yes, John. All standing … which is why Mrs V didn't go, but I went with friends. I have tickets for Sunday, Bellowhead and K.T Tunstall … both 90 minutes. I had planned to see both, and they're immediately after each other which means three hours minimum (plus a 20 minute walk to and from the car park). I have to say the knees are hurting today! Still, Bellowhead is the reason for going. It's an all day ticket, but i'm not going to stand all day!

It's a good festival … Richard Thompson tonight, but I had already arranged to take the grandkids to the circus. Which I have just got home from/


Entered at Thu Jul 18 22:28:32 CEST 2013 from (75.146.18.190)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Subject: David Byrne

Kevin, I saw David Byrne live barely 3 weeks ago with St. Vincent, a great young alterative female solo artist (in spite of the name) whom he recently did a very good album with. They were supported by the 8-piece horn section The Dap Kings.


Entered at Thu Jul 18 20:50:20 CEST 2013 from (70.50.65.225)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Bill M: Wow….good pick-up on The Rabble sounding like Talking Heads…….I recall many years ago you sending Landmark some kind of link or article about them from the Montreal Gazette………………..as to “back tracking”…….only for the elusive Al Edge as he is just so sincere in his love for Bruce Springsteen that I can’t bring myself to stick a pin in the Boss the way I would if playing to the frat boy crowd that also adores the man but I suspect for reasons not as deep and pure as Al’s………I do like Springsteen but all weightlifters are fun to make fun of……..As for GiGi, I’ll keep the rest of that story to myself.

JT: That is quite a list of shows……..glad that you are here……………I still believe there is a wonderful film screaming to be made about the Toronto scene 1959-1965……and with names like Dylan, Young, Joni, The Band and all the great Soul and Jazz guys that were mainstays at the time on the scene…..it has the money-boys like…….Just got a letter in the mail with an Oliver Jones stamp on it……..nice touch.


Entered at Thu Jul 18 20:26:02 CEST 2013 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: Danny Brooks in Toronto

John D: The date at Hugh's is Sept 12. I suspect you did what I did the first time. To get beyond listings for August, go to the bottom of the Calendar and click 'next'.


Entered at Thu Jul 18 19:54:59 CEST 2013 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

mike h

Web: My link

Randy Ciarlante's trio "CKS Band" w/ Bruce Katz & Scott Sharrard have a gig tomorrow night @ 8 PM @ Bearsville Theatre.

"The CKS Band is a powerhouse Blues/Soul & Rock organ trio. The group features Randy Ciarlante (The Band, The Levon Helm Band) on Drums & Vocals, Bruce Katz (The Gregg Allman Band,John Hammond, Delbert McClinton) on B-3 Organ and Scott Sharrard (The Gregg Allman Band) on Guitar & Vocals. The CKS Band was formed in Sept. of 2011 and has since played the Bearsville Theater, The Brigg’s Farm Blues Festival, Helsinki Hudson, The Blue Note NYC, Levon Helm’s Midnight Ramble and many other venues and festivals to spectacular reviews."


Entered at Thu Jul 18 19:53:15 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Van

Peter? Did you have to stand for the enire show. From the pictures it appears that way. My "standing" days at concerts are long gone.


Entered at Thu Jul 18 19:51:27 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Danny B

I hope to catch him at Hugh's Room. I have to look up the date and make sure I will be here. For a couple of years now I coincidently am away; when he comes.

p.s. I just checked his site and there's no mention of Hugh's Room; but he told me he was appearing there this time around.


Entered at Thu Jul 18 19:26:25 CEST 2013 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

John D: I just checked Danny Brooks's website and see that he's part of a Mad Dogs and Englishmen tribute show at the Kitchener Blues Fest on Aug 9. Can't make it myself, but hope to catch him in Toronto a couple weeks later. You?


Entered at Thu Jul 18 17:59:21 CEST 2013 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Kevin J: Doesn't this quirky version of "Time Is On My Side" from 1970 sound like early Talking Heads? I suspect that Landmark saw the Rabble back in the day.


Entered at Thu Jul 18 16:27:36 CEST 2013 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Van Morrison concert review

Thank you for the 'Van' review, Peter. Some 'music journalists' might want to read it and pick up a few pointers on how to review a concert effectively.


Entered at Thu Jul 18 15:51:03 CEST 2013 from (24.114.70.200)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

LINKED: The best concert film that nobody knows about. It is impossible to find and that is the only reason I have linked it. An astounding experience that I enjoyed more than the also great "Stop Making Sense" Do yourselves a favour and watch some or all of it. Like Robbie Robertson, David Byrne has largley retreated to the shadows of film wok after a career as a rock superstar but simply one of the most charismatic performers the industry has ever seen.


Entered at Thu Jul 18 14:12:36 CEST 2013 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: 1965 and 1974

John D: I was there the 2nd night in 1965 while you were there the first night. I was near the front as well but not as close as you were. As for 1974 at Maple Leaf Gardens, I was there on Jan 10, 1974 and saw a superb show. I have never seen the Stones live and I envy your experience in that regard. I'll never forget the performance in 1965 of 'Stones That You Throw".


Entered at Thu Jul 18 13:53:36 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Van Morrison

Link to my review of Van Morrison in a magnificent show at the Larmer Tree Festival last night. Great set list, and photos from the Facebook Van page. He must be in the best vocal form of all of the Last Waltzers. Probably got the best band too!


Entered at Thu Jul 18 13:52:53 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Bruce

I own a lot of music DVD's and just wanted to say that the double disc of Bruce and the E Street Band "Live in NY" maybe one of the top two I have. The other? TLW of course.

When I interviewed Mr. Van Zandt a few weeks back I asked him how he could do such long shows night after night. He said, "simple. I thrive on the energy that is Bruce." He feels that Bruce's latest album may be his best yet. "After all the writing of songs and albums released, he never ceases to amaze me." A quote from SVZ.


Entered at Thu Jul 18 13:40:45 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: JT/ Bob & The Hawks etc.

Once again Jerry I'm filled with envy; as you got to see The Hawks at the Concord. Courtice-Oshawa might as well have been a million miles away. As for Massey Hall, I believe Bob and the boys were there for two nights in a row. I was there for the 1st night. Not sure if it was the same evening you were there. My best friend Bob and I had 3 front seats on the middle aisle. Why 3 seats? My friend Bob wanted a seat to put our coats on. Go figure. I will never forget that night.

Other monumental evening? The first Stones concert at Maple Leaf Gardens. I just want to say that the first Massey Hall Band concert; with Jesse Winchester opening; in 1970 was musically one of the best shows I ever saw. Oh and let's not forget Tour 74. Went both nights and got introduced to the man himself by my friend, Roberta.


Entered at Thu Jul 18 07:18:27 CEST 2013 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: The cobwebs of my memories

Kevin J: II know exactly what you mean. Sometimes I can't believe I had these privileges. I saw Bob Dylan backed by Levon and the Hawks on Nov. 15, 1965 at Massey Hall. My dad bought me the tickets. That with the Hawks of 63-64 formed the foundation of my first live music experiences. Simon and Garfunkel came next (soon after their first album). While Dylan and the Hawks were NOT booed or heckled at Massey Hall, Simon and Garfunkel were given the gears but Paul Simon said something cutting and intelligent (I can't remember what it was but I remember he did) and after that the heckling stopped. My education was complete when I saw The Jimi Hendrix Experience at MSG in New York in 1967 during the summertime just after the release of his first album. (I saw the play "The Deputy" during that visit to NYC. That too was another kind of education and fit very well into my sensibilities).


Entered at Thu Jul 18 04:47:30 CEST 2013 from (96.245.176.214)

Posted by:

bob w.

Hello to John D. Hoping you and Ala are well.

Enjoyed your link. JT of the Sensational Soul Cruisers is a great guy by the name of John Bowen. John and I worked side by side for Electric Factory Concerts thirty years ago. It was a very pleasant surprise to see him pop up in the video with Springsteen. John was a good friend of Clarence Clemons.


Entered at Thu Jul 18 00:44:41 CEST 2013 from (24.143.45.245)

Posted by:

ray pence

Location: the heartland/flyover country/lawrence kansas

Subject: bruce springsteen and academy of music

Hello friends, fellow Band lovers, i've been away a while, good to drop in and contribute.

i've been to four Springsteen shows, each one wonderful, with two experiences in "the pit" in Kansas City, sublime.

i was also blessed to attend the Levon Helm Band's show in downtown Kansas City a little over three years ago, did not realize I would not have another chance to spend time with the man and his band live, it is an indelible priceless memory.

Bruce Springsteen is and always has been the real deal, the genuine article, he earns every penny and then some, and his E Street Band rocks hard, tight, streamlined, and elegant.

very eager to attend the Springsteen and I movie next week; also, have heard about the "new" revision of the Rock of Ages shows, can anyone enlighten me there?

peace and good music to you all!


Entered at Wed Jul 17 23:11:27 CEST 2013 from (174.236.162.56)

Posted by:

Dan

Location: Philly

Subject: Robbie

Anyone know what robbie or Garth are up too? Also, did anyone else hear that Lemmy Kilmister is dying?


Entered at Wed Jul 17 21:25:01 CEST 2013 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill

Kevin J: What counts is that you, sitting with GiGi, were enumerating the audience rather than your blessings!


Entered at Wed Jul 17 21:21:27 CEST 2013 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

In re: Springsteen. His first two albums did next to nothing. Then, all of a sudden, he's on the cover of Time and Newsweek and he's being hailed as the savior of Rock and Roll. For the cognescienti, this had all the trappings of HYPE, to be quickly followed by the punks and new wave etc. So while rawk went off in some different directions, Bruce ascended to commercial heights and stadium tours with the same sort of music he had been playing for years, plus some synths. He marries some starlet then breaks up his band.

Given all this, it seems pretty easy to criticize Bruce the star rather than appreciate Bruce the musician/writer/activist. These days I think most fall into the latter category--with good reason as he is a major figure in the history of rock-- but the off-putting nature of his rise will always stick to him among those who worry about such things.


Entered at Wed Jul 17 21:04:41 CEST 2013 from (70.53.47.228)

Posted by:

Kevin J

A few points:

* Ben Rayner is an ass of a reporter/reviewer………His review of the Dylan show in November was disturbing not because he disagreed with my position but because it was filled with lies. There simply was not a steady exodus of fans to the exits as he claimed and the fan reaction was not tepid at best – again something he claimed. I have been very hard on Bob Dylan in the past for all sorts of things – namely his mostly embarrassing live television appearances and for a number of years some truly awful live concerts……..But when a major newspaper assigns a reporter to review a show, consumers of that paper should – at least – expect an honest accounting of what went on, not something clearly inspired by what he expected to see based on reviews of previous shows from the tour. With honesty shot, there is no way to ever read that reporter again. No wonder newspapers are in their final days of existence.

* Springsteen: Let’s try and follow the plot……the question/concern raised by Al was not whether Born In the USA was a fine album or not ( it is ) or whether Dancing in the Dark is a fine song ( it is not ) but why the rock cognoscenti have not afforded him the status of a Dylan, Bowie, Young and so on…………..I was simply making the point that if BITUSA and more importantly all the get me to the top of the world hype that he participated in at the time could be removed from his profile then his work most likely would be seen in a more deserving light. He is a great songwriter and better yet a fine man and no doubt the damage he did to his reputation in the mid 80’s was not all his fault but people are influenced by things like that. Imagine how Rod the Mod would be judged if he had died after Every Picture Tells a Story

* Another documentary that I have recommended for years here but not sure anyone else has seen it is “New York Doll” the story of Killer Kane……….Does not matter one bit if you were a fan of the Dolls, it is a great documentary. No an all-time great like the Ginger Baker one but not far off.

*Finally on Shows we have seen.................this GB has quite an extraordinary source of memories.......JT with The Hawks in the early days ( my time machine rock dream to be sure ).............Pat and his journey with pals to see The Band at Watkins Glen.........The late great Rollie going The Last Waltz ( driving Garth's car to boot! ) and bob w seeing Springsteen in 1972 with just 150 people in the crowd - wow!..........I guess Kevin J seeing at-the-time unknown band Midnight Oil at the legendary Manor in Kingston sitting with a stripper named GiGi and only 25 other people doesn't count.......didn't think so.....


Entered at Wed Jul 17 20:39:34 CEST 2013 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Jorma Kaukonen and Finnishness

How do you think "Finnishness" affects you as a musician and a person? From BluesWebZine.com : - That is always an interesting question. I think there is a passion for music and the written word that is very Finnish... I have what seems to some to be an unreasonable love of cold days and long winter nights. I tend not to like to talk a lot and I know what Sisu is!


Entered at Wed Jul 17 20:32:29 CEST 2013 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Al E: Thanks for your gracious response to my note about Bruce and "Sailing" yesterday. I cannot backtrack anywhere near as much as Kevin J, but I will remind you that "Born To Run", the song, was on my Edge-induced top 30 of a couple years ago. And I'm on record as thinking that Bruce's original of "Atlantic City" tops even the Band's. (My statement that in a perfect world, those two songs, pressed on one 45, would comprise my entire Bruce collection need not be dredged up at this point.) Anyway, you got me thinking a bit more about Bruce's wordiness and intensity on those classic songs you specified and about how the lyrics tend to poetry - let's say midway between Robert Service and Lawrence Ferlinghetti. And the Beat element in that, together with Bruce's socio-political conscience, causes me to suggest that you hie right down to the library and take out Sean Wilentz's wonderful "Bob Dylan in America". Chapter 1, "Music for the Common Man: The Popular Front and Aaron Copland's America", is all about Bob's political antecedents - Seeger, Seeger's father, Copland, Brecht et many al. Chapter 2, "Penetrating Aether: The Beat Generation and Allen Ginsberg's America", is more self-explanatory. Off your topic, but on that of others posting at the GB of late, is Chapter 4, "The Sound of 3:00 A.M.: The Making of 'Blonde on Blonde', New York City and Nashville, October 5, 1965 - March 10 (?)m 1966".


Entered at Wed Jul 17 19:38:21 CEST 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Paul Griffin

Mr. Griffin got a rare songwriting credit with Walter Becker and Donald Fagan on the Steely Dan song "The Fez" from "The Royal Scam."


Entered at Wed Jul 17 18:58:08 CEST 2013 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

David P, that was a quote in Rolling Stone from a Dylan/Columbia source. I'm guessing that the Bootleg series that covers BoB will have a lot of the NY sessions--which included the buoys--that preceded the Nashville trip.

Ari, I loved the doc because it was so unflinching. The parts with Fela were amazing.


Entered at Wed Jul 17 18:57:26 CEST 2013 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Jorma Kaukonen

Thanks for the link. And now something meaningless knowledge to win a pint in a pub with: JORMA is Finnish form of Jeremiah and KAUKONEN means "someone who lives far away".


Entered at Wed Jul 17 18:42:46 CEST 2013 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Dear Alia,

Can you help with platonic love? If so, would you work your magic on bringing Bruuuce back to my friend Al Edge in the Liverpool area of England. Please just make sure it's the right Bruuuce; also answers to the name 'Boss', if that helps.

Thanks!


Entered at Wed Jul 17 18:25:13 CEST 2013 from (74.108.29.147)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Mike h

Mike H Thanks for the Rick/Jorma video. It was terrific, and I loved seeing Rick looking so good


Entered at Wed Jul 17 18:09:20 CEST 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Blonde on Blonde

Pat B: Don't you mean that Paul Griffin was the real hero of the initial NYC sessions?


Entered at Wed Jul 17 17:16:56 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

No, I've never heard of the film … sounds right up my street. Off to see Van Morrison this evening!


Entered at Wed Jul 17 16:57:22 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Web: My link

Subject: for bob w / Bruce & The Sensational Soul Cruisers

Doing Ain't Too Proud To Beg


Entered at Wed Jul 17 16:35:38 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Peter Viney Question?

Peter do you remember a U.K. film; from 2009 that was shown at SXSW. It is called, "The Promised Land - A Swamp Pop Journey." It's the story of one of my current favourite groups, Lil' Band O' Gold out of Lafayette Louisiana. Robert Plant has recorded with them and they have Steve Riley on Accordion. It's known as a super group of swamp pop music. Just wondering? It was shot as a documentary and I'm trying to find it on DVD. Directed by Matthew Wilkinson. Room 609 Films. They shot it for $60,000.00


Entered at Wed Jul 17 16:19:45 CEST 2013 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Bob Wigo's fave cover

Having just heard this version for the first time, you won't be getting any argument from me Bob lad.

Superb.

:-0)


Entered at Wed Jul 17 15:23:15 CEST 2013 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Toronto Dylan 15.7.13

Alas John D: I was not. I am in Victoria doing my summer stint here. I come to Toronto for a few days each month but had just left on July 5. I read Rayner as I have always read his reviews and was not surprised. He has not favoured Dylan's approach to his music for a long time. As for multi-act shows, I am not in favour. Though I thoroughly enjoy the music of RT, MMJ, and Wilco, as the Beatles said "Its All Too Much". I don't mind one opening act, but I find the multi-act shows tedious when I am really going to hear and see only Dylan. And so, the direction to me would be to avoid the first 3 acts and arrive at about 8 or 8:30. Had I been in Toronto, I would have been torn since I appreciate the music of the others, as I said before. Anyway, many did enjoy Dylan and as you know, recently, he has not been everyone's cup of tea. All you have to do though is experience one of his concerts in a positive sound venue (as I did late last year in Toronto) to appreciate what he is doing today. In a negative sound environment, as I experienced in Vancouver, it can be a less positive experience.


Entered at Wed Jul 17 14:15:57 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Web: My link

Subject: Bob Dylan & Friends last night in Toronto. JT were you there? Comments one way or the other please.

Bob doesn't seem to be Ben Rayner's favorite last night. I don't always agree with Mr. Rayner. As you read the link he does bring up a few good points. Because there are 4 acts on this tour, Richard Thompson had to go on at 5:30 p.m. People are just getting out of work; or trying to fight traffic to get to this venue. My Morning Jacket also suffered this way. It wasn't until Wilco that the crowds were; in their seats; according to Mr. Rayner. Colin Linden got to play guitar; in his home town.


Entered at Wed Jul 17 13:55:16 CEST 2013 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

mike h

Web: My link

Rick live w/ Jorma in '89 @ Uncle Willy's.


Entered at Wed Jul 17 13:35:39 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Todd

Todd. Thank you very, very much.


Entered at Wed Jul 17 13:18:48 CEST 2013 from (96.245.176.214)

Posted by:

bob w.

Web: My link

My first Springsteen show dates back to 1972 at the Main Point, a few miles west of Philly. He was a skinny twenty three year old with the look of a street urchin and energy poured off him in every direction. I'm pretty certain there were less than one hundred fifty people in that audience but every one of us left that show knowing we had witnessed a very special talent. I've seen him at least fifteen times since and he has never disappointed. He has earned his stardom and continues to earn it every time he takes the stage.

I have always looked forward to Bruce's choice of covers. The link above has more than ten years worth of setlists and is worth checking out for that reason alone. The site's comment that Bruce "premiered" "Ain't Too Proud To Beg" last night in Limerick is off the mark as I can recall him covering that one all the way back to 1975 and he very likely played it well before then.

My favorite Bruce cover has always been "Mountain of Love".


Entered at Wed Jul 17 12:10:01 CEST 2013 from (76.124.39.182)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Location: by the Pond, Drexel Hill, Pa

Subject: The Bouys, and summer music

First business, Gerry Hludzik (simultaneously sick/creative musician and humanitarian) referred to his group with the nautical pronounciation "the boys". As for summer music, it's been sparse for me. Saw a great Hot Tuna and guests show (GE Smith, Cindy Cashdollar, Steve Kimock and our own Larry Campbell) at The Beacon in December, flanked by TWO "Jimmy Vivino presents Garth and the LHS Band" shows. December at The Keswick Theatre, locally in Glenside, Pa. Breathtaking! Then I got a chance to repeat that incredible experience at Tarrytown Music Hall. My wife, Mary was originally going to get to experience that one with me, but, alas, she had a barium prep for a CT scan the day before, and didn't dare risk a turnpike trip with potentially explosive results too far away from home. Tuesday before last I had a bittersweet experience. After 4 or 5 Rambles per year at The Barn, I had been looking forward to a Road Ramble last July at the beautiful outdoor amphitheater at Longwood Gardens in nearby Kennett Square, Pa. I still have 3 unused tickets to that local gig that didn't happen after The Boss left us last April. Finally got to the amphitheater Tuesday before last, to see a gorgeous "the sacred meets the profane" show from the irascible Buddy Guy. As a light misty rain fell on that fragrant, acoustically perfect setting, he played his stuff, tributes to fallen greats, and then totally owned John Hiatt's "It Feels Like Rain". Out of breath, tears running down by the end of this masterpiece by the Living Legend. I also saw a fiery acoustic show by Dave Mason, playing as a three piece. His drummer, Alvino Bennett (a monster on a big set) played sweetly on a spare set of hand drums and two toms. Jonathan McEuen (son of Nitty Gritty Dirt Band's John McEuen) filled out the ranks aptly on 2nd guitar. Other than those shows, I've been knee deep in the zydeco. My GB location "By the Pond" is actually shorthand for my address, "East Coast Zydecological Observatory & Turtle Ranch". Saw zydeco stars Curley Taylor, Step Rideau (in his FIRST East Coast appearance) and Jeffery Broussard & the Creole Cowboys locally this spring. Two weekends ago at the Kempton Jambalaya Festival I saw the long absent (18 yrs) from the East Coast, Jude Taylor, with Boss Hogg (Eric Minix) on bass. Jude's guitars were handled by Little Ray Neal (recently of Bobby Blue Bland's band) and Dennis Paul Williams of Nathan Williams' Zydeco Cha-Cha's. Troy (Dikki) Carrier's Zydeco Krewe featured Jude's brother, Mike Taylor. Corey Ledet's zydeco band featured the great Paul "Little Buck" Senegal who played with Clifton Chenier, Rockin' Dopsie, and, most of his career with Buckwheat Zydeco. I asked Paul if he was coming out this way July 12th with Buckwheat. He said no, he had a high paying gig in Memphis with Robert Plant and had a dispensation. God bless, and gotta love the payday. Then, 7/12 I saw Buckwheat hisself, playing hale and strong, right off of treatments for lung and throat cancer. He played his ass off, as strong as I've ever seen him, and I go back to 1978 with him. Guitarist Mike Melchione, 18 yrs w/ Buckwheat was extremely capable in the guitarist seat. Next night, CJ Chenier played, and was missing his guitarist of 17-18 years, Timmy Betts. Not to worry, his original guitarist, Selwyn Cooper was up there. Selwyn played in Clifton's band and continued with CJ in 1988-89. He's been out since then with The Creole Zydeco Farmers and The Zydeco Hurricanes. We hugged, shouted "yeah you right" and celebrated his career, 37 yrs of which I've witnessed. Yeah, life is good!


Entered at Wed Jul 17 10:19:36 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Chuck Berry, Bruce Springsteen

Toppermost's Daily "Top Ten" by an artist is me on Chuck Berry, and it's a double because as well as ten by Chuck, there's my ten favourite covers too.

If you visit Toppermost, do click on Bruce Springsteen and comment. I didn't do that list, but I commented with my own ten, which includes Dancing In The Dark AND Born in The USA.

It's almost knee-jerk to diss Dancing In The Dark. These were early days for video, we watched it incessantly that year. For a month at least the rumor mill said "the girl" was Bruce's sister, and it was some time before we knew it was Courteney Cox. OK, the make-up's a little thick on Bruce's face, but it's immediate floor-filler music, and Bruce likes that kind of thing. Just look at his covers … Ain't Too Proud To Beg on the recent setlist Al posted is another automatic floor filler.

The fact that Ronald Reagan used Bruce's name and the song title "Born in The USA" with no sense of irony is hardly Bruce's fault. It's clear that whoever wrote the speeches and thought it a good idea had never listened to the song. Negative stuff on the album fits all too easily into the "If it sold millions, I hate it" syndrome. Hey, good stuff sells millions too. I commented on the Toppermost site on this album. I played it to death. I have the 12" singles for the B-sides too. "Born in The USA" deserves every cent it made.


Entered at Wed Jul 17 06:47:51 CEST 2013 from (74.101.159.143)

Posted by:

Ari

Subject: Pat

Pat, I'm surprised you liked it so much. I was so underwhelmed that I left the theater with less respect for Ginger Baker than I had when I went in. Very rare after watching a good bio doc, the only other one was Pearl Jam Twenty, but I still like Eddie Vedder for some reason, seems like a good guy.


Entered at Wed Jul 17 05:33:10 CEST 2013 from (108.195.7.170)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Canadian BoB

John D, I stumbled upon a nice little record shop in Newburyport Massachusetts this past weekend and asked the owner of the place (who has been there since 1976) if he had ever seen the Canadian pressing of Blonde on Blonde. I figured that if I found it, I'd send you a smoke signal, as I know you've been looking for it for some time now.

Sadly he didn't have anything like that, but he did tell me that he had one of the original US Mono pressings at one point, (the one with the original artwork with the photo of Claudia Cardinale) and it sold for $250.00. I'll continue to keep an eye out for the Canadian Mono, but I have a feeling that if it ever surfaces, it's gonna cost a small fortune.

It was fun to be in a "real" record store again. Really nice selections.....felt almost like a curated collection. It reminded me of the record shops that I used to go into in the 70's and 80's. Even had a small selection of harmonicas and guitar strings!


Entered at Wed Jul 17 05:13:18 CEST 2013 from (24.108.1.255)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: Kevin J

Ginger Baker. Certifiable maniac. But he is the master of 4/4 time. 4/6, 4/7, 4/11 time, doesn't matter. It all comes back to the 4. He gets it. The master.


Entered at Wed Jul 17 04:53:48 CEST 2013 from (24.114.68.31)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Stevie Wonder

......and let me be the first here to also send out the biggest possible cheer to a truly all-time great in Stevie Wonder and his decision to boycott playing shows in any state that has "Stand Your Ground" laws......otherwise known as freedom for little flunkies to carry guns and shoot dead unarmed kids for just being a suspicious colour.


Entered at Wed Jul 17 04:13:59 CEST 2013 from (24.114.68.31)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Pat B: You will recall that I gave the Ginger Baker doc the highest possible recommendation some months back.........Glad that you watched it.......a truly awful human being but oh what a documentary.....and what a musician he was/is.

Al...........I am glad you qualified that because as I have written here in the past, I really enjoyed The River, Darkness on the Edge and Nebraska is simply one of my favorite all time albums....I liked his first two as well and of course raved about his latest. Bruce's problem above and beyond that short stint of tight shirts, weightllifting and badly thrown pitches was wanting to be -or being convinced he should be - the biggest star on the planet. How else to explain the atrocity that is the Dancing In The Dark video? I really believe he would have an entirely different "slotting" in the all-time greats hierarchy if he had just never recorded Born In The USA album.....or better yet never allowed himself to be marketed in such an overblown and clearly uncomfortable way...........add to that the old farts that make up the rocks critics club were just never going to elevate the "next Dylan" to a level any where near the real one or even any of his lesser contemporaries.


Entered at Wed Jul 17 03:49:43 CEST 2013 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

"Beware of Mr. Baker" is one of the best music docs ever.


Entered at Wed Jul 17 01:34:41 CEST 2013 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

I think 'shunned' is the wrong term and certainly too stark in your case Kev. I guess I mean 'not really afforded him the critical acknowledgement that is surely merited by the music he's laid down' comes nearer to what I really mean.

Even the critic's criticism that many of his fans seem to have take on board - namely the dearth of true innovation in his music - becomes extremely suspect as you wade through his immense back catalogue.

Sure you can see where he's been hugely influenced by his predecessors but then you look at the likes of Sandy, Blinded, Thunder Road, Backstreets, Incident, NYCS, Rosie etc etc and you ask yourself who before ever did stuff like it? Van? Dylan? In a manner of speaking yeah re intensity and length and certainly quality perhaps but surely nobody can say Springsteen's didn't bring in a whole different style with its own distinctive stamp.


Entered at Wed Jul 17 01:13:43 CEST 2013 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Joan: Delighted you enjoyed the clip. Amazing stuff.

Kev: you're bang on re his respect for his audience. It's got be extremely doubtful if any artist past or present has ever come close to emulating it.

Even greater, though, in my humble opinion - and I'm sure the root of his genuine delight in his audience's delight - is the respect he has for the rare artistic gift that has been bestowed upon him.

And by that I don't mean simply his own creations but running parallel his intrinsic burning passion to drink in the music of so many others. Only time will ever do justice to the man's art. So many - yourself included I think - have essentially shunned him due to the stereotyping of that early hype machine but his musical legacy is there to be judged and will I'm sure in decades to come stand him alongside the greats.

Here's what this 63 year old teenager offered Limerick tonight.

:-0)

First a three song aperitif
1.Does This Bus Stop At 82nd Street?
2.For You ( solo piano )
3.HEARTS OF STONE

Then the first course
4. THIS LITTLE LIGHT OF MINE
5. American Land
6. Badlands
7. Death To My Hometown
8. Hungry Heart
9. Spirit In The Night
10. AIN’T TOO PROUD TO BEG
11. American Skin
12. Promised Land
13. Wrecking Ball
14. We Take Care of our Own
15. Jack of all Trades
16. The River

Then the main course - the entire BORN TO RUN album
17. Thunder Road
18. Tenth Avenue Freeze-Out
19. Night
20. Backstreets
21. Born to Run
22. She's the One
23. Meeting Across the River
24. Jungleland

Followed by the sweet

25. Waitin on a Sunny Day
26. The Rising
27. Land of Hope and Dreams
28. My Hometown
29. Born in the USA

Then cheese and crackers
30. Glory Days
31. Bobby Jean
32. Drive All Night
33. Dancing in the Dark
34. Shout
35. This Little Light of Mine [reprise]

Unreal.


Entered at Tue Jul 16 23:01:50 CEST 2013 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

John D, I think I heard Sooner or Later in the Canadian mono and it was huge. Griffin on piano, Kooper on organ and some of the boys.


Entered at Tue Jul 16 22:48:46 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Paul Griffin

Pat. I couldn't agree with you more. Just personal for me, I wish they would mix the organ higher, that was unique to the Canadian Mono original release. What a difference it makes. Wish you could have heard it.


Entered at Tue Jul 16 22:42:31 CEST 2013 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Of particular interest: "Sets for Blood on the Tracks and Blonde on Blonde will eventually come out. When fans hear the Blonde on Blonde set, they'll realize that the real hero of the sessions was pianist Paul Griffin. . . There will also be a Basement Tapes box one day. We're trying to get the best sources on all the Basement Tapes. That'll happen one day, absolutely."


Entered at Tue Jul 16 20:55:13 CEST 2013 from (136.167.102.150)

Posted by:

Dave H

The Bootleg Series 10 deluxe edition is indeed pricey, but if you are a downloader, note that iTunes is selling the 2-disc edition plus the complete Isle of Wight show (53 tracks in all, though a couple are duplicated) for $27.99 in US dollars. (It's $18.99 for the 2-disc set without Isle of Wight.) Not a bad deal if you can do without the books and the remastered original Self Portrait (which will presumably be released as a stand-alone disc someday soon anyway).


Entered at Tue Jul 16 20:30:37 CEST 2013 from (74.108.29.147)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Al Edge

Al, Thanks for posting Bruce a 2nd time, I didn't have time to watch it before. The man is great!

The only person I know of who has seen Bruce more is the ever shrinking Governor of New Jersey, Chris Christie.


Entered at Tue Jul 16 18:40:04 CEST 2013 from (70.53.47.228)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Springsteen, Dylan and Linden

Say this for “New York City Serenade”………it brought bob w and Al Edge back to the GB so even if I am uncertain as to its “spellbinding majesty”……..it did have something very special going for it……..What I love about Bruce Springsteen is the just great respect he has for ALL audiences…………..he could be playing somewhere in remote Sweden or God knows where and you just know he will give it all he has got and isn’t saving that special performance of a rarely played song just for New York or LA…..That is an artist……….for too long I judged him harshly because of the square headed buffoons that I witnessed being his fans in the “Born in the USA” era……..I was wrong to do that………true story though……..I have only met two BOSS fans I like……ever.

Jeff Rosen: What a talent…….Granted he is working with Bob Dylan but the way he has the heavy hitters in the rock journo world eating out of his hands is mind boggling…..a master at work in how offering less in terms of publicity but making it feel oh so exclusive works every time………….If only The Band could have legged it out for another 20 years and hooked up with Jeff…..just imagine how the mythical specialness of The Band could have been exploited for commercial gain….RR has a touch of that too but artists can never be both behind and in front of the curtain at the same time.

Colin Linden: I always loved his story from rehearsals for the 1989 Juno awards ( Canada’s Grammys named after Pierre Juneau – the man responsible for Canadian content rules on commercial radio – he created an industry but he also responsible for Glass Tiger and Platinum Blonde – and that is hard to forgive! ) ……………….back to the story……..Colin mentioned how when word got out that Robbie Robertson was coming by the hall in the afternoon for rehearsals with The Band and Blue Rodeo for that night’s Hall of Fame induction that every guitarist in Canada seemed to be there and when Robbie walked in and said “anyone got a pic?” every guitar player in the room including Colin instantly searched what they had to try and find one……such was their respect …………………Much later that night, Colin Linden got to play with Robbie and Rick and Garth at the great Horseshoe on Queen Street in Toronto……………….Really happy for him that he got to play with Bob Dylan last night.


Entered at Tue Jul 16 18:32:39 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: More Self Portrait quotes

Self Portrait, albeit a very minor Dylan work, has its own riches, and now that the album is well into the past, it is easier to enjoy them … Go on, admit it - even the cover painting has its virtues.

(Michael Gray The Art of Bob Dylan:)

…Dylan’s most trashed record, even though some of it fares better than an armload of his work from the 1980s and 1990s.

(Tim Riley, Hard Rain )

As a personal scrapbook of the music that formed the evolution of Dylan’s genius, it’s a lot more audacious, witty and self-aware than David Bowie’s encomium Pin-Ups or John Lennon’s Rock & Roll … Today the record’s simple verities and almost total absence of ego seem far more in tune with the spirit of our times.

(Nigel Williamson, Uncut Legends #1: Dylan , 2003)



Entered at Tue Jul 16 18:18:58 CEST 2013 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Isle/Portrait/Voice/Colin

To be able to finally own a quality Isle of Wight recording will be a treat.I loved self portrait when it was released-I know-I'm nuts,but its a beautiful sounding album from a pure music perspective even though it was not an original.Heck,it was just fine music.Those who complain about Dylan's voice should rejoice.IMHO,this is the finest singing Dylan has ever done over the course of his career.Gotta wonder what's going on in bob's band with now,a third(excellent) guitar player.Strange happenings in Bobland!


Entered at Tue Jul 16 17:59:33 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Time Passes Slowly

My vinyl finds today were Judy Collins "Whales and Nightingales" for 99p, bought because it has Time Passes Slowly and The Patriot Game. Time Passes Slowly is greatly under-rated. The other was "Underground Fire" by The Ventures, bought because it has The Weight on it … and a cover of Crazy World of Arthur Brown's Fire. They were desperate to be an up-to-date covers band, but by 1968 weren't far off "Hammond A-GoGo" budget albums, picking out the melody line of hit tunes.


Entered at Tue Jul 16 17:44:13 CEST 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Dylan scratched involvement in Scratch

Around 1970 Dylan was tentatively working on a collaboration with the poet Archibald MacLeish to contribute songs for a dramatic adaptation of Stephen Vincent Benet's "The Devil and Daniel Webster." The play was entitled "Scratch", which Dylan mentioned in "Chronicles", and early on things didn't work out, as Dylan soon withdrew from the project. New Morning's title song, along with "Father of Night" and "Time Passes Slowly", were however intitially written for the play.


Entered at Tue Jul 16 17:38:51 CEST 2013 from (80.3.71.222)

Posted by:

Ian Woodward

Subject: Isle of Wight concert

From ROLLING STONE:

A deluxe edition of the set will contain a complete recording of Dylan and the Band's complete 1969 set at the Isle of Wight. It was his first real concert since a motorcycle crash prematurely ended his 1966 world tour. "The concert has been bootlegged many, many times," says the source. "There were four songs from it on the original Self Portrait, but we always hated the way they sounded. They were mixed a long time ago and they put Bob's voice way high in the mix and the band is somewhere in the back. They were treating him like he was Tony Bennett or something. This new version has the vocals down and more of the audience sound. It sounds great."


Entered at Tue Jul 16 17:13:58 CEST 2013 from (63.88.115.195)

Posted by:

carmen

Location: pa
Web: My link

Subject: new cd

big news


Entered at Tue Jul 16 16:12:04 CEST 2013 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Off the Richter scale

FRED: You have to promise me you'll never let it happen. I value remaining in one piece for my remaining years. Don't want bits scattered far and wide!

:-0)

KEV:They're my pyjamas he's wearing there!

:-0)


Entered at Tue Jul 16 16:09:17 CEST 2013 from (24.114.68.31)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

LINKED: Ha! Another Sailing with Eric Clapton joining Rod.......


Entered at Tue Jul 16 16:03:14 CEST 2013 from (24.114.68.31)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: For Bill & Al with love.......

LINKED: A very rare video from TOP of Rod Stewart and Sailing......only 200 views..........has there ever been a better "rock star" ? Britt adds nicely.


Entered at Tue Jul 16 16:00:23 CEST 2013 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Al: I wonder what would happen if The Boss played a Band tune while wearing a Liverpool shirt (say the style worn in 1984's European Cup)? How giddy would you get? And would we be able to harness this as a viable source of energy? : )


Entered at Tue Jul 16 15:51:12 CEST 2013 from (108.195.7.170)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: V10

Ian, thanks for the info and updates re: Dylan's Another Self Portrait. The piano & vocal version of 'Masterpiece' really grabbed my attention. Looks like I'll have to start saving up my nickels.


Entered at Tue Jul 16 15:50:54 CEST 2013 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Colin Linden one more time

John D: I too met Colin on occasion (usually with BARK after a show, where he would come out and talk to those hanging around). He was friendly and personable and it was refreshing to talk to him even for a few moments. By the way, this was true of Stephen Fearing and Tom Wilson as well. Good on him! I am delighted that he has had the opportunity of likely fulfilling a dream.


Entered at Tue Jul 16 15:48:00 CEST 2013 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: It is to laugh or maybe cry

Greil Marcus takes a lot of heat. His reaction to "Self Portrait" was not different than that of many at the time. Again, it is so interesting to me that 'open-minded' young people were so dismissive and uncompromising. The heavyweight champion of the world was putting out 'lightweight' material in their opinions. This was unworthy in their view. I bought it at a flea market soon after its release in a used bin sealed and unplayed. I recall my (at least) 4 reactions: 1) Why didn't I even know about this record album 2) Why was Dylan doing this? 3) I would have to keep it a secret that I liked it because that was an unpopular view among my peers. 4) Was this the end? It is to laugh in retrospect!!!


Entered at Tue Jul 16 15:41:53 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Colin Linden

Colin Linden is a great guitar player! All I can think of this morning is that I first met him at either the ages of 11,12; or 13. Now he has played with Bob. Knowing him the way I do, I'm sure there is a part within him that is one very excited and happy guy and he has played with some of the best; including Rick Danko and Garth.


Entered at Tue Jul 16 15:33:22 CEST 2013 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: And now for some other news... Randy Travis

There was some optimism displayed in this story. A stroke such as this is very problematic and life-threatening (I am aware of many who haven't survived) so this news is welcomed.

"NASHVILLE, TENN.—Country music star Randy Travis was awake and interacting with his family and friends Monday as he recovers from surgery following a stroke, his doctors said. In a news release and video from the Texas hospital where the 54-year-old singer is recovering, doctors said Travis remains in critical condition and on a ventilator, but is off a heart pump and is breathing spontaneously. His breathing support is gradually being reduced and he has begun the early stages of physical therapy."


Entered at Tue Jul 16 15:30:17 CEST 2013 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Bill - Strawberry Fields and getting hung about!!

Ha ha.

Bill, I luv Rod the Plod and sung Sailing [badly] at 3am as much as the next man and I certainly wouldn't take anybody to task if they claimed that when the Celtic cockernee was with the Faces rock reached a peak of excitement it has never scaled since...but Sailing and New York City Serenade!!!!!!

:-0)


Entered at Tue Jul 16 15:19:52 CEST 2013 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Thank you Ian and thanks to the powers that be

Ian: Thanks for the track listings. This is a giant step forward for this period. It is most interesting and I am pleased that these studio performances are being released.


Entered at Tue Jul 16 15:16:39 CEST 2013 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Contrasts

Delighted you watched it Pete. Hard to credit the two performances were part of the same night's work.

:-0)

Thing is nobody likes to goof around more than Springsteen as we all witnessed at Manchester last year [linked], especially where the sheer joy and exhuberance at the heart of the best rock 'n' roll is concerned.

However, a piece of such quality as New York City Serenade is such a rarity in rock's canon and when it's performed with the spellbinding majesty of the other night in Roma, you just have to sit back and gasp in awe. Of course, you'd give your eye teeth to have been there but you thank the lord for You Tube and the fact he was considerate enough to have bequeathed us artists of such immensity.

:-0)


Entered at Tue Jul 16 15:17:15 CEST 2013 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Al E: Okay okay - because it's you I watched it this time. Nice, but nothing to get hung about. The part that starts at 7:45 is exceptionally nice, as you say, and very much like Rod Stewart's terrific job on "Sailing.


Entered at Tue Jul 16 15:07:39 CEST 2013 from (80.3.71.222)

Posted by:

Ian Woodward

Subject: ANOTHER SELF PORTRAIT track listing

The Bootleg Series, Vol. 10 - Another Self Portrait (1969-1971)

CD 1

1 Went To see The Gypsy (demo)

2 Little Sadie (without overdubs, Self Portrait)

3 Pretty Saro (unreleased, Self Portrait)

4 Alberta #3 (alternate version, Self Portrait)

5 Spanish Is The Loving Tongue (unreleased, New Morning)

6 Annie's Going To Sing Her Song (unreleased, Self Portrait)

7 Time Passes Slowly #1 (alternate version, New Morning)

8 Only A Hobo (unreleased, Greatest Hits II)

9 Minstrel Boy (unreleased, The Basement Tapes)

10 I Threw It All Away (alternate version, Nashville Skyline)

11 Railroad Bill (unreleased, Self Portrait)

12 Thirsty Boots (unreleased, Self Portrait)

13 This Evening So Soon (unreleased, Self Portrait)

14 These Hands (unreleased, Self Portrait)

15 In Search of Little Sadie (without overdubs, Self Portrait)

16 House Carpenter (unreleased, Self Portrait)

17 All The Tired Horses (without overdubs, Self Portrait)

CD 2

1 If Not For You (alternate version, New Morning)

2 Wallflower (alternate version, 1971)

3 Wigwam (original version without overdubs, Self Portrait)

4 Days Of '49 (original version without overdubs, Self Portrait)

5 Working On A Guru (unreleased, New Morning)

6 Country Pie (alternate version, Nashville Skyline)\

7 I'll Be Your Baby Tonight (Live With The Band, Isle Of Wight 1969)

8 Highway 61 Revisited (Live With The Band, Isle Of Wight 1969)

9 Copper Kettle (without overdubs, Self Portrait)

10 Bring Me A Little Water (unreleased, New Morning)

11 Sign On The Window (with orchestral overdubs, New Morning)

12 Tattle O'Day (unreleased, Self Portrait)

13 If Dogs Run Free (alternate version, New Morning)

14 New Morning (with horn section overdubs, New Morning)

15 Went To See The Gypsy (alternate version, New Morning)

16 Belle Isle (without overdubs, Self Portrait)

17 Time Passes Slowly #2 (alternate version, New Morning)

18 When I Paint My Masterpiece (demo)



Entered at Tue Jul 16 14:52:16 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Ian Woodward Self Portrait

Damn Ian. After listening to your link I'm going to have to buy it now. It's interesting hearing acoustic versions of songs that would become a part of New Morning. Interesting comment; from Al Kooper about New Morning being a reaction to Self Portrait.

The one thing I remember best is how quickly New Morning was released; after Self Portrait. That was extremely rare for Bob to release two albums in a row that quickly.

Sounds good JT.


Entered at Tue Jul 16 14:44:35 CEST 2013 from (80.3.71.222)

Posted by:

Ian Woodward

Subject: Another Self Portrait

The press release for ANOTHER SELF PORTRAIT is embargoed until 9.00 am EST (2.00 pm UK time) but I am told that Amazon, as is their cavalier wont, have already posted a listing.

There are two tracks from the Dylan and The Band at the 1969 Isle of Wight concert (not the ones on the original SELF PORTRAIT) on the basic 2-CD set (thus dupicating two tracks that will be on the bonus CD with the complete concert) and there is what purports to be a new BASEMENT TAPE recording. If this correct (and not an error), it seems strange to include a 1967 recording on a set that includes "1969-1971" in its title, even though this BASEMENT TAPE recording does have some kind of link with 1969.

More shortly.


Entered at Tue Jul 16 13:55:50 CEST 2013 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: BARK tour

I just checked BARKs tour schedule and they are to appear in Hinton Alberta on July 19 and then in Edmonton in August, followed by an appearance in BC in September. Is this a 'one time' for Colin Linden or ....? Time will tell.


Entered at Tue Jul 16 13:28:27 CEST 2013 from (80.3.71.222)

Posted by:

Ian Woodward

Subject: 1952 Vincent Black Lightning

This was posted on-line. I'm not sure if it's complete but note that Dylan's rendition of "1952 Vincent Black Lightning", almost at the very end, is given as a request.

Sunday, July 14, 2013, My Morning Jacket, DTE Energy Music Theatre, Clarkson, MI

Evil Urges, It Beats For You, Golden, Touch Me I’m Going to Scream Pt. 1, I Will Sing You Songs, Holdin On to Black Metal, Wordless Chorus, Touch Me I’m Going to Scream Pt. 2, Circuital, Gideon

Sunday, July 14, 2013, Wilco, DTE Energy Music Theatre, Clarkson, MI

War on War, Handshake Drugs, I Am Trying to Break Your Heart, Too Far Apart, Forget the Flowers, Impossible Germany, Born Alone, Via Chicago Art of Almost, Sloth (Fairport Convention cover) (with Richard Thompson), California Stars (with Richard Thompson), Tomorrow Never Knows (The Beatles cover) (with Richard Thompson)

Sunday, July 14, 2013, Bob Dylan, DTE Energy Music Theatre, Clarkson, MI

Things Have Changed, Love Sick, High Water (For Charley Patton), Soon after Midnight, Early Roman Kings, Tangled Up in Blue, Duquesne Whistle, She Belongs to Me, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, A Hard Rain’s A-Gonna Fall, Blind Willie McTell, Simple Twist of Fate, Summer Days, 1952 Vincent Black Lightning (Richard Thompson cover) (by request), All Along the Watchtower, Encore: Blowin’ in the Wind


Entered at Tue Jul 16 13:13:15 CEST 2013 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Colin Linden

Colin Linden: I have seen him many times in concert. First with The reformed Band at the wonderful Convocation Hall concert (UofT) in Toronto where I first heard 'Remedy', then with BARK at the Horseshoe and then a couple of other times. I'm not sure if this is a permanent replacement for Charlie Sexton in the Dylan band). If there were any formal announcements, I haven't heard or seen them. Maybe PSB knows. In a word, like the previous 2 (Robillard, Sexton), Colin Linden is superb.


Entered at Tue Jul 16 13:01:06 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Al, I watched it … then noticed Summertime Blues from the same show, watched that and sent the link to several friends.


Entered at Tue Jul 16 12:53:52 CEST 2013 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: That Bruce clip from Rome

Judging from the zero response other than dear Bob Wigo I have to take it nobody else was arsed to watch the clip I posted a few days ago.

Everyone to their own like but I really would implore anyone who loves their music - which is everyone on the GB as far as i've ever been able to gauge - to take a look at the video.

The entire thing is mesmerising but the soaring emotion from around 7mins 45 secs in to the end surely make it one of rock music's seminal musical events.

As Kev rightly jokes I truly am a Springsteen nut so it's easy to file what I say about the man in the 'oh not again' category. But do please give this a go. It really is special. I've seen the man around 35 times now but I'd willingly trade them all to have been in Rome to witness that final 3 minutes of what I can only term utter magic.


Entered at Tue Jul 16 11:20:08 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Greil Marcus on Self Portrait

Yes, ironic that Greil is doing the liner notes, Three quotes from the 1970 review:

‘What is this shit? …… Jesus. This is awful.’

‘I once said that I’d buy an album of Dylan breathing hard. But I never said I’d buy an album of Dylan breathing softly.’

It most closely resembles the Dylan album that preceded it: Great White Wonder, and though it’s a good imitation bootleg, it isn’t nearly the music that Great White Wonder is.


Entered at Tue Jul 16 11:15:14 CEST 2013 from (80.3.71.222)

Posted by:

Ian Woodward

Web: My link

Subject: ISIS magazine on "Another Self Portrait"

I dare say that there'll be pretty much blanket coverage on-line but ISIS, the magazine to which I contribute from time to time, broke the story last year. I was, in part, involved in this. Someone said to me, fairly early on, that "they" wanted to rehabiltate 1973's "DYLAN" album, though those were not the actual words used:

http://www.bobdylanisis.com/contents/en-uk/d19.html

The other thing was that most other reports related to Dylan's 1970 recordings, whereas I had always maintained that this release (if it came to pass and that wasn't certain) would cover a wider time span than 1970, which is what is happening, it seems.


Entered at Tue Jul 16 11:05:11 CEST 2013 from (80.3.71.222)

Posted by:

Ian Woodward

Web: My link

Subject: Advert for "Another Self Portrait

A few samples and a few new photos:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=GFdgwMhWcV4#t=0s


Entered at Tue Jul 16 08:51:03 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: From Wikipedia …

EXTRACT FROM WIKI ENTRY:

Thanks to rumours that one or all of The Beatles would be joining him on stage, Dylan's comeback show had now been, in the words of music journalist John Harris, "inflated into the gig of the decade". On 31 August, a nervous Bob Dylan arrived on stage in a cream suit recalling Hank Williams, with a haircut and a short beard. Backed by The Band, he performed recent pieces from his Nashville Skyline and John Wesley Harding albums as well as countryfied versions of earlier songs such as "Maggie's Farm", "Highway 61 Revisited" and "Like a Rolling Stone" − much to the surprise and consternation of the audience and the throng of journalists.

Levon Helm later commented: "Bob had an extra list of songs with about eight or ten different titles ... that we would've gone ahead and done had it seemed like the right thing to do. But it seemed like everyone was a bit tired ... the festival was three days old by then."

John Lennon opined that Dylan's performance was reasonable, though slightly flat; and that the audience was "waiting for Godot or Jesus". Eric Clapton was mesmerized, however, having already been inspired back to blues and country post-Cream by Dylan's change of musical direction and by The Band's album Music From Big Pink. "Dylan was fantastic," Clapton later said. "He changed everything ... [The audience] couldn't understand it. You had to be a musician to understand it." Another vocal champion of The Band and avowed Dylan fan, George Harrison wrote a country song inspired by the event and dedicated to Dylan, "Behind That Locked Door", later released on his All Things Must Pass triple album.

Folk singer Tom Paxton has referred to the "negative reaction in the British press", including "downright fabrications: like saying he had run off stage half-way through. ... I went with him and The Beatles to the farmhouse where he was clearly in a merry mood because he had felt it had gone so well ... The Beatles had brought a test pressing of Abbey Road and we listened to it and had quite a party."


Entered at Tue Jul 16 08:34:44 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Bootleg 10

Patience is a virtue … look at the "Brandeis University" CD. Originally that was a bonus disc and was hard to get, and copies appeared on ebay at silly prices. A year later that "limited edition, once only" release was just slipped out as a regular release, now on amazon.co.uk for a mere £6.07.

But "Complete IOW"? I can't wait to get that in decent quality, let alone the remastered Self Portrait (I too love that album). The really irritating thing about these deluxe editions is you end up with a beautifully produced book of photos, one you'll never look at twice, which "justifies" about 60% of the cost of the deluxe edition.

We know they'll put out those two bonus discs once they've assembled them and shifted the "deluxe editions". It's whether one can wait. However, amazon.co.uk doesn't have it listed yet, and we can hope for a three tier release … 2 CD, 4 CD then De Luxe 4 CD with unwanted book. That isn't unprecedented.


Entered at Tue Jul 16 07:00:19 CEST 2013 from (72.78.40.79)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love

Subject: Bob News

As of last night's Toronto show, Charlie Sexton out, Colin Linden in.


Entered at Tue Jul 16 02:57:36 CEST 2013 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Web: My link

Subject: A lovely sailor's song

The Grey Funnel Line done here live by June Tabor -


Entered at Tue Jul 16 02:20:56 CEST 2013 from (174.254.162.19)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Wooden Ships on the Water

Hey Rockin’ Chair thanks for the info. It is interesting to me to hear about the regional variations in lingo and terminology. I’ll check out that you tube video that you mentioned. Most of my knowledge was gained from hanging around the marina as a youth and paying attention (in between the cursing and the drinking) ;-).

  That cruiser of yours sounds like a beauty! Holy cow!! 54 feet is quite a bit larger than what I’m used to. Most of the boats that I took care of were your basic cabin cruisers in the 24’ to 32’ foot range. Chris Craft, Trojan, and Bertram were pretty popular around here.

  The largest boat that I worked on was a 46-foot, 1957 Chris-Craft Constellation, made of mahogany with a flying bridge powered by twin Chrysler 440’s (gasoline). Large heavy boat, but with those engines and the deep V hull, it could really come up out of the water and cruise at a pretty good speed. Really stable in the water as well. Turned a lot of heads, but also drank a LOT of fuel. There’s something special about those classic wooden boats as long as you have the time and money to take care of them properly. Glad to see that yours is in good hands now, and it sounds like you had a nice time with Susan’s son & his wife for their wedding vows.

  Peter V, interesting how the same word can have completely different meanings from one place to another. You mentioned a “Johnny” the other day, in regard to hospital garb. Typically around here, you hear of them as “Johnny Coats”. It’s a rather humbling affair with the opening in the back, and I’m not quite sure how they got that name, but my guess is that the ease of access made it easier for patients (with or without a nurse’s assistance) to use the bathroom or the “john” while infirmed.


Entered at Tue Jul 16 02:02:46 CEST 2013 from (24.252.147.171)

Posted by:

Calvin

Saw Lyle Lovett with his Big Band, and Gospel Choir, a few years back. Just an incredible show. Currently I have tickets to Bob Mould, Billy Bragg, Nick Lowe, Amee Mann and Over the Rhine sitting on my desk. Going to Late summer concert wise.


Entered at Tue Jul 16 01:33:39 CEST 2013 from (96.245.176.214)

Posted by:

bob w.

If Lyle Lovett and his Acoustic Band are headed your way.....don't hesitate. Just a great show. All extraordinary musicians. Russ Kunkel is a brilliant drummer.


Entered at Tue Jul 16 01:06:42 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Self Portrait New

$125.00???? Too rich for my blood. Hopefully that amount will change; before release.


Entered at Tue Jul 16 01:01:25 CEST 2013 from (80.3.71.222)

Posted by:

Ian Woodward

Web: My link

Subject: Bootleg Series Vol.10 (1969-1971): Another Self Portriat :

Dylan's next Bootleg Series, a mentioned the other day:

http://www.amazon.com/Another-Self-Portrait-1969-1971-Bootleg/dp/B00DY951RQ/ref=sr_1_5?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1373928937&sr=1-5&keywords=bob+dylan+bootleg+series+10

This link shows, I think, the De Luxe edition, which will include the complete Dylan 1969 Isle of Wight performance on a bonus disc.


Entered at Mon Jul 15 22:57:37 CEST 2013 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Mrs. Captain

John, we actually have one out here. A friend of mine I grew up with, (his dad and mine were drinkin buddies). Well Jimmy has two tugs and barges and his old lady runs one of them.....and! she is not a very nice person at all. Strange, 'cause Jim is a really good guy.

Funny, I was just rummaging around in that Rockin Chair of mine, doing some cleanup, (we have friends coming alongside tonight with another boat). I was tiding up some books in the library.....some that were there when we bought her. Here I find a hand book on "power boating". Much of the terminology we've just been discussing.

It reminded me of my brother Buddy, who is the "Ship's Pilot", for 39 years now. Buddy has these idiocyncracies, did I spell that right...........I dunno. Anyway, people will say crazy things like they call a marine chart a "map". He goes ballistic. There is no such thing as a map when it comes to navigation. THEY ARE CHARTS! He's really funny.

Keel hauled you say Carl? that's no fun. The most fun is watching these "summer sailors" trying to dock their boats. It's hilarious, but some times pretty scary and dangerous.

You'd think if a man buys a ship 40 to 60 feet long, he'd learn how to run it properly. I've thought of starting a school to teach people how to do this. Many just don't understand at all the fundamentals of boat handling. Wonder some of them or their wives don't get hurt really badly.


Entered at Mon Jul 15 22:14:15 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: The Sea

So Rockin' Chair. Is the next thread on Tugboat Annie?


Entered at Mon Jul 15 21:59:17 CEST 2013 from (184.66.101.38)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: Keel-Haul

Hey Norm. My late uncle Blake used to work on one of the ships that serviced the Dew Line up north and apparently he was the last man to be keel-hauled in Canada, although accidently. And he lived!


Entered at Mon Jul 15 19:26:16 CEST 2013 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Nuns & Cans

Forgot to answer your question Todd. That is unfamiliar to me. For a very interesting little bit of sea ter. watch Stan Roger's vid of "Mary Ellen Carter" on youtube.

It begins with an interview of a sailor, I believe by his accent from some where in Massachusetts. He explains how the song helped him survive after a sinking and his explaining of how the ship sank gives an idea of some of the terminology.


Entered at Mon Jul 15 19:19:50 CEST 2013 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The Rule

When the draft of your ship exceeds the depth of the water, you most assuredly are aground!

Todd, I think the sailor slang, is a little different every where. A good example is on the TV series, (Deadliest Catch), I don't know if any of you have seen it. The king crab fishermen in the Bering Sea, all American fish boats. Their slang, and what they call different equipment is a little different than ours.

To get a real handle on much of where it came from, one should read one of the books my great grand father wrote, "Cruise of the Cachalot". Cachalot is the French word for whale. Mot long after I joined the site here, Norbert and I discussed this. I believe he got the book.

Great Grandfather, my mum's grand dad was from London, England. Ran away from home at age twelve and went to sea on these whalers. He became a journalist and writer. Was one of the journalists present and writing about the voyage of the Titanic.

My new friend Lloyd Merriman in South Africa tho', has a lot of the same terminology as I.

Susan always admonishes me. "Why do you SWEAR so much?" I'm a sailor it's required!, She says, "Is it in a hand book some where?"

Todd the Rockin Chair is a 54' Monk McQueen motor yacht. Designed by Ed Monk senior, and built at McQueen shipyard in Richmond, (suburb of Vancouver BC). She is teak planked on oak frames. Plywood decks with quarter inch teak veneer over. Almost entirely teak interior, with a small amount of mahogany. Built in 1967. Powered with 2 - 903 Cummins, naturally asperated developing 300 hp each. All underwater fixtures are solid brass. Through hull for shafts, rudders etc.

Last Friday, Susan's son Ken and his wife, pledged their wedding vows on the bridge deck just aft of the bar. The day was perfect, sunny with a slight nor-west breeze, in the lee of Harwood Island. As they live in Estevan Saskatchewan, we were able to give them a great adventure for their wedding....it was fun.

I own a fibreglass boat, my fishboat. I've owned it 37 years now. Bought it when it was 3 months old. My tug of course is steel. I still love the old wood boat. They are work, but if you keep after them, and stay on top of it you can save yourself a lot of work. If you let them go.....well they can become a mess. When I got the Rockin Chair, at that time called (Burollo) some kind of gawd damn Italian wine. Well she was sadly neglected. You have to respect an Ed Monk ship more than that. The only good thing, was I was able to get her much cheaper. I'm still working at refurbishing her. It's a labour of love.


Entered at Mon Jul 15 19:19:11 CEST 2013 from (74.108.29.147)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Nautical language

Someone told me that the word "POSH" is from sailing on passenger liners. Port Out, Starboard Home. The preferred side of the ship. Just one of the random factoids that run through my mind


Entered at Mon Jul 15 18:45:03 CEST 2013 from (108.204.9.198)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT
Web: My link

Subject: Look at the sun.....sinking like a ship

Check out the link. Great Pro-shot version of Amy Helm and the Handsome Strangers doing Dylan's 'Meet Me In The Morning' at Mountain Jam from June 2013. Nice to see all the different camera angles and close ups of the instruments as they're playing. Byron is using his Fret-less Uke Bass on this one. Not a lot of room for intonation errors on that puppy!


Entered at Mon Jul 15 18:09:56 CEST 2013 from (108.204.9.198)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Secrets of the Sea

Hey Norm. Thanks for the additional info. Whaddaya mean "mostly right"!? I was following the Red Right Return rule as Joe pointed out. Of course I knew that you reverse it when you're heading out to sea!

I do agree though, that it can get pretty complicated, and my expertise in navigation is limited to the above rule. As far as I can tell, they key thing is knowing where the rocks are, and how deep the water is (and what the draft of your vessel is). Fortunately, most of the sailing that I've done has been in and out of the same harbor, and the rocks stay put for the most part. Interesting about the whistle buoys. Where I'm from, most of the navigational buoys are the bell type that you mentioned.

But are you familiar with the "nuns" and "cans" terminology, or is that only a USA thing (America for Kevin).;-)

Had a really scary experience one time coming into Narraganset Bay in Rhode Island. Thick thick fog rolled in quickly and I could barely see past the bow. Thank God for modern electronics, where you can at least get an idea of where you are, even if you can't see where you're going.

I used to have a romantic traditional idea of wooden boats being the thing to have, but the more that I worked on them, I really grew to like fiberglass more and more. It got to the point where the most teak that I would want to deal with was a swim deck where you would just have to clean it and oil it. Sanding and varnishing isn't my idea of a good time any more. Is the Rockin' Chair wood or glass? I know that you looked at both types when you were buying, but I can't remember what your final decision was. I do sometimes miss the peacefulness of laying on my back in the springtime in a gravel boatyard painting the bottom of a boat, knowing that the summer season would soon be here. In some ways it's the best job that I ever had. I got to meet a lot of curmudgeonly old sailors and I learned how to hold my liquor and also learned some colorful language!

All of this talk about boats reminds me of my Father-in-law who served in the US Navy during the Cuban missile crisis and later worked on nuclear submarines. He would always remind me that subs are called boats, and the things that cruise on top of the water are called ships.

Interesting that the buoy and nautical discussion came up. I just spent the weekend in the port towns of Portsmouth New Hampshire, Newburyport Massachusetts, and then at a friend's wedding in Gloucester Massachusetts.

I was also recently doing some genealogical research and learned that my earliest ancestor in this country, came over much earlier than I had originally known. Most of my family came to the US towards the end of the 19th century, but the earliest was originally from Essex County England, sold his land, bought a ship, packed up his wife and nine children and sailed it to Massachusetts, and then Connecticut in 1635. Much earlier than I would have guessed. Also found out that I share a bloodline with FDR on his mother's side. (and I have no idea why none of the money trickled down to me!)


Entered at Mon Jul 15 16:24:20 CEST 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Vinyl Siding

On the turntable this week:

CHILDREN OF THE FUTURE -- Steve Miller Band (original 1968 Capitol LP)
MUSIC FROM BIG PINK -- The Band (2012 Mobile Fidelity LP reissue)
FRISCO MABEL JOY -- Mickey Newbury (Drag City LP reissue) Includes original version of Mr. Newbury's "American Trilogy" arrangemnt.
SCHEHERAZADE Rimsky-Korsakoff -- Chicago Symphony Orchestra conducted by Fritz Reiner (Chesky Records LP reissue of the classic 1960 RCA Living Stereo recording)
CALIFORNIA BLOODLINES -- John Stewart (1969 Capitol LP)
IN A SILENT WAY -- Miles Davis (1969 Columbia "360 Sound" stereo LP)


Entered at Mon Jul 15 15:39:50 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Web: My link

Subject: Ronnie Hawkins selling his estate


Entered at Mon Jul 15 12:43:24 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I consider Norm the authority! I researched it a bit more and “boo-wee” is strongest in New England, as Todd attested, and the Great Lakes, but not universal in the USA. It is odd … “bou” as in “boutique” followed by “y” as in fancy, randy, tarty, floozy, druggy, silly. But “y” in that final position is normally following a consonant. It’s hard to see how the “boo-wee” pronunciation originated. In Websters, they point to old French, but Oxford points to Dutch, which given its popularity in the North-East states, looks likely.

Norm’s point about international navigation is important. There’s an international maritime language, SeaTalk, and I assume like the English of aviation, there will be set expressions and vocabulary and pronunciation, so “boy”. For example, Air Traffic Control use “niner” because in poor radio communication, you hear vowels more than consonants and FIVE and NINE are easily confused. Mind you, I just checked, found an aviation website with pilots saying it wasn’t always used within the USA … worrying, because it’s radio clarity that was the point, not understanding foreigners. SeaTalk came in the mid-90s, but there were textbooks of it ten years earlier.

One textbook, called “Seatalk” won the Duke of Edinburgh book prize in the late 80s. The author and publisher are invited to Buckingham Palace to receive the award (there are about a dozen categories). Anyway, they announced SeaTalk for the innovation award, and the author stood up to go forward, but was pushed physically back into his seat by his publisher, one Robert Maxwell, who then marched up to shake hands and have his photo taken with Prince Phillip. But grabbing the award for maritime English didn’t help Maxwell’s end in a watery grave. Maybe he was thumbing through the book looking for “Help!” when he went down the third time.


Entered at Mon Jul 15 12:09:10 CEST 2013 from (96.30.173.135)

Posted by:

joe j

'Red Right Return', a navigational memory aid, was the name used by a bunch of local kids for their band a couple years back. The Naughty Buoys were a short lived New Wave band back when the wave was new. 'The Bell Buoy' was actually a gay club.

Magnificent morning on the rock. The capelin are rolling on the beaches. I got up at daylight and filled my buckets. Whales are chasing the capelin and putting off quite a show just offshore. Good as it gets.


Entered at Mon Jul 15 07:20:05 CEST 2013 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Can Buoys

Gawd Damn Todd..because you got a lot of experience, I've got a lot of teak for you to sand and varnish!

Yer almost right Todd. It's like this. Marker buoys as you are referring to are like this. If you are coming off the land, like out of a harbour or river. You keep green on your right, (starboard), and red on your left, (port).

If you are coming onto the land, into a harbour or up a river, the opposite applies.

You all can consider this to help remember. Port is a red wine....yes?? so port is always red...to your left. The left side of your ship displays a red light. The right side, (starboard) displays a green light.

So then, if you are coming on to land, or off land the rule is true.

As far as buoys go, in navigation. There is a whistle buoy, which will emit a whistle every so many seconds. When you look at your navigation chart, it will show a designated buoy, and the variation of how many seconds apart you will hear the whistle, or a bell buoy will have a continuous bell ringing with the motion of the tide.

There will be a "light" that will show, red, green or white and be designated on your chart, and showing the time in seconds between each showing. As you can see, this is not a simple thing. That is navigation. Non of it is simple.

In conclusion, it is always, (in our world) pronounced boy!

A bell buoy, a whistle buoy, etc..........

It makes no never mind what Pat's explanation says, that is just another interpretation. What I'm talking about is international law of navigation.


Entered at Mon Jul 15 06:59:35 CEST 2013 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

This should settle the buoy fued.


Entered at Mon Jul 15 05:08:42 CEST 2013 from (108.204.9.198)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Buoy

Out here in Southern New England, and even as far up as Maine, I've mostly heard them referred to with the "boo-ee" pronunciation. I grew up in a shoreline community, and spent most of my youth working in a boatyard, painting and maintaining boats...waxing, washing, cleaning teak, polishing deck hardware etc. fun times.

I assume that when you are talking about buoys, it is the smaller type of buoy that a lobster pot line is attached to. If you're talking abut navigational bouys, I've mostly heard them referred to as "nuns" and "cans" to mark where the channel is. Around here the nuns are red, and the cans are green, and you keep the nuns to the right (or starboard) as you're coming into a harbor or going upstream.

Are they called nuns and cans elsewhere? Do they use the same color scheme with nuns being red, and cans being green?

Never heard the term Scotchman, but I believe it.


Entered at Mon Jul 15 01:55:21 CEST 2013 from (202.67.41.24)

Posted by:

Toko Baju

Location: surabaya
Web: My link

Subject: Bajumurmer.com Toko Baju Online Jual Baju Grosir Murah Reseller Dress Gamis

Bajumurmer.com Toko Baju Online Jual Baju Grosir Murah Reseller Dress Gamis http://subsafan.blogspot.com/2013/06/bajumurmercom-toko-baju-online-jual.html


Entered at Mon Jul 15 01:32:11 CEST 2013 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Rock the Boat!

,Don't rock the boat baby

Rock the boat.....don't roll the boat over!

So the really story on BUOY........you buncha gawd damn land lubbers.

The word is pronounced boy....by any one with any gawd damn salt in their veins.

For all my life, the only ones you ever hear say boo-ee, is Yanke tourists or people from the wrong side of the Rockies. Maybe that's what they call them back there in those puddles in Ontariah or Wisconsin. I don't know.

When Chris first started hangin' round heayuh. He called hisself Northern Boy. Which I changed to buoy, but it's still boy!

I used to piss him right off razzing him......'till he figured me out. We became friends and he and his wife Theresa drove down from Hope and visited an afternoon when we were playing music in a Legion in Surrey. Really nice people Chris and Theresa. He brought me a T shirt with a stencil picture of the Band on it.

No.... a buoy, is a boy. However out here in our commercial fishing industry, you'll very seldom hear them called that. They are called a "Scotchman". I don't remember why right at the moment. Ever since I been out on that water which is getting into 53 years now they are called a Scotchman.

Some old timers still call them a "Bladder", because I think it was sheep bladders they used long ago. Still on our coast from time to time we pick up buoys from Japan that get loose and drift over here. They are made of glass, with heavy rope woven around them. I think you can still find them on the internet. They are different shapes and sizes. Mostly a light green in colour so light you can see thru them. There are ones that are a beautiful magenta colour. These are from the Emperor of Japan, and have this colour because they have gold in the sand when the glass is blown. There is a book on these glass floats to identify them in their different shapes and sizes, as some are quite valuable.......so there you have it.


Entered at Sun Jul 14 20:22:48 CEST 2013 from (68.171.231.86)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Here is a link to the talented and prolific Nova Scotian Joel Plaskett performing "Island Girls And Harbour Boys". Great song and good pun.


Entered at Sun Jul 14 15:22:48 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Not that you can always trust Wikipedia; but....

I was putting information; into my database system and according to Wikipedia every album: from Stage Fright to Moondog Matinee was released on the 15th of the month. Stage Fright and Rock of Ages on August 15th. Just a small detail; but I found it interesting.


Entered at Sun Jul 14 08:43:34 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Buoyed up by responses

I found an online discussion (linked). So "bwoy" is an interesting one … standard in the 17th century. Who knows where "boo- ee" comes from, but it's in "Baywatch." In general, people talk about "AE" or American English to embrace the USA and Canada though there are many differences. Crudely you can say that British and Australian are more often the same in pronunciation, USA and Canada are more often the same. Having taught English to people from Mexico and Quebec I'm usually carefully to say USA when I mean USA, but not so often with language / grammar where "AE" or "Am" in a dictionary if unmodified with "US" or "Can", means both.

Boo- ee surprised me because I'd never heard it. I have been harbour sailing in the USA too, but my companion, though a US resident for 40 years and a citizen, was brought up in England.

The one that had us laughing out loud in the audio of "Inferno" was near the beginning where the hero, Robert Langdown, wakes up in a hospital bed wearing nothing but a johnny. I nearly ran the car off the road. If a nurse told you to put on a johnny in Britain, you'd think you'd arrived in a saucier than normal film of "Carry On, Nurse!" because the only British meaning is condom. I had to come home and look it up in the dictionary. I'd never heard a hospital gown called a "johnny" before.


Entered at Sun Jul 14 05:32:23 CEST 2013 from (68.171.231.83)

Posted by:

Bill M

Come to think of it, I wonder how last week's feature group, the Buoys of "Timothy" naughtyriety, pronounced their name.


Entered at Sun Jul 14 01:04:52 CEST 2013 from (24.114.68.31)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Say What Boy

In Canada - it is Boy with a minor w touch preceding the o. I believe it to be "boo-ee" in the US.........and as a note, it is always frustrating to be asked a question about a place called "America" as if all of us would know just where that is or better yet would have the same pronounciations.


Entered at Sun Jul 14 00:49:08 CEST 2013 from (68.171.231.84)

Posted by:

Bill M

Joan: Thanks. The brain can be such an annoying place. You'd think that if it's going to note your mistakes it could at least tell you at the time instead of interrupting your sleep at 4:00 AM.

Peter V: I grew up saying 'boy', but was always familiar with 'boo-ee' from TV. I always took it as a US tendency.


Entered at Sat Jul 13 23:26:59 CEST 2013 from (96.30.173.135)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: Naughty Buoys

It was always 'boy' around here but the other pronunciation has been creeping in in recent years.

Our old friends, the Eagles, are headlining about a hour away tonight. Opening acts include Johnny Reid, Matt Minglewood, Blue Rodeo and Tragically Hip. Not a bad line up. I was interested but my days of outdoor concerts may be over. Methinks I'll walk around the harbour instead and catch some local folk musicians do their regular Saturday night gig.


Entered at Sat Jul 13 21:54:14 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Nautical stuff

We've been listening to Dan Brown's "Inferno" in the car, know, it's heavily padded out crap, but it does keep you awake.

Anyway, the reader pronounces "buoy" as "boo- ee" rather than "boy". Is that normal in America? I've never heard it before.


Entered at Sat Jul 13 19:58:29 CEST 2013 from (74.108.29.147)

Posted by:

Joan

Web: My link

Subject: Work boats Try # 2

Sorry about that Bill. I woke up about 4 AM and realized I neglected to add the link.


Entered at Sat Jul 13 17:15:39 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Never mind David

Sorry...........figured it out.


Entered at Sat Jul 13 17:09:32 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: MFBP SACD

David, I don't know if you are on line this weekend; but I have gone to the Music Direct Page 3 times this morning and hit the "Add To Cart" button and nothing happens. Is it available for order now?


Entered at Sat Jul 13 15:25:21 CEST 2013 from (96.245.176.214)

Posted by:

bob w.

Thank you, Al. We were fortunate to see him twice last year. Both shows were wonderful.


Entered at Sat Jul 13 14:49:00 CEST 2013 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: An improved video [of NYCS]

There surely are no words for something this magnificent. Still wiping away the tears!


Entered at Sat Jul 13 14:27:18 CEST 2013 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: No way should anyone on the GB miss out on this epic performance

New York City Serenade. Rome. Two nights ago.


Entered at Sat Jul 13 06:04:59 CEST 2013 from (24.114.68.31)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

LINKED: Clip of Ronnie Hawkins and his beautiful home that Bonk is referring to........


Entered at Sat Jul 13 06:04:40 CEST 2013 from (99.140.169.134)

Posted by:

Adam

Subject: Band archival releases, Part 2

I just wanted to add to my previous post:

Robbie has done a really admirable job overseeing the archival releases in The Band's catalogue. I did not want to seem un-appreciative of what we already have... it's just that for myself and many fans, the appetite and desire for more Band material will never slow down!

Robbie first opened the archives for the 2000 reissue series, completed the campaign with "A Musical History" box set in 2005, restored "The Last Waltz" for a CD box set and DVD release (itself a blessing - imagine if TLW was not available on DVD. Not hard to imagine.), and the "Festival Express" footage.

Sure, the Grateful Dead in comparison have been doing archival audio releases for years and years. But hardly any video of them from the '60s/'70s has been released. And compare all of this to the Allman Brothers. It has taken them years to settle legal issues with live releases, and just this year released their deluxe edition of "Brothers & Sisters".

And also keep in mind the The Band's releases have all been kept IN PRINT! That alone is wonderful.


Entered at Sat Jul 13 05:58:46 CEST 2013 from (67.87.216.18)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Heaven Knows recently.


Entered at Sat Jul 13 05:44:52 CEST 2013 from (67.87.216.18)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Heaven Knows


Entered at Sat Jul 13 05:41:58 CEST 2013 from (67.87.216.18)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Summer medley


Entered at Sat Jul 13 04:44:16 CEST 2013 from (75.65.19.104)

Posted by:

Klaudia Kroboth

Subject: Great music!


Entered at Sat Jul 13 04:39:47 CEST 2013 from (24.108.1.255)

Posted by:

BONK

Location: Salt Spring Island/Cabbagetown

Subject: The Hawk

Just watched a clip from a couple of years ago about how Wanda met Ronnie and he refers to himself at the time as "Rudolf Vasilino" I laughed so hard the tea came out my nose and choked me. I'm afraid we might lose him soon 'cause I just watched a clip from the Toronto Star where he says he has sold Mortgage Manor North. He doesn't look well.


Entered at Sat Jul 13 04:06:02 CEST 2013 from (197.220.160.88)

Posted by:

Ghana Gold

Subject: Gold dust / bar offer

Hello Sir, We are group of local miners which have our own mine company in Ghana West Africa, 0ur price is reasonable compare to the world market, our price is USD$37,000 for a kilo, and we have 50kg to 120kg at the moment for sale. We were told that there is a lucrative market for gold in your country now, if even you are not buying the gold may be you can get me a buyer and you will get your commission for getting us a buyer. These are the Specs of our gold: Quantity: more than 50-120kg Quality: 22karat+ Purity: 94.22% Price: $37,000 per a kilo I wait for your reply soon. Regards Mr. K. J. Hamed Tel: +233 236117478


Entered at Sat Jul 13 03:57:47 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: The two Bobby's

Link no longer works. Glad I went earlier this afternoon. Thanks again Ian for the tip.


Entered at Sat Jul 13 03:52:23 CEST 2013 from (24.114.68.31)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

LINKED: Bob Dylan & Joan Baez 1976


Entered at Sat Jul 13 03:16:48 CEST 2013 from (24.114.68.31)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

LINKED: Bob Dylan's infamous run through of Masters of War at the 1991 Grammys.......let's be happy that he has made the long climb back........and iit is at least omforting to know that even in that Fog his heart was in the right place as he sang this song that night as the US was about to or had just started a war with Iraq and I believe George Bush 1 was in the audience...........Of course the President likely turned to his wife or mistress and asked "What the fu*k is he singing about?"


Entered at Sat Jul 13 03:06:42 CEST 2013 from (99.140.169.134)

Posted by:

Adam

Subject: Band archival releases

I am so excited for the upcoming deluxe edition of "Rock Of Ages". I've been thinking about the history of Band archival releases lately.

The 2000 reissue series (with bonus tracks, outtakes, etc.) was completed with "A Musical History" box set in 2005. That was almost 10 years ago already! I can't believe it. And of course "The Last Waltz" was expanded into its own box set in 2002, along with the DVD.

I really hope this "Rock Of Ages" release will do extremely well, and that the gates will open for more Band releases. There is still the "Royal Albert Hall 1971" audio and "Festival Express 1970" video on the table. The Band has been very classy in releasing their archival material to high standards, but we just need more of it. Grateful Dead fans are the luckiest people in the world, with a million hours of officially released concerts. Of course, out of the "big three" groups of the era (my title), The Band has more officially released video from 1969-1978 than either the Grateful Dead or Allman Brothers.


Entered at Sat Jul 13 02:59:29 CEST 2013 from (24.114.68.31)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

....on the theme of Bob paying tribute......here is one of the worst covers ever of one of the worst songs Bruce Springsteen ever wrote - definitley one of the top 5 worst "rock videos"'ever made - but give Bob a break as this was smack dab in the middle of his "FOG" years which lasted about 4 years and almost gloriously included some of the worst live performances ever by a major artist..........culminating in a "for the ages" run though of "Masters of War" at the 1991 Grammys which was startling for even Fog knowledgable fans..........all that said...I salute his dignified recovery......no celebrity nonsense or tabloid exploitation........just get better and back to productive work.


Entered at Sat Jul 13 00:09:01 CEST 2013 from (24.114.68.31)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Sometimes life just doesn't seem to add up.........when I was a kid, Englebert Humperdick was already close to 100.......life has gone on and on.....and it seems he is still the same age he was in 1972............now I learn that Bobby Vee - another name I literally had not heard a single thing about in my lifetime - is YOUNGER than Bob Dylan.......Something is going on here......anyhow, I really enjoyed that clip of him singing Suzie Baby.....and for what it is worth.....a man's face can tell some of the story but I think the way someone moves can often tell more........Bob is still walking like a man of 50 years his junior and shows very good levels of alertness and agility......I believe this "never ending tour" has a number of years left.....God willing.


Entered at Fri Jul 12 23:32:12 CEST 2013 from (80.3.71.222)

Posted by:

Ian Woodward

Subject: Dylan (again)

Couldn't agree more about Dylan's backing in concert. I thought exactly the same when I heard the Vee tribute.

The next Bootleg Series will (most likely) be a SELF PORTRAIT 2 - literally - out-takes, alternate takes and some of the original tracks but without the overdubs.

I'd like to think that they would use the Isle of Wight concert as a "bonus" CD in the De Luxe edition but I've heard nothing to that effect.


Entered at Fri Jul 12 20:59:24 CEST 2013 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The jeers & digs

OK! I got that Bill!............one of these days....


Entered at Fri Jul 12 20:11:28 CEST 2013 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Joan: Unfortunately there's nothing linked. I suppose you're aware that some of those tugboats are almost as old as their skippers.


Entered at Fri Jul 12 19:41:53 CEST 2013 from (74.108.29.147)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Boats and Penn Station

It was a sin that they tore down Penn Station. It was airy and beautiful, It was torn down and the tracks were covered by a passage way and low ceilings that were universally ugly dark and depressing.I commuted through Penn and it really was poor. They tried to do the same to Grand Central but fortunately civic groups prevailed and so it stands.

I was reminded of the attached link when Northwestcoaster talked about old service boats. It is a charming story


Entered at Fri Jul 12 17:46:05 CEST 2013 from (98.15.190.173)

Posted by:

Lars

Location: Lubberville

Subject: The Nav (no "y")

Norm, a "deck head" is a bosun's mate who likes to smoke hemp rope. What we civilians call a ceiling the Nav calls the "overhead." Bulkheads, decks, and ladders, etc. Go back aft and get me a can of slack.....and when we caught hell and just could not take any more b.s. we looked at each other and just said "SAND!"

Avast and turn to.


Entered at Fri Jul 12 17:35:14 CEST 2013 from (96.54.178.226)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Panned; righteous indignity

Yes Bill M.: It was eviscerated from the top down...unfairly in my view. Time for another one maybe.


Entered at Fri Jul 12 16:57:53 CEST 2013 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

JT / Kevin J: I think "Self Portrait" was so called for a reason. Forty (christ!) years later, maybe it's time for "Self Portrait 2".


Entered at Fri Jul 12 16:33:42 CEST 2013 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Suzie Baby - proves my point

'Suzie Baby' proves my point: Dylan can sing in front of a minimalist band and should go out for a concert with this type of backing, presenting his material in a semi-acoustic format: This is a dream. He can hit the notes both up and down. Don't get me wrong. I like what he is doing when the sound system in the arena supports it as I noted it did in Toronto. But what a dream....


Entered at Fri Jul 12 15:54:59 CEST 2013 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Duvet

Yes Kevin J: Vee, Lightfoot, Cohen, Zevon, Holly, Aznavour, Garcia and the Dead, Harrison, Williams, Cash, Rogers, Pomus, etc.and it goes on and on... covers and more covers from the live shows and from recordings. The man sure knows what he likes and what his roots are. The radio shows were the greatest testament of what Dylan saw as his sources (even with the producer's input). It would make a great album. As you say, "Just my imagination, running away..."


Entered at Fri Jul 12 15:38:30 CEST 2013 from (24.114.68.31)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

LINKED: An excellent article on Ray Davies..........found on the Dylan site this morning..........Recommended reading.......Love the guy!

........so Gordon Lightfoot shows up at a Dylan show in September and Bob plays a Gord song, same with Cohen some years back, now Bobby Vee........Let the imagination run.......


Entered at Fri Jul 12 14:07:00 CEST 2013 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: BTW rock music and playing poker... maybe?

In the opposite side of the Sound JOHN MAYALL is announcing for 50 years of the blues. After this MANFRED MANN is announcing for _60_ years of pop in the same town of Hamlet.


Entered at Fri Jul 12 11:59:28 CEST 2013 from (83.249.143.62)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Tugs (especially to West... errr... Rocking Chair

Did you know that Gulf of Finland was full of German and Russian mines after WW2. My father who was officer in the Navy had only a handful of old tugs in his escadrone to solve the problem. Russians had taken all the gems. Tugs are living a long life. Some of these were seen in Finnish harbors even in the sixties. Made me cry and laugh.


Entered at Fri Jul 12 10:53:41 CEST 2013 from (80.3.71.222)

Posted by:

ian Woodward

Subject: Ages of Rock

If it was taken after the show, I'm not surprised.

Touring so much must take its toll.


Entered at Fri Jul 12 10:05:15 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

We all do.


Entered at Fri Jul 12 09:59:43 CEST 2013 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Bobby V looks in a lot better shape than Bobby D.


Entered at Fri Jul 12 09:43:29 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Phew! Bobby Vee still looks like Bobby Vee, and younger than Bob. Just checked on Wiki, and he is two years younger (1943 to Bob's 1941). Because Bob Dylan was in his backing band, I assumed Bobby Vee was the older one. Bobby Vee Meets The Crickets will come off the shelf for an airing today. I was going to link to Come Back When You Grow Up, but that song's a major earworm … it's so catchy that you hear it once and it plays all day.


Entered at Fri Jul 12 09:21:32 CEST 2013 from (80.3.71.222)

Posted by:

Ian Woodward

Web: My link

Subject: Dylan and Bobby Vee backstage

Bobby x 2.

In case the above doesn't work, you can also cut and paste this:

http://instagram.com/p/bpDqhZxfsz/#


Entered at Fri Jul 12 08:14:34 CEST 2013 from (83.170.97.21)

Posted by:

micheal rodgers

Location: usa

Subject: wolves temple

my name is micheal rodgers i am here to give a testimony about wolves temple that helped me in gaining double promotion in the organisation where i worked under two weeks and customers attraction in my wives super market,i am using this medium to tank the wolves temple for there great job in my and things have been going on well with me and my family.if you are going through any difficulties i advice you contact them on wolvestemple@gmail.com to get your problems solved.


Entered at Fri Jul 12 07:40:56 CEST 2013 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Suzie Baby corrections

Corrections: Suzie Baby (not Susie); Played in St. Paul, Minn., not Duluth, Minn. My apologies.


Entered at Fri Jul 12 01:53:50 CEST 2013 from (96.54.178.226)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Bobby Vee /Susie Baby/Bob Dylan/Elston Gunn

Bob Dylan sang "Susie Baby" last night in honour of Bobby Vee (in Duluth) who apparently attended the concert, it is said. He proved that though his voice is somewhat 'gruff', he could hit all the highs and lows that the song required. Elston Gunn indeed!


Entered at Thu Jul 11 21:08:44 CEST 2013 from (70.53.45.43)

Posted by:

Kevin J

David P’s post triggered a thought about Massey Hall ( site of all sorts of Band and Band related shows ) in Toronto. Last week some time the Globe and Mail newspaper ran an article on renovation plans for the great venue. This has me really worried as this is simply one of the finest, funkiest places one would ever be lucky enough to watch a rock n roll show in. Great little downstairs bar and lounge area as well and the article ominously suggested more space and new washrooms………………we all know that this is “code” for VIP lounges and Sushi taking the place of beer taps………………….ahhhhhhhhhh!

Brown eyed girl: Hurry on back, you must put a stop to these renovation plans.

Memo to the city of Statford, Ontario: Pull that plaque now on the irresponsible little jerk J. Bieber and replace it with one of deserving homeboy Richard Manuel......Not even the great Spell caster Dr. Atakpo could sort this little punk out.


Entered at Thu Jul 11 20:53:37 CEST 2013 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

The best single volume study on the Revolution is probably Robert Middlekauf's This Glorious Cause, part of the Oxford History of America.


Entered at Thu Jul 11 20:29:11 CEST 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The Halls of a Station

I wonder if the beginning of the song was inspired by the demolition of the Pennsylvania Station in New York City. The time frame fits, as the present day Madison Square Garden was opened in 1968 at the former site of the above-ground building of Penn Station after a five year demolition & construction project. It was controversial at the time and in the news, as a majestic historical site was replaced by a far less aesthetically pleasing structure. As a child I remember walking through the halls of Penn Station, impressed by its granduer and how the sounds echoed within.


Entered at Thu Jul 11 20:04:57 CEST 2013 from (80.3.71.222)

Posted by:

Ian Woodward

Subject: Liberty's Exiles

Thanks for all the feedback. Very interesting. I think David P has identified the book I had in mind and I'll try to get hold of a copy and put it on my reading list.


Entered at Thu Jul 11 19:26:10 CEST 2013 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: idle scheming / defence mechanism

David P: To accept that the song was "totally inspired" by a walk in the woods is to overlook a mountain of beautiful lines that suggest otherwise: "Out of all the idle scheming, can't we have something to feel? Once upon a time leaves me empty and tomorrow never comes. I could sing the sound of your laughter, still I don't know your name."


Entered at Thu Jul 11 18:58:11 CEST 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: In A Station

"Once I climbed up the face of a mountain
And ate the wild fruit there."

As Richard Manuel revealed in a 1985 interview with Ruth Albert Spencer, he drew inspiration from the bucolic beauty around Woodstock and the changing of the seasons."

"Yeah, I like to get out and wander around in nature sometimes. That song 'In A Station' was totally inspired by Overlook Mountain."

Thus nature inspired Richard, just as the poet William Wordsworth was inspired centuries before climbing Mt. Snowdon in Wales.


Entered at Thu Jul 11 17:23:01 CEST 2013 from (97.81.222.55)

Posted by:

Jimmy Nelson

Web: My link

Subject: You never hear about this Richard Manuel gem

"In a Station," so sweet ... so emotional. I just love this one.


Entered at Thu Jul 11 16:01:40 CEST 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Loyalists

Maya Jasanoff wrote an excellent book on the subject, "Liberty's Exiles: American Loyalists in the Revolutionay War" (Vintage Books 2011).


Entered at Thu Jul 11 15:35:23 CEST 2013 from (24.114.68.69)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Greg's report that Six Nations had been loyal to the British.....

.......oh no........one more bit of news for The Band fan's Nut Brigade Club to hate Robbie Robertson for.

Santana: A few posts below another classic tribute to the great Spellcaster.............all in all, start to finish the best work by Santana since Abraxas.

Norm: I really enjoyed that tale of sound systems on the Tug.


Entered at Thu Jul 11 15:14:16 CEST 2013 from (99.255.116.43)

Posted by:

GregD

Location: UEL country

Subject: UELs

Bill M is quite correct in his "essay" on United Empire Loyalists and their place in Canadian history. I would add that one of those "important" Indian tribes who were loyal to the British crown and granted land in what is now Canada after the American Revolution were the Six Nations of the Iroquois, home of Robbie Robertson's mother (Band connection). Many UELs also settled in the areas along the Grand River in southern Ontario (also Band country).


Entered at Thu Jul 11 14:33:44 CEST 2013 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Ian W: I can't help with the specific reference, but the general point, reflected in Peter V's suggestion, is that a large proportion of those on the losing side ended up in what is now Canada. Many in the north would have walked farther north, and many others would have sailed to Halifax and dispersed, mostly westward, from there. Here these people are called United Empire Loyalists or UELs, and their cultural / historical presence is felt especially along the north side of the St Lawrence River and eastern Lake Ontario. You have to keep in mind that things moved slowly in those days, so Americans were still moving northward into Ontario in the early 1800s, though free land would have been a huge consideration, perhaps a bigger consideration that loyalty to the crown. In any event, we heard a lot about the UELs all last year, the two hundredth anniversary of the start of the two-year War of 1812, in which (in our view) 'we' (British, Canadians and First Nations forces) successfully fought back an attempted invasion by the US. A very large proportion of the Anglo-Canadians would have had roots in what was by then the US, as did the more important of the First Nations.


Entered at Thu Jul 11 07:53:14 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Robertson Davies 1991 novel "Murther and Walking Spirits" has one thread among its several, about United Empire Loyalists leaving New York and heading to Canada in the Revolutionary War.


Entered at Thu Jul 11 02:39:02 CEST 2013 from (80.3.71.222)

Posted by:

Ian Woodward

Subject: Help sought (not musical)

I was prompted to ask this question by an earlier comment about limiting the voting franchise to those who are knowledgeable about politics. The figure of "20%" was cited and my mind moved on to thinking about politicians in terms of their voting and their perception of their authority to enact legislation. In a democracy, most politicians seem to regard "50% plus one" of the votes as a mandate to act as if it meant "100%". Furthermore, acheiving less than 50% of the vote but gaining a majority in the voting chamber is also regarded as an absolute mandate.

But that's not really my topic here. That concerns the American War of Independence and a particular book on the subject.

As a broad generality, it is sometimes written that: one-third of the settlers favoured separation from Britain; one third cared neither way; and one third opposed separation. A few years ago, there was a book about those who opposed separation (and were thus on the losing side) and what happened to them subsequently but I'm blowed if I can remember the author or the title.

Can anyone out there supply these?


Entered at Thu Jul 11 01:03:56 CEST 2013 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The head, the deck head & the dick head.....

Yer almost right. I think sometime ago I spoke of communication from a fellow tug boat man in South Africa. My uncle had been captain on one of the "Saftug" ships, "John Ross" perhaps close to 30 years ago.

This fellow Lloyd Merriman, his father is now captain of John Ross. Well yesterday in the mail I received this most beautiful book published last year about these two tugs, (which in the 70's were the two biggest most powerful tugs in the world). Lloyd sent me this copy. It's called "A Tug At My Heart".

I'm quite overwhelmed. What a class gentleman. I feel like a very lucky man.


Entered at Wed Jul 10 23:40:39 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Nautical language

I thought the "head" was the bucket at the front of the boat (bows) for relieving oneself.


Entered at Wed Jul 10 23:31:57 CEST 2013 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Correct This!!

Stop working for a living......gawd damn it!......that's what I want to do.

Kevin.... you need to understand how this works. Youtube is ok, if you're around internet service. However, on the ship boy, that's where you listen. On my tug, I still have the old cassette system with speakers built into the deck head, (that's ceiling to you folks).

But, my computer contains a program called "Chart View" the computer is hooked up to a Furuno GPS, and that is the navigation system. I have down loaded onto my hard drive, many of my favourite cd's. When towing, the music plays in the background, while the navigation system does it's work. A nice little sound system from Staples, has BALLS! and that is the second sound system.

On the Rockin Chair, there is a CD player, radio system, with 14 speakers, two in every room , and on the top bridge each with their own volume control. Again there is the computer with nav. system, and down loaded music. I mean...no matter where you are.....no matter what you do, you got to have music.

Add to that, my computer on the Rockin Chair, has my down loaded sequenced music for my backing band so I can play my guitar, and have the music from my computer backing me. Many places I go in a little bar on the water, even in remote places and play music. One night in Rivers Inlet, a few years back, the little bar at Duncanby Landing was full of American tourists with their yachts all tied there.

I hauled my sound system up to the bar, (this is my portable 500 watt system I use in small bars.) I played all evening, 'till about midnight and came away with $600 yankee dollah maun....plee dat music, drinkin' and disturb the peace maun.


Entered at Wed Jul 10 21:07:49 CEST 2013 from (70.53.45.43)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Meow! Car Speakers

An interesting thought about listening to music rather than news in the car. On a long trip. I think just about everyone mixes things up as two hours is about my limit for listening to music…..but on shorter trips – music certainly is the choice. Some years back, I asked the question at the GB as to how the folks here were listening to music other than live music…..Interesting responses and at the time I remember being confused when Brien Sz listed “computer” as a good percentage of his listening…….In time I came to realize that he was just ahead of the curve in that many people were just staring to get into YouTube and various other forms of music on the computer……As an update, I am probably even more tilted toward the vehicle than ever before. I would think 70% of the music I listen to is in the car……..25 years ago, it would have been almost 100% house or apartment. I spent a lot of money on installing a great system in one car and fortunate to have a very good system in a recent auto purchase………anyhow, car – 70%, Ipod – 20% ( Zero unless travelling which I do a lot so that accounts for the big percentage ), Home - 10% with too much of that being music through television speakers – and therefore not ideal due to location and volume restrictions. I play music at home every day but don't seem to find the time to just listen to it the way I used to....have to find a way to correct this.


Entered at Wed Jul 10 19:30:46 CEST 2013 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Meet the Family

Did ya ever milk a cat?????


Entered at Wed Jul 10 19:18:16 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Thank you David.


Entered at Wed Jul 10 18:48:27 CEST 2013 from (74.108.29.147)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Ducks

The town I live in is a peninsula. We have a lot of waterfowl. They go back and forth between the bay and ponds. In the spring when the ducklings are hatched , the Momma duck will lead the the babies across the road from pond to bay. It happens so often that the town has posted "Duck Crossing" signs. It is cute but is does tie up traffic.


Entered at Wed Jul 10 18:26:15 CEST 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: MoFi MFBP

John D: Yes, this is the second time round that Mobile Fidelity has reissued MFBP. Back in the '80s that released a gold Ultra Disc CD and vinyl LP version cut by Stan Ricker. The newer heavy vinyl and SACD versions are readily available online through Music Direct in Chicago, which now owns MoFi.

Back in 1968 mastering engineer Bob Ludwig cut an initial "reference" version of MFBP, but it was rejected by Capitol because they felt it had "too much" bass. So it was re-cut by Capitol's engineer, lopping off everything below 80hz. Keep in mind that back then most record cartridge's would have problems tracking grooves with deep bass.

The '80s MoFi versions restored the deep bass, but their newer versions not only get the low level right, but also restore the wonderful midrange and top end. And as Adam previously mentioned, even the standard CD layer of the hybrid SACD version is great.


Entered at Wed Jul 10 18:10:06 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

An ideal election would be one in which only I voted, but the problem with your 20%, Kevin, is it would include all the party activists and those most interested in politics, which means a surfeit of extremists at opposite ends of the spectrum.

Would you put the lady's frustration at the ducks down to being in a Korean car? I think frustration on the road comes from listening to too much news and not enough music. If you're listening to something excellent, a delay in travel prolongs the pleasure, and you can relax and smile at the ducks.


Entered at Wed Jul 10 18:00:35 CEST 2013 from (70.53.45.43)

Posted by:

Kevin J

JT: Thank you.

I was on Leslie this morning going South ( calm down Bill M! ) and was held up by about 20 ducks crossing the road ( very slowly )…….quite calming and lovely really but there was one lady in a Hyundai that was visibly upset and banging her hands on the wheel…..oh well, it just reinforced my thought that democracy is probably healthiest if voter turnout is kept to around 20%.....................Think about any room you have ever been in….Bar room, Living room. Boardroom….has there ever been more than 20% of the people in it that room that were fully informed and that you would trust to select a government………Didn’t think so and yet the media goes ga ga every time an election is held and turnout is low……………..the lower the better I say!


Entered at Wed Jul 10 16:55:29 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: David P My MFBP Correction

So I went deep into all the versions of MFBP and even though mine is from Mobile Fidelity, it is indeed the "GOLD" edition that I own and that is from 1989. I haven't played it in years and the sound is amazing. The SACD version I guess is even better; but I will admit that sonics seem to be an individual taste as one gets older.

I would still like to know where you found it on line; but knowing you, you probably found it retail?


Entered at Wed Jul 10 16:50:03 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Milk a cow

There was something in the paper the other day saying after domestic dogs, cows kill the next greatest number of people. Far more than bulls.


Entered at Wed Jul 10 16:35:11 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: MFBP I'm very confused David.

OK David, So I go into my collection and I find my Mobile Fidelity Version of the CD MFBP; with the words "Original Master Recording; in black lettering; with a gold background. It is from 2009. Is it SACD? I don't think it is. No mention of SACD on the label. When I go on to Amazon there is no mention of the SACD version.

However my "Original Master Recording" Mobile Fidelity from 2009 is there. There is a version for sale on Music Directs website for $30 bucks. It seems also to be from 2009. Need some clarification please David. Thanks for the help David and please point me to the site; where you bough it. I'm talking CD here of course.


Entered at Wed Jul 10 16:15:38 CEST 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Milk Cow Blues

"If you see my milk cow, please drive her on home
"Cause I ain't had no milk and butter
Since my cow's been gone."

Listening closely to the vocalists' exchange in "We Can Talk" you can hear:

Levon: "Did you ever milk a cow?"
Richard (faintly): "Milk a cow."
Rick: "I had the chance one day, but I was all dressed up for Sunday."

That is preceeded by "To keep the wheels turnin' you've got to keep the engine churnin'." And richly appropriate, one churns raw milk to separate the cream into buttermilk & butter.

Hearing the "milk a cow" exchange in the song also brings back a childhood memory for me. When I was six years old, we lived for a short spell out in the country here in Georgia. The neighbor farmer across the road once showed me how to milk his cow. I still, to this day, remember my awkward attempt, which finally proved successful. Then there was that day, when cutting across the pasture, I was chased by an angry bull. I also recall, that at the neighbors' farmhouse, when you wanted a glass of fresh milk, you drew it from a cool bucket with a ladle. Of course, nowadays, drinking raw milk is forbidden by our government agencies.

With regard to SACD playback: Many Sony blu-ray players, even inexpensive models, will play the high-resolution SACD layer. All one has to do, using the menu feature, is to select the proper audio output.


Entered at Wed Jul 10 15:39:14 CEST 2013 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Heart issues

Kevin J: Bob Dylan had a fungal infection causing pericarditis, inflammation in the sac surrounding the heart (according to this report).

"Bob Dylan was hospitalized on May 25, 1997 seriously ill with histoplasmosis, a potential life threatening fungal infection that causes swelling of the sac surrounding the heart. Histoplasmosis is caused by the fungus histoplasma capsulatum. Dylan was treated with antibiotics, and his condition was not considered life threatening. Doctors said his condition was made more severe by a delay in diagnosisHe was released from a Los Angeles hospital over the weekend of May 31-June 1 (1997). "

RANDY TRAVIS is said to have a VIRAL CARDIOMYOPATHY, a serious condition of the heart muscle (and not the sac around the heart). This results potentially in heart failure. Both are serious conditions since the function of the heart is compromised.


Entered at Wed Jul 10 09:49:43 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

SACD is having something of a comeback. I'm annoyed with myself, because about four or five years ago, our local Sony shop was ditching SACD players very cheaply in its sale (like £300 down to £75). I was tempted but only had fewer than ten SACDs and thought the sale was because Sony thought the format dead. But they are creeping out again. And no cheap SACD players are around!

Switching to SACD on my big AV amp has become an irritation, because while the amp continues to work perfectly, the display is completely f*cked, so switching TV to DVD even requires rotating the dial and waiting for sound. I was looking at new ones, and they all seem to go for digital displays and few controls. I want an old-fashioned one with lots of buttons so when the display dies I can still select what I want!


Entered at Wed Jul 10 06:15:50 CEST 2013 from (99.140.169.134)

Posted by:

Adam

The "Super Audio CD" format, when they are "Hybrid SACDs", can be played on both CD and SACD players.

The Band SACD releases are Hybrids. For those like myself who don't own an SACD player, you can play the "redbook CD layer" and get better quality sound than regular CDs.


Entered at Wed Jul 10 01:23:45 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Some, but not all, SACDs are hybrids, encoded with both CD and SACD, so you can play them in a CD player, but you won't get the superior SACD sound.

Some DVD and blu-ray players can also play SACD but need switching to it. Pioneer machines often have an SACD setting. Sony, even though they invented SACD, are less likely to have it.


Entered at Wed Jul 10 00:04:18 CEST 2013 from (68.171.231.81)

Posted by:

Bill M

Kevin J: Lemme guess. Did the best have something to do with our earlier topic, milking?


Entered at Tue Jul 9 23:48:24 CEST 2013 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Raquel/SACD Player?

Raquel was always my favorite of that era,with Bardot a close second.Gina Lolllobrigida never interested me much but Loren did.Off topic very badly,but is a special player needed for SACD's or can I use my regularCD/MP3 player? And,thanks,Kevin,for the response!(My dear wife will be pleased I went back to the topic.)


Entered at Tue Jul 9 23:33:30 CEST 2013 from (70.53.45.43)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Jed………….If Cher had been a CD then Raquel Welch would have been a SACD………although some say “Super Audio” CD’s sound just like regular CD’s…..I distinctly remember putting on a SACD of Dark Side Of The Moon and believing to this day that it was the 2nd best experience I have ever had in a car……


Entered at Tue Jul 9 22:52:29 CEST 2013 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: SACD

Being technologically ignorant can anyone tell me what an SACD is and what type of player is is played on? Much appreciated.


Entered at Tue Jul 9 22:26:30 CEST 2013 from (99.140.169.134)

Posted by:

Adam

David - The MoFi releases are incredible. On "We Can Talk", you can hear Garth's foot pedals for the Lowrey organ during the intro. Now that is detailed sound.


Entered at Tue Jul 9 22:12:48 CEST 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: We Can Talk

The recent Mobile Fidelity LP reissue & SACD version of "Music From Big Pink" really presents "We Can Talk" and the rest of the album better than any previous versions IMHO.


Entered at Tue Jul 9 21:56:08 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: All dressed up for Sunday

Mark, thanks for that story. Wonderful stuff!


Entered at Tue Jul 9 21:23:23 CEST 2013 from (70.53.45.43)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: mike h

Thank you. I love looking at those pictures. What a view of the stage from those seats as well.


Entered at Tue Jul 9 21:12:49 CEST 2013 from (70.53.45.43)

Posted by:

Kevin J

I was sorry to see news today that Randy Travis is in critical condition. Is that not the same heart virus that almost killed Bob Dylan some years back? Hopefully, he pulls through the way Bob did. I always think of Randy Travis, Steve Earle and Dwight Yoakum together in the sense that they were labelled or marketed – for a very brief period – by the industry in the middle 1980’s as the new stars of a new type of country music……..It wasn’t really the case but all three had very distinctive talents……..After watching the three on a the Grammy awards I think it was back to back to back, I remember going straight out and buying Earle’s “Guitar Town” – a fine album which was the beginning for me of moving away from to that point had been a pretty narrow rock n roll play list………..never purchased any Yoakam or Travis – though an interview with Yoakam during that period on Much Music led me to the great Joe Ely……….and I never purchased another Steve Earle but Guitar Town did lead me to Townes Van Zandt and weirdly enough an album last year by Earle's son named Townes Earle.


Entered at Tue Jul 9 20:41:56 CEST 2013 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

mike h

Web: My link

The Band - July 13, 1976 - Tarrytown, NH - photos by James R. Anderson.


Entered at Tue Jul 9 19:10:46 CEST 2013 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Hunh????

What in hell sense is that supposed to make Bill????...........gawd damn it!


Entered at Tue Jul 9 17:30:52 CEST 2013 from (68.171.231.87)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: we can talk

I like the stories posted here. Father Clock can both tick and tock - but all we can do is the latter. If you take "milking a cow" in its euphemistic sense (as in Why buy the cow when you're already getting your milk for free?), then the lines simply reverse the traditional straight line / gag line sequence. Here the (very) straight man doesn't even realise he's being asked a bent question - so gives a very straight answer.


Entered at Tue Jul 9 16:30:40 CEST 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Vinyl Siding: The Last Waltz

Last April Rhino reissued a limited edition (3500 copies) remastered vinyl version of "The Last Waltz." For those who missed out, it was recently announced that Rhino will be releasing other run of the 3-LP set on Sept. 3.


Entered at Tue Jul 9 14:19:51 CEST 2013 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: What's Opera, Doc?

Mark: that was funny!

My wife did that with Elmer Fudd's "Kill the wabbit" once. This happened about 2 years ago. She was reading a magazine while I was flipping through the channels and I stopped on a program that was about La Scala of Milano putting on Wagner's Die Walküre. when the music started for Ride of the Valkyries, I hear my wife start to sing "kill the wabbit". All I can say is....whatta woman! : )


Entered at Tue Jul 9 13:38:09 CEST 2013 from (24.39.33.90)

Posted by:

Mark

Location: Maine

Subject: Did You Ever Milk a Cow?

When I first got into The Band, as you can guess, all the albums were in heavy rotation on the CD player. Unfortunately, it took a while longer for other members of the family to catch the bug. For me, the turning point in their ultimate conversion to Band Fans was caused by the line in question. We drove by a bunch of cows in a field and my wife made a comment about her grandparents having cows. My ten year asked, word for word, "Did you ever milk a cow?" Without missing a beat, my wife answered "I had the chance one day, but I was all dressed up for Sunday"....and the ten year old laughed and knew the line, too! The wife is now a full-fledged fan, but the now 20 year-old is still working her way back to them.... :)


Entered at Tue Jul 9 09:54:41 CEST 2013 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: I bet you never milked a cow?

I love the response

I had the chance one day

but I was all dressed up for Sunday


Entered at Tue Jul 9 09:05:23 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Time Marches On

I just looked … Scrooey Mooey is not on youtube, but the collectable B-side Time Marches On is on youtube.

Time Marches ON … Don't give up on Father Clock?


Entered at Tue Jul 9 09:01:35 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: We Can Talk

Thanks for kind comments. Last week a record collector I know loaned me some British pressings on rare labels for the book I'm working on, so I could scan them. At the top was Scrooey Mooey by The Peels on the Audio-Fidelity label, a very rare 45 from 1966 (Karate label in the USA).

So I played it and it's a pastiche of Louie Louie with different lyrics and I'd never heard it before … but what jumped out at me was the line "Have you ever milked a cow?" The song is funny, and the backing is very well produced. I wonder if The Hawks knew the song and that line had taken Richard Manuel's fancy? Going back to my article on We Can Talk (linked) it struck me that Louie Louie itself is another song famed for enigmatic half-heard lyrics.

Actually Scrooey-Mooey is a song known for it's B-side, Time Marches On, a brassy instrumental which was popular on the Northern Soul scene … it's the B-side that makes it collectable.


Entered at Tue Jul 9 05:10:25 CEST 2013 from (74.78.175.69)

Posted by:

Far East Man

Location: Rockport, ME

Subject: We Can Talk

Sometimes simple things send you into a tailspin. In the Uncut article on MFBP, there's a small section with notes on each song. For "We Can Talk " the author claims it was written by Robbie. So I have spent the last few days asking myslelf how I could have missed that. It is by far one of my favorite songs by the group, because it has righteous contributions from each member. It feels like pure Richard. Well, sometimes we just like to allow ourselves to suffer I guess. There are multiple things I could have done to verify this, but I chose to hammer myself and trusted the article. In all honesty, as I get older, I also forget to check on things. Imagine my delight upon entering this page tonight and finding out the truth. Thanks to Peter for the wonderful write up as well. I found the sharper blade. Whew.


Entered at Mon Jul 8 22:55:59 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

We re-watched The Conspirator this evening, which starts the day "Lincoln" ends. We wanted to check our judgment that it is a better film. James McAvoy is superb, and courtroom dramas never fail.

Link is to my original review on the cinema showing … must be two years old now.


Entered at Mon Jul 8 22:24:41 CEST 2013 from (70.53.45.64)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Thinking about films on or about the US Presidency, I re-watched ‘All The President’s Men” again a few weeks ago. An almost perfect film by another fine director Alan Pakula. What a decade the 70’s was for film.


Entered at Mon Jul 8 19:07:33 CEST 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Bill M: In conjunction with the agreement between Capitol and Groscourt (therein referred to as the "Company") the guys individually signed an Artists Declaration in which they:

"Join in the representations and warranties made in the Capitol-Company Agreement as respects to my employment contract with Company, I agree to perform all the terms and provisions of my said employment contract and of the Capitol-Company Agreement which relate to my phonograph record endeavors, the use to be made of such results and proceeds and grant to Capitol the perpetual right to use and publish my name, (including any professional name adopted by me), signature, likeness, voice, sound effects and biographical material concernin me for advertising and trade purposes in connection with recordings made under the Capitol-Company Agreement and the exploitation thereof, and I agree that if the Capitol-Company Agreement is inconsistent with my employment contract, the obligations of the former shall supersede those of the latter."

Their Artists Declaration included this other curious clause:

"Agree to look solely to Company for the payment of my fees and/or royalties as the case may be, and will not assert any claim in this regard against Capitol or attempt to prevent the manufacture, sale or distribution of phonograph records manufactured from Company masters produced under the terms and conditions of the Capitol-Company Agreement."


Entered at Mon Jul 8 18:55:45 CEST 2013 from (74.108.29.147)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Jean Ritchie

Jean lives in my town, Port Washington. She was a very interesting lady. A master dulcimer player and maker. She would frequently perform at our library. (Her house was about a block from he library)


Entered at Mon Jul 8 18:18:08 CEST 2013 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Kevin J: I watched a bit of Ebony Buckle. Lovely face.

Picked up three CDs at the local free market on Saturday, a good but non-essential album by a New Orleans band called Blind Melon, a Townes Van Zandt live (ditto), and "Journey to Love: Rare & Early Elektra Classics", which apparently came glued to "Mojo" magazine some years ago. For me, the revelation on that one was Jean Ritchie, who I'd hear of forever but never heard; her "O Love Is Teasin'" is a brilliant bridge between Karen Dalton and Joni Mitchell. Otherwise I like the line in Fred Neil's "Blues On The Ceiling" that for him "Love is just a dirty five-letter word". Maybe not up to the sardonic standard of "they'll probably drop the atom bomb the day my ship comes in", but still pretty good. And there's the nice lines towards the end of Phil Och's rewrite / expansion of "Universal Soldier", "I Ain't Marching Anymore": "Call it peace, call it treason, call it love, call it reason, but I ain't marching anymore". And then there's the closing reminder of how brilliant Love could be - "7 and 7 Is".


Entered at Mon Jul 8 17:48:55 CEST 2013 from (70.53.45.64)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Lincoln

I pointed out my disappointment with the film “Lincoln” seven or eight months ago………..Like most of the magnificent group of US born directors that came of age in the 1970”s such as Coppola, Scorsese, etc. Steven Spielberg has lost a lot off his fastball……..nit-picking historical facts have little to do with the problems of this film. While the acting was great – and not surprising given the casting of Daniel day Lewis and Tommy Lee Jones – the direction in too many parts of the film was on par with TV Movie of the Week stuff……. there must have been ten instances of the long dramatic pause with zoom focus/hushed sound while all waited for something or other to happen – usually a vote. Annoying to say the least especially for a film with an adult audience.

Ebony Buckle: Surprised Joe was the only one here to make note of my attachment of last Friday. I found her to be astonishing - really.


Entered at Mon Jul 8 16:58:25 CEST 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Thaddeus Stevens

It's interesting to note that Thaddeus Stevens, a native New Englander, established a law practice in Gettysburg, Pa. in 1816. He spent a quarter century there and began his career in politics before moving to Lancaster. That the abolitionist's path to fame crossed through the site of the decisive Civil War battle is one of those twists of history. Just over a hundred years after Thaddeus Stevens opened his law office in Gettysburg, Captain Dwight D. Eisenhower, in his first independent command after graduating from West Point, was assigned to a tank training unit at Camp Colt in Gettysburg. Three decades later, in 1950, Gen. Eisenhower and his wife bought a farm near Gettysburg. Two years later he was elected president.


Entered at Mon Jul 8 16:54:20 CEST 2013 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: How is your bird?

Link to a very special LARS / Dylan send-up - from '65. Another of John D's former comrades, backed by who knows who.


Entered at Mon Jul 8 16:48:10 CEST 2013 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

David P: I have to think that Grossman would have insisted on an amendment that captured any and all post-Crackers lineups of our guys, including the MFBP lineup that was just a list of the guys' names.

I was told ca '77 that Grossman had wielded his similar contract with the Full Tilt Boogie Band guys in such a way as to prevent them from using the name post-Janis. Most of them went out for a short time as King Biscuit Boy and the Full Tilt Boogie Band, but that didn't last long - due to a stop order from Grossman, I suspect.


Entered at Mon Jul 8 16:31:40 CEST 2013 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: History on film

Sometimes liberites with "the facts" need to be taken...you've got to cram in a lot into the time allotted for the film, so composite characters need to be created or certain things have to be left out. That's why I always feel that short stories make better films than most novels do.

I guess a lot depends, too, on the purpose of the film: action-packed blockbuster or one trying to be some sort of a "history lesson" (and I mean that in a good way).


Entered at Mon Jul 8 15:54:14 CEST 2013 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Accuracy in film

I agree that movies do not have to be accurate. There have been many recent movies about current war-torn sites that were said to inaccurate. However, the question of how far a movie can stray from accuracy and still maintain some semblance of the truth is at issue. I'm not a historian so I don't know enough about these movies to comment. However, from what I have read from some reviewers, there is doubt about some issues (that seem to be of concern) despite the excellent acting. Reminds me a lot of the issues raised by the soldiers in the recent movies about the middle east.


Entered at Mon Jul 8 15:52:43 CEST 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Capitol Contract

The way the deal was structured was that Groscourt Productions, Inc. signed an agreement with Capitol Records, Inc. to provide "the exclusive personal endeavors of Levon Helm, Robbie Robertson, Richard Manuel, Rick Danko and Garth Hudson, performing as 'The Crackers'...in connection with the production of records." The guys had previously signed an employment contract with Groscourt, Albert Grossman's partnership at the time with John Court.


Entered at Mon Jul 8 15:52:10 CEST 2013 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

And here's the other song / jingle that John D referred to, "Do It To 'Em" by the BTB-$ (nee the Big Town Boys). As it was a commercial record, specific reference to Big G Walters has been removed.


Entered at Mon Jul 8 15:45:07 CEST 2013 from (101.164.0.90)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Subject: Pat... Some good points

I don't think movies should necessarily be accurate, but do you improve the story? Inglorious bastards was terrific... My main issue with Lincoln was the way the slaves behaved... Why didn't they just raise up? Maybe I'm too picky...


Entered at Mon Jul 8 15:41:27 CEST 2013 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

So the rest of you know what John D was referring to, here is a link to "Babe Ruth" by Butterfingers. Babe Ruth and Butterfingers were sister chocolate bars, and the song started out simply as a jingle for one of them. It went over so where that it was released commercially under the name of the other. But really it's Robbie Lane and the Disciples minus Robbie Lane, likely shortly after they left Ronnie Hawkins. The organ is played by the late, great Doug Riley, who wasn't formally a Disciple but who appeared with them on their weekly TV show. Doug's long-time jingle-writing partner, Terry Bush, was actually in the Disciples, having taken over from Domenic Troiano when the latter moved on to the Rogues.


Entered at Mon Jul 8 14:26:46 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Yes, it has that sense of being shoehorned in, but if you have to do that, you don't start off with it … maybe they thought they'd get it over with!


Entered at Mon Jul 8 11:18:59 CEST 2013 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Peter: just a thought, I wonder if that scene was put in to avoid any potential hubbub regarding the lack of African-American roles of substance in the movie. You know Spielberg caught flack for not having a British (or Canadian) presence in Saving Private Ryan...perhaps it was an attempt to cover the studio's backside.


Entered at Mon Jul 8 10:56:15 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Lincoln

I'm not so sure about "water closet". They definitely existed in 1865 (only just, 1858-9), but the word - allegedly- first appeared in 1870 in Britain, 1880 in America. Even if Lincoln had heard of this new device, he seems unlikely to have used it to others moving, or having movements, in less exulted bathrooms.

Another was reference to Jefferson Davis as "Jeff". Would he have done that? Was it deliberately demeaning? (as "Adolf" was used in WW2). It jarred for me, as I suspect a veil of formality would have been maintained.

The good points of the film were Daniel Day-Lewis and Tommy Lee Jones, i agree. And Day-Lewis captured the homely, folksy quality of narrative that you'd expect of Lincoln.

I read a few reviews today. Lots of 100s (or 10s) but then you get a St Louis one and a NY Observer one (Rex Reed, LINKED ABOVE) that give it 5, for reasons which I think are correct. I recall we had issues with Rex Reed's reviews in the past, but on this one, I think he's right. He sums up:

QUOTE: In all, there’s too much material, too little revelation and almost nothing of Spielberg’s reliable cinematic flair. But on the plus side, there is nuance and wit, and Daniel Day-Lewis always makes you care. UNQUOTE

The point of interest is the impetus to get the 13th Amendment passed before the Confederate States are eligible to vote, hinging on a Catch-22 based on the legality of the Emancipation proclamation … a Catch 22 because it hinges on the contention that the CSA states never left the union, thus giving authority to the earlier act. It's a fine point for those not immersed in US history. I thought it hard going on first viewing. Watching it on the DVD then discussing it this weekend revealed that British friends hadn't a clue who anyone was or what was going on and thought it boring. There were too many characters who appeared very briefly (and then you were supposed to remember them in the vote) and a non-US audience can't be expected to know that then Democrats were then on the right, Republicans on the left, let alone who Seward, Stevens etc were.

The script didn't help that. But the worst bit was the start, after a brilliantly-filmed hand to hand battle (best bit of the film) when he speaks to those philosophical and erudite black soldiers. You KNOW that never happened. You know it's retrospective sanitization and PC stuff, which should not appear in a serious discussion of what attitudes to slavery were.

As to Box Office, in the UK it was delayed right up to the awards (cleverly) so that it was launched in a wave of "must see" excitement, which soon dissipated when you watched it.


Entered at Mon Jul 8 05:25:37 CEST 2013 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Lincoln must have done something right. It made 182 million mostly because of word of mouth. People here loved it. Glory OTOH made about 26 million--not that commercial success means a lot. However, I could argue that Glory played much looser with the facts than Lincoln.


Entered at Mon Jul 8 04:53:33 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Bill M

Boy Bill that's some story and what a fantastic memory you have. Yes Scott Morgan was there and he was from Fargo, North Dakota. I have no idea how I remember that.

Tommy gave me a copy of Do It 'Em Big G years ago. I treasure that. G also used Baby Ruth by the Butterfingers as a theme for a period of time. He and Kenny Wells used to do their show standing up and leaning into the mic. Their third musketeer was Mike Sheppard. He used to say, "your listening to the Sheppard gig." His real name was Mike Knuckle. He went on to Hollywood to be an actor.


Entered at Mon Jul 8 02:31:45 CEST 2013 from (68.171.231.82)

Posted by:

Bill M

JT / John D: Big G's theme "" Do it to 'en Big G", was turned into a 45 by the Big Town Boys, who were headed by Tomy Graham and Brian Massey, whose earlier group, the Regents, briefly included, Robbie Robertson, circa '59. I saw both of them at a recent gallery opening (in which each was involved), and then the next evening I happened to be walking through a hotel to find that the group playing in the dining room was Little Caesar and the Consuls led by saxist Norm Sherrat who was in the group when Robbie passed through the lineup, also in '59. On drums was Sonny Milne, who took over for Levon on Hawkins' bandstand

I guess I discovered John D at the start of '?0. CKFH was a bit of a halfway house for me as I shifted my allegiance from CHUM-AM and its tighly formatted pop to CHUM-FM and its weirder stuff. I don't know when exactly when either of us ended up at CHUM-FM, but John was still at CKFH in August '70 when I went to collect the top 10 that I'd won in a contest. Program director Duff Roman gave me the records, but Jojn D wandered through the office, and another dj, Scott Morgan (?), stopped to talk to my father.


Entered at Mon Jul 8 00:50:23 CEST 2013 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Voting rights

I thought that all members of the Hollywood brethern known as The Academy, not just a select jury (like what happens at the Cannes Film Festival), vote for what wins come Oscar night. Or am I misguided in my belief? Wouldn't be the first time. : )


Entered at Sun Jul 7 22:50:52 CEST 2013 from (96.30.173.135)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Subject: geetar players

A couple of my favourite local artists, jazzman, Duane Andrews, and country picker, Craig Young, get together on 'Tennessee Blues'. You might also want to check out 'Duane & Dwayne', a collaboration between Andrews and Cape Breton fiddler, Dwayne Cote.


Entered at Sun Jul 7 19:23:10 CEST 2013 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: 77 years

Excellent win for Andy Murray. Enjoyed it thoroughly!. There will be a party in London tonight.


Entered at Sun Jul 7 16:59:23 CEST 2013 from (86.31.65.133)

Posted by:

David Marsh

Location: scunthorpe,north lincolnshire,united kingdom
Web: My link

Subject: society

Always supporting all those who expose what affects people in society. From all your friends at Tom Thumb and friends. Thank you.


Entered at Sun Jul 7 16:20:00 CEST 2013 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Being overwhelmed by personage

Sometimes, even juries cannot see past names if the material is near adequate. They may forget why they are there and what the job entails (maybe this is too kind to those judging). With a major director and his previous work and with an actor who is arguably the best at what he does, one can get 'snowed' and forget to critically assess content. Also, studying history is not something these jurors likely do. We've seen this before. I agree. A knowledgeable international jury may have seen it otherwise.


Entered at Sun Jul 7 16:12:20 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Lincoln

I thought the beginning where the articulate black soldier debates with Lincoln "deeply unconvincing." It's an example of presentism, where the attitudes and knowledge of now is imposed on history. I spent four years on American history and politics and knew the background. Most other Brits,including highly educated ones, found it perplexing and very boring because the ins and outs of politics were arcane and dull. The Conspirators is a better film of the era. Given powerful contenders, I'm amazed it got any Oscars.

I remember British commentators said the day after the awards that if the jury were even 10 or 20% international, it wouldn't have even been shortlisted.


Entered at Sun Jul 7 16:00:29 CEST 2013 from (101.164.0.90)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Subject: Lincoln

It was the editorial commentary tat defeated me in the end. There is no way a black slave cold walk out in protest, and then walk back in for no reason, for example. Glory was a much better film, which kept the dignity and humanity of its characters without lying about what happened. Jefferson Davis as payed by tommy lee should win an Oscar.


Entered at Sun Jul 7 15:46:40 CEST 2013 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Donabie and Pritchard

John: I do remember listening to you nights and during the day weekdays. I was somewhat of a night person as a teen, switching from Bob Lane (CHUM FM) and his algebra/calculus questions to CKFH. But it was CKEY in the early 60s. That's where I first heard Sam and Dave and others and got R&B. Your R&B show came in the 70s and I loved it. Dave Pritchard had a huge impact on me as the late 60s brought 'the new music' and the world expanded for the youthful listener. I started to hear all kinds of music in those years.


Entered at Sun Jul 7 15:30:05 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Halcyon Days

JT, Dale Paterson does a wonderful job in his Rock Radio Scrapbook site. Sometimes; however things aren't quite right. Not Dale's fault; as he does rely on those of us still around.

Don Danard was indeed the morning man. When I arrived in the fall of '67, it was to do an all night R&B show called Where It's At; from 1-6 a.m. Big G did 7-10 and Kenny Wells (Special K) 10-1 a.m. In '68 I moved to mid-days. During the first decade of my career we all (with the exception of the morning man) worked a 6 day week. Therefore the mention of me doing weekends is partially correct. I worked Mon-Sat. The point of the 6 day week; from a management point of view is that they didn't have to hire weekend staff. It would be about the mid 70's; when I finally got to work a 5 day week. Yay!


Entered at Sun Jul 7 14:42:38 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: JT/BIG G

Your absolutely right sir. CKEY early 60's. Along with Dave Mickie (Marsden) Duff Roman and others. I would work with G at CKFH; in 67-68.

Emceeing a press conference Tuesday morning; with The Rascals. I find it historical; in the sense that all 4 original members have come together 43 years later. I don't remember that happening before. Interesting its been held; in the same place; where Dylan would hear Levon and The Hawks for the first time.


Entered at Sun Jul 7 14:38:31 CEST 2013 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Halcyon days of radio in Toronto

Big G. Walters: CKEY in early 60's. Then stints at other places and then Toronto's CKFH (see below) with John D. and then the USA before returning to Canada. CKFH (Fall, 1967) (Source: Scrapbook files and station promo material) 6-6:30 a.m. - RELIGION 6:30-10 a.m. - DON DAYNARD 10 a.m.-3 p.m. - DAN O'NEIL 3-7 p.m. - TOM FULTON 7-10 p.m. - BIG G. WALTERS 10 p.m.-1 a.m. - KENNY WELLS 1-6 a.m. - JOHN DONABIE weekends: GARY DEAN, MIKE WILLIAMS


Entered at Sun Jul 7 10:23:30 CEST 2013 from (80.3.71.222)

Posted by:

Ian Woodward

Subject: Spooky Tooth

I lived in Carlisle for 25 years and, for many of those years, the best record shop in town was called Pink Panther and was owned by Keith Jefferson. He was a big Spooky Tooth fan, gathered anything and everything to do with the band and was always pleased when I was able to take him anything at all relating to them. In "exchange", he kept his eyes open for anything Dylan that came his way, including snippets from the CBS reps. He had known the guys in the VIPs from their early days. Sadly, Keith dies a few years back.

http://www.newsandstar.co.uk/keith-jefferson-1.837146?referrerPath=2.1916


Entered at Sun Jul 7 08:13:53 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

On John's Art link there were two left in stock. When I checked there was one. Nw, I guess there are none, but we do know where those two copies went!


Entered at Sun Jul 7 08:10:53 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Art

I've been hoping to find Supernatural Fairy Tales by Art for years. Thanks, John. I just Googled, found the Cd at amazon and bought it.

I have the Island 45 of What's That Sound, and in 1968/9 considered Spooky Tooth just about the best band on the British college circuit. The difference between Art and Spooky Tooth is the addition of Gary Wright to make it Spooky Tooth, which was admittedly a very important addition.

Spooky Tooth did the British cover version of The Weight.


Entered at Sun Jul 7 06:00:23 CEST 2013 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

jt

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Big G Walters

I REMEMBER Big G Walters well, John. He was great. I think it was CKEY early 60s?


Entered at Sun Jul 7 05:41:24 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: p.s.

They also did a great cover of The Rascals, "Come On Up."


Entered at Sun Jul 7 05:37:20 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Web: My link

Subject: Peter V Do you remember Art?

I'm listening to one of my all time Canadian radio heroes, Big G Walters tonight on an air check; from 1968. He introduces a song that is a cover of the Buffalo Springfields's "For What It's Worth." It's called "What's That Sound?" I Love It!! I jump on to Amazon.U.K. and low and behold I find that the album Supernatural Fairytales, is still available. Here's a review, I found on Amazon.U.K.

"An obscure beat group from Carlisle, VIPs, recorded few undistinguished 45s for "Island" before mutating into short-lived "Art", which recorded only one album for the same label. But that album was produced by Guy Stevens (Procol Harum, Mott the Hoople, Who, Small Faces, Rolling Stones, and, finally and later - "London Calling" of Clash).

A very decent album, quite unusual early British psychedelia, rough sometimes, but talented and inventive, and with good assortment of melodies on offer. Do you want to know "What's That Sound"? It's not only an interesting cover of Buffalo Springfield's "For What It's Worth", it's the sound of future unborn yet Hot Chocolate. The title track is heavy and hard edged psychedelia. "Come On Up", "Brothers, Dads and Mothers" - classic combination of hard-rock and prog. "Flying Anchors" - acoustic, trippy and meditative.

All in all, "Art" was very promissing early prog/psych outfit - which lived to high expectations, because the same year (1967) when their debut album was released, they passed away - and resurrected. As Spooky Tooth this time.

The album is a must for every fan of Spooky Tooth and early British prog/psych."


Entered at Sun Jul 7 05:13:53 CEST 2013 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: the Hawks

Kevin J: The Hawks were another animal. The protoplasm was the same in 1968 but the art of 1961-1964 was entirely different. They were raw and they were bar. There is no semblance of the Hawks after MFBP. Bob is right about what a truly great band they were. They were something different after the tour. Even Moondog Matinee doesn't reproduce the Hawks accurately, but that's somewhat like what it was.


Entered at Sun Jul 7 05:09:50 CEST 2013 from (68.171.231.81)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: What were people calling it before the term "water closet" was introduced?


Entered at Sun Jul 7 04:42:49 CEST 2013 from (24.114.69.109)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

JT: Interesting to wonder tht if one could separate the two if Bob the Man would be a fan of Bob the Artist and his post 1983 output........probably not funnily enough............whenever he is asked to name his favorite contemporary artists, he lists Gordon Lightfoot and John Prine and Jimmy Buffet but then only references songs that they recorded 35-40 years ago .........in one of his rare comments on The Band, he said something along the lines of "yeah, yeah, Rag Mama Rag and all that is OK but you really should have seen them as the Hawks"........and then the Johnny Cash comments in RS.

Oh well, I prefer 2nd half Bob to 1st half Bob.........in my new car, the only Dylan loaded into the eye drive system is "Love &'Theft", "Together Through Life", "Tell Tale Signs" , "Infidels" and "Street Legal".........other than "Duke's Whistle" Temptest is a bore to me........as to the earlier albums and songs......of course there is so much that I will always love but other than the few he has astutely chosen to play in 2012/2013 tour such as " Tangled Up in Blue" or "Johanna's Vision" or "You Ain't Goin Nowhere" or " Thin Man" I am happy to see him focused primarily on the newer material for the live shows...............Finally, comments on the voice and band and sound all valid especially 2004-2011 ........but the 2012 Dylan presenttion really did adjust and deliver a kind of intimate show that matched his voice and song selection . The Toronto and Montreal shows I saw in Nvember 2012 were beautiful.......truly beautiful .


Entered at Sun Jul 7 03:19:38 CEST 2013 from (76.14.18.133)

Posted by:

Tiny Monster

Location: Out-There

Subject: ... Dylan ...

Wow, I mean I've followed Bob since the beginning like most of you. I have no expectations but for everyone to show up and do what they do. Some of Bobs past endeavors I just let go by but I still find him funny and endlessly entertaining. Who is it exactly expecting to see Bob sing solo with an acoustic guitar and a harmonica ? Are you kidding me ? Wilco is enough all by themselves after all ...

HUH ? ...



Entered at Sun Jul 7 02:49:17 CEST 2013 from (96.30.173.135)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Subject: 13th Floor Elevators

Link is to 'All Over Baby Blue'.


Entered at Sun Jul 7 00:40:23 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Dylan

The voice is shot, but the answer is to hire Leonard Cohen's concert sound engineer, board, mics the lot. Leonard Cohen's band would help too, but forget that. You need someone who can frame and amplify the nuances of what's left so that it's absolutely clear from a whisper to a … well, gurgle. You hear every breath of Len with crystal clarity, and he can go as soft as he wants (well, having a band who can do that too helps). It's far from impossible.


Entered at Sat Jul 6 21:59:28 CEST 2013 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Scope

It is interesting, Kevin J. I wonder if what Dylan said about Cash could be applied to Dylan. Certainly, some would say so. Should we only perceive Dylan as pre 1966 or pre 1975 or should we as individuals who respect his work look at the entire body of work? If I look at what I consider his excellence, there would be some songs on albums that would cover the entire scope of his output, even to the present.


Entered at Sat Jul 6 21:33:17 CEST 2013 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Never ending Tour

Ian. I hope you get to those shows. I'd be there too if I was in the UK. It is Bob Dylan doing what Bob Dylan does and we are the fortunate ones with whom he shares. 'Good and bad, I define these terms/Quite clear, no doubt somehow'. Its all good even if its different and even if it hurts.


Entered at Sat Jul 6 21:23:06 CEST 2013 from (80.3.71.222)

Posted by:

Ian Woodward

Subject: Bob Dylan

Bob Dylan hasn't done an entirely acoustic show in his own name since 10 May 1965 in London (and I was fortunate enough to attend the overspill show on the previous night, a show only set up after the 10 May 1965 show sold out so rapidly).

Yes, he followed these with the part-acoustic/part-electric shows with which you are all so familiar and he has made acoutic guest appearances and has included acoustic segments in his own shows but no acoustic show of his own for 48 years! I doubt if he'll start now.

Yes, I also like the small group quasi-acoustic shows he has done. Again, I was fortunate enough to have attended all four of the Supper Club shows in New York in 1993 and have never, ever, regretted the time, effort and money involved in attending those. I doubt we'll see their like again, either, I'm sorry to say.

Now, we get a voice with a range so narrow it is almost negative but I've still got my name down to attend half-a-dozen of his UK shows later this year. Sad, perhaps, but true.


Entered at Sat Jul 6 21:10:45 CEST 2013 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Suburbia

All comments and criticism are welcome. Thanks Kevin J. With respect, I disagree. Dylan has the ability to take almost any one of his songs and transform it to whatever genre he wishes. I've heard it and seen it. No knock against your comments burt I think there are many that he could do this with in the last 30 years and would welcome a try, mixed with the older stuff of course. In fact, I'd love to hear him try with Tempest songs of Love and Theft Songs for example. I am confident that he could do it. I guess we humbly disagree and that's OK. It is what this site is all about.


Entered at Sat Jul 6 20:33:48 CEST 2013 from (24.114.69.109)

Posted by:

Kevin J

JT: Didn't mean the previous to be a knock at you as I think you know the respect I have for you but just the general thing that all Dylan followers can grow weary of.......and that's going to a show and having to hear year after year how Biff and Betty Suburbia just wish Bob would have played guitar and played his old ones "just like he used to".........Jumping Jesus, he hasn't written a song that would suit that presentation in 30 years!


Entered at Sat Jul 6 20:07:00 CEST 2013 from (24.114.69.109)

Posted by:

Kevin J

.......funny that Bob Dylan had related thoughts on Johnny Cash in a recent interview ( 2nd paragraph ) .....and for the record, Bob's shows of 2012 were as stripped down and pure as one could ever hope to get at this stage of his career.....anything further would not work - at all. To even wish to see him go back and try and recreate guitar & harmonica Bob is to fall into the sme trap that plagues all those uninformed fans and critics that inhabit the devils creation otherwise known as the "Comments" sections of newspapers and YouTube....................anyway, below, Dylan on Cash from recent RS mag:     

In the Rolling Stone interview, Dylan also expressed some backhanded nostalgia for the early recordings of his old friend and duet partner Johnny Cash, in the process describing the country legend’s acclaimed 1990s comeback albums as ”notorious low-grade stuff.” Cash died in 2003, riding high on a decadelong comeback masterminded by producer Rick Rubin. Over that time, they recorded a series of Grammy-winning albums that showcased Cash’s acoustic side. But Dylan said he started missing Cash ”10 years before he actually kicked the bucket.” “I tell people if they are interested that they should listen to Johnny on his Sun records (of the 1950s) and reject all that notorious low-grade stuff he did in his later years. It can’t hold a candlelight to the frightening depth of the man that you hear on his early records. That’s the only way he should be remembered,” Dylan said.

Norm: Thanks for the invite........with that guest list - would definitley be a raucous party........As Bob Dylan once clipped from Muddy Waters..... "Someday Baby"........


Entered at Sat Jul 6 18:56:17 CEST 2013 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: The Tour

Wilco is not backing him to date. He is out there with his own band, with Charlie Sexton replacing Duke Robillard as noted in earlier posts. Enjoy. I read that Wilco, MMJ are great and that collaboration does occur. But not so far with Dylan and these other bands.


Entered at Sat Jul 6 18:43:02 CEST 2013 from (76.14.18.133)

Posted by:

Tiny Monster

Location: Out-There

Subject: ... Dylan ...

...Tickets in hand for Dylan next month with Wilco and My Morning Jacket. My first for Dylan though I've seen Wilco three or four times. Should be interesting ...

...Depending on which Bob shows up. I think Wilco is backing him, does anyone know anything about these shows ? ...


Entered at Sat Jul 6 17:58:30 CEST 2013 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Dylan........Sort of

I sort of agree with you about Dylan's singing Jerry. There were many times that he sang in a mimicking voice, or it seems to make a mockery of things. An example, is the way he talks a lot in the DVD, "Long Road Home".

However in that concert all those years ago that George Harrison organized. At Madison Square Gardens, the concert for Bangladesh, when Dylan came on stage, with the old jean jacket and his guitar, I believe he opened with "Blowin' in the Wind".....he could sing. There was nothing fake. He sang those songs in his set purely, and he sounded great. That is classic Dylan. Anyone would pay to watch a performance like that. Just give it a glance on Youtube. That was the Dylan every one wanted.


Entered at Sat Jul 6 17:26:03 CEST 2013 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: JT

Excellent posts on Dylan,and agree strongly.The acoustic idea would be interesting too.


Entered at Sat Jul 6 16:32:09 CEST 2013 from (24.161.12.36)

Posted by:

Dennis

Location: West Saugerties, NY

Subject: Game Changing Debut's

Growin' up on the outskirts of the big apple, and stickin' to the debut album theme, this person can't overlook Al Kooper and Blood, Sweat and Tears' 1968 release, Child is the Father to the Man, a real game changer on the rock 'n jazz scene at the time.

And then again, I don't believe anyone's yet noted the 1968 release of Peter Green's Fleetwood Mac, a real interesting band (for the moment).


Entered at Sat Jul 6 16:32:20 CEST 2013 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Acoustic or near acoustic Dylan

So now I come to a wish and a dream. I would like to see Dylan go out in concert as an acoustic or near acoustic show with minimalist backing at most. My personal choice would be a man with his guitar (unlikely if he is truly suffering with arthritis or cannot manage the guitar alone anymore). Or with the piano and if so, with a guitarist backing him, Dylansinging with mouth harp when needed with 1 microphone. Any songs. I don't care. Or at most, like he did in 1994 on that TV show with a few backing players in a near acoustic format. This would require guts and nerve for Dylan. But, if the music is going to be presented in the 'bluesy' manner that Dylan is capable now of delivering, so be it. I am prepared. I know what I will be getting and I will pay to hear it. One can only hope. From a Dylan adherent, come hell or 'High Water. '


Entered at Sat Jul 6 15:57:54 CEST 2013 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: The Voice Bob Dylan

Bob Dylan was always about the lyrics. Even at the start, his detractors said that he could not sing. I never agreed with that. I though his singing voice supported his lyrics in a way that was unique and complimentary. Most importantly, I found it pleasant to the ear (not all listeners did in those early days and there was a lot of criticism). So we come to the last few years. And I am mainly now speaking about live performances. Even in the 90s, the voice was not grating and acceptable in the context of those superb lyrics. It is only in the last few years that so many have complained. The critics complain that 'the songs are not the same and are unrecognizable in concert' and more recently that the voice is terrible. Those who laud Dylan in concert today speak about his 'blues' voice and comment that at 72 his voice clearly has devolved and that it is understandable. To me, an adherent since 1963, the 2012 concerts in Vancouver and then in Toronto, taught me a lesson. I was present for both concerts. In Vancouver, the perception to my ears was that Dylan's performance was subpar and that was largely because I could not make out his lyrics and that I thought was because he was in poor voice. The performance in Toronto was above average (not too long after Vancouver). The sound system in Vancouver was dreadful while that in Toronto was very good. I will never agree that a performer must present his performance the same way as he/she has 'put it out' on record or early in his/her career. For my money, Dylan has the artistic freedom to do whatever he wants with his material. If you don't like that, don't go. He has done this for decades! Listen to "Hard Rain' for just one example. As for the voice, it is now ragged and 'bluesy' and very different from what it was in the early decades. But so is the voice of many performers who survive 3-5 decades in this business. It is the listener who must become agile and bending and responsive to change. I find it humorous that the same very open-minded individuals of the 60s and 70s who loved Dylan and loved flexibility and change are so resolute and staid and angry that change has occurred. These same people with their previous open-minded pedigree are closed-minded and walk out of concerts because 'Things Have Changed". I don't begrudge them their negative feelings. They should do their homework before they go! This is not a greatest hits show. Most of this current tour is relatively new material sung in a bluesy format by a man whose voice is at the end of its life. Going to a Dylan show today is accepting this change. I will continue to go when I am able.


Entered at Sat Jul 6 15:03:04 CEST 2013 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Jefferson...who?!?

Those pesky eurocentric Europeans and their euro-eccentricities. : )

Don't they know how to use Google over there or are they afraid that if they do, they may be spied upon by the NSA (which is a different entity from the CSA)? : )


Entered at Sat Jul 6 11:48:02 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: water closet

Watched Lincoln on DVD last night. As a movie it really doesn't work at all for non-Americans. My fellow watchers didn't know who Jefferson Davis was for example. The politics is far too intricate for an international audience. But one major blooper. The president tells a joke (and very well) about a "water closet" a word first used in Britain in 1870, and first recorded in america in the 1880s.


Entered at Sat Jul 6 09:03:03 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Toppermost: Bob Dylan

The new Toppermost site has a Dylan Top 10 by Roger Woods today, and Eddie Cochran from me yesterday. The site is going to be eclectic and has a policy of putting up just one artist per day. Discussion is invited. I think it's regular fun and Top Tens get everyone discussing. Look, but do comment. Like most Wordpress Blogs comments are moderated not "instant" though once you become a regular they go through.


Entered at Sat Jul 6 03:39:23 CEST 2013 from (96.30.173.135)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Subject: Long Distance Operator

Link is to James Cotton Blues Band.


Entered at Sat Jul 6 03:31:57 CEST 2013 from (96.30.173.135)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: Ebony Buckle

Yes.


Entered at Sat Jul 6 00:38:35 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

And reading carefully the confusion predates the deal.


Entered at Sat Jul 6 00:29:30 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Uncut "Music from Big Pink."

David, the quote is Robbie:

Grossman had secured a record deal with Capitol after a little confusion about what was on offer. "Albert said, 'Do you want to do an album of Dylan instrumentals or something?" recalls Robertson, 'I said, No! We're going to do something else."

It does contrast with Loog Oldham's 3rd volume of autobiography where he states Grossman was always there with his musicians, and part of the action, unlike other managers Loog Oldham knew.


Entered at Fri Jul 5 21:32:48 CEST 2013 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: ROBBIE

Hi you all!!

+++++++++++++++++++

NORM: Thanx for the invite..Love to come, but moi in a bikini? Everyone would leave for sure..

+++++++++++++++++++

HAPPY BIRTHDAY, dear ROBBIE, and many more...

Good poem for us "over-the-hill" people.

Over The Hill Birthday

It’s birthday time again I see;

Another year's gone by.

We’re older than we used to be;

The thought could make me cry.

For getting older is not such fun,

When there’s hurting in your back,

And it’s agony if you have to run,

And a pleasure to lie in the sack.

Yes getting older is quite a bore,

But to not get old is worse.

So "Happy Birthday!" let’s shout once more,

And to heck with our ride in the hearse!

Hooray for getting older! Happy Birthday and many more.

++++++++++++++++++++++

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxo

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++



Entered at Fri Jul 5 19:57:00 CEST 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

It's hard to believe that Grossman was totally ignorant of what the group was up to when he was pitching a deal with Capitol. If there was indeed a demo tape at that point, wouldn't he has listened to it first? It is confusing.


Entered at Fri Jul 5 19:33:30 CEST 2013 from (74.108.29.147)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Robbie Robertson

Happy Birthday Robbie


Entered at Fri Jul 5 19:29:37 CEST 2013 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

David (P?): Maybe Capitol would have bought a total pig in a poke, but wouldn't Grossman have taken along one of his remaining copies of the 14-song demo of our guys backing Dylan in the basement?: "I'm going to let you in on the ground floor. Listen to this, and then imagine how much better this sort of material would sound with better voices."


Entered at Fri Jul 5 19:01:08 CEST 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David

Subject: Capitol-izing

The oft told story is that Albert Grossman went to LA seeking a deal for The Band with Warner Bros., but Warner honcho Mo Ostin was out of town and he then went to Capitol Records instead. Without an audition or demo tape, Capitol moved quickly to sign the group, then named as The Crackers, in February 1968. It's quite possible that Grossman hinted that Warners had expressed interest and he no doubt presented the group as Bob Dylan's backup band. This is reflected in the contract clause that granted them an exclusivity exemption, allowing them to perform & record at will as "as side men and/or as joint artists with Bob Dylan." So even if Capitol signed them sight unseen & unheard, with their Dylan association, they were not exactly an unknown quantity. It's also quite feasible, that in his pitch to Capitol, Grossman mentioned songwriting collaborations with Dylan.


Entered at Fri Jul 5 18:22:17 CEST 2013 from (70.53.45.64)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: Ebony Buckle

Anyone out there looking for a fine television detective series to watch…..I would highly recommend Inspector George Gently – a BBC show set in 1960’s North England…………On to season 5 now and it has some great music tie-ins….with one recent episode dealing with underground soul clubs of that era – and some fine music being played and the one I watched last night had the beautiful and talented Ebony Buckle doing an out of this world take on “Silver Dagger”………………………….DO CHECK OUT THE LINK ABOVE.


Entered at Fri Jul 5 18:14:04 CEST 2013 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: RR

Happy Birthday,Robbie!


Entered at Fri Jul 5 17:10:38 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

A very happy birthday to Robbie Robertson indeed. Thanks for reminding us.


Entered at Fri Jul 5 16:00:44 CEST 2013 from (24.114.69.109)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Happy Birthday to Robbie Robertson. I know that this site does not make a habit of paying tribute to him in any way but I think it is worth the mention, especially since it is his 70th!


Entered at Fri Jul 5 15:55:42 CEST 2013 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: "5000 Spirits" may have changed the game, but I'd rank "The Big Huge" (NB: not "The Wee Tam") as the definitive album of the ISB and the genre. For some reason Heron's richly tuneful toe-dips into religiousity always remind me of Richard Manuel.

Re game-changers, John D made it very clear that his list is of personal game-changers, which strikes me as a useful distinction from world-changers. I've always been a johnny-come-lately, so entire fads have come and gone before I've even noticed them. But even my own personal game-changers are hard to identify, I find. I could cite the first Lightfoot, which I got in '66, but it was 10 years before I got another (and I now have none). "Let it Bleed" was a revelation, but the only later Stones I liked enough to consider keeping is the "Beast Of Burden" 45. Come to think of it, the biggest game-changer may have been the jukebox in the highschool cafeteria in grade 9. It seemed that "Psychotic Reaction", "Foxy Lady", "Purple Haze", "Living Loving Maid", "Good Times, Bad Times" and "Hearbreaker" were always playing, and though some were years old by then they were all new to me. My friends would look at me like I had two heads when I asked them "Who's that?", but that's the price you pay for an education.


Entered at Fri Jul 5 15:40:10 CEST 2013 from (24.114.69.109)

Posted by:

Kevin J

.......and not just because it's the truth that retired hundreds of the worst rock bands the industry ever knew but because it just might bring Al Edge back kicking and streaming..........I humbly offer the biggest game changer and Debut the industry has ever known.......Never Mind the Bollocks, Here's the Sex Pistols!


Entered at Fri Jul 5 15:29:05 CEST 2013 from (24.114.69.109)

Posted by:

Kevin J

The subject at Uncut and here was Debut Albums and their impact......If we are now changing the subject to just Game Changers........then there are many more that come to mind........Prince's 1999 ( his 5th album ) was a major game changer.......it actually made a monster of the day named Bruce Springsteen scrap what he was doing and go back to the studio to re-record what would become his first number one single....."Dancing in the Dark".......Prince's influence on the entire industry was felt for years afterwards.


Entered at Fri Jul 5 15:27:56 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Game changers

The issue with both Dylan & The Beatles is the sheer number of game changers. Bringing It All Back Home plays John the Baptist to Highway 61 which in turn reaches its heights in Blonde on Blonde.

I'd agree with John that Rubber Soul is the game-changer, but then it accelerates into Revolver and finally blossoms on Sgt Pepper.
In both cases you get a set of three. Freewheelin' and Nashville Skyline were also game changers in their own way. \ An obscurer one: The 5000 Spirits by The Incredible String Band is the definitive psych-folk album, a genre that is now flying off the shelves … mention of Karen Dalton last week, brings us to Vashti Bunyan.


Entered at Fri Jul 5 14:59:42 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Game Changer LP's - IN ORDER OF RELEASE

1. Beatlemania - The Beatles (1st Album released in Canada)

2. Bringing It All Back Home - Bob Dylan

3. Highway 61 Revisited - Bob Dylan

4. Rubber Soul - The Beatles

5. Blonde On Blonde - Bob Dylan

6. The Stax-Volt Tours in England & France

7. Music From Big Pink - The Band

8. The Brown Album - The Band

1991 The Compilation album of The Righteous Brothers - The Moonglow Years.

In order of release. There were other great artists and LP's released; but as my title reads: Game Changers for me personally.


Entered at Fri Jul 5 13:38:53 CEST 2013 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

mike h

Web: My link

New material from Randy Ciarlante & Jim Weider w/ Albert Rogers on vocals. Nice stuff.


Entered at Fri Jul 5 13:24:59 CEST 2013 from (92.236.128.33)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham UK

Subject: Game changer albums

I'm just catching up with this thread. I think the Brown Album was the game changer. I bought MFBP as soon as it was available but that was solely on the strength of The Band's association with Dylan who had really been the game changer earlier. But 'The Band' was on another level again. I remember buying it in Oxford Street when it first came out and rushing back to my student rooming house (just off Park Lane) to play it on my Dansette. I was astounded by the range of songs on topics I'd never have imagined being set to music.

And I've got to give a shout for Astral Weeks. That was pretty astounding music when first heard. And I've got to give a shout to Blue - in fact I think that changed more games than Astral Weeks.


Entered at Fri Jul 5 12:36:24 CEST 2013 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Debut albums that captivated me because I was of that impressionable age when they came out: The Cars and Joe Jackson's Look Sharp. I liked Dire Straits first one but the previous two had more of an effect on the 15-16 year old me.

Also two in the 80s: Greetings From Timbuk3 and Blue Rodeo's Outskirts, because they sounded so un-80s-like.

Sadly when Big Pink came out I was more interested in what was going on with The Friendly Giant & Mr. Dressup. I was 5 at the time.

Now back to "rebuilding" my iPod. Last month (2 years to the day I bought it, one year to the day the warranty ran out) it froze up and everything got deleted on it. Just about done. At least it's keeping me out of trouble, being busy that is.


Entered at Fri Jul 5 11:03:31 CEST 2013 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: Uncut

Looking forward the Uncut Big Pink article. I probably haven't bought a music mag since the invention of the internet (or this site maybe) but I'll buy this one.


Entered at Fri Jul 5 08:57:33 CEST 2013 from (99.141.54.199)

Posted by:

Adam

I'm thrilled about the "Music From Big Pink" Uncut cover story. I am also happy that they agree with me, and list Big Pink as the major game changer in music. I fully stand by my earlier statement. The Beatles are fine, changed the world and influenced the music industry greatly. But The Band and "Music From Big Pink" are on a whole other level.


Entered at Fri Jul 5 05:04:08 CEST 2013 from (12.198.97.2)

Posted by:

Jimmy Nelson

Web: My link

Subject: Tarred and feathered, yeah!

This has always been one of my favorite deep cuts on 'Big Pink.' Nice to see it get its due in the Across The Great Divide series ...


Entered at Fri Jul 5 04:25:11 CEST 2013 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Sea Cruise

Hey Carl!......sure glad you are feeling better......hell yeah, your in.....wouldn't that be a hoot.

Mike, good to hear from you. Of course Lars is always on board in my book. He may be kind of disappointed in me now tho'. I can't blame him. I should have been over to see him and Kris long before now. I owe him one.

Nothing would make me happier than to have a whole gang of our guest book friends on board, from all over.


Entered at Fri Jul 5 04:09:05 CEST 2013 from (184.145.67.233)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: sea cruise (ooh-wee)

Gee, Norm, with you at the helm, it's . . . it's . . . like awesome, man. Can Lars come, too?


Entered at Fri Jul 5 03:51:50 CEST 2013 from (24.108.1.255)

Posted by:

BONK

Location: Salt Spring Island/Cabbagetown

Subject: Rockin Chair

Norm. Be careful what you wish for but, now that I'm feeling better, if you get that group together I'm in!!! Holy shit! Can you just imagine the stories from a weekend like that? Cheers, Carl


Entered at Thu Jul 4 23:57:06 CEST 2013 from (80.3.71.222)

Posted by:

Ian Woodward

Subject: UNCUT feature on The Band

It's probably been mentionedd elsewhere but if not, but The Bnad are featured in an upcoming UNCUT

http://www.uncut.co.uk/blog/uncut-editors-diary/the-band-neil-young-the-rolling-stones-nico-johnny-marr-richard-hell-and-gr


Entered at Thu Jul 4 23:10:31 CEST 2013 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: you're - you're

See that......I make Bill so nervous he starts to stutter:):)

Susan's a slave driver. I've been varnishing and painting and cleaning that Rockin Chair for this wedding.....but....it's all fun.

Bill, a whole gang of yuz should just come out and grab that gawd damn Jerry and come for a "Sea Cruise" ouwee....ouwee baby..........ouwee....ouwee baby, won't you let me take you on a "Sea Cruise".

Bill, Kevin, John, that gawd damn Mike Nomad, Serenity & Brown Eyes in their bikinis........oooooouuuu!


Entered at Thu Jul 4 21:47:35 CEST 2013 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Web: My link

Subject: God Bless The USA...

This song is one that should be heard more than just today!!

God Bless you all... xoxoxo


Entered at Thu Jul 4 21:39:22 CEST 2013 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Web: My link

Subject: HAPPY 4th to all Americans

Hi guys!! Hope you are all having a good holiday!!

Link just for you all...

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

DAVID Z: If you are still around, HAPPY BIRTHDAY!! xoxo

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

CYA soon xoxoxo


Entered at Thu Jul 4 21:20:08 CEST 2013 from (174.116.172.227)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: JQ: thank you

Nice interpretation of a great song, JQ. Thank you. There is something about the way Elvis Costello phrases the song that appeals to me.


Entered at Thu Jul 4 20:29:58 CEST 2013 from (174.116.172.227)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: The Windy City transit

CTA was a great 1st album. I saw them at O'Keefe Centre in Toronto in either late 69 or early 70. That band blew me away!


Entered at Thu Jul 4 20:27:59 CEST 2013 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Web: My link

Subject: Alison

JT - Try this one. N Lowe produced the original and seems to have a real feel for it here -


Entered at Thu Jul 4 20:02:46 CEST 2013 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Some Things Never Change Dept

Rockin C: Note how you're you're still always inviting one or another of us to come go with you on your boat (or is it ship?), which is, if your tales of nautical derring-do are to be believed, rockin' round the clock. I guess none of us can leave our childhoods behind.


Entered at Thu Jul 4 19:34:08 CEST 2013 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: First Timers!!!

Bunch-a-young punks! Sultans of Swing was ok.....but......for me, "When it Comes to You", and "Your Settin Me Up" were major songs, and of course, "Brothers in Arms".

Songs that grabbed you as a kid. I think I was 12, there was this old out door swimming pool in North Surrey, and a kind of burger, hot dog stand. An old Wurlitzer stood out in the dirt. You plugged in a nickel......get that a NICKEL! There were big speakers on poles and when Rock Around the Clock started blaring out of there, that is where Rock & Roll began for me. I remember that 45 wore out a few times, and they kept replacing it. Next was the Del Vikings, and my all time favourite R&R song....."Come Go With Me"

But then, what would any of yuz know about that????


Entered at Thu Jul 4 19:23:37 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Traffic's first two were a definite shift. Both very important to me at the time … I don't play them enough.


Entered at Thu Jul 4 19:17:22 CEST 2013 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: In terms of albums, I think Uncut's right to go with MFBP over PPM. Huge impact, but no big single. While the Beatles had a greater impact, in the early going that impact was on the back of their hit singles.


Entered at Thu Jul 4 19:02:59 CEST 2013 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Traffic's first was quite a shock to me. I still play it all the time.


Entered at Thu Jul 4 18:24:48 CEST 2013 from (74.108.29.147)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Songs that evoke memories

Right around the time that Dire Straits came out with their album, Super Tramp came out with Breakfast in America. It got quite a bit of play for a while.


Entered at Thu Jul 4 18:22:25 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

BTW, Uncut goes with MFBP as THE major style changer. Though I still say after Please, Please Me.

CTA (first Chicago) was significant, but I don't think it was singularly significant, because you have Blood, Sweat & Tears around the same time, as well as Electric Flag, but that was duller than the other two. It was more there was a wave of that kind of horn-driven thing.


Entered at Thu Jul 4 18:00:09 CEST 2013 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

I didn't get to the first Beatles album until way after the fact, by which time is seemed quite lame. And Elvis, forget it. So I lean to Far Easy Man's nomination of the first Dire Straits as something that was fresh and special and suited my tastes. Nevertheless, I think Chicago's first album rates a mention as a very significant style-changer (even if I didn't like them all that much).


Entered at Thu Jul 4 16:29:47 CEST 2013 from (174.116.172.227)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Sultans

I still remember hearing "Sultans of Swing" for the first time. It was a knockout and to me was the best thing I had heard in the 70s. It was fresh and vital and direction-changing from what was coming out. Only early Elvis Costello did the same for me, but for different reasons. While I'm at it, I want to put a plug in for Allison (or is it Alison) by Mr. Costello.


Entered at Thu Jul 4 12:46:58 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: UNCUT "Music from Big Pink."

The latest Uncut features The Band on the cover and the lead story is an analysis of MFBP with "Robbie Robertson Exclusive" and quotes from Garth. Having read (and written) so much about it, I didn't find a lot that was new, but it is clear, good quotes too.

The main revelation was that Grossman got them the Capitol deal without having heard their new material, and asked if they were going to do instrumental versions of Dylan songs.

The cover CD is called "This Wheel's On Fire" and the back cover follows the TLW design, but it is just the usual "This months new music in 15 tracks" without Band reference … they're doing this a lot with lead stories, titling the covermount CD for them.


Entered at Thu Jul 4 12:00:04 CEST 2013 from (50.100.174.9)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Duke

This from Duke Robillard's Facebook page: "I will make one small non-cryptic post hear to clear up any confusion or misinterpretation. I left the Bob Dylan tour of my own accord. All I can say is it wasn't for musical reasons and please don't ask any more." Charlie Sexton played again last night.


Entered at Thu Jul 4 10:57:52 CEST 2013 from (88.195.215.226)

Posted by:

Kalervo K

Location: Vantaa, Finland

Great to be back after many years!


Entered at Thu Jul 4 10:12:44 CEST 2013 from (118.99.64.137)

Posted by:

toko online

Web: My link

hi admin, just blogwalking


Entered at Thu Jul 4 09:27:02 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

The first Dire Straits is a wonderful album, but I never thought it a change for music in any way … more a reminder that excellent songs and good players will continue through generations of musicians. Still, it's how old you are when you hear it.

Ones I'd mark out are Otis Blue, the first soul album that really worked as a album rather than 2 A-sides, 2 -B sides and filler. What's Going On? as the ultimate concept soul album, and Catch-A-Fire, one of the most original albums I ever heard where every single track was of the highest quality.

I was amused looking through various blues compilation reissues to see that at least three claimed to be the "most influential on British R&B." They were all wrong. One of the most influential albums ever was the Pye International release of the great Chess classics: The Blues Volume 1 (see link). Everyone I knew had that album … My Babe, Smokestack Lightning, Hoochie Coochie Man, Spoonful, I Wanna Make Love To You, Don't Start Me To Talkin' (Band link there), Juke, Walking The Boogie … all the old Chess classics assembled in one package. You had to buy Volume 2 for Got My Mojo Working, Thirty Days, and Bo Diddley's I'm A Man, plus Key To The Highway and So Many Roads, but mainly Volume 1 formed the repertoire of so many British R&B bands.


Entered at Thu Jul 4 05:40:12 CEST 2013 from (208.120.36.230)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

I still remember the peach Snapple I was drinking the day High on the Hog was released.

.....OK, you guys win.


Entered at Thu Jul 4 02:43:28 CEST 2013 from (24.252.147.171)

Posted by:

Calvin

Oh yeah, Dire Straits-That first album did change a lot about music for me-before that I was (in High School mind you) The Clash, Jam and Pistols. Maybe some Adam Ant when I was feeling poppy. The Kinks and Who when I wanted more mainstream.

Mark Knopfler changed the direction my tastes went. Uncle Tupelo's No Depression, The Pixies Surfer Rosa, and David Baerwald's Bedtime Stories (Although in fairness Baerwald had kicked around awhile and had a hit as part of a duo)had huge infuences on me as well.


Entered at Thu Jul 4 02:33:07 CEST 2013 from (24.114.69.109)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Far Easy Man

Ah....great great choice of Dire Straits debut. I remember exactly lying in bed late at night and hearing "Sultans Of Swing" played for the first time......It really was stunning.....that guitar and voice and lyrics........The Police would come around just a little bit later and some people point to that but I always saw through them........The Dire Straits really was altering - not just as an alternative to disco or to punk but also to the what was the rock scene of the day........and as a young guitar player....it blew me away.


Entered at Thu Jul 4 01:30:31 CEST 2013 from (174.252.35.142)

Posted by:

Far Easy Man

Location: Rockport, ME

Subject: Debut Album

I wasn't alive for Heartbreak Hotel or Please Please Me, but I did think about a favorite debut. "Dire Straits" came out in the late 70's , and what a treat it was. I was a huge Beatles fan and had not been turned on to the Dead or The Band. Radio at the time was filled with Foreigner, Styx, Boston etc. Then you here "Sultans of Swing" and man you are free. Six Blade Knife, Down to the Waterline, Wild West End - fantastic. Great stuff. On another note - I feel that the best Dylan/Band collaborations are on the Woody Guthrie tribute. I Ain't Got No Home, Grand Cooley Dam, and Dear Mrs. Roosevelt. Tight, great arrangements. Well done.


Entered at Wed Jul 3 22:10:54 CEST 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Counting the cars on the New Jersey Turnpike or was that the Black Horse Pike?

I was on an exciting adventure back then. After school let out at the first of June I travelled from Atlanta to New Jersey by bus with a friend of mine. In Philadelphia we had to switch from Greyhound to another bus line to go to the shore. My friend & I both had our guitars and I remember sitting on the bus platform there playing Simon & Garfunkel's "America", which we'd just learned how to play. Stayed at my grandfather's house for a week near the north end of Ocean City, where we were within walking distance to the beach, boardwalk and downtown area. At some point coming & going the bus took us past Tony Mart's in Somers Point, where just a few summers before Levon & The Hawks rocked the joint. Always wondered if, during their days there, they ever went over to the beach at OC, which was a straight shot across the 9th St. bridge.


Entered at Wed Jul 3 21:22:29 CEST 2013 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Byrds & Dirt Band

David; I don't know if you've ever had the opportunity of watching the video of the making of the album Circle Two, the Dirt Band and friends.

Just before the recording of "You Ain't Goin Nowhere", Roger McGuinn recalls the making of Sweethearts ---. He says when we went down to Nashville and cut the album, because country was very political, our R&R fans thought we had, "gone over to the other side" and began to hate us. The country fans saw us as a bunch of "Carpet Baggers" and wanted nothing to do with us. So we thought we could gain a country audience, but we kind of lost them both there for a minute.

I'm sure you know, that cut on "Circle Two" features Jerry Douglas on his dobro, Mark O'Connor on fiddle, with Roger and Chris.

On my CD, we have done that song, and my brother plays his dobro and does a pretty slick job.


Entered at Wed Jul 3 20:32:42 CEST 2013 from (68.171.231.88)

Posted by:

Bill M

Davvid P: A nice evocative post. At the risk of putting unwelcome words in your mouth and/or thoughts in your head, it seems likely that at some point earlier in your life you were carried on a parent's back on Independence days. Maybe across the grounds of some taffy-scented fairground - maybe even Ocean City.


Entered at Wed Jul 3 19:54:46 CEST 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Another 1968 LP that had a huge impact for me was the Byrds' "Sweetheart of the Rodeo", released in late August. Although it wasn't a debut album, it was the debut of Gram Parsons in the group. The Byrds had dabbled with the country on earlier albums, but with SOTR they completely reworked their sound. I can still recall hearing the amazing single of "You Ain't Goin' Nowhere" on a jukebox in an arcade on the boardwalk in Ocean City, NJ in early June. The sweet sound of Lloyd Green's pedal steel blending with the smell of salt water taffy in the ocean air. Funny how a song can evoke the memories from when you first heard it. Just as when the needle on my record player first dropped down on MFBP with the opening notes of "Tears of Rage."


Entered at Wed Jul 3 19:33:31 CEST 2013 from (174.116.172.227)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Rolling Stone Mag on Robillard/Sexton

An article now appears at the Rolling Stone Magazine site but it does not confirm that this is permanent. There has been no comment from the Dylan camp. The article is a rehash of what is known already (the comments about sales on Facebook etc). It is unusual, it is noted, for anyone to leave the tour over the past few years, with rare exceptions noted.


Entered at Wed Jul 3 18:29:24 CEST 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: MFBG

Kevin: Yes, listening to "Music From Big Pink" when it was first released was a unique experience. It was like a breath of fresh air. As I recall, Cream's "Wheels of Fire" came out around the same time, and my friends & I were playing that. At the time I was also listening to Simon & Garfunkel's "Bookends", Moby Grape's "Wow/Grape Jam", Frank Zappa's "Lumpy Gravy", and Buffalo Springfield's "Last Time Around." Later in the year I got the Steve Miller Band's "Children of the Future", Jefferson Airplane's "Crown of Creation", Procol Harum's "Shine on Brightly", Miles Davis' "Miles in the Sky", "Elecric Ladyland" Jimi Hendrix Experience and the Nazz self-titled debut.


Entered at Wed Jul 3 17:55:09 CEST 2013 from (70.53.45.64)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Jon….indeed and funny……anyhow, I hope that you enjoy the July show. I saw Bob twice in November and they were really great concerts. The best I have seen him in well over a decade as he finally adjusted the presentation to fit what is left of his voice and it was very effective. Only quibble with the summer tours with the multi-opening acts is that the Dylan band usually cuts back a few songs.

Debut Albums: in terms of impact, this really is a judgement that depends on being there at the time. By the time I heard MFBP it had already been out for 15-20 years and The Weight was already an anthem, etc. so this is entirely unlike an Eric Clapton hearing it for the first time and being stunned by its course altering greatness. I also recall David P explaining so well the impact the experience of listening to this record for the first time had an him…….Like others have outlined, I can only imagine how special it must have been to hear The Beatles for the first time….or Bob Dylan’s debut………or Bob Marley…………………I remember every minute, every detail of the afternoon at my parents’ home listening to my brothers copy of Rock Of Ages – late 1970’s….not a debut , of course but I can relate.


Entered at Wed Jul 3 16:17:28 CEST 2013 from (88.171.122.91)

Posted by:

Ramzy

Web: My link

On Vee-Jay I wanted to say that despite all that is well known because it not time now.


Entered at Wed Jul 3 16:01:39 CEST 2013 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon L

Location: NYC

Subject: Re: Dylan live

Kevin, wild, and just as we called it awhile back. I'm due to see Dylan and band July 27th in Wantagh... wonder if Charlie will already be getting The Glare (again) by then?


Entered at Wed Jul 3 15:54:47 CEST 2013 from (174.116.172.227)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: The answer ...maybe

Kevin J: I missed that! Very interesting. Thanks for pointing it out.


Entered at Wed Jul 3 15:50:47 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: David P/Beatles

David you are absolutely right. Capitol U.S. were very slow on releasing and getting excited; about The Beatles. Meanwhile Capitol Canada started releasing singles; in (I believe) the Fall of '63. Cliff Richard once told me; in an interview that he blamed Capitol U.S. for not getting behind him in 1958. That's why he never took off there. Everywhere else in the world he was a major contender. Once the U.S. got on the British Invasion bandwagon; especially Ed Sullivan........they were on their way.


Entered at Wed Jul 3 15:42:49 CEST 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

I meant to say that Vee-Jay didn't have the promotional clout of the major labels.


Entered at Wed Jul 3 15:41:00 CEST 2013 from (24.114.69.109)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Tennesse Troubles

Before I get started.........Great to see your name here this morning - bob w.

JT: This review of a few nights ago caught my eye and I was wondering if the end was near:

"The band is really sharp except for some mistakes by new guitarist DukeRobillard. Duke seemed to come in at the wrong time a couple of times,especially on Simple Twist of Fate when he started a little solo right when Bob was going into a verse or was about to blow on harmonica. He got The Glare from Bob, and several times you’d see Bob talking to him and gesturing between songs.".

.........and then when Duke posted on his Facebook page that he had a bunch of Bob Dylan CD's and albums for sale. "slightly used" you knew the jig was up...........too bad because Sexton was clearly fed up over the last year with how guitar was being featured and I would guess Duke R was getting bored as well.


Entered at Wed Jul 3 15:40:25 CEST 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Please Please Me did not please Capitol

The initial release of "Please Please Me" had less of an impact here in the U.S. due to the fact that Capitol Records passed on releasing it. As a result, it was released here by the small independent label Vee-Jay Records. It didn't sell a lot of copies of the single, due in part because they have the promotional clout of the major labels. The Beatles really didn't hit it big here until Capitol finally saw the writing on the wall and released "I Want To Hold Your Hand" b/w "I Saw Her Standing There" in December 1963.


Entered at Wed Jul 3 14:12:39 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: The British Invasion

I can still remember the absolute excitement I felt for the British Invasion. I was a Beatle, Rolling Stones, Searchers fanatic. I bought every copy of Fab magazine I could find. My dear friend Benjy Karch and I; from CHUM-FM dreamed of going to Liverpool; in our 20's. I find it hard to put into words what that sound did to me.

It's interesting that I never got to see The Beatles live; but I went to every early Rolling Stones tour; at the Gardens. Never got to see the original Searchers. I remember my radio D.J. Hero and mentor Big G Walters emceeing the Stones show. Coming out; in his CKEY Good Guy (red) jacket I believe. I really did love early Beatles. Yes it was poppy; but I was able to grasp it like I did R&B. I wanted so bad; in my teens to be a Brit. What it would have been like to actually be there. Go to the cavern etc. Yet it's interesting; over the years that most of my British Invasion heroes longed to live in America. Taxes?

I think that the biggest reason we jumped on to the British Invasion was that for the most part, American Rock and Roll; which started out wild; with Little Richard and Elvis had really simmered down to a more middle of the road approach. Fabian and Bobby Rydell didn't do it for me.

The Beatles and The Stones breathed new life into Rock and Roll. Especially for kids that didn't get to experience the first wave of American Rock And Roll.


Entered at Wed Jul 3 12:47:13 CEST 2013 from (50.100.174.9)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Please Please Me did not please me

I agree with hindsight that the British invasion had a huge impact as so many have said. It changed the course of popular music. "Please Please Me" did NOT impress me when I was 15. I was into the Rolling Stones and had discovered the blues through them. I had been listening to R&B and this was a natural extension. I found the music on "Please Please Me" to be 'poppy' and light and it was only later (20 years later) that I appreciated what was there. So there you have it. A confession from a Beatles adherent who didn't become absorbed early in the game.


Entered at Wed Jul 3 12:26:16 CEST 2013 from (50.100.174.9)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: What's Going On?

Bob Dylan and his Band played Memphis last night. Charlie Sexton replaced Duke Robillard in the band for the entire show as far as I understand it from the short comment in the article I read. No warning as far as I can tell. Why is anyone's guess. There was no previous mention in reviews of problems and the reviews were generally favourable, with one exception. Whether this is a one time event or something else... time will tell.


Entered at Wed Jul 3 12:02:10 CEST 2013 from (96.245.176.214)

Posted by:

bob w.

Thanks, Kevin. I'm already standing in line.

Best wishes to all.


Entered at Wed Jul 3 10:35:12 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I'd go for Heartbreak Hotel single, Please Please Me album. Note how they set out their stall that early: pure Merseybeat with Love Me Do, Please Please Me showing what the next three singles would be like. Really raucous powerful rock with Twist & Shout. There's A Place and Misery points the way to introspective stuff like In My Life, Norwegian Wood. I Saw Her Standing There is a great medium rocker pointing to the 1965 singles, possibly the best original on there. Then three girl group covers: Baby It's You, Boys, Chains to cement their pop sensibility. Till There Was You to show the route to Yesterday or Fool On The Hill.

But mainly it's the impact it had in the UK … the USA waited a year.


Entered at Wed Jul 3 04:04:55 CEST 2013 from (24.108.1.255)

Posted by:

BONK

Location: Salt Spring Island/Cabbagetown

Subject: Please, Please Me

That album knocked me on my ass as an eleven year old. There'd be no more listening to Elvis or any one like him for the next few years. In my opinion, the British Invasion changed the music scene forever. And to this day I can't figure out why it had such an impact on me and my friends!


Entered at Wed Jul 3 02:45:25 CEST 2013 from (101.164.0.90)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Subject: Please, please, Peter...

I'd go with heartbreak hotel. But, please please me is a worthy contender.


Entered at Wed Jul 3 00:41:28 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Rod Stewart was quoted saying he had discussed a Faces reunion with Ronny, as he said the Stones wouldn't go on forever as "Jagger's several years older than me."

The Daily Mail had Jagger & Richard from Glastonbury on the cover as "Night of The Living Dead."

But I watched 35 mins of it live, and have recorded the rest, and I thought the Stones were F*cki*g brilliant, and that in "Miss You" the bass player was playing stuff Wyman was never capable of playing. Also Mick Taylor in Midnight Rambler was fantastic.


Entered at Wed Jul 3 00:21:11 CEST 2013 from (68.171.231.88)

Posted by:

Bill M

Thanks David P. I forgot to specify which Dalton album, didn't I.


Entered at Tue Jul 2 23:22:07 CEST 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Karen Dalton

Light in the Attic records helped revive interest in Ms. Dalton in recent years when it reissued her 1971 album "In My Own Time", recorded at Bearsville.

Pat: You're right, his last name was Biggs.


Entered at Tue Jul 2 23:21:32 CEST 2013 from (70.53.45.64)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: The Faces

For bob w, some news from ABC in an interview with Ian McLagan a few days ago:

McLagan tells ABC News Radio that a full reunion of the surviving band members may finally be in the offing since front man Rod Stewart “is really keen now to do it.”

Ian reports that Wood had dinner with Stewart in Los Angeles a few weeks ago and found the singer “in a great frame of mind.” He adds, I’ve been up for it [for] forever, so’s Ronnie, so’s Kenney. If Rod will do it then we will.”

Actually, Stewart had discussed doing a Faces reunion in which he suggested that a special concert could be organized that also would feature a reunited Jeff Beck Group. McLagan, however, is less enthusiastic about that plan.

“I’m not interested in that,” he tells ABC News Radio. “I love Jeff, but I think that’s stretching us all in different directions.”


Entered at Tue Jul 2 22:13:41 CEST 2013 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

BWNWITenn: Belated thanks for mentioning Karen Dalton (who I grew to enjoy, but it took 30+ years). Richard Bell's on it alright, but the stars of the instrumental show are Bobby Notkoff on violin and Richard's Full Tilt comrade (and replacement in BARK) Ken Pearson on organ. Oddly enough, since I mentioned him just a couple days ago, the best song for me is Dalton's version of Dino Valenti's "Something On Your Mind" (at link).


Entered at Tue Jul 2 21:27:30 CEST 2013 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

David P, I believe his name was Biggs.


Entered at Tue Jul 2 21:23:01 CEST 2013 from (70.53.45.64)

Posted by:

Kevin J

The late great Glenn Gould – Canada’s original punk rocker – is one of the very few Canadian’s to have declined entry to the Order of Canada……………………I like to think that the great man had a foreshadowing of Preston Manning being named to the Order and realized that the club was beneath him…


Entered at Tue Jul 2 20:39:16 CEST 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The Gettysburg Line

Gettysburg's strategic location just seven miles above the Mason-Dixon line, which helped lead to it becoming the site of the bloody battle fought there in July 1863, also made it an important way stop on the Underground Railroad. One of the main stations there on the Railroad was the Dobbin house, built in 1776 by Presbyterian minister Alexander Dobbin's two slaves. His son Matthew later became a "captain" in the Underground Railroad, who used the house as a temporary shelter for slaves headed North to freedom. Before the war some African Americans, escaping from nearby Maryland and other slave states, settled there. After the Battle of Gettysburg, one African American resident, Basil Briggs, even made money from the Confederate dead. He got a contract to remove corpses from hastily dug graves for reburial in what became the Gettysburg National Cemetary. He removed some 3,000, including 45 Confederates who'd been buried on his own property.


Entered at Tue Jul 2 20:37:19 CEST 2013 from (70.53.45.64)

Posted by:

Kevin J

One of my favorite hockey stories……………..one night during a game the 60’s between the Habs and the Leafs, the guys on the Canadiens – responding to a local newspaper article on Eddie Shack which accurately described him as an illiterate - really got on him teasing him from the bench………3rd period and Shack scores on a breakaway…….skates in front of the Habs bench….stops and says “Goal……..G – O – A - L” ……… He is still around...I see him regularly at Pusateri’’s at Avenue and Lawrence……always hear him before seeing him!


Entered at Tue Jul 2 20:12:49 CEST 2013 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

John D: Great idea! The original led to the Leafian hordes winning the cup, so assuming history repeats you'd receive your own Order of Canada from a grateful Leaf nation.


Entered at Tue Jul 2 19:42:07 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Bill M

No Bill, I never did. I've had my name on a few jackets; where the artist is thanking me; but that's about it. Maybe it's time for a new version of "Clear The Track, Here Comes Shack." :-)


Entered at Tue Jul 2 19:39:33 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: The Hawk to receive an Honourary Order of Canada

Ronnie will be honoured with receiving an Honourary Order of Canada. They had to make it honourary (first time ever the government has done that) because he is still an American citizen. Robbie has received The Order of Canada. Hoping Garth will get it one day soon. The Order of Canada is the highest civilian honour one can receive in Canada.


Entered at Tue Jul 2 19:35:54 CEST 2013 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Kevin J / Landmark: I didn't remember, but am not surprised, that Dean and Hovaness Hagopian are brothers. When he was based in Ottawa, Dean did a 45 backed by the Regals (a proto-Staccatos group) and then a second one backed by the real Staccatos, who of course turned into the Five Man Electrical Band, whose best song is perpetually up for discusssion ...

By the way, I realised over the weekend that Wally Rossi's bassist at the El Mo wasn't Hovaness at all, it was Angelo Finaldi. I mentioned his old group, La Revolution Francaise (famed for their song - at link), and he seemed a bit embarrassed for political reasons, and said something like "What would I know - I'm just a crazy Italian.)

John D: All this reminds me to ask if you ever got to do a record of your own? Like Dean Hagopian, Dave Mickie, Dave Pritchard, Dave Boxer, Frank Cameron (sorta), Dave Johnson (sorta), Duff Roman (sorta), the Chummingbirds, Garry Ferrier, Brian Skinner and so many of the other great DJs from back then. (I don't mean the "We all eat at Mister Submarine jingle.)


Entered at Tue Jul 2 18:36:35 CEST 2013 from (70.50.66.170)

Posted by:

Kevin J

I watched the documentary “Inventing David Geffen” yesterday and really enjoyed it. I think most here would as well as it documents well not only an interesting period in rock n roll history but offers some insights into the business side of things…….David Crosby describes how the guys in CS&N wanted a guy on their side that was as “vicious and ruthless” as “The Man” on the other side of things and that found just that guy in Geffen……I hadn’t realized what a force he was in the early days…..After a short period with Laura Nyro and really having worked to promote and develop her and managing to get many of her songs to other artists to record….he was able to make a deal for her to sell her publishing for 4 Million….a pretty good deal in 1968/69………………Robbie Robertson contributes a few thoughts and a particularly funny bit about Geffen and ‘Free Man in Paris”…………RR seems a bit amazed that Geffen was not honoured to have inspired such a great song.

Canada Day: Perhaps it is just me but I really dislike the mixing of music and flag waving and the Tragically Hip seem to do too much of this………..and shed a tear for the death of rock n roll when it has descended to such a level where bands are flown into to commemorate the appointment of a Central Bank Governor.

Chinese and the building of the Canadian railways: Yes Norm, a sad history indeed……I saw a play 8-10 years ago at the Elgin, I think, where this was all dramatized.

Bill M: Thank you for that Moonquake link and also the info……………………as noted previously, the drummer was the brother of famed Montreal radio man Dean Hogopian.


Entered at Tue Jul 2 17:14:27 CEST 2013 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Railroads, prdjudice & Bigotry

While discussing "railroads", you may consider the contribution of the Chinese to the building of the railroads, and how they were treated.

As they set records for laying track, the worse they were treated. A no-win situation for what they had to endure. So there was still a lot of racism in this country.

The plight of Japanese people as well in this country after Pearl Harbour, when they were placed in the camps. There are many pictures of the fleet of Japanese fishing boats in Steveston that were taken from them in that war. I had a friend who was a fisherman I spent a lot of time with when I was a salmon fisherman. His father had his boat taken away back then. Bob pretty much hated our government forever.


Entered at Tue Jul 2 16:57:56 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Thanks John and Bill. There was a close association between Quaker beliefs and anti-slavery sentiment, and in Britain generally, the anti-slavery movement was strongest among Protestant nonconformists groups, including Presbyterians … and as names show, the presbyterian Sots were a major element in early Canadian history. Hull, where I studied American history, was the home of William Wilberforce, and the Wilberforce museum, so the centre of the anti-slavery movement in Britain.


Entered at Tue Jul 2 16:42:26 CEST 2013 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: I think it's fair to say that the Colonial government of the day was tolerant of the underground railway, and that the population was broadly opposed to slavery. Obviously many were actively supportive of the work and of the escaped slaves, but many were opposed (though had no means aside from petty racism to do anything about it) and the majority were too tied up in their own challenges to give it much thought. The Canadians who chose to fight for or otherwise support the Confederate side were likely a mixture of racists, boys playing with guns, unthinking friends of the underdog, and anti-American followers of the dictum that 'the enemy of my enemy is my friend'.


Entered at Tue Jul 2 16:34:26 CEST 2013 from (99.245.109.0)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Runaways

Your impressions are correct Peter. The Underground Railroad ends about 150 miles north of here in Owen Sound Ontario. There is a large gathering there every summer.

The following is taken from Black History Canada:

"Places had code names to help keep the routes secret. Detroit, from which most left the United States, was known as "Midnight." The Detroit River was called "Jordan," a biblical reference to the river that led to the promised land. The end of the journey also had a code name, such as "Dawn." People could communicate without being specific: "Take the railroad from Midnight to Dawn." The refugees arrived all across Canada, from Nova Scotia to British Columbia, but most came to what is now southwestern Ontario, to places such as Windsor, Fort Erie, Chatham and Owen Sound."


Entered at Tue Jul 2 16:15:36 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Last Runaway

I may have recommended this before. I was perplexed by Canadians helping CSA prisoners, having just read "The Last Runaway" by Tracy Chevalier, set in Ohio in 1850, and as ever meticulously researched. It's the story of a Quaker girl who's just arrived from Dorset and gets involved with the underground railway. Quakers were heavily involved, and because the law had just changed, slave catchers could roam the free states capturing runaways, and people harbouring them could be fined or have their land confiscated.

The detail in the book is impressive, right down to differing quilting techniques, but after the law was changed on runaways, true safety only lay in Canada, which i had the impression was sympathetic to runaways.


Entered at Tue Jul 2 15:56:54 CEST 2013 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Calvin: I wanted to say "Sandusky, city of light, city of magic", but that description had already been applied to another Ohio city.


Entered at Tue Jul 2 15:16:13 CEST 2013 from (70.28.32.74)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

Listened to plenty of the Hip as well as many more of Canuckistan's finest yesterday from my Ipod. Both while walking as well as through an Ipod charger/player I received as a gift. Two interesting things, we had a re-enactment of what was the best Five Man Electrical Band song. Once again, as once happened here in the GB, four people, four separate song picks as their favourite. The second was when my mother teared up when hearing "Four Strong Winds". Turns out that it has been a favourite of hers since it came out. She always had great taste in music but this one floored us as we never would've expected it.

By the way, can you increase the memory on an Ipod or would I have to purchase a new one with more capability?

Also I am considering going to Farm Aid as it's in Saratoga this year (9/21/13). The bill (so far) is Neil Young, Dave Matthews, John Mellencamp, and Wille Nelson for now. I figure that's like seeing a year's worth of shows in one sitting. Can't wait.


Entered at Tue Jul 2 13:39:09 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Canada Day in Trafalgar Square made the main BBC and ITV news yesterday evening, not something I remember before. The Canadian Embassy's along one side, I seem to remember. But they had the tie-in to the new Canadian Governor of the Bank of England starting work on the same day … he doesn't get the day off.


Entered at Tue Jul 2 12:12:26 CEST 2013 from (50.100.174.9)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Lodon Town on Canada Day: The Tragically Hip

The Tragically Hip headline Canada Day festivities in Trafalgar Square yesterday. It was streamed onto video on CBC. Jann Arden and the SheepDogs were openers while others appeared as well. This was an excellent international celebration of Canada Day and The Hip were right on the money. Gord Downie did his theatrics and the band was superb, playing stuff from all their albums including the first 2! Too bad when the best show on the planet on Canada Day isn't in Canada, but near the Canadian embassy in London. It is said that there are about 85,000 Canadians living in London and from the panning of the crowd, it was likely that many of them were there, including someone very dear to us who loved it. "New Orleans is sinking, man, and I don't want to swim. Swim."


Entered at Tue Jul 2 09:47:55 CEST 2013 from (41.162.7.114)

Posted by:

NUX

Web: My link

Subject: Where you are

Just thought I would share this with ye all.


Entered at Tue Jul 2 06:40:58 CEST 2013 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

There is a Confederate cemetery on Johnson Island. A quarry destroyed the camp site.


Entered at Tue Jul 2 02:50:47 CEST 2013 from (108.45.16.225)

Posted by:

Calvin

Famed Sandusky? The POW camp was actually on Johnson Island-a 300 acre or so island about 3 miles out into Sandusky Bay in Lake Erie. Over the last decade a number of groups have been working hard to turn it into a National Historic Landmark. I believe in was the only Union POW Camp set up specifically to hold Confederate Officers as well.


Entered at Tue Jul 2 02:32:07 CEST 2013 from (68.171.231.89)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Pat B / David P: here is an article that does double duty by linking Gettysburg to Canada's Confederation. The same paper, yesterday's Toronto Star, also ran a review of a book by John Boyko that talks about the leader of a Canadian band of pro-Confederate guerillas who made un unsuccessful attempt to spring prisoners from a Union-run PoW camp in famed Sandusky.


Entered at Tue Jul 2 00:33:07 CEST 2013 from (96.30.173.135)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Subject: Memorial Day

As I do most every year I remind all that July 1 is the anniversary of the Battle of Beaumont Hamel, a defining moment in our nation's history, when the Royal Newfoundland Regiment suffered over 90% casualties. I don't believe any of my own ancestors were involved at the Somme but we lost a couple at Gallipoli. The Pogues 'The Band Played Waltzing Matilda' and a generous glass of Jamiesons' will help close out the day.

I always think of our late friend, Steve Heggison, on Memorial Day. We had several discussions on the Battle of the Somme, a subject on which he was quite knowledgeable.


Entered at Mon Jul 1 23:48:04 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Look of love

Mostly, Dusty Springfield's version of a song will be the best. A couple of weeks ago I bought Nina Simone's "Silk & Soul" (a mere £3 in FOPP, London). That has an interesting version of "The Look of love" too.


Entered at Mon Jul 1 23:44:47 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Dunc: Ah, I did lights on Pearl Carr & Teddy Johnson too, though they were middle of the bill. They did "Sing Little Birdie", then dressed up as Pearly King and Pearly Queen and did The Lambeth Walk. Watching that twice a night was hard work


Entered at Mon Jul 1 22:35:28 CEST 2013 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Dusty's Springfield's "The Look of Love" has to be definitive, and Bill Evans performing "Alfie" from Live at Montreaux Vol. 2 is sublime.


Entered at Mon Jul 1 22:10:03 CEST 2013 from (86.173.113.43)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Peter, Roger

Burt has had over 40 GB hits. Interestingly I stilly play the Stranglers Greatest Hits and Isaac Hayes's versions of Walk on By. He sang songs from an album he made with Elvis Costello and said he was working with him again.

And, Peter, I went back to read your review of 'The Look of Love' where you mention two Baccharach tracks - the title song and I think from memory, Alfie.

Roger. I'm not big on going to classical music concerts, which is sad in a city which has two symphony orchestras, Scottish Opera and Scottish Ballet(both of which I have been to). I'll have to make classical music my retirement project.

Peter, enjoyed the Embassy page. Pearl Carr and Teddy Johnston mean one thing to me, Crackerjack's first hosts. Family joke was that I called her Pedal Car.


Entered at Mon Jul 1 21:54:30 CEST 2013 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: CANADA

Canada’s international reputation rising: Survey Canada’s reputation is improving overseas, according to a new public-opinion survey of respondents in 20 countries.

While Canada was criticized for pulling out of a U.N. pact on combatting desertification, this country's reputation has actually risen recently, according to an international survey.

By: Rick Westhead Staff Reporter

Keep that maple leaf patch on your backpack for at least another year.

Canada’s reputation is improving overseas, according to a new public-opinion survey of respondents in 20 countries.

Fifty-six per cent of about 20,000 respondents view Canada favourably, up from 53 per cent last year. The findings are included in a report by polling firm GlobeScan to be released Thursday.

Canada’s reputation outside its own borders trails only Germany, which is regarded positively by 59 per cent of respondents.

The survey, commissioned by the BBC, comes as debate intensifies over whether Canada is losing influence on the international stage, thanks to its controversial foreign policies on issues such as climate change, Israel and international aid in Africa.

Earlier this year, Canada was criticized for its decision to withdraw from the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification. While the government justified the move because of the treaty’s $300,000 annual cost, critics said it would isolate Canada, which is the only country to withdraw from the convention.

The countries where Canada did best in the GlobeScan survey aren’t surprising. In the U.S., 84 per cent of respondents view Canada positively, compared to 82 per cent in France, 80 per cent in the U.K., and 79 per cent in Australia.

CYA soon xoxoxo


Entered at Mon Jul 1 21:44:21 CEST 2013 from (99.237.0.147)

Posted by:

Serenity

Location: Kitchener, Ontario, CANADA [and proud of it!]

Subject: HAPPY CANADA DAY to ALL Canadians

Thanx to all the CANADA DAY greetings..

In a poll we are ranked #1, and another we are #2 with Germany as #1]

Here's a bit of trivia about us..

Canada Day is the national day of Canada, a federal statutory holiday celebrating the anniversary of the July 1, 1867, enactment of the British North America Act, 1867 (today called the Constitution Act, 1867), which united three colonies into a single country called Canada within the British Empire. Originally called Dominion Day, the holiday was renamed in 1982, the year the Canada Act was passed. Canada Day observances take place throughout Canada as well as among Canadians internationally.

Have a good holiday..xoxoxo



Entered at Mon Jul 1 21:30:45 CEST 2013 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Which brings up an interesting point. I ran into a number of Canadians who fought in the 8th Michigan. I wonder if any of the Canuckstani element of the Band had CW vets in the family somewhere.


Entered at Mon Jul 1 20:54:20 CEST 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: In the Electric Mist at Devil's Den

And only one regiment from Levon's home state of Arkansas fought at Gettysburg. They suffered over 30% casualties on July 2, fighting at Devil's Den with Maj. Gen. John Bell Hood's Texas Brigade, led by Brig. Gen. Jerome Bonaparte Robertson. Levon would later play the ghost of John Bell Hood in the film "In the Electric Mist."


Entered at Mon Jul 1 19:22:53 CEST 2013 from (108.90.18.26)

Posted by:

Pat B

Only 750 troops from Tennessee were at Gettysburg. Virgil Caine was most likely holed up in Vicksburg or camped with The Army of Tennessee southeast of Murphreesboro TN. Even George Stoneman had taken medical leave from the Army of the Potomac after Chancellorsville due to his "problem". Still, Gettysburg and the Fall of Vicksburg on July 4 certainly made those bells ring.


Entered at Mon Jul 1 15:23:33 CEST 2013 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The Days They Drove Old Dixie Down

Today marks another historic anniversary (150th), of the Battle of Gettysburg, July 1-3, 1863.


Entered at Mon Jul 1 14:51:38 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Embassy

Last week we mentioned the Oriole & Embassy labels in Britain … link goes to a page someone just sent me on the history of the Woolworths label … banned from the charts for outselling the real items!


Entered at Mon Jul 1 14:42:27 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Toppermost

An old friend just launched his Toppermost website. People submit ten favorite tracks by an artist (in alphabetical order, not 1 to 10) and others can argue, as we often do here. See link to my Band selection. The other launch items are The Everly Brothers and the McGarrigles, with others waiting in the wings (Eddie Cochran, Chuck Berry & Bobby Darin are forthcoming ones from me).

Do have a look, comment and say you've come from the Band site if you do.


Entered at Mon Jul 1 13:16:25 CEST 2013 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Please, Please Me

Please, Please Me has to be the most earth-shattering first release by anyone.


Entered at Mon Jul 1 12:36:54 CEST 2013 from (99.141.54.199)

Posted by:

Adam

"Music From Big Pink" was released 45 years ago today. No debut album before or since has ever come close...


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