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The Band: Live at the Academy of Music 1971

Levon Helm: Ramble at the Ryman

The Band: Three of a Kind

Robbie Robertson: How to Become Clairvoyant

Garth Hudson Presents a Canadian Celebration of The Band

Levon Helm: Electric Dirt

Garth and Maud Hudson: Live at the Wolf

Pulse

Dirt Farmer

Elliot Landy's Woodstock Vision

The Band Guestbook, June 2012


Entered at Sat Jun 30 18:44:50 CEST 2012 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: The Band/Psychedelics

Was The Band's music in any way influenced by psychedelics,musically,lyrically or both? Any responses would be deeply appreciated.


Entered at Sat Jun 30 18:44:18 CEST 2012 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: The Band/Psychedelics

Was The Band's music in any way influenced by psychedelics,musically,lyrically or both? Any responses would be deeply appreciated.


Entered at Sat Jun 30 11:00:58 CEST 2012 from (95.109.35.243)

Posted by:

Sister Maud Hudson

Web: My link

Subject: Peace & Love Festival, Borlange, Sweden

FULL GUEST ARTIST ROSTER REVEALED for GARTH HUDSON and DEADMAN at the PEACE & LOVE FESTIVAL in Borlange, Sweden - Saturday, 30 June 2012 - John Hiatt, Calle Norén (Sugarplum Fairy), Anna Ternhiem, Israel Nash Gripka, Basia Bulat, Stiko Per Larsson, John Hiatt, Jerry Hoff & Melo (Hoffmaestro), Ebbot Lundberg (Soundtrack Of Our Lives), Orlando Weeks (The Maccabees), and Sister Maud Hudson


Entered at Sat Jun 30 10:39:48 CEST 2012 from (209.17.178.226)

Posted by:

JT and LvdB

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Destroyer (Dan Bejar and band)

We just saw Destroyer in Vancouver at the Vogue. Incredible show. Part of the Vancouver Jazz Festival.


Entered at Fri Jun 29 21:02:23 CEST 2012 from (68.198.166.204)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY
Web: My link

Subject: Cher - Silver Wings

For the Guestbook Cher fans. Beautiful song.


Entered at Fri Jun 29 20:53:59 CEST 2012 from (68.198.166.204)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY
Web: My link

Subject: Hank and The Cupcakes

Just a fun song. So much energy. You have to be young to play this kind of music.


Entered at Fri Jun 29 20:25:23 CEST 2012 from (199.233.179.254)

Posted by:

Ignatius

Location: Pac NW US
Web: My link

Subject: The Weber Brothers on Kapipal - Financing their next album

If this has been mentioned before I won't apologize for repeating. The fantastic Weber Brothers, graduates of Ronnie Hawkin's Rock and Roll boot camp, are asking for donations to finance a kind of greatest hits record. They are a band well worth your support, and they give you the chance to chime in on song selection. Real road warriors, these kids play mostly in the Toronto area, but to me they are world class representatives of the great roots rock tradition fathered/grandfathered by their heros, The Band. Please visit the site above, maybe explore the videos on their website, consider a purchase of their music (I recommend the live album, in constant rotation on my iPod) and then consider making a contribution.


Entered at Fri Jun 29 19:58:00 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Susanna Clark

"It's a quarter moon in a ten cent town
Time for me to lay my heartaches down"

Sad to hear of the passing of Susanna Clark. As Solomon mentioned, she did the cover painting for Emmylou Harris' 1978 album "Quarter Moon In A Ten Cent Town". She also co-wrote, along with Carlene Carter, the opening song on the record, "Easy From Now On", containing the line that became the album's title.

Also on the album is Ms. Harris' fine cover of Rodney Crowell's "Leaving Louisiana In The Broad Daylight", featuring Rick Danko on fiddle & harmony vocal and Garth Hudson on accordion. Garth also contributed sax on another song on the record.


Entered at Fri Jun 29 16:56:57 CEST 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Destroyer (Dan Bejar and band)

Nux: Nice to see Destroyer getting recognition. Out of Vancouver, Dan Bejar and his band are getting the attention they have deserved. A member of the elite band, New Pornographers, Dan Bejar has been quietly putting out stellar music over the past 10 years. Listen to "Kaput'. I have been a Todd Rundgren fan since Nazz. When Nazz came out, I was walking along Yonge St. and they were blasting out of a small shop that sold clothes and music and I was knocked out. "Runt" and "Something, Anything" are superb and the work that Todd Rundgren has done and what he has achieved in music over 40 years or more is stellar. The tradition continues...


Entered at Fri Jun 29 16:01:04 CEST 2012 from (63.88.115.195)

Posted by:

carmen

Location: PA

Subject: Blood On The Tracks

Thanks for the info


Entered at Fri Jun 29 14:29:41 CEST 2012 from (69.156.29.216)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

It was the eighties and I was in the Guvernment Club with friends. When they performed this song....I just danced right on the spot where I was standing.

JD:We're planning on seeing Tedeschi Trucks Band tonight as well.

"We can't even think of a word that rhymes. School's out forever. School's out for summer."


Entered at Fri Jun 29 13:56:15 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: I Wanna Roo You

Link to "I Wanna Roo You" as covered by Rumer. OK, I prefer Van Morrison's original, but this is a lovely version, and the female voice will help males to appreciate the lyrics.


Entered at Fri Jun 29 13:41:46 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Something / Anything

Always a favourite album. The bit I've quoted often is Todd's voice between tracks, "This is the sound of bad ed-ting"


Entered at Fri Jun 29 13:40:33 CEST 2012 from (92.18.207.248)

Posted by:

Solomon

Web: My link

Subject: Susanna Clark R.I.P

Mrs. Clark was a vital figure in Nashville’s close-knit singer-songwriter community beginning in the early 1970s. She was a close friend and inspiration to Townes Van Zandt, Rodney Crowell and others, and her lyrics, her music and her visual art were enjoyed by millions: Her evocative paintings graced the covers of Willie Nelson’s Stardust, Emmylou Harris’ Quarter Moon In A Ten Cent Town, Guy Clark’s Old No. 1, Nanci Griffith’s Dust Bowl Symphony and other acclaimed albums.


Entered at Fri Jun 29 10:57:57 CEST 2012 from (41.162.7.114)

Posted by:

NUX

Subject: Classic Albums(Richard Haslop)

Hello everybody,everything is well with my newborn daughter Leighvon.Here is another of my friend Richard Haslops reviews.Enjoy:

TODD RUNDGREN Something/Anything? By Richard Haslop

You don’t have to look far to spot the fact that, popwise at least, we’re living in the past. While Simon Reynolds’s recent Retromania, written in support of the idea, expressed with its tongue only half in its cheek, that pop might end, not with a bang but a box set whose fourth disc you never get round to playing, investigates and explains, across 400 eruditely entertaining pages, the cultural theory behind the phenomenon, you only need to glance at critics’ albums of the year lists from the last couple of years to see the evidence. Contemporary rock acts like Destroyer, Midlake, Ariel Pink’s Haunted Graffiti, Dawes, Jonathan Wilson, Yuck, Blitzen Trapper and several others make sounding like they come from another decade cool, and do so with great skill, enthusiasm and often without even a trace of irony. Although Destroyer and Yuck, for example, have located themselves firmly in the ’80s and ’90s respectively, most recently the seventies, and especially the frequently maligned pre-punk seventies, has emerged as the decade du jour.

Although it does seem unusually prevalent right now, the concept is by no means new, of course. In fact, the best work of arguably pop’s best exponent of deliberately sounding like the music of an entire period focused on the very period in which it was itself made. Todd Rundgren’s frequently brilliant 1972 double album, Something/Anything?, sounds both like a terrific various artists compilation – a kind of Everything You Wanted To Know About 1972 But Were Afraid To Ask – and creatively individual enough to stand out as not only a great Todd Rundgren record but perhaps a great rock record as well.

Rundgren, an in demand engineer and producer who might have been an important figure even if he hadn’t sung, played or written a note himself, has a considerable catalogue of his own. But it’s seriously patchy and spotted, possibly littered, with chunks of technically clever self-congratulation. His undeniable and, at times, unmatched studio wizardry quite often outstripped his musical ideas so that, for example, one side of his 1976 album Faithful, where he performed note perfect imitations of the Beatles, Beach Boys, Yardbirds, Hendrix and the wild, mercury Bob Dylan, is impressive once or twice, but seems ultimately unnecessary in the light of the easy availability of the originals.

Nor is Faithful by any means alone in that regard, but on Something/Anything?, three of whose vinyl sides contain no sound, vocal or instrumental, that wasn’t made by Rundgren himself, right down to the Motownesque “female” backing voices on Wolfman Jack, Rundgren strikes the balance, song after song, between studio genius and musical engagement. Focusing with uncanny accuracy on the lush and adult end of piano driven pop, in the vein of Carole King, Laura Nyro and Elton John, he also nails both generic Motown and the more specific Motown of Stevie Wonder and the early ‘70s psych-funk of the Temptations and brings out his guitar for adventures in power pop – where his previous group, the Nazz, whose Hello It’s Me is updated by half a decade, was an important touchstone – melodic hard rock, carefully crafted pop psychedelia and several other substyles. Critically, however, though there is obvious self-deprecating humour in a song like Some Folks Is Even Whiter Than Me, he does so without disappearing into pastiche or too broadly drawn satire.

He’s a sort of pop chameleon in reverse, not so much adapting to the rest of the musical landscape as moulding and shaping specific elements from all over its spectrum to fit whichever song he happens to be working on. He does it so well that the fourth side, a slightly self-indulgent pop operetta with a studio band that includes, inevitably, the Brecker Bothers on horns, sounds no louder, denser or more convincing than Rundgren flying completely solo.


Entered at Fri Jun 29 05:19:20 CEST 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Pirates.......NOT LUMBERJACKS!

Now pay attention! Especially you Lars.........and Peter. I think Peter was probably in this......in tights.


Entered at Fri Jun 29 01:52:40 CEST 2012 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

Carmen, this book retells the story of the making of BoTT, Quite good.


Entered at Fri Jun 29 00:39:06 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Most major publishers now have a take-down person dealing with YouTube full time. I'm told the major record companies have whole departments. Unfortunately here at Viney corp we only have the CEO, the office cleaner and the tea boy (all three roles shared by one person) and that one person wastes so much time posting stuff on the web that he never gets round to it. But yes, when he does they're not interested.


Entered at Fri Jun 29 00:25:33 CEST 2012 from (136.167.102.118)

Posted by:

Dave H

Carmen: The original Blood on the Tracks sessions from the fall of 1974 started in New York with Eric Weissberg and his backup band, Deliverance, as accompanists; they play on the album cut of "Meet Me in the Morning" but Dylan decided not to use anything else from this session on the original LP (a couple more cuts with Weissberg surfaced on the Bootleg Series release later on). Dylan then recorded an album's worth of songs with backup from Tony Brown on bass (and Paul Griffin on organ on a few tracks), and for a while considered the album done, but at the last minute he re-cut 5 of the same songs while visiting his brother in Minneapolis over the Christmas holidays, using a group of local musicians. So the released album contains material from 3 different sets of sessions, with very different styles, as is fairly noticeable when you listen.

I'm guessing that the Band was never in the running to participate. Planet Waves had not been a big commercial success, and the Band had its own career to maintain. However, Dylan did decide around this time to finally allow an official release of some of the Basement Tapes material, which was compiled by Robbie Robertson and appeared in the summer of '75.


Entered at Thu Jun 28 23:01:29 CEST 2012 from (63.88.115.195)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: PA

Subject: Band/Dylan

Listening to Planet Waves and I was wondering if Dylan ever considered The Band for Blood on The Tracks. I remember reading that Dylans took home an early version and his brother convinced him to use differant musicians. I wonder who was on the original cuts.


Entered at Thu Jun 28 22:23:55 CEST 2012 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: the other side of YouTube takedowns

I wonder if YouTube reacts more quickly to UMG than it does to VineyCorp . . . .


Entered at Thu Jun 28 21:48:39 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I don't understand … surely up there in the far north, the sundial works 24/7 in summer and not at all in winter?


Entered at Thu Jun 28 21:14:35 CEST 2012 from (83.249.106.36)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Progress - is the best - but only - if you live - in the West

Yes JayTee, we didn't have indoor taps or toilet in our cabin near Russian border in late sixties. We didn't have electricity either. My grand mother had a battery driven mono radio receiver (Philips). - THE WEIGHT HAS NEVER SOUNDED BETTER!!!


Entered at Thu Jun 28 20:57:31 CEST 2012 from (166.147.89.148)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Done!

For those not from the US, today we, officially (to a degree), joined you in the manner in which health care is provided for.

I've been listening to Rush just now - you can imagine his vitriolic gas.

I miss Steve's POV today!


Entered at Thu Jun 28 20:54:38 CEST 2012 from (108.54.247.103)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Progress

I get real tired lately cranking that handle on my wind up Victrola. (and I actually do have one)


Entered at Thu Jun 28 20:08:50 CEST 2012 from (184.66.178.72)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Enemy of Progress and Running water

I trust that this does not include running water from taps and indoor toilets.


Entered at Thu Jun 28 18:59:42 CEST 2012 from (83.249.106.36)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Time / Peter V

As an enemy of all progres we do it our way. My wife carries a sun clock around her neck (in fact, purchased in the same village in South of France were Dylan wrote some of his songs in "DESIRE" album). So, she had to go to the window or outside. If it is cloudy or night... sorry...


Entered at Thu Jun 28 18:09:08 CEST 2012 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

mike h

Web: My link

"One For The Road"


Entered at Thu Jun 28 15:13:20 CEST 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Thank you BEG. Looking forward to the Tedeschi-Trucks Band tomorrow night.


Entered at Thu Jun 28 14:50:20 CEST 2012 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Psychedelics

Anyone know if and to what extent psychdelics influenced The Band's studio work? Many lyrics and some of the music allude to the possible influence of such experience. Would appreciate any help with learning about this.Thank you.


Entered at Thu Jun 28 14:49:32 CEST 2012 from (70.54.133.238)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

"The lurid oils of Edward Kasper's cover painting suggest a double-edged image of the Band. There they are, the five of them, hanging out at the Jook Joint in Shit City Iowa, the scene of interminable nights of roadhouse dues long ago. But it's hard to tell whether Kasper's commissioned portrait is an assertion of flesh and blood in the face of dehumanizing stardom or instead a projection of lassitude, of the wish to retreat from the responsibilities of musical maturity and genuine stature."

JD: When I heard your voice at the Betty Lavette show, I knew it was you even before you introduced yourself. She's a real pro but I can't say that I was wowed. We also saw Roy Hargrove the other night. I remeber that I enjoyed his music more the year before.


Entered at Thu Jun 28 14:48:03 CEST 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Where do they go?

As to my earlier post, I have also lost my Stage Fright insert. I believe a Seef photo. Man!


Entered at Thu Jun 28 14:36:11 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Web: My link

wedier hudson show article linked


Entered at Thu Jun 28 14:32:32 CEST 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Moondog Matinee Cover

Does anyone has a high res .jpg; or close to it of the Edward Casper painting on the cover of Moondog Matinee? I have no idea what happened to mine and living in Toronto, I would just like to copy a really good jpg. With all sorts of albums being reissued, I wish Moondog would be reissued on vinyl; with Mr. Casper's painting. Thanks.


Entered at Thu Jun 28 08:39:09 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Time after time

Egg timers manufacture must be in recession. Once everyone had two or three, perhaps with Souvenir from Blackpool on the side. I realised when my watch broke six months ago that watches are now redundant or a jewellery item, because there's a clock on my mobile phone. And iPad. In the kitchen there are clocks on the oven, microwave, central heating timer , radio and phone. We used to have one on the wall but took it down when it needed a new battery.


Entered at Thu Jun 28 02:30:49 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Subject: superb,

thank Goodness it wasn't one minute quaker oats she was timing!


Entered at Wed Jun 27 23:27:50 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Al, that's boasting. A soft-boiled egg takes at least three minutes.


Entered at Wed Jun 27 21:57:56 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Yazoo

Carmen: The Yazoo name would also appeal to Robbie, as the Yazoo were a tribe of Native Americans that lived in the Mississippi area near the river of the same name.


Entered at Wed Jun 27 21:10:28 CEST 2012 from (63.88.115.195)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: PA
Web: My link

Subject: Yazzo Street & Good Web Site for Levon and Band Photos and info

Robbie Robertson—The Band’s guitarist, and principal author for this song—once stated that it was based on an actual Yazoo Street in a town in Helm’s home state of Arkansas: “I thought, ‘Wow, they don’t have streets like that in Canada. There’s no streets up there called Yazoo!’ It was like, ‘Jesus, let me make up a little story here about stuff going on in this kind of almost red light district.’ Everything was lit in red in that song for me.” Because the song was set in the South, Robertson decided that Levon Helm would be a more appropriate singer, employing his “best redneck-wildcat yelp” (Hoskyns, 1993).


Entered at Wed Jun 27 20:32:15 CEST 2012 from (24.164.173.243)

Posted by:

Lars

Was this woman from Nantucket?


Entered at Wed Jun 27 18:19:42 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Morning has Broken

She was standing in the kitchen, preparing our usual soft-boiled eggs and toast for breakfast, wearing only the skimpy 'T' shirt that she normally slept in.

As I walked in, barely half awake, she turned to me and said softly,

"I need you to make love to me this very moment!"

My eyes lit up and I thought to myself, "I am either still dreaming or this is going to be my lucky day!"

My sap rose. Instantly. Not wanting to lose the moment, I embraced her with all the passion I could muster, lifting up her T-shirt to ensure our bodies joined as one right there across the kitchen table.

As I finished she said, "Thanks," and returned to the stove, her T-shirt still up around her neck.

Happy, but by now more than a little puzzled at this rare union, I asked, "What was that all about?"

"The egg timer's broken" she replied


Entered at Wed Jun 27 17:57:35 CEST 2012 from (83.249.106.36)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Cryptic, cryptic

My wife's colleague's neighbour's daughter was nanny for Bill Wyman's child (who wasn't?). Visiting my wife's colleague's neighbour he said these immortal words:

"I've never been in Rolling Stones concert. I've never heard Mick or Keith sing or play. I heard Brian and Charlie."


Entered at Wed Jun 27 11:00:46 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Vertigo

Bill, I know about Paranoid. In the words of the immortal Kenneth Williams, playing the role of Julius Caesar, “Infamy! Infamy! Everybody’s got it in for me!”

Gentle Giant evolved from Simon Dupree & The Big Sound, one of the hard working British bands I harp on about. To recap, along with The Alan Bown Set, Zoot Money and Steampacket these bands headlined at colleges and ballrooms in the mid to late 60s. Most moved R&B to soul, then went somewhat psych in 1967 to 1968. The unifying factor is that they all earned more per night than chart bands, but then tended to 7 to 8 piece bands with horns, rather than four or five. Gentle Giant was the three brothers from Simon Dupree (a fictional character, not one of the band).

The Vertigo label had three strands when it started… proto-metal (Black Sabbath, Uriah Heep, Status Quo, Juicy Lucy), then the musicians bands doing musician stuff veering into jazz (Colosseum, Manfred Mann Chapter Three, Nucleus, Keith Tippett), then the prog , folky and plain odd stuff that is so collected: Magna Carta, Ian Matthews, Gentle Giant, Fairfield Parlour, Dr Strangely Strange. Well, so is the musician / jazzy stuff collected.

They also had Rod the Mod’s “An Old Raincoat”. The label got swamped by the success of Status Quo (about forty charting singles!) and revived by the success of Dire Straits. But it’s the swirl label era to 1973 that fascinates, and the gatefold sleeves and designs are so outstanding that I suspect we’re looking at an art interest as much or more than a music interest. The collectability is fuelled by the use of soft card rather than laminate which means sleeves got scuffed and torn, making mint copies rare.


Entered at Wed Jun 27 08:06:05 CEST 2012 from (68.171.231.81)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: ... or something like that ...

Peter V: Just because you won't play Paranoid doesn't mean they shouldn't be after you. Also, odd that you should mention that Ian Matthews out of the blue, because ever since someone mentioned "Lonely Surfer", what's been running through my head is his voice singing "And I was the only dancer to the gay quadrille that he played".


Entered at Wed Jun 27 05:39:19 CEST 2012 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

If you're gonna talk about artists on the Vertigo label, wouldn't Gentle Giant be a lot more fun?


Entered at Wed Jun 27 03:43:59 CEST 2012 from (208.120.213.56)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

That's a good question...


Entered at Tue Jun 26 23:34:42 CEST 2012 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: what's going on here?

Stranded out in the night; Eliza took me down, to see the widow give rain to the town. It's against the law to be a tonic man, but the widow knows she's got the upper hand.

So I went on in, feeling kind of wheezy. You know she soothes my mind, boys, she rocked me kind of slow and easy all day and all night.

Pick a card before you go – it’s a long trip to Mexico. (Eliza waiting by the door, I can't stay here anymore, no, no.)

Then she took a pill. She washed her feet in the mud. She said, "Look out son; you know, I just started a flood for forty days and forty nights."

Then I dropped my shoes, and ‘Liza called my name. She said it looked to her like it's going to rain. Then the Cotton King, he came in choking -- and the widow laughed, and said: "I ain't joking.”

King punched the wall.

She said, "Now don't you tease me . . . . I just fell in love, boys, so rock me kind of slow and kind of easy all day and all night.”

Sweet William said, with a drunken head: "If I had a boat, I'd help y'all float."

Eliza stood there watching William in a trance, as the widow saved him the Saint’s Vitus dance -- but just then an old man (with a boat named "Breezy") said, "You can ride with pride, boys, if you rock it kind of slow and easy all day and all night."


Entered at Tue Jun 26 20:57:05 CEST 2012 from (108.54.247.103)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: great sites

Peter, I loved the Vertigo label and sadavid, the Vincent was amazing.


Entered at Tue Jun 26 18:38:41 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Vertigo

One of my favorite LPs, Ian Matthews' "Tigers Will Survive" on Vertigo, was a fine example of great cover sleeve artwork (link above).


Entered at Tue Jun 26 18:07:21 CEST 2012 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: " . . . paint a Starry Night again, man . . . ."

The classics endure.


Entered at Tue Jun 26 14:23:41 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Web: My link

Subject: Garth and Weider pics , Iridium show

link


Entered at Tue Jun 26 13:45:38 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Magna Carta

The link takes you to a Vertigo discography site with the spinning centre label in operation. Warning. Set an oven timer for thirty minutes in case you get hypnotised.

I did my Tuesday morning check on my local secondhand record store, and there, beaming at me, first 45 single in the rack, was Airport Song by Magna Carta. It was the Philips reissue not the Vertigo 1970 original, but at £1 it was worth picking up.


Entered at Tue Jun 26 13:27:18 CEST 2012 from (24.252.150.3)

Posted by:

Calvin

Sorry Bill, that wasnt what I meant at all. I meant while I do like Magna Carta as their playing can be captivating in a restful sort of way-and I do have a couple of CDS, I just dont remember talking about them.. I found it quite funny people on GB might remember something Ive said, and musical tastes Ive discussed, over the past 12 years that I dont even remember talking about

certainly no need to apologize tome.


Entered at Tue Jun 26 10:12:27 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Vertigo design

I should add that in the case of Black Sabbath, it was more enjoyable without the tone arm in the groove, and that is the optimum way to play Paranoid.


Entered at Tue Jun 26 09:21:28 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

Subject: Magna Carta

I found a copy of the Mid winter 45 recently, which I like. It's just before the Vertigo label albums, and everything on the Vertigo label is sought after and valuable. That sort of psych-folk material is becoming retrospectively popular. Apart from playing Mid-winter the last couple of weeks, I hadn't thought about them in years. I was amazed they're still going,and having googled them, that they continued and did so many albums. I think of them in the Vertigo swirl design era and that's it.

The appeal and price of Vertigo records is that mixture of unusual material and beautifully designed sleeves and that brilliant centre design that they dropped after a few years. We would sit and marvel at them just going round on the turntable. So much that we sometimes forgot to drop the tone arm in the groove.


Entered at Tue Jun 26 07:05:03 CEST 2012 from (68.171.231.83)

Posted by:

Bill M

Calvin: Sorry for having confused you with whoever it was who seemed quite up on thhe group and its current activities. I agree about the cloyingness, aside from "Lord Of The Ages" an FM radio 'hit' when I progressed out of top 40.


Entered at Tue Jun 26 06:08:42 CEST 2012 from (24.252.150.3)

Posted by:

Calvin

Odd Bill, while I do have a respect and enjoy some aspects of Magna Carta (I always thought theyd have been a great instrumental group-I find their lyrics somewhat cloying at times) I dont remember ever talking about them here.

But yeah, they can play if you are into that sort of folk music.


Entered at Tue Jun 26 05:07:58 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Relative to the recent past talk of roaylties getting tio artists, and someone's questions about downloads, how much an artist might make etc. etc.the label i own just got paid for 19 Deezer streams of songs from school for fools. Got paid 21 cents. the label owns the sound recording. the label pays me my songwriting royalty from that, pays me my publishing from that , pay my artist his cut (which if it ever recoups it's expense,including his advance, he will get). Everything left over is the labels.But, the point is, how the internet has effects the artist.this is the reality. Had the streams been the sale of 2 cds or records,chances are the artists royalties would have been higher than the 21 cents the label got paid.

My other artist,I gave a very unusual deal. that artist gets straight off the top, a chunk, before anything else gets paid.Had the 19 Deezer streams been his, he'd have made 5.25 cents! Still less than the roylaty would have been on 2 discs or records.


Entered at Tue Jun 26 00:58:32 CEST 2012 from (86.179.72.143)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Thanks

Sadavid, I like Ian Rankin books too.

And like me and other popsters of that age, Rebus will certainly have Solid Air, the greatest Scottish song.

Bill M. There were a few things that took me into BARK. Garth playing, you and Steve's enthusiasm, the availability of Let's Frolic Again in a Glasgow shop. But why I took a chance...in addition to the aforementioned, was their enthusiasm for John.


Entered at Tue Jun 26 00:14:40 CEST 2012 from (68.171.231.82)

Posted by:

Bill M

NWC: i agree about Magna Carta, at least with respect to "Lord of the Ages". Main writer and wife still tour under the MC name; we saw them maybe three years ago. I think it is Calvin who I also a fan.

Sadavid: are you trying to say without saying that Yilady's taste is dweeby?


Entered at Mon Jun 25 18:43:43 CEST 2012 from (83.249.106.36)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: A Scotch, please!

One of my favourite groups in early innocent years was MAGNA CHARTA. They had one or two members from Scotland. Their sound was so mellow and soft that DONOVAN would sound like LORDI (European Song Contest winner) compared to them.


Entered at Mon Jun 25 18:14:21 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Bob Dylan's Greatest Hits

John D mentioned the new Audio Fidelity reissue of Dylan's Greatest Hits. What makes this new version unique is that it's sourced from the earliest surviving individual stereo mixes of each song, rather than the dub reels prepared for the original Columbia GH release.


Entered at Mon Jun 25 17:39:17 CEST 2012 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: every record sells a story

Dunc: a couple of years ago I was travelling on business; our hotel had a little 'take a book, leave a book' shelf in the lobby, so I picked up Ian Rankin's _Knots and Crosses_, read it and left it again. A decent read, and m'lady enjoys a detective story, so I stuffed her stocking with a paperback copy an xmas or two ago.

Created a monster: ever since, Amazon has been delivering the whole series to my house, in increments . . . .

I don't know if Rankin started the trend, but I've noticed in a lot of airport fiction lately, the author has to tell you what the protagonist is listening to. A lot of John Martyn and Rolling Stones, in Rebus's case -- both of whom / which I mean to explore further -- plus a lot of bands I've never heard of.

The device can be annoying when it's overdone (Rankin seems to overdo it as the series goes on and on) and it can backfire when the hero / heroine has a taste for the hackneyed / dweeby. M'lady has also been through most of John Sandford's Lucas Davenport books (which means I have as well, just 'cause I find it hard to let any book out of the house without reading it first). In one of those novels, the prot. is given an iPod or some such; the premise is that the player will hold 100 songs, so every so often there's a bit of dialogue about choosing this song over that one to end up with the "100 best rock songs." The eventual playlist is published as an appendix to the novel (see [My link]) -- I couldn't help thinking that any list so top-40-weighted was a cynical effort to play to the tastes of as big a set of readers as possible.


Entered at Mon Jun 25 15:09:25 CEST 2012 from (184.144.108.26)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

I admit it....Here's the song that I called out at the Bottom Line in NYC.....and Garland perfomed it!! (fast tempo version) Thank you Garland!!!! It was after this show that I had an invite to a jazz club where he had an after party. I took a close friend of Crabby's who I would hang with at other times as well who worked for ABKCO Music & Records, Inc.


Entered at Mon Jun 25 14:53:46 CEST 2012 from (184.144.108.26)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Garland Jeffreys:

6.29.12 FitzGerald’s 32nd Annual American Music Festival Chicago, IL
6.30.12 Roots & Rock Sessions Live From the Oval FREE OUTDOOR SHOW IN OUR OWN BACKYARD!! New York, NY
7.3.12 Free Music Tuesdays Ypres, Belgium
7.6.12 Montreux Jazz Festival w/ Rodrigo y Gabriela & BeBe Winans Montreux, Switzerland
7.7.12 HR1 Radio Frankfurt, Germany
7.15.12 Great South Bay Music Festival Patchogue, NY
8.3, 8.10 & 8.17.12 – Residency at Rodeo Bar New York, NY
8/25/12 Pink Pop Classic Landgra

Bruce Springsteen & Garland Jeffreys live @ Pinkpop 2012 - 96 Tears


Entered at Mon Jun 25 11:26:27 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: And so we finished Friday night....

...with a little jig and a bit of a laugh

:-0)

after 35 concerts I finally realise what Jon Landau meant


Entered at Mon Jun 25 09:25:06 CEST 2012 from (68.171.231.80)

Posted by:

Bill M

Nazareth took its name from "The Weight"? Nothing to do with the Nazz (Band link: Todd) or "The Nazz Are Blue". Or Wild Man Fisher.


Entered at Mon Jun 25 09:18:33 CEST 2012 from (92.18.162.8)

Posted by:

Solomon

Subject: Mike Scott

Dunc: I think you must also check out the Mike Scott song She Is So Beautiful from the same cd. Thanks for reminding me of that Bob F.


Entered at Mon Jun 25 03:09:28 CEST 2012 from (68.198.166.204)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Mike Scott

Dunc, are you familiar with the beautiful Mike Scott song 'Edinburgh Castle'? It's on his 'Bring 'Em All In' cd.


Entered at Sun Jun 24 23:12:56 CEST 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Nazareth

Shame on you Dunc! I would have figured everyone knew this. Play the album, "Hair of the Dog". Nazareth were huge on this coast. My wife at the time, (who I grew up with) played those gawd damn guys music constantly.


Entered at Sun Jun 24 21:38:58 CEST 2012 from (70.53.115.22)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Or Duncan, even. Thanks for the info, Dunc. By the way, I understand three more episodes of Case Histories have been scheduled. Catch the earlier three if you can, however. Other than the setting for the series, in and about Edinburgh, the music selections for the episodes (female country and western tracks seem to be the mainstay) are superb.


Entered at Sun Jun 24 21:16:02 CEST 2012 from (86.182.154.90)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Mike

I've never seen them, Mike, but I'm interested. Edinburgh is an interesting, beautiful city.

I would strongly recommend the Ian Rankin 'Rebus' boxed sets, also set in Edinburgh, when Rebus is played by Ken Stott of the national theatre. Great stuff. They are not expensive, now.

Rankin and his character, Rebus, are musicos like us. Indeed, I remember Peter being amazed at the Van Morrison song he chose for Desert Island Discs from 'Hard Nose The Highway'. I didn't say at the time, but it's an album I play regularly too.

What's in a name! You can't get more Scottish names than Robbie Robertson and Neil Young. It must be in the blood.


Entered at Sun Jun 24 20:58:01 CEST 2012 from (70.53.115.22)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: Teevee query

Apropos of nothing really, Dunc, but concerning mainly Scotland — and Edinburgh specifically — I wonder if you ever tuned into the BBC a year or so back to see any of the three episodes of "Case Histories," a detective series featuring a character named Jackson Brodie (played by Jason Isaacs)? I found the episodes, broadcast in the U.S. by PBS, quite compelling. We don't get too many police-type mysteries of this sort over here that are set in Scotland, so it was all fairly interesting.


Entered at Sun Jun 24 20:17:14 CEST 2012 from (86.182.154.90)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Never knew that, Solomon.

Church halls were big for pop up here in my youth. I did see AWB in a hall, but I can't remember if it was a church hall. I thought they started in Dundee with the three Dundonians and Alan Gorrie and never had a clue about Forever More. Church hall gigs, indeed any gigs, at that time had to stop at 11.45 on a Saturday in case the Sabbath was broken.

Also I feel we lost a lot of our best artistes to London at that time, probably because there was a gig every night without travelling.

I did see the Bay City Rollers(just wearing normal suits) and The Poets at dances at the local ballroom when they were learning their craft.


Entered at Sun Jun 24 19:20:44 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Nazareth

They also covered 'Java Blues.' They've been well-documented on their choice of name. It was a good choice, because until then they'd called themselves The Shadettes, which is pretty dreadful. They have also said in their early years it caused them problems with various churches, and weren't allowed to play in a few church halls because of the name.


Entered at Sun Jun 24 18:30:44 CEST 2012 from (92.18.184.75)

Posted by:

Solomon

Subject: Nazareth

Dunc : One thing your should know The Scottish rock group Nazareth got their name from this line "Went down to Nazareth, I was feeling about half past dead". I'm sure you know the song.


Entered at Sun Jun 24 17:31:33 CEST 2012 from (86.182.154.90)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

I have enjoyed recent posts.

I'll put in a shout for my made in New York 'Grado' headphones, which cost me £109. Really noticed a difference to what I had previously.

When I've been in other parts of Europe (and Toronto) the band I'm often asked about is Nazareth. And, sadly, I know nothing about them.

Last five albums played.

'Another Side of Bob Dylan'. Some great songs.

'No Little Boy' John Martyn. I love the 'Rock, Salt and Nails' duet with Levon. It was Bumbles who told me about Utah Phillips.

'Please Please Me' The Beatles. It was Bob W, I think, who said in a post that his favourite rock and roll song was 'I Saw Her standing There' and it's difficult to disagree.

'Revival' John Fogerty. John Fogerty was one of the best concerts I have ever seen.

'One More Shot' Danko, Fjeld, Andersen. I think this matches many post Band releases.


Entered at Sun Jun 24 16:25:01 CEST 2012 from (85.211.77.77)

Posted by:

Tim

Subject: Levon and the Hawks: From Bacon Fat to Judgement Day

Is there any news on a release date and/or content (e.g. track listing, packaging)?


Entered at Sun Jun 24 15:51:54 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Dylan in hi-fi

I mentioned this once or twice. A reviewer said that you can always tell when a musician has invested in expensive hi-fi, because their sound changes. He quoted Dylan, and said Nashville Skyline was the point where you could hear this in Dylan. Possibly … he would be talking about the backing mix, not the voice.Maybe he means the Anti-Phil Spector … treasuring distinguishing instruments (the trees) rather than appreciating the sound of the whole (the wood).

I can't really see that because it was always practice to mix on huge great monitor speakers, then check the mix on standard bookshelf speakers (AR18s in the UK), then check again on a mono car radio speaker.


Entered at Sun Jun 24 14:36:13 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Location: Hi-fi

It's like food, Graham. The best meals of your life weren't the most expensive, or the most skilfully cooked, but the ones with the best company in the right ambience when you were in a good mood.

Same with hi-fi. Perhaps one of the most sublime listening experiences of your life was (say) Music From Big Pink on a cruddy mono record player. I think of hearing Strawberry Field Forever previewed on a mono transistor radio at university round a communal formica table, or hearing Jonathan Richman's Roadrunner on a lousy mono Fiat 128 Rally car radio whizzing through Snowdonia in Wales in beautiful sunshine. I hear that now and momentarily I'm back there waiting for the DJ to tell me what it was, so I can get a copy.

So the ears fade (measurably from the age of seventeen, and inexorably), and you hope that getting better and better audio equipment will be the Viagara of music appreciation.

It doesn't make your life better, or make you twenty-one again, but it will bring more out of the music. It's the same with better cars, better TVs, blu-ray or whatever. The improvement IS measurable, but whether it makes you happier is up to you.


Entered at Sun Jun 24 06:30:04 CEST 2012 from (68.199.198.175)

Posted by:

John W.

Got a text this evening from a friend who was at the Iridium club, said Jim and Garth were fantastic playing Rag Mama Rag!


Entered at Sun Jun 24 05:47:59 CEST 2012 from (58.104.10.150)

Posted by:

Graham

I have never understood some people's enthusiasm for high quality sound. I listen to old blues stuff from the 1920s and 30s where you can barely hear them play. I would love it if they could improve the sound of those old recordings but anything from around the 1940s sounds good to me. I find enjoyment in the music rather than the sound quality. Still some people seem to get an incredible amount of enjoyment out of the technical side of things judging by the enthusiasm with which they speak about it.


Entered at Sun Jun 24 00:23:33 CEST 2012 from (68.171.231.82)

Posted by:

Bill M

Kevin J: your prayers are answered - Nazareth is booked to play Duncan BC's centennial on July 5!


Entered at Sat Jun 23 21:07:15 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: multiple CDs

It's the dream that there's some nuance you've missed which will come leaping out. I have 10 Big Pinks … 5 Cds, 4 LPs, one DVD-audio. The DVD audio really was different.


Entered at Sat Jun 23 17:27:48 CEST 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: JT / Bob Dylan

Just read your post and will figure equipment out. However I couldn't resist and ordered the CD from Amazon.ca With shipping, tax etc it came to a total of $40.00 I believe it's too much money; but I did it anyway.


Entered at Sat Jun 23 15:57:58 CEST 2012 from (124.168.55.83)

Posted by:

dlew919

Web: My link

Subject: RIP Uriah Heep Producer Jerry Bron

I like, btw, Jan, that Levon's terminal date is covered. (Not deliberate, of course, but in a sense, he still lives.


Entered at Sat Jun 23 15:40:24 CEST 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Old ears and headphones

Especially 'old ears' like mine. Headphones seem to optimize the listening experience for me.


Entered at Sat Jun 23 15:38:07 CEST 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Audio Fidelity

John D: I have too many copies of cds purchased to try to improve the listening experience. This is especially true for Dylan and the Band when possible. What kind of equipment is needed to truly 'hear the difference'. I know the speakers count for a lot. But what is recommended to optimize the listening experience and get the most out of a production like this one? I've never been convinced that I can improve on some of the productions I already have. Will this one improve on other previous cds? John and others: What sound equipment do you have (current or old) that is reasonable and makes the listening experience outstanding? Can the human ear discern the differences outside of a specially built listening room in an electronics higher end stereo store?


Entered at Sat Jun 23 15:22:25 CEST 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Bob Dylan / Audio Fidelity

I'm sure David P already knows this; but Bob Dylan's Greatest Hits will arrive from Audio Fidelity on July 3. I would love to see Greatest Hits Volume 2 and Blood On The Tracks do the same. Like David, I really like what Audio Fidelity does.

However it asks the same old question. How many copies of the same CD does one need?


Entered at Fri Jun 22 23:27:24 CEST 2012 from (85.255.44.135)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Just as we laid down this rose (link above), Muddy turned up at his master´s grave with the guy who rebuilt the Barn. A moment to remember. Afterwards we went up to the Buddhist monastery on Overlook Mountain, lighting a candle for Levon and reading some of the memorial cards from family and friends in the shrine.


Entered at Fri Jun 22 21:24:57 CEST 2012 from (217.5.150.254)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Subject: Pacific Ocean Blue by Dennis Wilson

That album is a favorite of mine. It's a shame Dennis' life had to be cut short as it was, and a shame material this good could not have been the driving force behind the Beach Boys during that late 70's era.


Entered at Fri Jun 22 21:17:07 CEST 2012 from (70.114.168.78)

Posted by:

Crazy Chester

Location: Austin, TX

I'm with you Joan ... sometimes there is just no other way to acquire something - and if there were a way to make sure the artist sees some profit from it, I would, but the fact that we often can't do this is hardly our fault.


Entered at Fri Jun 22 20:00:45 CEST 2012 from (108.54.247.103)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Bootlegs

I'm one of those people who prefer to have the actual CD in hand. I'm not that fond of downloads. I have bought a lot of music over the years. I have bought some bootlegs when there is no way to get the material "honestly". I wish I could have a system to be sure the artists get their "props" for this material, but I don't know how.


Entered at Fri Jun 22 19:24:33 CEST 2012 from (70.50.65.228)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: Woodrow Call and not tolerating certain things........au revoir

…..You’re welcome Joe…………..said sarcastically………………


Entered at Fri Jun 22 18:56:23 CEST 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Dennis Wilson

Let's just say glenn that "Cuddle Up" by Dennis Wilson is one of my wife's favorites tracks of all time.


Entered at Fri Jun 22 18:40:16 CEST 2012 from (108.82.188.117)

Posted by:

glenn t

Subject: pacific ocean blue

I meant to post this during the Beach Boys discussion...what are GBers thoughts on the Dennis Wilson solo stuff? They recently released his Pacific Ocean Blue with lots of extra tracks from his 2nd unreleased album Bambu. What about the Carl Wilson solo lps...any thoughts?


Entered at Fri Jun 22 15:12:28 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

iTunes pays me through CdBaby.CdBaby takes 9%.Depending on which iTunes it is, i get between 63 cents and a $1.04.Europe pays higher thsan Canada,Canada pays higher than US. etc.

If someone is independent, this matters a lot to them, as Peter says, it is more thasn they'd get for a particular cut or a whole album thna label would pay them. but if they are on a label, then it doesn't make a difference, they still get less, just less of less.Everything is less, many people buy one track, rather than a whole recording.

streaming- internet streaming is a huge loss to any artist.

There is no way that digital distribution has been a boon to any legitimate artist , label, or producer.

The devil is digital.


Entered at Fri Jun 22 10:18:40 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I go to Record Fairs in search of vinyl, and there are far fewer bootlegs these days. Those that are left are dusty, and still there at the next fair a month later, so I doubt that the odd bootleg materially damages The Band, and there were never more than one or two. I haven’t seen any for years. Tons of recent Dylan, but like the Grateful Dead he doesn’t seem bothered. I guess he makes enough on the concert price and the quantity of live bootlegs keeps the devoted happy. What really does hurt is illegal downloads.

The legal stuff? I don’t know iTunes rates, but if they’re anything like eBooks, an iTunes download sale will be considerably more profitable to the artist than a conventional sale with the merchant and label cut. I assume iTunes is the best model for the future.

Secondhand books and records. No, the artist isn’t paid and never has been. Authors retain a love of secondhand book shops, and vinyl dealers say rock musicians are some of their best customers. I guess everyone tolerates secondhand.

As for YouTube there are tales of people who’ve published such popular video clips that they’ve been approached by advertisers and paid, often lots. But I think that’s more the original concept of YouTube of funny home clips which go mega. Most stuff that goes on YouTube no one will ever get paid for. Artists place stuff there for publicity. We’re going to do the same with ELT video. What I don’t like about YouTube is they allow obvious copyright theft stuff to go up, then even if you’re registered with them, it takes them weeks to react to a take down notice, bu which time it’s too late. I loathe the people behind YouTube, but the genii is well and truly out of the bottle now, and I find myself using it for reference in doing my book on vinyl. If I want to hear an obscure 1959 track (which I have), it’s quicker to pull it up on YouTube than it is to find the single among the many here.


Entered at Fri Jun 22 07:31:14 CEST 2012 from (126.68.109.111)

Posted by:

joe j

Kamakura was delightful. After we did the obligatory shrines/temples I had a relaxing hour sipping ice cold sake in a sidewalk cafe just people watching while the women did their inevitable shopping. I've hit a couple music stores so far but nothing special to report.

Fred, you call this rain? I'm from Newfoundland where rain is COLD. This is what we call angel piss.


Entered at Fri Jun 22 06:48:15 CEST 2012 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Joe J: glad you're having a good time. Pity about the weather, though. F*"#*$ing rain!! : )


Entered at Fri Jun 22 03:53:29 CEST 2012 from (184.66.96.46)

Posted by:

BONK

Location: SaltSpring Island/Cabbagetown

Subject: Peter V and Maud.

Like Peter, I've paid for everything I own. Everything! But now I have some questions. When I go to Itunes and pay $1.49 for a song, does the Artist get a piece of this? If so, how much? When I check out a tune on YouTube does the artist get a piece of this after so many hits? When I go into a second hand record store and pay $20.00 for some long lost album or CD does the owner make sure that a cut goes back to the Artist? This might sound gullible but I've really never given it much thought. And I'm sure a lot of others haven't either. I was recently at a Blues Workshop here on the West Coast and a friend and myself did a tribute to Levon by covering one of the Band songs. It was an OK job but now it's made it's way to YouTube and has about 70 hits. Is this wrong? I know that Artists have been ripped off for years and it has caused many of them great hardship. But how do we fix it? Feeling perplexed and a little guilty about the whole situation. Respect, Carl.


Entered at Fri Jun 22 02:54:22 CEST 2012 from (74.198.9.140)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Bravo Landmark.............and I do know about the Dow story as I knew the Dawes family that owned the brewery..........not a pretty thing to happen at all.

As Jacques Villeneuve said recently......."thiis is a generation of kids whose parents have never said No"........So of course they expect everything for free.............Jazz clubs in town pay musicians less today than they did 25 years ago.......the most talented musicians in this city are having an increasingly difficult time even filling a full schedule for Music lessons.........Why pay the thinking goes.............The great point in the Maud attachment.......is that the Free Download generation that is sitting in to fight the 1% is killing the very people that made their parents feel good enough to conceive them in the first place. St. Peter won't be asking whether you liked the Christmas album.....but rather whether you paid for it or not.....


Entered at Fri Jun 22 01:41:55 CEST 2012 from (96.20.158.81)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

Trust me that I haven't looked at this album cover in over 35 years so my recollection may be a bit off. As well, there is no cheating on my part. Alors:

"She was waiting for her sister at the station in Torino, but you know I love you baby, but it's getting too hard to laugh". Voila mon ami. And I was never an O'Keefe drinker nor a Dow man. Look that last one up. It's legendary for all the wrong reasons.


Entered at Fri Jun 22 01:25:44 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I agree absolutely on bootlegs and downloads, Maud. Unlike the person on the blog linked with 11,000 songs who paid for 15 CDs, , I have every official Band / Band member single, LP, CD, video and DVD, and I paid full price for every one of them … except two sent me for review, and I duly got reviews in Record Collector. At a personal level as a creator of videos / DVDs we have been hit just as hard as musicians, and have virtually been driven out of business. As some may remember, when we had Little Pink going we would't even allow links to YouTube. Now you can't fight it, though YouTube are the biggest copyright violators in the world by a mile. It's hard because some stuff (e.g. Rumer) is placed by the artist for publicity. Other stuff, where you just get a photo of a 45 disc and the audio track is straight violation. I link to stuff which I think is probably approved, but you never know. If it's pre-1962 it has no European copyright anyway. I think that's wrong, but it is the position.

My remark about Japan was flippant, so excuse that … there used to be shops there with arrays of bootlegs in dark corridors way up in office blocks. I was going round fifteen years ago with an obsessive Ray Charles collector and got to see some of them. I counted over 100 Led Zep bootlegs in one. The Band never got attacked at remotely near that level. But I couldn't resist a couple of things. Much of the stuff circulating is crap. People record bits on mobile phones and put them on YouTube.

There is a difference between unreleased stuff that people only acquire after they've bought everything officially available and straight pirates. But musicians and video producers are between a rock and a hard place. The most frequent request we get on our video website is "where can I can get a free download of this?' That's the attitude. In fact Simone Felice has allegedly approved free downloads of two live shows from Bush House, London (2011, 2012) and that's a modern move. Sell some, give some away too. It's a conundrum, but artists and copyright owners have to seek out some way of making a living in a digital age. How ,I don't know!


Entered at Fri Jun 22 01:25:27 CEST 2012 from (124.168.55.83)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Location: Northwest coaster

At the early gates the question will be: 'have you bought Dylan's. Xmas album?'

'yes, st Peter'

'come in my child, you've already been to hell...'

Joking, joking...


Entered at Fri Jun 22 01:15:56 CEST 2012 from (58.104.5.43)

Posted by:

Graham

In Australia an ITunes song is $2.19. In the US the same song is $1.29. Who is getting ripped off?


Entered at Fri Jun 22 00:50:36 CEST 2012 from (24.168.45.86)

Posted by:

Sister Maud Hudson

Web: My link

Subject: bootlegs, free downloads, then no artist!

Artists don't really want you to feel guilty for not caring about paying for their works. Having a mob approval is a fascinating psychological study, but it's old now and kills artists literally. Free ... free ... FREE ... Free!!!! What fun everyone has been having with bootlegs for so long now there is rarely any connection I see here that encourages support for anyone in The Band other than something spectacular or free or old or glamourous (oh yea I said spectacular). Hopefully the few of you who are boasting about bootlegs come to terms before your last day because everyone in The Band has been generous and loving to their fans. Those free downloads and bootlegs kill. I hope you can hear me. Richard, Rick, Vic Chestnutt, John Herald, and don't forget it affects the families, children, friends. PLEASE click on web link to see a blog if you care about the subject at all ... and I hope I didn't spoil the party. Sending love to you. Thank you Jan for keeping this forum going ... and all these wonderful archives. You are magnificent! ...smh


Entered at Fri Jun 22 00:49:29 CEST 2012 from (70.50.65.228)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

.....Has anyone knocked them? Everyone has bands or songs that meant something to them at that special time in life where basement parties and getting just that one dance with a girl meant everything........"This Flight Tonight" and "Love Hurts" are in no need of defence - just praise - they both still sound great.........besides Landmark was too busy avoiding O'keefe bottles and trying to figure out the real title to Shawn Phillips's "Women"...


Entered at Fri Jun 22 00:04:37 CEST 2012 from (206.18.100.1)

Posted by:

Calvin

Im expecting someone to rush to the defense of Nazareth, If the past 12 years have taught me anything its that there isnt a single musical act I can think of who doesnt have a champion and die hard fan-and frequently they pop up in the GB.


Entered at Thu Jun 21 23:43:19 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Vinyl Siding

Peter: Surf's Up will have to wait, as I'm too busy playing MoFi's stunning new LP reissue of "Music From Big Pink" and an original Argo 45 single of Clarence "Frogman" Henry's cover of "You Always Hurt The One You Love" b/w "Little Suzy" (written by Robert Guidry a/k/a Bobby Charles).


Entered at Thu Jun 21 23:38:30 CEST 2012 from (70.28.32.74)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

Proud to say that being a male Canuckistani of a certain vintage, I have never owned a Nazareth album and lord knows, I've owned some questionable, perhaps dodgy albums in my time. I did own the Shawn Phillips one though.

"Holland" is still a favourite. Special mention to the song "Leaving This Town". Somewhat akin to "Feel Flows", another fave of mine.


Entered at Thu Jun 21 22:22:15 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

David, dig out that Surf's Up … the delights go beyond just the Brian tracks. Remind yourself. But Holland is also a stunning album.


Entered at Thu Jun 21 22:20:27 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

There are some very interesting record stores in Japan. Like take the elevator to the 17th floor, walk along to the 9th door on the right, knock three times … that's how I got certain Band bootlegs.


Entered at Thu Jun 21 20:38:28 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Peter: I do have an old LP copy of "Surf's Up" stored with the records I really don't listen to anymore. Just not one on my essential list, as I never was a hard-core fan of the group after Brian stepped out of the picture. I also have several different LP versions of "Pet Sounds", which I do play often. Come to think of it, I also have a copy of the DVD-audio/hi-res version of that album.


Entered at Thu Jun 21 20:26:59 CEST 2012 from (70.50.65.228)

Posted by:

Kevin J

NorthWestCoaster: Very funny and true……not the best word choice to precede Christmas! What was Bob F floating about 3 take-backs each a year….I have two left……

Joe J: You seem to have made a base close to Tokyo…….so a travel suggestion that may be of value………..Some years back I was in Tokyo and had two days free….I had seen most of the city and after checking things out realized that the logistics and cost realities of getting to Kyoto for just a day didn’t work………………………so, a lady at the hotel suggested a day trip to a place called Kamakura……..only an hour or two by train if memory serves and a lovely little town for a visit……What made it really special and the reason I would suggest going is the Buddha that is there…….Most Buddha’s in Asia are on mountain tops and many are highly impressive ( Hong Kong and Indonesia, etc. ) but the Buddha in Kamakura is the one that made the biggest impression on me…..you have to walk through a bit of a tree maze before getting to it and it actually sits at the foot of a hill rather than being on top………..one of those magical travel experiences that usually result from having no idea where you are going before getting there…………also remember having a few drinks in town watching people walking past eating roasted sweet potatoes like they were ice-cream cones…………………..Did get to Kyoto years later and while great in its own way……my fondest memory of Japan was that day in Kamakura…………………….Also as I am sure Fred has pointed out, if anything like they were years back the record shops in Japan are the best in the world……..staggering collections of all works by the popular and obscure………………By the way, David and Peter are both banned from entering the shops though on fears they might buy up the entire record supply of the country…..

Bill M: The Nazareth Greatest Hits album was in just about every record collection of just about every Canadian male that came of age in the mid 1970’s....................Shawn Phillips “2nd Contribution” was in almost every Montreal household during that same period……Long way from Texas but they loved him there.


Entered at Thu Jun 21 19:32:42 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Surf's Up

David P! I cannot believe you don't have a copy of "Surf's Up" LP. "No "Holland" is a surprise, but no "Surf's Up" is astonishing. That really is one of the twenty essential records.


Entered at Thu Jun 21 19:32:31 CEST 2012 from (64.105.104.78)

Posted by:

Pat B

Hit 130 mph in a '71 Covette (454) on the highway just north of Janesville WI, going northwest. Other than a bullet train in Shanghai, that might be my top speed on the ground.


Entered at Thu Jun 21 18:53:12 CEST 2012 from (83.249.106.36)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: The horrific (?) Christmas album / Kevin

Son, prepare yourself for Saint Peter's question at the Pearly Gate: "Have you purchased Dylan's Christmas album?"

BTW PETER. On Saturday a salut will be fired a few miles south of Hamlet's castle to celebrate the restoration of a cannon from the 19th century. It helped to scare Englishmen away from these waters. I'll be there but I'll celebrate THE BAND GB as a peace project instead :-)


Entered at Thu Jun 21 17:47:47 CEST 2012 from (72.255.72.102)

Posted by:

John L

Location: Kentucky

Subject: Visited Woodstock

For many years I planned to go to Woodstock. Unfortunately I waited and waited. My goal was see a Midnight Ramble and soak up some time in a historical music location. I waited to long and did not get see one of my muscial hero's (Levon Helm) before he passed. I recently stopped in Woodstock. I saw my hero's grave site, Bearsville Theatre (saw the Vanderbuilts) and met a lot of wonderful people. I will return to Woodstock and spend more time in this musical heaven. Thanks you to everyone who made my 48 hour visit a memorable one.


Entered at Thu Jun 21 17:10:10 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Endless Summer

Talk of the Beach Boys in recent days seems quite appropriate, as yesterday was the summer solstice. While my collection of Beach Boys recordings is not in the least bit extensive, it does include what I think is the most essential material. At the top of the list are the DCC gold CD reissues (out-of-print) of Pet Sounds and the two compilations, Endless Summer and Spirit of America. On vinyl I also have the recent 2-LP set of the SMiLE sessions. Hats off to EMI/Capitol for doing a great job in releasing this material after all these years.

The Endless Summer is of course the title of Bruce Brown's classic 1964 film about chasing the summer sun around the world surfing, with a fine soundtrack by The Sandals. The 35mm theatre print was shown to larger audiences two years later, as Dylan & The Hawks were touring the world with their motel tans.

And another classic tune for the soundtrack of summer is Jack Nitzsche's instrumental "The Lonely Surfer", a minor hit in 1963 with its reverb drenched guitar, seemingly wet with ocean spray (link above). Not long ago I picked up the original Reprise mono 45 single.


Entered at Thu Jun 21 15:30:48 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Corvettes

My dream is also a pre-62 Corvette, John. There's a point where Chevrolet switched from drum brakes to disc brakes, and the ones with discs are more valued, I was told, because the drums can't actually stop the cars. Talking to people at that show, they'd go to the USA, find one and ship it back and sell it, paying for the trip. Shipping this way is cheaper than the other way. Anyway, the key was to remove the radio and carry it as hand luggage, because so many originals, which match the dashboard, were taken out and replaced with eight-tracks. Therefore the radios command a premium price to restore the cars to original looks (with hidden CD or I guess now it would be iPod). So they got stolen on the ships. I was very tempted by one that had been converted to right hand drive, but was told that rendered the car without value (none were produced), and also unless done perfectly, dangerous. You'd go a year without seeing a Corvette in the UK, so seeing 120 or more in a field was exciting.


Entered at Thu Jun 21 14:22:49 CEST 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: 8 Track

In 1970 I was single, carefree and bought one of the first 6 240Z Datsun's to arrive in Canada. Back then you could pick up a MGB for about $2800.00. Mine cost &4200.00 taxes in. My friends thought I had lost my mind

My music player of choice was an 8 track. Loved that sound. Wasn't fun; when a track would stop and pause till it jumped to the next channel. Kromer Radio said I should go cassette. Not for me. Loved that 8 track sound inside that 240Z. Got married and my wife told me it wasn't practical. Would love the money to own a 1960-62 Corvette today. Dreams.


Entered at Thu Jun 21 12:56:19 CEST 2012 from (24.252.147.174)

Posted by:

Calvin

Im going to guess around 1981 owned a 76 Nova with an 8 track player, it didnt come with any 8 tracks, but I did find a human tooth under the seat. Even by then there was only one record store in the area that still carried 8 tracks, and I went up and purchased the Last Waltz, No Nukes and Queen's Night At The Opera.


Entered at Thu Jun 21 12:31:06 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: 8-track

8 track was a dud format here, but some years ago I went to a Corvette rally. Several classics for sale, and the cleverest sales pitch was having the Beach Boys hits playing on what looked like an eight track. My companion (who knew a lot about restoring cars) said he reckoned the 8 track was show and there was a CD player hidden somewhere. There's a place near here that specialised in putting CD players hidden in classic cars, but wiring them to be switched on and off and volume controlled by the original radio controls.


Entered at Thu Jun 21 09:28:39 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Beach Boys new album

Funny, I checked back on reviews of the new album. The Word dismissed it as “ireedemably cheesey”, but Mojo didn’t review it in the July issue, in spite of devoting the June issue to the reunion and the 50 Greatest Beach Boys Songs. It was the weekend newspaper reviewers that went for two stars. Barney Hoskyns in the June issue was ecstatic about the song That’s Why God Made the Radio:

Barney Hoskyns says: “There are chord changes in it so beautiful, and so un-obvious that you instantly know (Brian) has still got that gift for pulling beauty out of the ether which almost no one else in the formal pop tradition has equalled.”

Barney knows about bands where there are feuds, and one guy, the lead singer, works hard keeping the live band going and playing, and another genius behind the scenes is most reluctant to perform in public.

The Fifty Greatest Beach Boy Songs issue of Mojo has the “newest” as Sail On Sailor, which is forty years old. Nothing in four decades? It’s probably about right, though I can think of a few solo Brian Wilson. I would have had Marcella in there, which Mojo didn’t.

They say the reunion is genuinely loving and harmonious, though it’s not really a reunion without Carl and Dennis, and while David Who? impresses, it’s a bit like having Pete Best in a reformed Beatles.

Blondie Chaplin gave a revealing short interview in the Mojo issue… he quit after one of Mike Love’s brothers viciously assaulted him. He was called on stage and sang once with them twenty years later and says “Carl was happy to see me … the others, I don’t know.” The puzzle of Mike Love is (a) the name (b) the constant harping on about peace and love from someone who appears to be bristling with aggression, though he says “I’m competitive.”

Having said that, the reunion is built around Brian’s amazing band, and when they did the Beach Boys hits in Brian Wilson solo shows, Brian had to sing too many leads, and his voice can be strained and a bit quavery on them. You do expect to hear Mike Love leads, which you get now, but you also expect Carl leads, which you can’t.

There is a difference in British and American perceptions. Al Jardine says bitterly “Capitol were so behind Pet Sounds that they released Best of The Beach Boys two months later.” In the UK, Pet Sounds was their biggest album. And in contrast to Mike Love’s rant against ‘the mop-tops’, Paul McCartney still maintains that God Only Knows is the best pop song ever. The early Beach Boys stuff was submerged by Beatlemania, which started here in late 62, not 64. The Beach Boys first Top Ten hit in the UK was I Get Around, then they had a great run … Barbara Ann, Sloop John B, God Only Knows, Good Vibrations, Then I Kissed Her, Heroes and Villains were all top ten, mostly top three. So they ascended in the UK as the Beatles ascended in the USA.

I wouldn’t be a rock snob if I didn’t boast that I bought both Surfin’ Safari and Surfin USA on initial release, to the surprise of all my pals (except one, who formed one of the very rare British surf bands).


Entered at Thu Jun 21 08:17:13 CEST 2012 from (126.68.109.111)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: Ahhh Nazareth

Greetings from Japan where I'm recovering nicely from a bug I may have picked up in Nikko.

Many years ago I bought an old Dodge Dart for a summer job (Steve & I had quite the interesting discussion about the reverse thread lug nuts). Car came complete with an 8-tack and a dozen tapes. The only ones I could bear to listen to were the greatest hits of Nazareth & Jim Croce so we played them over and over. "This Flight Tonight" was my favourite and at the time I thought it was a Nazareth original.

At the end of the summer when we made it back to 'civilization' I bought a new Stevie Wonder tape. It immediately tangled and that was the end of my 8-track experience. The Dart though was a survivor. I sold it for what I paid for it, a couple hundred, and it was around for several other owners.

I've never felt the need to buy any other music by Nazareth or Croce but any time I hear one of those songs on oldies radio it all comes back and I'll howl along.

BTW thanks for the tips Fred. We're doing great and I've never eaten better.


Entered at Thu Jun 21 05:46:29 CEST 2012 from (68.171.231.81)

Posted by:

Bill M

Kevin J: I too like those two Nazareth tracks, though my favourite memory relating to either is a classmate at the time asking, in reference to "Love Hurts", "Is that the one where the guy sound like he's got a pickle up his ass?" The answer is of course yes. ,


Entered at Thu Jun 21 02:33:09 CEST 2012 from (206.18.100.1)

Posted by:

Calvin

A Bit surprised in hearing you says the Beach Boys album is getting bad reviews on your side of the pond Peter. I havent read a bad review of the album yet over here. In fact I keep reading about it being the best album in 35-40 years and that sort of thing. And that little mini song sequence of Brian's is getting rave reviews. Of course here in the States its probably our natural incliantion to be kinder to our boys of summer.

Ive seen then once, Im guessing about 1983, on a double bill with Chicago. It was at a 20,000 people ampitheater which is mostly lawn seats. And while I had a bit to drink I distinctly remember being in a bunny hop line about 200-250 people long


Entered at Wed Jun 20 22:05:59 CEST 2012 from (70.50.65.228)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

LINK: A CBS piece on Beach Boys tour.


Entered at Wed Jun 20 21:22:41 CEST 2012 from (64.105.104.78)

Posted by:

Pat B

This tour is certainly being handled by Brian's people. The staging is quite brilliant with none of the corny stuff that accompanied the Mike Love summer BB tours of the past. Surprising emphasis on David Marks.

I believe the most underrated BB album is Summer Days and Summer Nights. I take that over Pet Sounds anyday, but then I'd take Rubber Soul/Revolver/MMT over Pepper's.


Entered at Wed Jun 20 20:37:15 CEST 2012 from (217.5.150.254)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Which makes the new Beach Boys album all the more satisfying for me that it exists as it does. This is possibly the first album since the SMiLE period that Brian not only is involved with as the producer and primary songwriter, but seems for the first time since to actually be the initiator of the creative process since then. He seemed a very reluctant participant dragged out to please the fans back in the mid-70s. This time, SMiLE is no longer a myth but a realized accomplishment both solo and as the recently released SMiLE sessions by the Beach Boys. I think Brian finally got to come back in triumph, under his own terms and for his own motivations. Mike gets to take his rightful place; the lead singer for the car song oldies.


Entered at Wed Jun 20 18:50:46 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Elton did it with humour (assuming the bleep was Thank fuck …) and Dylan did it with dignity, and brought out the irony too. But what a total arsehole Mike Love is. Always suspected so. That video confirmed it. He must know with his reference to "mop tops" that if Paul were on a show with them, Paul would be headlining. The Stones would be second, and they'd be arguing with Billy Joel for third spot.


Entered at Wed Jun 20 18:39:46 CEST 2012 from (70.50.65.228)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

LINK above is the infamous Rock n Roll Hall of Fame ceremony where Mike Love challenged other rockers to just try and match the BB's live........Bob Dylan, as always, found just the right words to confront such nonsense......also part of link.....


Entered at Wed Jun 20 17:59:16 CEST 2012 from (217.5.150.254)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Subject: Beach Boys lyrics

Agreed that there are some very bad lyrics on That's Why God Made the Radio. That's always been a Beach Boys liability when not working with a great collaborator like Tony Asher or Van Dyke Parks. All Summer Long, a great early BB song, also is trite in retrospect but at the time it came out the themes it expresses were yet to be run into the ground for 50 years. I'll give them a pass then; it's what they do and can't expect them to change at this stage of the game. Were John Lennon still alive we may be getting 'Imagining Peace and Love, let's protest again, so just Gimme Some Truth, I gave it my all, I still bury Paul!'.


Entered at Wed Jun 20 17:50:39 CEST 2012 from (70.50.65.228)

Posted by:

Kevin J

I was about to slam just the thought of anyone wanting to see the Beach Boys based on my feelings about Mike Love…….but reading the review in the Toronto Star today and Jon’s note that the show in New York was also outstanding….this has to rank as one of the more pleasant musical surprises in years…………45-48 songs a night is staggering( Bob Dylan in comparison has been doing 14-16 songs per show for years now )…….Money has been mentioned as a barrier a few times………just how much are tickets for this tour?

A recommendation for those here that enjoy comedy……….I rented a dvd a while back called “Bill Hicks – An American Story”……..by way of clumsy comparison to music…….if most stand-up comics working today are Bon Jovi or worse…. Then the late Bill Hicks was The Band………………….A brilliant guy and as good as stand-up ever was. Rent it….you will thank me later.

Bob F: Yes…….always in fun………truth is I had stopped listening to Joni with both ears in the 1980’s and was in a friend’s Jeep oversees at some point late 90’s and she had “Turbulent Indigo” on and I was stunned at how good it was………..so the “ten off the top of my head” were indeed from 30 years ago but I have liked some more recent songs as well…………………..Thinking about this a bit further though……… Bob Dylan is the ONLY artist in the business that I have consistently purchased everything they release….( the horrific Christmas album and Live with Dead being exceptions ) and the greatest testament to his career might be that in terms of listening patterns….the most played Dylan releases by me over the last many years would be……’Together Through Life”…..”Love and Theft”…..’Street Legal”…….”Infidels”……and .’Tell Tale Signs”….Other than a few individual beauties on my IPOD like “Visions of Johanna”, I rarely listen to any of the 1960’s Dylan.


Entered at Wed Jun 20 17:46:21 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: California Girls

In the late 80s I took all three kids to see The Beach Boys. Couldn’t afford just myself on this tour! Anyway, my youngest, then 6 or 7, loved the Beach Boys hits. He was very excited, sat numbly through the support set (someone like Mac Davis) and promptly keeled over and went to sleep the second they started and could not be woken. He finally woke during the encores, watched one song, and said “Is that all they’re doing?” The cheesy bit was California Girls where a bevy of bikini-clad beauties shimmied on stage. By then, late 80s, that really wasn’t cool, and Mike Love was bent double with back problems, which made the leering comments about cheerleaders (yes, he’s been running those for 25 odd years) seem particularly out of place. But they were very good indeed.


Entered at Wed Jun 20 17:18:34 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: 1970 Beach Boys

Mike Love said the new one is most like "Sunflower." That has Add Some Music To Your Day, and one of my favourites, Cool Cool Water. I thought it sounded earlier than that.


Entered at Wed Jun 20 17:12:53 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Big Pink

A British inner sleeve from 1968 is plain white, has a plastic liner, and says PLASTIC BAGS CAN BE DANGEROUS. It doesn't say EMI or Capitol. I guess it's an "any EMI late 60s inner sleeve." For the nitpicker, you just avoid a CBS-ROCK MACHINE TURNS YOU ON inner because it obviously didn't live on the record when it was issued.

A friend showed me her black and gold Parlophone "Please Please Me" signed in her presence by all four Beatles. More interesting because George signed on the back, Paul wrote "On the front, George!" George wrote "Sorry" and then signed on the front too. It's a bit worn and dull, but what detracts from value is indeed an orange and black CBS 1969 Rock Machine inner sleeve. As I said, just check charity shops and find any EMI 1962 album with an EMI inner sleeve at 50p and switch it. It could be on anything. They only had one EMI style.


Entered at Wed Jun 20 17:12:40 CEST 2012 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

mike h

Web: My link

Summer time!


Entered at Wed Jun 20 17:05:40 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Beach Boys

All the songs sound great melodically, vocally and instrumentally, no problem. It's only the lyrics that grate a bit … but maybe they always did. I'd recommend it.

Al, I got Mrs V started on willy warmers, but she kept running out of wool. Last night … exactly as expected from Roy Hodgson. Grinding out a mildly lucky 1-0 win, forming a very hard to beat team, but not much fun to watch. Still Steve Gerrard had a brilliant night,


Entered at Wed Jun 20 16:55:14 CEST 2012 from (217.5.150.254)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Subject: That's Why God Made The Radio

Unfortunately I will probably miss the tour due to the $$$, but the new album, which I decided to get out of morbid curiosity, is amazingly good, especially considering how bad it could have been. Yes, it's got 2 or 3 obligatory Mike Love sun and fun songs, but they are tolerable filler when packaged with the Brian Wilson material. His final 4-song suite is worthy to be included with his best work, and very poignant. It's obvious that Brian WANTED to do this album as opposed to being dragged out and put on display as he was with the 'Brian is Back!' B.S. of the mid to late 70's. Like anything, it can be picked apart and nit-picked to death, but getting new music that is actually relevant and worth listening to with full attention again from a Brian-run Beach Boys is a gift to be savored.


Entered at Wed Jun 20 16:37:28 CEST 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Holland Beachboys

Jon: "Holland" by the Beachboys. My absolute favourite. There is a live album which followed it soon after with some of the songs from this album and other 'hits'.


Entered at Wed Jun 20 16:34:43 CEST 2012 from (208.120.213.56)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

Beach Boys -- I saw them at NY's Beacon Theater when they came through town last month. Outstanding show, a solid three hours and IMO nary a dull moment. Terrific setlist -- all the 60s hits of course, but a number of rare chestnuts and covers as well (hence why it ballooned to 45 songs I guess), and a nice mix of the fun/poppy stuff with more soulful ballads. One of the highlights for me was Add Some Music To Your Day, performed with Brian at the piano and the others clustered around him singing harmony (see Youtube). All the original members were in fine voice, though Brian did seem tired out by the end... it must be a grueling tour and I hope it's not taking a toll on him.

Since the show I've been flirting with picking up some of the BB's more obscure late 60s/early 70s albums. Any recommends?


Entered at Wed Jun 20 16:17:33 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Knitware

Nah - those days long gone Pete along with all those dear aunties who knitted them.

Just left with the willy warmers now.

:-0)


Entered at Wed Jun 20 15:51:24 CEST 2012 from (62.140.137.87)

Posted by:

Hilda F

Location: The Low Countries

Subject: Sleeve MFBP

A few days ago there were some posts about the gatefold sleeve... I got curious and dug my copy that I bought in 1968 out of the box I keep it in....it turns out mine has a gatefold sleeve with a circular little emblem that says ' PRINTED IN USA' but the disc itself was manufactured in Holland by licence.....how weird is that then....But what is the inner sleeve supposed to look like...because in the course of time it wound up with a CBS one.... Can anyone tell me?


Entered at Wed Jun 20 15:22:44 CEST 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Never Ending Tour

It is very interesting to note the cities where Bob Dylan and His Band (I include his Band because they are a critical element of his performances...all excellent musicians..more than ever these days especially) will appear in August 2012. These are in many cases places where Dylan and His Band have never appeared. It is an opportunity for many who have never heard Dylan. Management with Dylan have thought this out effectively. I hope the docs at the Mayo Clinic appreciate their opportunity.


Entered at Wed Jun 20 14:03:52 CEST 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Beachboys in Toronto 19.6.12

As I read it on line, Mike Love apparently said (after about 6 songs)...'Its time for an intermission followed by a nap' and later said "I'd watch more hockey if there were cheerleaders which lead into "Be True To Your School" .SET LIST: Do It Again Little Honda Catch a Wave Hawaii Don’t Back Down Surfin’ Safari Surfer Girl Wendy Marcella Then I Kissed Her Kiss Me, Baby Getcha Back Why Do Fools Fall in Love When I Grow Up (to Be a Man) Darlin’ Disney Girls Please Let Me Wonder Isn’t It Time It’s OK California Saga: California Cotton Fields Be True to Your School Don’t Worry Baby Little Deuce Coupe 409 Shut Down I Get Around INTERMISSION Add Some Music to Your Day Heroes and Villains Sloop John B Wouldn’t It Be Nice I Just Wasn’t Made for These Times Sail on, Sailor All This Is That That’s Why God Made the Radio In My Room Forever God Only Knows Good Vibrations California Girls All Summer Long Help Me, Rhonda Rock and Roll Music Do You Wanna Dance? Surfin’ USA ENCORE: Kokomo Barbara Ann Fun, Fun, Fun


Entered at Wed Jun 20 13:16:12 CEST 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Beach Boys

They did a 2 and a half hour show last night here in Toronto. Sweltering heat and a very short downpour. First concert of any kind; in my life that I missed because of price. According to the Toronto Star, Mike Love (who is the oldest Beach Boy, 71) at intermission said it was time to take a nap.


Entered at Wed Jun 20 08:05:36 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Just Googled the Beach Boys. Their concert three days ago had 48 songs! That kind of justifies the price. They are not doing Spring Vacation, the reunion track about good vibrations and being in harmony. Imagine Robbie rejoinng The Band circa 1996 when Free Your Mind was in the set. They could have done a lyric along the same Beach boys lines:

Now we've lifted that weight

Eliminated all of that hate

Discord was only a rumour

So let's sing it all in good humour

Na na na a na na na


Entered at Wed Jun 20 07:48:03 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I like to think that poodle was named Cher after Cherie Blair, but perhaps that's insulting to the dog.

Anyone heard the new Beach Boys? It had awful reviews here, but I listened through it twice in a row yesterday, and thought it far better than the reviewers had said. You do have to ignore the number of mentions of beach and ocean, and the thought of Mike and Brian "hitting the hot spots" to dance is amusing. Also all that guff about 'now we're singing in harmony' And ''nothing but good vibrations' makes you glad Robbie never rejoined The Band. Dawn breaks over the Ocean reminds strongly of Bluebirds Over The Mountain too. BUT it sounds very good, excellent backing, excellent singing too. It's no Smile or Pet Sounds, but it has the air of say, greatest early hits, volume 3 .


Entered at Wed Jun 20 06:29:38 CEST 2012 from (58.104.12.98)

Posted by:

Graham

I am wondering if we could use technology to solve all our problems. Some of us would have preferred Joni to do different songs during TLW, some us want Cher there, some of us want less of Robbie. Would it no be possible to make an interactive version of the movie so you could change the bits you don't like? For example, you could take the vocal line of Both Sides Now off Miles of Aisles and replace the backing with suitable bits of The Band playing edited together digitally. If you think there is too much Robbie you could air brush him out and if you wanted Cher there you could use computer graphics to squeeze her so she could do one of the verses of The Weight. There was a four girl pop group in Japan and somebody watching their video noticed that one of the members was actually a composite of the other three.


Entered at Wed Jun 20 02:51:19 CEST 2012 from (99.244.253.166)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: G Allman

I've read nothing but very positive reviews of this book. It wasn't one I had planned on reading; but one reviewer has turned my head towards it.


Entered at Wed Jun 20 01:17:38 CEST 2012 from (68.198.166.204)

Posted by:

Bob F

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: All in fun

Kev, we have a beautiful 13 year old black standard poodle. Guess what her name is? Cher of course! I didn't name it, my daughter did. This whole Cher/Joni Mitchell back and forth is all in fun. It's always fun to banter with you because I know your having fun with it also. There are some people if you disagree with them, they go into the old school yard bully mode and just ignore you forever. I never have to worry about that with you.


Entered at Wed Jun 20 00:46:51 CEST 2012 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Cher?

No,Cher doesn't belong at a waltz,a last or a first. However,I just finished Gregg Allman's new autobiography(absurd read--excellent musician who does better at writing songs not books!)and Cher merits praise for living with Allman.Interestingly,Gregg had no connection to The Band other than Watkins Glen and the 2009 ABB @ the Beacon Theater when they were joined by Levon.Perhaps if Gregg had a deeper connection,Cher might have been eligible! She'd look great with Neil Diamond in matching blue sequined outfits.


Entered at Wed Jun 20 00:15:55 CEST 2012 from (68.198.166.204)

Posted by:

Bob F

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Kevin J's Top 10 Joni's

Kev, I'm worried about your top 10 Joni songs. All of them are at least 30 years old. Hasn't she done anything in the last 30 years as good as these chestnuts. How about something off of Turbulent Indigo or Shine? No? Also, you know she didn't actually go to Woodstock. I think she stayed back in The Plaza when the boys went. Didn't want to deal with the mud and the people. She did write the song and gave it to her boyfriend(s) to record. I don't know, to me that always felt like milli vanilli songwriting.


Entered at Tue Jun 19 23:31:13 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Counting …

Nineteen Joni CDs (two are compilations) plus one DVD (plus TLW).

five Cher albums, three CD singles, eleven 45s. 45s are her best shot. Plus eleven Sonny & Cher 45s. There you go.


Entered at Tue Jun 19 23:20:33 CEST 2012 from (24.252.147.174)

Posted by:

Calvin

Using Todd's scale I have 10 Joni Albums (and honestly I cant see how any serious music fan doesnt own Blue & Court and Spark-and maybe even a few others like Turbulant Indigo and Hejira), and 1 Cher Album, (the for-mentioned GH Album).

The Point is, every so often I want to hear Bang,Bang or Gypsies, Tramps and Thieves or Half-Breed (Shockingly absent from the GH Album ;).

And every so often I want to hear Court and Spark start to finish. And that is sort of the differentiater for me. Cher has had an incredible career, she is the only artist to have one of her single's go No 1 on a Billboard list in 6 separate decades, but there isnt a great Cher album I can think of.

So one is a great singles artists and one works to craft albums. Even if I didnt listen to their work I could guess which one I'd prefer based on that description.


Entered at Tue Jun 19 22:39:47 CEST 2012 from (70.50.65.228)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Walk of Fame - Breaking News

Randy Bachman and singer-songwriter Sarah McLachlan will be inducted into Canada’s Walk of Fame this fall, organizers announced today……………Sadly, The Band was again overlooked……..Team Canada 1972 was voted in which means Harry Sinden ( coach ) and J.P Parise ( player ) are in and Rick Danko and Garth Hudson are not!


Entered at Tue Jun 19 20:52:15 CEST 2012 from (70.50.65.228)

Posted by:

Kevin J

….and its ok to like Jackie Collins or Danielle Steele ( I guess..)….but trading in all the Hemmingway or Shakespeare on the self – on anyone’s self – I would object to….next up…..I am petitioning The Faces fan club under rule 785 ( the first 784 deal with the promotion of drinking ) that was written to explicitly deal with fans of otherwise exquisite musical taste like Bob F that have mysteriously fallen prey to an anti-Joni cloud…….Ruling is pending……apparently the keyboard player has to first get his knife out of the lead singers head…….real fans are hoping its Hucknall not Rod!


Entered at Tue Jun 19 20:40:30 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Cher covered Dr. John's "I Walk On Gilded Splinters" on her 3614 Jackson Highway album. The original version was included on Dr. John's 1968 Gris-Gris album, produced by Harold Battiste, who was also credited as arranger on Sonny & Cher's 1967 hit "The Beat Goes On".


Entered at Tue Jun 19 20:28:04 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Kevin, it's OK to like both of them. That way peace and harmony lie … and Gypsies, Tramps & Thieves, Walkin' in Memphis, It's In His Kiss (to name but three) … what's wrong with them?

OK, Cher does say in her autobiography "Sonny & I were the first hippies" but it is said tongue in cheek and she adds "but only the clothes."


Entered at Tue Jun 19 20:24:42 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Sonny & Cher & Mac Rebennack

Upon further review, Sonny & Cher did have a musical connection with one particular Last Waltz performer -- Mac Rebbenack, years before he adopted the persona of Dr. John. Mr. Rebbenack was a back-up musician with the duo in late '60s, thanks to his old friend from New Orleans, producer/arranger Harold Battiste, who was working with Sonny & Cher at the time. The young, bearded Mac can been seen playing guitar with the duo in the legendary Gold Star Recording Studios in the video clip link above. Look for the future Dr. John (at left) at around the :29 (with cigarette) and 1:19 marks.


Entered at Tue Jun 19 19:11:00 CEST 2012 from (70.50.65.228)

Posted by:

Kevin J

….a man is seen standing on a ledge 40 floors up……….God makes contact and says’ “what has gone wrong my son?” “Just about everything, My Lord…I’ve lost my wife, my job, my car and my girlfriends have stopped talking to me…” God acknowledges that this has been a bad patch but rightfully points out that all of this happened over a year or more ago……..what has caused this dramatic action of wanting to jump off a building? Not even the Almighty can figure it out………..”Well, the last girlfriend…. not only left but pinched “Blue” on the way out the door and left me a copy of Cher’s Greatest Hits in its place!” “Oh Dear, it is worse than I feared……..Jump my son Jump!”


Entered at Tue Jun 19 18:48:51 CEST 2012 from (83.249.106.36)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Chere Cher

I disagree with DAVID P.

It reminds me of how my professor humilated me in the seventies. I said: "I have all my material in a box in alphabethical order!" The professor said: "The key is not what you have in your box. The key is _the box_." It took twentythree years for me to understand. I hope this helps to understand the connection between The Cher and Band.


Entered at Tue Jun 19 18:28:26 CEST 2012 from (70.50.65.228)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

LINK.......my favorite cover of a Joni song.......a band that I loved as a teenager from the land of Dunc....they also did a wicked take on "Love Hurts"......ah....memories...


Entered at Tue Jun 19 18:17:29 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I wouldn't compare Madness to Joni Mitchell, though I do like that Two-Tone stuff. Good album last year too.


Entered at Tue Jun 19 18:12:50 CEST 2012 from (68.198.166.204)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Cher

Todd, since you only have one Joni cd I'm going to assume your really not impressed. I would suggest trading it in for Cher's Greatest Hits 1965-1992 on Geffen Records. A great collection. Remember, before Cher starting slowing down she took a song to the top 10 in 4 consecutive decades. There are not many people who have done that. Now of course if you hate pop music it might not seem impressive. However, I think for anyone to be able to do that they would have to be very talented.


Entered at Tue Jun 19 18:08:02 CEST 2012 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Subject: no regrets

My personal prejudice is that Joni is / was as great an artist as any that joined The Band for TLW; "Coyote" is a monstrously good song, and particularly apt to the occasion, for at least 2 reasons:
1) the references to "the white lines . . . the fine white lines on the freeway" are entirely appropriate to an event that was, by all accounts, a blizzard, snow-wise; and
2) the references to Coyote, the Trickster figure of North American mythology, are a nod to JRR's heritage and interests -- recall the "trickster" R. Remus and the story of The Rabbit Man. Forty years on, JRR is still talking about chasing rabbits . . . .


Entered at Tue Jun 19 18:04:52 CEST 2012 from (70.50.65.228)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Oh My……. “Be My Baby” and “You’ve Lost That Loving Feeling” are Cher songs…..are they?….……..up next, floozy-groupie extraordinaire Cathy Smith is credited by members of the Band GB as having Gordon Lightfoot, Hoyt Axton and The Band songs as “her songs”…..and she once had a pretty nice ass so let’s compare her to Joni Mitchell………………MADNESS…………….no wonder Joni has a chip on her shoulders the size of Saskatchewan.……………….add in being made to wait for 4 or 5 years after being eligible for the Hall of Fame ( which when eventually called to Cleveland, she rightfully snubbed them ) and then receiving a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award which read "one of the most important female recording artists of the rock era" does anyone think peers Dylan, Simon, Morrison had the differentiating tag “male” on their awards? And trust me on this one…..if you have lived in or travelled to as many p[laces on this earth as I have and sat with people to play or listen to music…..The international awareness/respect of Joni Mitchell and “her music” dwarfs that of just about any male artist of the rock era not named Bob, John(2) or Paul(2)

10 off the top of my head……”Both Sides Now”…..”Chelsea Morning”…..”Carey”…..”Big Yellow Taxi”……”Woodstock”……”For Free”……”Free Man In Paris”…..”Case of You”……”Help Me”……”California”…..I could name 10-15 other great songs………………….clearly this is an ALL-TIME artist.


Entered at Tue Jun 19 17:58:35 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I'd vote for Coyote on a "Joni Best 12 Ever" compilation and it was current. I wouldn't change it. But I'd add one. Raised on Robbery had the Robbie connection (he played on it), but I still think it was a Big Yellow Taxi or Both Sides Now night.

So Neil … Cherry Cherry in the "Hot August Night" arrangement? Or go totally tin-pan alley with I'm A Believer?


Entered at Tue Jun 19 17:31:58 CEST 2012 from (108.200.220.97)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Joni vs. Cher

Is it even a contest?

I have one Joni Mitchell album and zero Cher albums, so I suppose my wallet votes for Joni.

I don't particularly dislike Cher, but never had the urge to buy her material. I kind of like her as a comedienne and dramatic actress, so I think there's some talent there.

A friend if mine from college, who has a really nice singing voice and perfect pitch, used to tell me that Cher sang slightly flat. Consistent, but always a little flat. The same friend also told me that Bruce sings a little sharp, so perfect pitch isn't necessarily a deal breaker, but sharp must be easier on my ears than flat.

I still think that Joni should have done something like 'Carey' or 'Raised on Robbery'. And Neil Diamond should have done 'Solitary Man' or 'Shilo'.


Entered at Tue Jun 19 17:18:02 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Cardies

Al, don't you get new ones knitted for you now? Or do you only get the wooly mittens?


Entered at Tue Jun 19 17:14:55 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Rumer

… actually is a songwriter, but not on "Boys Don't Cry." The sleeve notes are by veteran music writer Max Bell. It seems ten years ago she approached him to educate her in the great rock classics, and he played her tons of early 70s stuff. In the sleeve notes (you must buy the 16 track Special Edition, not the normal twelve track), he explains that, and then every one of the 16 songs gets a separate picture of the 70s album it was from. As noted, she covers lesser-known Jimmy Webb, Clifford T Ward, Todd Rundgren, Leon Russell, Hall & Oates, Stephen Bishop, Terry Reid, Neil Young, Tim Hardin, Townes Van Zandt, Richie Havens, Paul Williams, Ronnie Lane & Ronnie Wood, Isaac Hayes, Bob Marley … and Gilbert O'Sullivan (!) … and makes it all work as one.

The real surprise was "It Could Be The First Day". We first listened in the car and tried to recall which Carpenters record it could possibly be from … it's by Richie Havens, but her version is Richie Havens as Karen Carpenter might have sung it. (Did she? ). Remarkable work. I assume "Boys Don't Cry" is ironic as they're all emotional songs written by men.


Entered at Tue Jun 19 17:05:18 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Given all that, David, you think she'd have welcomed an evening off in San Francisco.


Entered at Tue Jun 19 16:46:09 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

In my opinion, not only did Cher NOT belong at The Last Waltz, no one associated with The Band would have entertained the thought. Despite her talents, she circled in a completely different orbit of show business, which only intersected with The Band through her social connection with David Geffen. At the time of TLW, she'd just released a dreadful album, was busy taping a second run of the appalling Sonny & Cher Show with a controlling ex-husband, dealing with a tumultuous second marriage and raising a daughter & 4-month old son, Elijah Blue Allman. That had all the makings of a soap opera, not a waltz with The Band.


Entered at Tue Jun 19 12:34:09 CEST 2012 from (124.168.55.83)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Web: My link

Subject: Free music debate

I have over 11000 songs in my iTunes, but I paid for most of them... A great letter in favour of paying artists.


Entered at Tue Jun 19 12:18:14 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: JT

JT: Wow. Jerry just realised it's you. Wasn't until when you mentioned your dad owning the bar I put 2 and 2 together. Long time mate. I can recall with great fondness your reminiscences about those early days and our 'meaning of life' discussions about whether there could be such a thing as absolutes in music or artistic quality.

Can't recall if we ever ventured into colons back then but, hey, who's counting.

:-0)

PV: I presume like me you still wear your Val Doonican cardie!! :-0)


Entered at Tue Jun 19 09:37:45 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Hendrix on the Lulu show

This is the famous one. Watching again, I have my doubts … there was all sorts of crap at the time of how dare they do what they wanted on live TV, but effectively they played what they were booked to play before they switched, and the story at the time was Lulu was going to come up and duet which they forestalled, but I can't see any sign of that. I don't think she was ever daft enough to think she could front that band. Rehearsed?


Entered at Tue Jun 19 09:25:16 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Scud Mountain Boys

Check out a live version of Gypsies, Tramps & Thieves by The Scud Mountain Boys … unfortunately the (better) album version isn't on YouTube, but it is on iTunes.

I just checked Cher's autobiography, which as you will all guess, I keep next to my bed. She said that when they got to England everyone wanted to know if she was "Red Indian" (half) so there's another link to an interview section.

We've discussed this before. Because Britain never had those appalling Sonny & Cher TV shows (which I have seen) we are able to regard her without so much backlog of distaste. And because the Allman Brothers were nowhere near as popular here, we don't think, 'Yuk! Greg Allman!' either. Mind you, "Jessica" is incredibly well known here because of "Top Gear."

As Al I'm sure will agree, we could never take Val Doonican seriously here, images of his horrible cardigans and sweaters on his TV show blank out any ability to listen to him. Though he was fecking awful anyway.

Now Lulu … similar profile. Not a writer, but an interpreter. Also a pal of The Beatles, married to a Bee Gee, one of the first to cover david Bowie … but she has comparable image issues. It was her show that Hendrix did his famous thing on … I'll have to repost to link that.


Entered at Tue Jun 19 09:02:40 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Cher

Well. Cher, like Sinatra, Elvis, Cliff Richard, Tom Jones and coming up to date, Rumer, is an interpreter not a songwriter, so you can't compare.

You'd have to take songs she's sung and sung backing on, which might bring Brian Wilson in on her side, as she sung on The Ronettes Be My Baby and the Righteous Brothers You've Lost That Loving Feeling, two of the towering recordings of the rock era.

Gypsies, Tramps and Thieves? Yes, put it next to W S Walcott Medicine Show, then cut in to Levon talking about Midnight Rambles and Robbie saying he has an idea for this film called Carny. So it would have enhanced TLW, and I don't think any of the Band guys would have objected to being behind her with a good view of her posterior on stage. We're talking 1976, not now.


Entered at Tue Jun 19 08:12:01 CEST 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: The Book

Kevin J - You are correct about my silence. I'd be glad to talk to anyone regarding the Concord Tavern (on Bloor near Ossington) and my recollection of those days if I get called. I never went to Yonge St music (too young) in those early days and the only reason I ever heard Levon and the Hawks (many times) and the others who were 'on the circuit' was because they 'rehearsed' Saturday afternoons and I got to be there because my (late) dad was one of the owners.


Entered at Tue Jun 19 03:51:04 CEST 2012 from (74.198.9.140)

Posted by:

Kevin J

........in fact, if there is anyone out there that even knows 20 Cher songs, I am heading to Mongolia...........Greyhound or Vesel....Hmmmm........


Entered at Tue Jun 19 03:34:21 CEST 2012 from (74.198.9.140)

Posted by:

Kevin J

If there is another person on this planet that would take any one of 20 ( ! ) Cher songs over Joni's entire catalogue then I'm chucking it all in and heading to Mongolia tonight"................Help!!..

JT: I take your silence as a no? Too bad....though I am sure he has a number of local sources to draw upon........


Entered at Tue Jun 19 02:27:09 CEST 2012 from (68.198.166.204)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hundson Valley, NY

Subject: Dan Bern

Dan Bern played The Falcon in Marlboro NY last night. He's on tour supporting his fine new cd called Drifter. He did a song from an old ep of his called Lithuania. It's this beautiful sad song about how his father's family was all mudered in Lithuania during World War 2. How his father lived with this horror his entire life but was able to go on and raise his family. How he told Bern about his lost relatives with stories but how he also teached him to laugh. The song also is about Bern coming to terms with his history and how different his life in sunny california is just a generation later. It's really a special song. I didn't link it because I couldn't find a live version on youtube. However the orginal ep version is on youtube. I didn't link because of the copyright but I'm sure Bern would be happy if anyone gave it a listen.


Entered at Tue Jun 19 02:17:00 CEST 2012 from (68.198.166.204)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY
Web: My link

Subject: Cher

Kevin, There are at least 20 Cher songs I would happily trade Joni's entire catalog for. 'Gypsies, Tramps and Thieves' is one of the songs. That is a statement I'll never take back.


Entered at Tue Jun 19 02:14:21 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Location: Liddypool
Web: My link

Subject: Paul

Yeah well in Dlew

The link is Paul Weller's timely tribute to his hero


Entered at Tue Jun 19 01:56:29 CEST 2012 from (124.168.55.83)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: And a happy Birthday to paul mccartney

Wings - great band. He was in a band before then, but I can't remember their name - the Quarrymen, I think...


Entered at Tue Jun 19 01:17:44 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Colonic irrigation

Thing is JT, colon trouble is the reason I spout so much shit. If only I could put a full stop to it

:-0) Oops


Entered at Tue Jun 19 00:42:11 CEST 2012 from (96.54.171.63)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Semi colon vs colon

Al: The semi-colon falls short of the colon by half.


Entered at Tue Jun 19 00:35:59 CEST 2012 from (68.171.231.84)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: on a Greyhound, not a cruise ship

I'm with Peter V. Imagine what Vanny and Cher could have pumped out as a unit? "Caravan" solo, followed by "Gypsies, Tramps and Thieves" solo, closing with the inevitable duet, "I Got You Babe". In matching pantsuits.


Entered at Mon Jun 18 21:44:44 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I've been thinking recently … Cher should have been at TLW.


Entered at Mon Jun 18 18:54:31 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Respect yourself - and your audience

Just read through the post backlog below - many of which concern the old chestnut, the nebulous concept of what should constitute an artist's song choice at a gig. Some really interesting stuff in there.

Personally I'd like to think I'm ambivalent about such things, though if I'm honest I'm probably not. That said, if an artist wishes to indulge what they perceive as their art at the expense of their more populist stuff then so be it. They're the ones up there doing it.

One thing's for sure, though - they'll struggle to sell out the Bernebau in Madrid like this fella and have the entire floor bouncing like Bette Midler's floppy bits!!!

Now counting down the seconds till Thursday and Friday night!!!!! One thing's for sure it'll be the best 2 x £65 that I'll have forked out since the last time the guy was here. Bruce is one artist who simply doesn't know the meaning of short changing. The linked madrid concert above chimed in at 3 hours 48 minutes - high octane all the way.

:-0)

Oh soz JT an extra one just for my cyberspace smiley buddy ;-0)


Entered at Mon Jun 18 18:37:29 CEST 2012 from (70.50.65.228)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Bob F: Indeed, when a person is big enough to admit a mistake or misstatement then that that content should not be reintroduced at any time by another….bad form on my part……Note though that since Peter has never retracted “Cher should have been at TLW” – I will continue to bring this up once a year……….As to Joni Mitchell, sometimes her attitude has interfered with performance (at least satisfaction of performance from an audience point of view re: TLW, PSB’s example as an opening act) but I fail to see how Laura Nyro being legitimately underrated has any connection to Joni Mitchell being overrated……If she had done nothing else in her career but write and perform the masterpiece “Blue” then she already would have been among the greats in this little thing we call pop and rock n roll…..

Based on his last post, I have this thought of Bill M on a cruise ship? So…. Bill…. if the floating hotel you might be on is taken over by pirates……..just scream out at them that Joni Mitchell was put on the same level as a guy named after a bee that wrote a song called “Russians” ( remember that horrific little ditty about if only the Russian President loved his children or some such nonsense ) ……anyhow, just the thought of this will certainly send the pirates into such a tizzy that they will be temporarily disoriented and able to be subdued……or better yet tell them that Greece is moving on in the European Cup and they might well just shoot themselves over fears of imminent boredom…..


Entered at Mon Jun 18 16:46:16 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Vinyl Siding: Music From Big Pink

Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab has just released a 180-gram vinyl version of MFBP, mastered by Krieg Wunderlich, that is by far the best sounding LP version. The sonics, from bass to mids to highs, are stunning. If you have a phono system, this is the one to have. And yes, the original gatefold cover with the next of kin photo is faithfully reproduced also.


Entered at Mon Jun 18 15:48:46 CEST 2012 from (69.14.50.154)

Posted by:

Bobby Pennock

Location: Motown
Web: My link

Subject: Live in Tokyo 1983

One of my Father's Day gifts was the Live in Tokyo 2 CD set. Man, the music is great but the sound is sorely lacking. Was this taken right from a video? Any chance the concert film will ever be available, legitimately? Who owns the rights? Overall, this may be my favorite live album by The Band. Thanks


Entered at Mon Jun 18 13:29:26 CEST 2012 from (64.231.177.177)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Levon and Robbie


Entered at Sun Jun 17 23:37:00 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I've only seen a couple of aluminium spiders … on US discs. So where and how did they get put on? It will remain a mystery.

Talking of flea markets, when I was browsing in the Brooklyn one a few weeks ago, there were quite a lot of imported British-pressed 45s. It was the punk / two-tone / Stiff label sort of thing rather than classic rock. But I was surprised to see it. /


Entered at Sun Jun 17 21:11:37 CEST 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Whoops ... sorry

My mistake... sorry


Entered at Sun Jun 17 21:10:12 CEST 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Destruction

I spoke like a child / You destroyed me with a smile


Entered at Sun Jun 17 21:06:42 CEST 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Destruction

"I spoke like a child / You destroyed me with a smile"


Entered at Sun Jun 17 20:21:39 CEST 2012 from (68.171.231.83)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: So the British never even got the terribly important Next of Kin photo? Also 45 adapters were almost alway yelow here. I'd probably get excited and buy any other colour. Except for thse clunky aluminum ones that you sometimes see wedded to a UK 45 in a junk store. Nobody can get them out, it seems, so how did they get them in?

Adam: Exciting news. I look forward to the article - or even just a transcript.

Rockin Chair: currently chugging towards Departure Bay, then to Comox, then likely Tofono. Will wave in your direction. You too Bonk. NWC: I enjoyed your post about bass tuning, especially JH playing Gb.


Entered at Sun Jun 17 19:12:25 CEST 2012 from (108.54.247.103)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Adam

How fantastic! London, The Hudson's interview.you are truly living "The Life". I look forward to reading your interview and your report from London. Have a great time!


Entered at Sun Jun 17 18:44:09 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The Smiley

"There's one thing you've got to learn

Is not to be afraid of it."

I said "No, I like it, I like it, it's good."

She said "You like it now

But you'll learn to love it later."



Entered at Sun Jun 17 14:45:29 CEST 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Al Edge .... Sad, Sad, Sad

:-( :-( :-( But, Al, I can live with them. I just don't like them.


Entered at Sun Jun 17 13:58:34 CEST 2012 from (108.82.188.117)

Posted by:

glenn t

Subject: dad's day

happy dad's day to all the parents (moms & dads)! raising children is a special privilege and a ton of work. God bless all of you who have expressed patience and persistence in trying to raise your family the best you can.


Entered at Sun Jun 17 11:54:34 CEST 2012 from (82.42.122.89)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Hully Gullybility

"I tell Mrs V I'll sell it all one day at a huge profit. She is BEGINNING to ask 'When?!"

Ha ha - pissed meself at that P. Funny stuff.

:-0)

Apologies to jT for smiley whiley but fuck it - here's another

:-0)


Entered at Sun Jun 17 08:44:23 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Big Pink vinyl

Just looked at the page here, which has various cover pictures. That's where you see this is a music site (good) not a collectors site.. No pictures of centre labels, only sleeves. Collectors are interested in centre labels first, because sleeves can be swapped around so are not how you know it is an early copy. With really valuable discs, you also need the correct inner sleeve, obviously on Sgt Pepper with its custom red and white inner sleeve, but also an EMI pressing should have an EMI inner sleeve.


Entered at Sun Jun 17 08:32:42 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Spidees

I used to call them adaptors too until the old vinyl bug got me. If you need to buy them, they're only sold in packs of ten now , and both mail order dealers sell the same type and call them spiders. For some reason they only come in yellow in 2012, though 99% of old ones are black. CBS put red ones on some 80s imports which match the label.

Big Pink was never issued as a gatefold in Britain. Way back in the 60s a friend whose dad was a pilot had one which I coveted. The first British one has just the painting, but early on they overprinted the title in luminous pink. The EMI "replica" in 180 gram vinyl not only doesn't have the gatefold, it has the garish 70s overprinting. The only gatefold copy I had was that Japanese exact replica CD. Those replica CDs are so good they include the dimpled paper finish on The Band, and the wrap round posters on Stage Fright and Moondog matinee. Whenever I see a gatefold import in Britain it's battered and priced at £20 plus. So a near mint at £5 was a great find here.


Entered at Sun Jun 17 07:56:22 CEST 2012 from (99.141.53.166)

Posted by:

Adam

Hello everyone, just wanted to check in and say hey. I wanted to mention that I will be attending the London Music Awards this month, where Garth Hudson will be performing and accepting his Lifetime Achievement Award. In addition, I was so honored to talk with Garth and his wife Maud last week for the article I'm writing. The Hudsons called me on the phone and we talked for nearly four hours! I'm working hard on typing out the content of the conversation, and I hope everyone will enjoy the article. Take care!


Entered at Sun Jun 17 05:28:35 CEST 2012 from (68.171.231.81)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V:e Big Pink, I didn't know there was anything other than gatefold. S for spiders (a new name to me), I'd call them record centres or 45 adapters or something along those linesa


Entered at Sun Jun 17 03:52:32 CEST 2012 from (58.104.8.207)

Posted by:

Graham

A few years back there was a guy on e-bay selling a set of silver CDs of the Dylan 66 tour. He said his wife complained that his CD collection took up to much space. She said they would have more room if they sold the CDs and Bob actually moved in with them. I though that was pretty funny.


Entered at Sun Jun 17 02:47:17 CEST 2012 from (24.252.147.174)

Posted by:

Calvin

Ah, well then yes Peter, the word in General Use is Spider if your talking about serious vinyl collectors.

I may haunt flea markets and the occasional record fair for Vinyl, but Im hardly an elitist about it (As really Im an elitist about so many others things I have to have a few things Im not) but I have a lot of friends who are, and who actually do make some decent money selling Vinyl finds on Ebay and the like.

Years ago I and a partner where involved with an Antique Mall just north of a Major Flea Market. Part of the deal was anyone with a stake in the store had to work one day a week at the store. Well, people would always come in to sell stuff, and my partner Alan and I would frequently buy things from them and keep them for ourselves. Well, the owner of the building and the guy who put the store together (who was somewhat of a friend as his wife and I had gone to Grad School together and were pretty close as friends go) kept watching us, and I could tell he wanted to say something but didnt think it was his place. Finally one day after watching us buy some motorized toys from the 1950s he had to blurt out "You guys know you really shouldnt keep all the cool stuff for yourself, right?"

Your story about what you tell your wife about your Vinyl purchases brought back that memory tonight Peter.


Entered at Sun Jun 17 00:55:58 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

Thanks Calvin, by general use I guess I mean 'general use among the elite band of vinyl collectors.'

I found a near mint Big pink today, Canadian copy with gatefold sleeve, a mere five pounds too. Couldn't leave it languishing in a shop. Also a first run Love Me Do. I have one, but you don't pass this stuff by. I tell Mrs V I'll sell it all one day at a huge profit. She is beginning to ask 'When?!


Entered at Sat Jun 16 20:07:30 CEST 2012 from (206.18.100.1)

Posted by:

Calvin

Yes Peter, I frequently heard them referred to as Spiders, also ocassionally spindle adaptors and cufflinks. But Id be hardpressed to say its in general use any more.


Entered at Sat Jun 16 18:45:27 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Spiders

Quick query for Bill or David. Those plastic bits you put in the middle of large hole US 45s to convert them to play on a small hole European spindle are called "spiders." The Beatles Record Store Day box set calls them "record hubs." Is this general (N) American use?


Entered at Sat Jun 16 17:52:29 CEST 2012 from (83.249.106.36)

Posted by:

NorhWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Coutnries

Subject: 2012-1977

Bill M, I disagree. I pay for the music for my own money. JOHN MAYALL was arrogant when I saw him for some years ago. Solo guitarist was _anybody_. - If I like to hear some good music I'd rather sit down and listen to an accordion player from Bulgaria in front of a liquor store instead.


Entered at Sat Jun 16 17:48:53 CEST 2012 from (68.198.166.204)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: KEVIN J WHAT I SAY?

Kev, can you really bring up a "take back" statement? lol We should put a Guestbook rule in place that we're all allowed 3 "take back" statements a calender year. Your right I do have a problem with Joni Mitchell but it's not about the Dylan statement. Old Mr D is as big as the Empire State Building he doesn't need Bob F sticking up for him. My problem with Ms. Mitchell is all the things she gets credit for that Laura Nyro did first and so much better. But, we will save that for another day. Have a great weekend!


Entered at Sat Jun 16 17:25:22 CEST 2012 from (208.120.213.56)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Web: My link

Subject: "Levon Helm's Band Rambles On..."

Really nice Rolling Stone article about Larry & Amy carrying on with the Rambles after Levon's passing ... worth a read.


Entered at Sat Jun 16 16:34:24 CEST 2012 from (68.171.231.82)

Posted by:

Bill M

Let's see: 2012-1977=35 years. Isn't that time enough for people to have come to accept that famous singers don't always perform their famous songs? Life can be a bitch, eh?


Entered at Sat Jun 16 14:57:05 CEST 2012 from (83.249.106.36)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster's Dog

Location: A stupid pink painted lifejacket

Subject: Bass

Question: - How many gbers do you need to tune a bass?

a.) Four. BRIEN tunes the B-string, ADAM tunes the A-string, NUX tunes the N-string and DAVIDP tunes the D-string.

b.) Dear Sirs, a bass does not need tuning. (Peter's choice)

c.) E# Ab D# Gb by Jan (after a half of a bottle of aquavit).


Entered at Sat Jun 16 13:26:25 CEST 2012 from (58.104.9.37)

Posted by:

Graham

Subject: Joe Walsh: I Shall Be Released

I really liked the Joe Wlash version of I Shall be Released just posted. Joe Walsh isn't somebody I have ever really listened to but I will have to check him out. The singers were great. I love that song and I like it done with a bit of power. Joe's singing wasn't so good but I enjoyed his guitar playing. You can't get better than a white strat!


Entered at Sat Jun 16 13:09:27 CEST 2012 from (83.249.106.36)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Double posting PETER V

Don't worry. It happens to all of us sometimes.


Entered at Sat Jun 16 13:07:04 CEST 2012 from (83.249.106.36)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: Double posting PETER V

Don't worry, it happens to all of us sometimes.


Entered at Sat Jun 16 11:38:15 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Singing “hits” or rather “best-known stuff.”

Singing “hits” or rather “best-known stuff.”

It depends on the artist. You don’t expect Miles Davis to do requests, though I had vaguely hoped that Joe Zawinul might do Birdland or Mercy, Mercy, but wasn’t surprised or disappointed when he didn’t.

It’s the question about the percentage of new stuff to introduce. Three to four from the new album seems the consensus. I was disappointed with The Waterboys, because the show was billed as an “Appointment With The Waterboys” and I was expecting ALL of the album “An Appointment With Mr Yeats” and we got two thirds, all together in the second set, which was right. But there was some of their early wannabe punk in the first set that I would gladly have lost to allow space for all the new one.

With Bap Kennedy, I went with a list of three songs I wanted to hear so much, he didn’t do any of them, but I came away delighted. I think that’s down to how artists relate to the audience. Van, Joni and Dylan are “aloof”. They don’t chat and you get what they want to give on the night. Bap Kennedy was so friendly and personable that you were happy to go along with him. At one point he said ‘What do you want next?’ and someone shouted ‘Whatever you want to play!’ and everyone clapped.

Judy Collins, Joan Baez, Maddy Prior, Leonard Cohen, Frank Allen of The Searchers, The Unthanks, The Civil Wars … these are all other examples I’ve seen in the last year or two of people who really work to relate to the audience, and if you like, welcome them into the show. Actually on that list, there are more women than men. Maybe that’s why Joni seems particularly aloof, because we expect Van and Dylan and Neil Young to be curmudgeonly old buggers. There is an air of “I am a great artist” and face it, Len’s claim is just as good, and Joan and Judy have the years of experience at the top level too. That doesn’t stop them trying to relate.

Mind you for artists being “up themselves” I don’t think I’ve seen anyone as up themselves as Michelle Shocked. Brilliant show, but you left with the impression of an unpleasant and arrogant person. Well, Van on a bad mood night gives off the same vibe.

On saving your best-known song for the encores, there are hidden rules there. You should do it as the FIRST encore, because everyone knows it’s coming, leaving the SECOND encore for miming surprise and gratitude at being asked again. Holding it for the second encore just indicates you were expecting it.

Jackson Browne has it sussed by keeping his long “Stay” for that position. That works both ways. Van Morrison now walks off for one second, turns back, does his closing medley and leaves. There is no pretence of milking encores. Paul Simon did five last time I saw him. Too much going off and being forced back on. Another way is to do the really really famous song as a cover in the second encore rather than your own stuff. A lot do that. I’ve seen tons … e.g. Rufus Wainwright … Across the Universe. Simone Felice … Helpless. John Wetton … God Only Knows. John Cale … Walkin' The Dog.


Entered at Sat Jun 16 11:09:08 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Joe Walsh: I Shall Be released

Many thanks … those three backing singers are superb, getting their chance at each singing lead. They take it back to a soul song. I was very surprised … I hadn't expected it to be like that.


Entered at Sat Jun 16 08:48:10 CEST 2012 from (198.36.218.33)

Posted by:

Jerry

Web: My link

Subject: Joe Walsh sends one out to Levon


Entered at Sat Jun 16 04:26:57 CEST 2012 from (64.18.79.137)

Posted by:

Dave

Subject: Fallen Angel

Does anyone have the chords/tab for Fallen Angel, by Robbie Robertson? I've looked everywhere and can't find them. Thank you.


Entered at Sat Jun 16 03:43:23 CEST 2012 from (50.101.59.239)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link


Entered at Sat Jun 16 02:21:33 CEST 2012 from (72.78.37.222)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love
Web: My link

Kevin, it took Joni Mitchell about four years after she seriously started performing in coffee houses and clubs to get signed (thanks in part to David Crosby). That really is not that long a time. Tom Rush started performing and then recording her songs and Dave Van Ronk and then Judy Collins followed, so by the time her first album came out, there was already a considerable buzz about her and it was well deserved.

And yes she is a true artist and follows her art and instincts. But that doesn't necessarily make for a good show. The first time I saw her was on the Rolling Thunder Revue. We had no idea she was on the tour, and it was a total surprise. The audience went crazy and she was totally great and amazing.

I saw her again opening for Dylan 28 years later and it was a total disappointment. It was all whatever her latest stuff was at the time, and it couldn't have been more boring, so much so that halfway through the set I got up and walked around. I'm all for an artist doing their latest stuff, but sometimes you have to acknowledge the audience a little. And in an arena setting - this was a college gym - she just didn't cut through at all, and all it might have taken was maybe doing "For Free."


Entered at Sat Jun 16 02:13:56 CEST 2012 from (124.170.227.33)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Kevin J... trying to guess those names...

Gene Simmons, Ace Frehley? Maybe Joe jonas? Justin Bieber - I'm drawing a blank here ... ;)


Entered at Sat Jun 16 00:55:17 CEST 2012 from (206.18.100.1)

Posted by:

Calvin

The term "Hits" has been a bit different in Jazz since around 1955 Graham. But no, nobody went to a Miles Concert (and I saw him twice) With any expectations of hearing Milestones, Bitches Brew or Sketches of Spain.


Entered at Sat Jun 16 00:27:02 CEST 2012 from (58.104.9.37)

Posted by:

Graham

Calvin, No, that's what I was trying to say. If someone is known for not playing their hits you would go in with the expectation that they weren't going to play them. I doubt anyone ever went to a Miles Davis concert expecting him to play his hits (if in fact he ever had any).


Entered at Fri Jun 15 23:57:41 CEST 2012 from (206.18.100.1)

Posted by:

Calvin

Interesting word expectations. When I go see a show, and Im still good for abou 25 a year, I have a pretty good idea of what to expect. If you pay to go see someone not known for playing the "oldies hits", and you get mad they dont play them-is it really their fault?


Entered at Fri Jun 15 23:16:11 CEST 2012 from (58.104.9.37)

Posted by:

Graham

On John Mayall's live Jazz-Blues Fusion album some one calls out for 'Room to Move' and John yells back, 'Why did you come here, to listen to an old record or something'. I think it is a question of meeting people's expectations. If you pay money expecting an artist to do their famous songs and they don't do them you would be disappointed. With regard to people talking to the audience, I read a while back about somebody attending a Clapton sound check and they said after a couple of songs he stopped and said 'Blah, Blah, Blah, Blah, Blah, Blah' which was supposed to be the bit where he talked to the audience. The person said they thought that was funny because Clapton hardly even says anything.


Entered at Fri Jun 15 21:45:51 CEST 2012 from (70.50.65.228)

Posted by:

Kevin J

“Bob is not authentic at all: He’s a plagiarist, and his name and voice are fake.” – Joni Mitchell after blowing a fuse at being compared to Bob Dylan.

Bob F: You are one of my fav’s here no question but………. I would think the above might well be the source of a lot of the anti-Joni feelings - not you in particular but the Dylan fans in general..... massive talents like Joni's often come with massive egos………….a couple of things….. Joni spent years and years working the coffeehouse and club circuit before becoming “Rich”….. Ani DeFranco has nothing on her in terms of paying hers dues……………..and putting Joni Mitchell in an “overrated category” with the even greater indignity of lumping her in with someone like Sting for God’s sake might be the most outrageous thing written here since……………..ah…….let me see…..the since retracted Kinks comment………………in terms of quality of songs….I can think of only 4 or 5 others in the rock game that are even close to her level……and we all know their names……………….

JT: Thank you………I think of you whenever I go to the guitar shop in Long & McQuade at Bloor and Ossington…………Has Robbie Robertson or any of his team been in touch regarding the book he is writing. Hope they have because I would rather read 3-4 chapters ( with details ) on that period of his life than one more sentence on the Dylan/Hawks tour 65-66…..


Entered at Fri Jun 15 21:03:06 CEST 2012 from (68.198.166.204)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Joni and Ani

Kevin J, I notice as I get further into my forced imposed retirement that my communication skills are slipping but I would like to try one more time with another example. When you go see Ani DiFranco the noice between songs is crazy. Total chaos. All these young and older woman and men are yelling out requests and just going crazy in the moment. I've never heard Ani say an unkind word to anyone. She just stands there with a huge smile on her face taking it all in. I always thought it's because she remembers what it's like to be be 3rd on the bill at some lousy club off the NY Thruway selling her tapes out of the trunk of her car after the show. Joni Mitchell has never had to struggle. Thanks to Judy Collins success came very quickly. I find the comments she makes to be very rude. Plus I think along with Sting she is the most overrated singer songwriter in the world.


Entered at Fri Jun 15 20:33:46 CEST 2012 from (216.80.70.2)

Posted by:

JT and LvdB

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: The best for the last

Kevin... As you know from previous posts, I'm not one for 'the best'. But, BEG has clearly saved 'the best' for the last. (smile - I hate those digital smilies and the emoticons even more). As for Joni, I always admired her and 'A Case of You' is one of many superb songs. "Court and Spark" is a classic and most of her other albums are very good and are timeless. As for what gets said at concerts by performers.... Some like it and want to be talked to. I prefer that the performance do all the talking. The exception is Leonard Cohen for me. His delivery adds to the performance and we learn from him. Up until 1966, Bob Dylan sometimes talked to us in the 60s, but since 1974, with the exception of the 'religious period' and with the exception of the 'jokes' period, we have largely received the silent treatment. Joni can say what she wants. Its her stage and though I agree with those that say that the dollars demand that the audience should get what it hopes for and expects, artistic freedom to present what he/she would lie and even the audacity of speaking one's mind when the performer is peeved or worse by audience hecklers or screamers is OK by me.


Entered at Fri Jun 15 19:56:16 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: One good version deserves another

Great song. I like the k.d. lang version equally as much … linked.


Entered at Fri Jun 15 18:43:06 CEST 2012 from (70.50.65.228)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

LINK above to a great Joni Mitchell song........according to some....written for ex boyfriend L. Cohen..........Soak this in and imagine how you would feel if some drunk is yelling for 'Yellow Taxi" while this is going on..........


Entered at Fri Jun 15 18:19:24 CEST 2012 from (70.50.65.228)

Posted by:

Kevin J

This seems to be missing the/her point doesn’t it?……..Joni doesn’t refrain from doing her hits ( as far as I know she almost always does the bulk of the famous ones ) she just bristles rightfully at louts in the crowd requesting songs. The Band never played their most famous song after 1976 – did they?

BEG: Glad that you survived encounters with that motley crew you mentioned……..hopefully our paths will cross at some point.


Entered at Fri Jun 15 17:15:54 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Absolutely, David. But I think Van Gogh did … isn't "Starry Night on The Rhone" later? A lot of painters do similar stuff in style and churn them out. And most art galleries are free or very cheap, or have free "Thursdays" or whatever, not counting exhibitions. You're seeing prices like £65 increasingly for singers. For a couple, £130 is a lot of money, and if they want Big Yellow Taxi, do it or give them a refund.


Entered at Fri Jun 15 16:37:00 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Like, you don't know what you've got 'til it's gone...

Joni Mitchell's famous response to an audience request can be heard on her 1974 live album "Miles of Aisles". Here is the complete quote:

"That's one thing that's always, like, been a difference between, like, the performing arts, and being a painter. A painter does a painting, and he paints it, and that's it, you know. He has the joy of creating it; it hangs on a wall, and somebody buys it, and maybe somebody buys it again, or maybe nobody buys it and it sits up in a loft somewhere until he dies. But he never, you know, nobody ever, nobody ever said to Van Gogh, 'paint a Starry Night again man!' You know? He painted it and that was it."

At the time Ms. Mitchell seems to have forgotten that she wasn't at an art gallery, but rather onstage performing before an audience that paid to hear her sing.


Entered at Fri Jun 15 15:22:06 CEST 2012 from (68.198.166.204)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY
Web: My link

Subject: Jeter and Dylan

This link was on Expecting Rain today. If like me your a Dylan and Jeter fan, it's such a fun read and so true.


Entered at Fri Jun 15 13:50:24 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Palling with Bob

The Blonde on Blonde sessions, leaving The Hawks behind, made sense. He’d tried it. They didn’t have a drummer, and as a unit they lacked “studio tan.” Any one of them was good enough to have replaced any one on the Nashville session guys, but as a unit they weren’t clicking for him, and he booked more people in Nashville too. Robbie was the one he’d picked first with Levon. Al Kooper was almost talismanic after Like A Rolling Stone. He took just the one Hawk.

On Robbie being closest to Dylan (or “the leech”), we watched the fantastic stage actor Mark Rylance being interviewed last night (a recording). He mentioned being with Dylan in “that awful movie, Hearts of Fire”, and (following recent discussions on bass here) he played the part of Dylan’s bass player. He said the tension was palpable. Everyone on the set fantasized about becoming Dylan’s pal. He said he sat at a table with Bob for an hour mentally rehearsing conversation starters. Finally he blurted out, ‘What do you think about Reykjavic?” (where there was a meeting with Gorbachev.). As he said he winced. He realized it was crass as the words floated over to Bob, who replied, “I don’t know nothing about nothing.” Then he said 25 years later Bob had come to see him in the Broadway production of “Jerusalem” (link to my review of British production), an attendance which was very important to him.


Entered at Fri Jun 15 13:40:58 CEST 2012 from (70.54.134.159)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

"Gordon Lightfoot, one of Canada's best known musicians, was inducted into the American Songwriters Hall of Fame in New York."


Entered at Fri Jun 15 13:26:51 CEST 2012 from (70.54.134.159)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Ms. Joni Mitchell

Bruce Springsteen began his musical journey around the same time as Garland Jeffreys. He never could understand why he "made" it big and Garland remained a cult hero. I only discovered Garland via of Louuuuu in the mid-seventies. I was listening to FM radio when it was still worth listening to.....and the announcer shares that here's Garland performing "Wild In The Streets".....a buddy of Louuuuu's from Syracuse University. Thank you Louuuuuu!

Also, Garland is probably more approachable because he doesn't have the "status" as Louuuuu and others. However, it is because of this that Garland has invited his fans (myself included) to a couple of his parties after his gigs. Sometimes the most generous people aren't the ones who have the most economic advantage or status. It's unfair that because his music can't be pigeon holed easily that he didn't receive more recognition and just rewards. In my books......He'll always be one of my top musicians that I can't live without. Garland Jeffreys stood for something.....and he's one of the most gifted singers period....Like Bob Marley, he's a singer-songwriter who stands for peace, love and justice. Long live Garland Jeffreys!


Entered at Fri Jun 15 09:00:37 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

BTW, you also have to consider, and it hurts, is that Joe Public is right, and your very early stuff is actually your best. Think I'll listen to Both Sides Now, Heart of Gold and The Weight this morning.


Entered at Fri Jun 15 08:13:33 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Sorry for doubled post. IPad fumbling again.


Entered at Fri Jun 15 08:12:06 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Requests

I enjoyed the Steve Earle and Neil Young stories. In Neil's case, many artists who say I'm not an oldies act' do need to get real and think, 'hey, ten times as many people came to see my last tour than bought my last album,' When that happens, face it, you are an oldies act. There is a refreshing honesty from The Searchers who KNOW they're an oldies act.

Yes, you do have to play your best known song. Sorry, saying you're bored with it is too precious. Another way, which Van did on the last tour, is to put the biggest song, in his case Brown Eyed Girl (trust me it is --- I have seen a dozen audiences reactions), as the opening number. Then you get it out of the way. You have to be confident than it won't be all downhill after that. But Van being ornery did it in such a radical new version that people barely recognised it.

In my limited area of English Language Teaching, every time I speak to groups of teachers, people bring up my first book. I started writing it in 1976. It was published in 1978. I reckon everything since is way, way better, but I'm still asked about it. I still sign copies. The American version is still in print. Should I say 'no, that bores me now?' No, the only reaction, and it's genuine, is gratitude that people liked it and remember it fondly. Singers should do the same.


Entered at Fri Jun 15 08:10:45 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Requests

I enjoyed the Steve Earle and Neil Young stories. In Neil's case, many artists who say I'm not an oldies act' do need to get real and think, 'hey, ten times as many people came to see my last tour than bought my last album,' When that happens, face it, you are an oldies act. There is a refreshing honesty from The Searchers who KNOW they're an oldies act.

Yes, you do have to play your best known song. Sorry, saying you're bored with it is too precious. Another way, which Van did on the last tour, is to put the biggest song, in his case Brown Eyed Girl (trust me it is --- I have seen a dozen audiences reactions), as the opening number. Then you get it out of the way. You have to be confident than it won't be all downhill after that. But Van being ornery did it in such a radical new version that people barely recognised it.

In my limited area of English Language Teaching, every time I speak to groups of teachers, people bring up my first book. I started writing it in 1976. It was published in 1978. I reckon everything since is way, way better, but I'm still asked about it. I still sign copies. The American version is still in print. Should I say 'no, that bores me now?' No, the only reaction, and it's genuine, is gratitude that people liked it and remember it fondly. Singers should do the same.


Entered at Fri Jun 15 06:44:16 CEST 2012 from (72.78.37.222)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love
Web: My link

Dave, according to the notes on Biograph, "Jet Pilot" is a Highway 61 outtake. That doesn't mean it's right of course. Now I seem to remember the single of "Crawl Out You Window" was out in November which would mean the October session. I think they wanted to get it out fast over the little fiasco with the version from the Highway 61 sessions getting mistakenly released. I heard the earlier version over the phone when a friend called me up and said, they announced "Positively 4th St," but it's not and then put the phone to his radio speaker. When it finally came out a couple of months after that, I knew it wasn't what I heard on the radio, but it took about five more years before the boots started surfacing.


Entered at Fri Jun 15 06:12:53 CEST 2012 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

PSB, of course. I meant the only thing that was released.


Entered at Fri Jun 15 04:23:49 CEST 2012 from (70.24.110.217)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

I just bought an album with Robbie Robertson and Mike Bloomfield on it

chrispscott
February 18th, 2009, 06:20 PM

"I picked up John Hammond Jr's So Many Roads today. I've been meaning to pick this up for a while because it's got 3/5 of The Hawks (aka The Band) and Mike frickin Bloomfield on it. A white-boy blues album from the mid-60s with two of my all time favorite guitarists on it? Yes, please! So I unwrap the packaging only to read that Mike Bloomfield plays piano on it. You read that correctly. Mike "I'm gonna cut you my licks are so sharp" Bloomfield plays piano. What in the holy hell? I can barely hear a piano. I've looked it up and Al Kooper claims it was because Bloomfield was intimidated by Robertson. I don't see how that can be the case when he worked with king ego himself Paul Butterfield.

Don't get me wrong it's a very good album. John Hammond is no Howlin Wolf but he does not do too bad for a rich white kid from New York. Robbie's playing on it is top notch with tone to die for. His mid-60s tone is in just about my ideal as a matter of fact. I was just really hoping to hear some interplay between Robertson and Bloomfield.

Ah well I also picked up a Butterfield Blues Band live album with a version of East-West with Bloomfield and Elvin Bishop going at it HARD and it cured my need for a Bloomfield fix."


Entered at Fri Jun 15 04:17:02 CEST 2012 from (70.24.110.217)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Of course all the other parts of Mike Bloomfield's Story are available.


Entered at Fri Jun 15 03:56:17 CEST 2012 from (70.24.110.217)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

The Michael Bloomfield Story - part 1...around 6:09 Re Levon and The Hawks and Robbie

Thanks so much Kevin. Two more weeks to go with full pay then back pay for summer and then 80% pay for 12 months......Yahoooo!!!!!

Btw, I think you're the only Torontonian I haven't crossed paths with so far.
I've met Bill M, John D, Blind Willie McTell, Calm, Pretty Little Girl, Wittgenstein, Cobi, Bill Avis, Nothern Boy , Northern Girl, JT......


Entered at Fri Jun 15 03:44:47 CEST 2012 from (24.218.16.94)

Posted by:

Dave H

Piecing together the backing musicians on Dylan's mid-'60s stuff is tricky at best, but it seems as if there were three studio sessions with the Hawks. They were fit in between road dates in late '65 and early '66:

(1) October 5, 1965 (with Levon Helm on drums): Medicine Sunday [early version of Temporary Like Achilles]; Jet Pilot; Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window?; I Wanna Be Your Lover; Number One [instrumental track].

(2) November 30, 1965 (with Bobby Gregg on drums): Visions of Johanna [early version with "nightingale's code" lyrics], Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window?

(3) January 21, 1966 (with Sandy Konikoff on drums): She's Your Lover Now

Sources can't seem to agree whether the released take of Can You Please... is from the first or second session, but it sounds to me like Gregg on drums rather than Levon. There were then two additional New York sessions which included Rick and Robbie but with Paul Griffin and Al Kooper replacing Richard and Garth; these sessions produced the album cut of One of Us Must Know before Dylan decided to move the sessions to Nashville, taking only Robbie and Al Kooper with him.

It's sort of odd that Dylan gave up so soon on the Hawks in the studio even as he continued to tour with them, though it's hard to argue with the results.


Entered at Fri Jun 15 02:53:05 CEST 2012 from (24.252.147.174)

Posted by:

Calvin

Couple stories about musicians and playing what the audience wants...

Was the summer of 2000 and Steve Earle was on the Transcendental Blues tour, so he was just starting to become a decent seller again and really hadnt had many "hits" at this point. Well I was in a small club seeing him and this drunk kept yelling "Copperhead Road"-which was essentially the only hit of Earle's career at this point. After listening to the guy yell at him for 3-4 songs Earle finally yells back at him "Dude, do your really think I'm not going to play it tonight, calm down".

Around 1987-88 Im seeing Neil Young with about 15,000 other people. And some people in the front row were yelling for Old Man or Cinnamon Girl or something like that, and Young stops the concert, sits down at the piano and lectures us for 5 minutes about he isnt an oldies act and if they came to see a musician who plays songs from 15 years ago and hasnt grown at all since him they can leave now and blah, blah blah

And the he played Needle and the Damage Done.


Entered at Fri Jun 15 02:40:46 CEST 2012 from (72.78.37.222)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love
Web: My link

Subject: Band and Bob revisted

Pat, They cut a lot more than "Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window, some stuff with Levon and some without and also with other musicians in attendance, but it wasn't used. For whatever reason, it wasn't used and Dylan apparently wasn't happy with what they were getting. The session info has always been a bit sketchy to say the least and in some cases wrong. For instance the early take of "Leopard-Skin Pillbox Hat" on the No Direction Home Bootleg series lists Bloomfield when it's clearly Robbie. Sean Wilentz who has had access to some info recently decided it had to be Danko on "One of Us Must Know."

Guys like Bobby Gregg and Paul Griffin probably made more doing sessions than they would have on the road.


Entered at Thu Jun 14 22:57:50 CEST 2012 from (58.104.2.199)

Posted by:

Graham

I recall an interview with Robbie where he said he didn't know much about Dylan before they met but after he heard some of the songs on Highway 61 Revisited he understood why Dylan wanted to us the Hawks.

BobF, what you write is ironic given the sentiments in Joni's song 'For Free'.


Entered at Thu Jun 14 22:54:53 CEST 2012 from (24.124.49.244)

Posted by:

Dexy

Web: My link

Subject: Ringo on Levon

Nice comments at the link above from Ringo about Levon and also about Clarence Clemons.


Entered at Thu Jun 14 21:45:04 CEST 2012 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: Massey Hall fund-raiser

A very nice article touting yet another tribute concert (tomorrow) to benefit The Kate McGarrigle Fund of the McGill University Health Centre foundation.
Emmylou, B. Cockburn, plus the usual suspects.
"Exclusive gala" tickets only $250 - gets you a good seat, a tax receipt and "entry to an intimate post-show cocktail with the performers."


Entered at Thu Jun 14 21:35:50 CEST 2012 from (99.236.202.207)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: Carly Rae Jepsen

Another Canadian we are proud of, making her "mark" on the BB charts..

'Call Me Maybe' makes it to No. 1 on Hot 100 Now that Carly Rae Jepsen's "Call Me Maybe" has been permanently etched in our brains, the single's now also taken over the top spot on Billboard's Hot 100 chart.

Jepsen's catchy single (and possible song of the summer) dethroned Gotye's "Somebody That I Used To Know," making Jepsen the first lead songstress to take her first Hot 100 song entry all the way to No. 1 since Ke$ha did the same with "Tik Tok" at the start of 2010.

It's a little surprising that it took "Call Me Maybe" some time to make its ascent on the Hot 100, seeing that it's been in rotation for months, and that's just Stateside. Our Canadian pals made "Call Me Maybe" a No. 1 single in February.

Gotye is still riding high at No. 2 with "Somebody that I Used to Know," with Maroon 5's "Payphone" at No. 3 and fun.'s "We Are Young" at No. 4. Adele, meanwhile, has notched her 24th week at No. 1 on the Billboard 200 albums chart with "21."

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxox

My signature quote...

"WHEN THE POWER OF LOVE, OVER POWERS THE LOVE OF POWER, THERE WILL BE PEACE!"


Entered at Thu Jun 14 21:13:21 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Joni might have meant Vincent by Don McClean, which some people call Starry Night. It's easily confused. But that's puzzling because Don sings it every time he goes out. Surely she can't be equating a painting with running through a three minute pop song? I can't find out how long it took Van Gogh to paint it. "He painted furiously" but it must have taken at least all night. Three minutes of "Big Yellow Taxi" for the paying public is nothing in comparison. I mean it would be somewhat arrogant to think they'd paid to hear extracts from "Mingus."


Entered at Thu Jun 14 20:25:07 CEST 2012 from (70.50.65.228)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Bob F……A tricky area that……….Sounds like Garland was pandering and if I was in the crowd I would not have appreciated an encore for just one drunk………………I get the distinction you are making but sometimes I think a bit of Joni in some of the big time male stars would have helped all of them................Joni is a true artist.....just not always a true performer.


Entered at Thu Jun 14 20:07:12 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Although I've always been a huge fan of Mike Bloomfield, I believe Robbie's style of playing was better suited for Dylan. At the time Robbie had greater sense of dynamics, adjusting his volume so as to not get in the way of the singer, something he no doubt was drilled in with Ronnie Hawkins. Apart from differences playing style, I also doubt that Mr. Bloomfield would have lasted through the rigors of a world tour, as he suffered from intense bouts of insomnia. That's a moot point, as Bloomfield at that juncture in his career wanted to call his own shots, rather than be a sideman, evidenced by his departure from Butterfield's band to start Electric Flag.

Mickey Jones left Trini Lopez to play with Johnny Rivers with a large increase in salary to $500 a week. When he got the call to join Dylan, he got a bigger bump to $750 a week, with expenses covered. One big plus Mr. Jones brought to the table was that he had proved his reliability, having done extensive touring of Europe, U.K. and other parts of the world with Lopez and Rivers.


Entered at Thu Jun 14 19:29:05 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: How The Band made Bob Famous

I was thinking about that. Bloomfield / Brooks / Kooper / Griffin / Lay or Gregg would have done a great job on Tombstone Blues or Highway 61 Revisited live, but the 66 tour was getting more interesting than that, and the time Kooper & Robbie spent on Blonde on Blonde together must have contributed to the difference between the odd 65 fragments and the full-on 66 sound. OK, they weren't approaching those songs, but being part of the creative process must have changed what Robbie did on the other songs. I think Rick and Robbie made the major difference, both of them stylistically different from Brooks and Bloomfield … obviously Garth too, but Al Kooper had the ear for the right thing to play on Dylan anyway. And as I said earlier, Rick got to sing upfront. Who would decline!

Dylan seems to have gone to a lot of trouble to land Mickey Jones from Johnny Rivers (don't forget he was the best paid guy in the line-up), and I think Mickey made a definite contribution to the Take No Prisoners playing. Levon was a way better drummer, but what Mickey did was right for that tour.


Entered at Thu Jun 14 19:17:43 CEST 2012 from (68.198.166.204)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Joni Mitchell

The problem with "artist" like Joni Mitchell is they were famous and rich from a very young age so they have no real appreciation of their audience. That's why she can say silly things like that quote about you don't ask Van Gogh to paint 'A Starry Night' again when she was annoyed because people were requesting songs. I recently saw Garland Jeffreys where he performed 96 Tears at the end of the show with the whole bit where he jumps into the audience and sings the refrain with every one. After the final encore a drunk charges up the aisle screaming that Garland hadn't performed 96 Tears! Every one is shouting and laughing at the guy but what does Garland do, he sings 96 Tears all over again with his arms around this drunk guy singing the song with him. Garland doesn't live in a mansion and he doesn't have Joni Mitchell type money but he loves and appreciates his audience. That what I call an Artist.


Entered at Thu Jun 14 19:18:53 CEST 2012 from (64.105.104.78)

Posted by:

Pat B

PSB is quite right. The Hawks never really cut much of anything with Dylan in the studio except Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window. Dylan pointedly did not use them for BoB except RR--Sooner or Later may be Rick but it certainly isn't Richard or Garth. Really wasn't until Planet Waves that they did an album together.


Entered at Thu Jun 14 18:02:58 CEST 2012 from (72.78.37.222)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love
Web: My link

Subject: What the Band did for Bob

Peter, it's really hard to say what would have happened if Bloomfield and Kooper (who left after the Hollywood Bowl) had stayed with Dylan and the group was Brooks on bass and whoever would have been on drums. Both Bloomfield and Robertson played guitar in a way that reacted to the lyrics, but they had different styles of playing. Robbie was into basically short explosive bursts and Bloomfield was more into runs and also playing fast. Kooper is and was a great appreciator of The Band, and has written and talked about Garth's work, usually in awe, especially about Garth's work on "Thin Man." But what Kooper had was that instinctual thing of knowing what to play that would make a song a hit.


Entered at Thu Jun 14 16:48:25 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

There are a lot of bass players and ex-bass players here!


Entered at Thu Jun 14 15:33:38 CEST 2012 from (78.79.61.171)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: when it comes to playing bass guitar on 12 bar blues, pretty much anyone with four fingers and a thumb on each hand can cope

It hurt me deeply!

Beside that I agree with PETER V about the lyrics in 'Saved'. Hearing this kind of text in my own language and from a furious gospel choir givs me nightmares. Somehow it doesn't sound as horrible in English.


Entered at Thu Jun 14 14:11:03 CEST 2012 from (89.98.112.112)

Posted by:

Hildairene

Location: The Low Countries

Subject: David P

Thank you so much for that link...I had it in my favourites collection but it got taken off....I wish I could download it somehow.....it is my all time favourite Dylan and The Band live performance


Entered at Thu Jun 14 13:12:11 CEST 2012 from (67.71.1.186)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Al Kooper and Mike Bloomfield at the Fillmore West 1968

1) The Weight (Robbie Robertson)
2) Mary Ann (Ray Charles)

Personnel: Mike Bloomfield (electric guitar), Al Kooper (organ), John Kahn (bass), Canadian Skip Prokop (drums)

I've always enjoyed "Sanctuary" CD by J Geils Band.


Entered at Thu Jun 14 12:41:35 CEST 2012 from (24.252.147.174)

Posted by:

Calvin

Bill, The original Lineup of J Geils got back together 2-3 years ago. So Woolf, Geils and Magic Dick are all currently touring together. At least from my recollection.


Entered at Thu Jun 14 09:01:56 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Kooper

September 1971 - it's not dated, but I found out from new releases in "Zig Zag".There's a lot more in the interview.


Entered at Thu Jun 14 07:12:08 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

Subject: You can call him Al

Al Kooper is a pretty consistent raconteur anyway, but that Zig Zag interview was circa 1972, which then would have seemed a long time after the event, but you now realise was the blink of an eye.

It made me think how much The Band did for Dylan on that 1965 to 1966 tour. if he had stuck with a Bloomfield, Brooks, Kooper line up, he would have lost all that reactive responsive Robbie guitar playing and got well played, but more conventional solos instead. I'm sure Rick's natural singing ability led to his first use of backing vocals, also like McCartney he was a melodic bassist, not a steady blues riff guy.. Though Garth is obviously a more individual and inventive player, Kooper himself would have been fine - he worked so well with Dylan that he was brought back on board for Blonde on Blonde. Richard is less clear, mainly because piano wasn't well mixed or maybe less able to cut through in the audience recordings we have.

So say not what Dylan did for The Band, but rather what The Band did for Dylan.


Entered at Thu Jun 14 04:40:54 CEST 2012 from (72.230.109.86)

Posted by:

Bashful Bill

Location: Minoa, NY (still)

Subject: J Geils

I just heard today that they'll be doing a free show here this Summer. Does anyone know who's in the current lineup? Again - I tried to find this info to no avail. thanks...........


Entered at Thu Jun 14 04:38:39 CEST 2012 from (72.230.109.86)

Posted by:

Bashful Bill

Location: Minoa, NY

Subject: Esquire

I recollect an editorial ( more of a rant, essentially) in Esquire magazine shortly after Paul Butterfield died. The editor was pretty pissed off at the latest waste of life in the rock&roll world. I remember some of it quite distinctly and will share but with paraphrasing(my memory isn't THAT distinct): the writer said that Butter reportedly attended AA and NA meetings while drunk or stoned yet claiming sobriety while speaking ( I knew little about 12 step at the time and didn't take note of what a violation of anonymity that was. but then again, he was dead, so maybe the writer thought his point trumped anonymity). He referred to Butter and Rick's excesses while on the road together, saying they practically competed to see which one could get farther out there. He ended with the sentence : "When is this shit going to stop?". I tried to track it down online but wasn't successful.......


Entered at Thu Jun 14 00:37:00 CEST 2012 from (58.104.2.231)

Posted by:

Graham

With regard to Newport etc I think over time these events have achieved legendary status but at the time it was just young folks having fun and people probably didn't take it all that seriously. I remember an interview with Ringo from around 1963 or 4 when someone asked him what he was going to do after his music career ended and he said he wanted to open some women's hairdressing salons. Also, now it must be pretty hard to remember with any degree of accuracy what actually happened. I don't think any of these stories lose anything in the retelling.


Entered at Wed Jun 13 23:58:12 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Zig Zag interview

I was looking for something else an hour ago, and found Zig Zag magazine #21 (Marc Bolan cover). I hadn't picked this one up in years, but it has an Al Kooper family tree and interview. He goes on to name names at Newport!

"Well some of our set that day was a bit fucked up … Sam Lay turned the beat of Maggies Farm around and that ended up as a piece of shit, but the other stuff was great."

So Bloomfield blamed Jerome, and Al blamed Sam. There's lots more on Forest Hills, and how Hollywood Bowl went down well … opposite reaction.

Also, on Bloomfield and Dylan:

"He was talking to me and Harvey (Brooks) over lunch one day and he said 'you cats are going to be really famous one day if you stay with Bob, and you'll make pots of money, but I just want to play the blues.' Well, I thought he was an arsehole and a mad arsehole at that, but I understood later it was a groovy decision.'

Mmm. I think Al's initial reaction was probably the right one!


Entered at Wed Jun 13 19:49:54 CEST 2012 from (64.105.104.78)

Posted by:

Pat B

A country musician decides to get his son music lessons on any instrument the young fella wants. The kid picks bass. The father gets him a nice amp and a Fender bass and sends him to the best bass teacher in Nashville.

The kid comes home from the first lesson all excited and Dad asks him what he learned.

"See this bottom E string, Dad? I learned everything you need to know about it."

After practicing all week, the kid goes to his second lesson and comes home equally excited. Dad asks what he learned this time.

"See this next string. It's an A. I learned everything you need to know about it." So the Dad asks, "When is your lesson next week?" The kids looks at him surprised and says, "Lesson?!? I got a gig."


Entered at Wed Jun 13 19:41:12 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: The Thin Man, The Hawks & Mr. Jones

Dylan in 1966 with a band that knew what to do.


Entered at Wed Jun 13 19:34:26 CEST 2012 from (24.252.147.174)

Posted by:

Calvin

And with that last statement Peter you nailed while I play the Bass and not another instrument, its much easier.

Arnold and Lay were hired away from Howlin Wolf's Band by Butterfield werent they? They were hard core Blues Artists. That period where he was in Howlin Wolf and then Butterfield's band in Arnold's High Point. But Sam Lay recorded some solo albums and played for Bo Didley, Muddy Waters, John Lee Hooker to mention a few. And if I not mistaken he is in the Jazz, Blues and RnR Hall of Fame. Now Im not a huge HOF Guy-but that is quite show of respect when you make all 3.


Entered at Wed Jun 13 18:06:36 CEST 2012 from (70.50.65.228)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

For Jed, David and anyone else interested in the Blues.....above LINK is to an interview that Buudy Guy did recently with the CBC's Jian Ghomeshi ( a Band fan )............Long time GB'rs will remember that this was a show the late Steve never missed........If only he had missed a few of the political ones...

Have fun on your break BEG.


Entered at Wed Jun 13 16:58:06 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

To be honest, David, when it comes to playing bass guitar on 12 bar blues, pretty much anyone with four fingers and a thumb on each hand can cope. You don't need to be Paul McCartney or Jaco Pastorious, though of course having the sense of rhythm and bounce of a John McVie certainly helps.


Entered at Wed Jun 13 16:55:50 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Congratulations, Nux. It's the most wonderful event there can be. After two or three days, you get over the need to sit and stare all the time and will be able to get some sleep yourself. For a couple of hours. Enjoy every second. However tiring it seems now, in twenty years you'll remember these days as magic.


Entered at Wed Jun 13 16:52:58 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Sam Lay & Jerome Arnold were excellent musicians when it came to playing blues. They just didn't fit with Dylan's style of music, a problem which was exacerbated at Newport when Dylan recruited the band practically on the spot with little rehearsal time.


Entered at Wed Jun 13 15:47:46 CEST 2012 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC
Web: My link

Some heartfelt words about Levon from Larry Campbell & Teresa Williams -- link goes to Larry's site, then click on 'Levon Helm 1940 - 2012'.


Entered at Wed Jun 13 15:35:30 CEST 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT and LvdB

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Vishoek of Fish Hoek

Amazing again! Vishoek (Afrikaans) or Fish Hoek (on the map) is a coastal town next to Cape Town. The Beach nearby is beautiful, but beware of the sharks. There have been a few shark deaths in past years.


Entered at Wed Jun 13 14:53:56 CEST 2012 from (63.88.115.195)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: PA

Subject: RR

RR was Dylan's guitarist on Blond on Blond.


Entered at Wed Jun 13 13:15:39 CEST 2012 from (92.18.173.137)

Posted by:

Solomon

Apparently Ronnie Hawkins was so unsure about the young Robbie that he was going to put Levon on lead guitar? I guess that must have been in the very early days.


Entered at Wed Jun 13 12:55:58 CEST 2012 from (92.18.173.137)

Posted by:

Solomon

Web: My link

Subject: Levon

Paul Jones played an obituary tribute to Levon Helm on his Blues show this week.


Entered at Wed Jun 13 12:53:39 CEST 2012 from (67.71.2.245)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

A friend sent this one of "Levon Helm, Rick Danko, Garth Hudson, Jimmy Weider, Richard Bell, Randy Ciarlante special guest Colin Lindin. Command Performance Canada 1994


Entered at Wed Jun 13 12:43:11 CEST 2012 from (67.71.2.245)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

SUNDAY AFTERNOON WITH BOB DYLAN AND MIKE BLOOMFIELD

"But one thing bothered me. Dylan is talking about his band, how they play differently from anyone else, and then he's quoted as follows: 'The guy I always miss, and I think he'd still be around if he'd stayed with me, actually, was Mike Bloomfield,' Dylan says of his collaborator on Highway 61 Revisited."

Mr. Dennis: So glad that it brought you fond memories. I really enjoyed my time in Woodstock and Saugherties. We ate at the former Get Away and didn't know it at the time. Thanks for correcting the person who originally supplied the link.

I'm taking a sabbatical next year Nux, so if my friend from The Beach goes back home to see her mom who lives in Capetown....hopefully I'll be back too as she has her own home there in Fish Hook. She was born in Ecuador, moved to England as an infant until she was nine and then moved to Capetown. We met at one of our universities in our "Making of the Working Class" Sociology course. We saw Tony Bird perform a couple of times here who is from Malawi.

Kevin John: I was one of the unfortunate ones who made a mistake in referring to "white blues musicians". I meant the older musicians that came from the plantations....where blues came from. I cringed even before you said anything. I always thought Richard had the soul of the Band and Levon the heart.

I agree with you Calvin: Joni isn't going to perform anything Band like or perform a song that Robbie played on one of her records....She's going to perform what she wants to perform because she is a true artist and beats to her own drum. If you didn't know her music....Your loss. How many women performed at TLW????.....speaks volume. When I was at one of Rick's Tributes at the Horseshoe.....There was barely any women there too.....Anyway, she only kissed Robbie...... lol She knew him a looooong time as she played the Riverboat here and Robbie is from Toronto and.....and......Listen to one of Joni's live recordings. She talks about how no one tells a painter what to paint so why would you tell a musician????? She was at TLW to honour the Band but like all musicians....She's performing for herself as well. In some ways the Band came full circle backing up everyone again........Amazing musicians but they worked so hard learning everyone's songs.......What were they thinking????


Entered at Wed Jun 13 10:01:08 CEST 2012 from (83.27.65.50)

Posted by:

arek

Location: Noway
Web: My link

Subject: Helo

Helo everyone :) I like this site :)


Entered at Wed Jun 13 06:56:20 CEST 2012 from (72.78.37.222)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love
Web: My link

Subject: Newport '65

Peter, Al kooper has voiced similar feelings about Dylan's backup at Newport '65, though he isn't as specific as Bloomfield when it comes to naming names. Dylan actually liked Sam Lay who is reported to be on some tracks on "Highway 61 Revisited," like the title track.

But Dylan never intended to use the Butterfield Band to tour, he knew it was Butterfield's band, not to mention Grossman was their manager. He hoped he could lure Bloomfield away, but that didn't happen.

The official story of course is that Dylan heard about The Hawks from Grossman's assistant Mary Martin. My suspicion however is he heard about them from John Hammond Jr., and they were friends. Check out pics of the Bringing It All Back Home sessions, and Hammond is hanging out.


Entered at Tue Jun 12 22:45:57 CEST 2012 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Saved

Thanks for clip,Kevin. I recall enjoying those shows with Petty a lot.Saw 3 of them.Bob was in excellent form and voice & I really dig/dug backup singers.


Entered at Tue Jun 12 22:09:47 CEST 2012 from (70.50.65.228)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: Bob doing one from "Saved" and confirming his heroes are few

And on Butterfield.....indeed David…...and a good point that has many examples in Jazz and even rock n roll too……….integration is usually the first step and often a noble one…......


Entered at Tue Jun 12 22:00:33 CEST 2012 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Blues

White,black,who cares.Play the blues well is all that counts. Saw many shows with Butterfield @ Uncle Willie's in Kingston.Saw Rick,Jorma,Jack & many other greats there. Anyone recall The Flamingo club in Saugerties? Great show with Levon in there--a real fine dance party. Butterfield did some excellent harp work,but I always found his playing less intriguing than Musselwhite.Few guitarists in history were/are in Bloomfield's league. The Band,however were best positioned musically to play with Bob. As for Saved,a superb album from a musical perspective albeit lyrically of little interest.


Entered at Tue Jun 12 21:19:48 CEST 2012 from (68.198.166.204)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY
Web: My link

Subject: Regina McCrary and The Chicago Mass Choir doing Pressing On

Regina McCrary and the Chicago Mass Choir doing a beautiful version of Bob Dylan's Pressing On.


Entered at Tue Jun 12 21:03:44 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Newport 65

This is what Mike Bloomfield said

"We were all at Newport, Kooper, me, Barry Goldberg and Jerome from the Butterfield Band playing bass … and he (Jerome) ‘s fucking everything up … and we’re playing and it’s sounding horrible and finally it’s time for the gig, and me and Barry are throwing up in these outhouses".

I thought the issue was that Jerome Arnold and Sam Lay weren't any good, which is why Dylan recruited Levon & Robbie?


Entered at Tue Jun 12 20:37:36 CEST 2012 from (86.182.154.90)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Nux

Congratulations, Nux.


Entered at Tue Jun 12 20:36:07 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Kevin: A key point with Paul Butterfield's band in 1965 was that it blurred distinctions of color, with the rhythm section of Sam Lay & Jerome Arnold recruited from Howlin' Wolf's band.


Entered at Tue Jun 12 19:37:34 CEST 2012 from (108.54.247.103)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Calvin

Good luck with the book.


Entered at Tue Jun 12 19:35:00 CEST 2012 from (108.54.247.103)

Posted by:

Joan

Web: My link

Subject: Nux

Congratulations! You'll get some sleep in a few months :-)


Entered at Tue Jun 12 19:17:33 CEST 2012 from (70.50.65.228)

Posted by:

Kevin J

……a few points on the Paul Butterfield/TLW and Blues discussion taking place here over the last week:

* Could everyone that does it and most here do – STOP with the reference to “White blues player”…….if you all want to refer to The Beatles as “white rock” or The Band as “white rock” or Levon Helm or Gregg Allman as having “white soul” then fine…….but it is madness pure and simple…..Levon Helm had “soul” – period end of story…….are young men and women of colour not allowed in Country music……if they get there in large enough numbers and stay there for 50 years…….will it be ok to call them “black or brown or yellow country”?

* Paul Butterfield………..I have never skipped his segment at TLW……..EVER…and not because it is a performance for the ages but because it is one of the 5 best photographed/filmed scenes of any song at any rock concert ever…….The lights going off ( an accident ) adds to the magic to be sure but the shots from behind Levon’s kit are stunning and the excitement in the room/arena is palpable……..Joni Mitchell has been skipped by me – I would guess roughly 45-47 times of the 50 or so times I have watched the film. I love her but she was not appropriate at all that evening – other than adding beautifully to some songs from backstage.

Serenity…….I used to read you to find out who was on David Letterman….now I’m afraid to look !


Entered at Tue Jun 12 18:40:24 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Calvin: Also beginning around the late '60s, Bill Graham and other promoters began adding elder bluesmen to concert bills. I remember going to see Steppenwolf when they first played here in Atlanta around that time and the James Cotton Blues Band opened. So in many ways, the young, white acolytes helped revive the careers of older bluesmen to wider audiences through both live performances and recordings.


Entered at Tue Jun 12 18:28:54 CEST 2012 from (64.105.104.78)

Posted by:

Pat B

Bob F, Last Chance Lounge and Ashes, as I recall. A lot of boots from that period too.


Entered at Tue Jun 12 17:57:25 CEST 2012 from (206.18.100.1)

Posted by:

Calvin

It strikes me that an offshoot of the Young White Guys Playing the Blue Genre is a whole new audience when looking for the music of Charley Patton, Sun House, BB King and the like. Perhaps why some many Elder Statesmen Blues Giants where releasing major albums, career wise, in the mid to late 1960s.


Entered at Tue Jun 12 17:34:02 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Ah. That's what we do when we have dull and formal people in Poole. We dispatch them at once to Finland where most people find them scintillating and exciting!


Entered at Tue Jun 12 17:24:16 CEST 2012 from (78.79.59.95)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

I spoke with a very dull and formal person the other day. He said: "I am coming from a town which no one here has ever heard of. I bet you haven't either". Me: "...which is...?" He answered: "Poole".

WHY DIDN'T I BET!!??


Entered at Tue Jun 12 17:14:20 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Vinyl Siding: Charlie Musselwhite

In addition to the Paul Butterfield Blues Band's debut album and John Hammond's "So Many Roads" in 1965, another landmark record that helped spread the popularity of blues to the white rock 'n roll audience was "Stand Back! Here Comes Charley* Musselwhite's Southside Band" released by Vanguard in 1967. One of the songs covered on that album was the instrumental "Christo Redemptor" (see link), which was an adaptation of Duke Pearson's "Cristo Redentor", recorded by jazz trumpeter Donald Byrd on his groundbreaking 1963 album "a new perspective: band and voices". Cristo Redentor is Portuguese for Christ the Redeemer, as in the iconic statute that rises above Rio de Janiero. Aided by Harvey Mandel, Barry Goldberg, Fred Below and Bob Anderson, Mr. Musselwhite blended jazz & blues with rock.

*the original Vanguard LP cover misspelled Mr. Musselwhite's first name


Entered at Tue Jun 12 17:01:59 CEST 2012 from (41.162.7.114)

Posted by:

Nux Schwartz

Subject: Durban

JT:I'm on the coast in Durban,but let me know and I'll try and connect with you!


Entered at Tue Jun 12 16:55:52 CEST 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT and LvdB

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Cape Town etc

Amazing, Nux! Small world. We have family in Cape Town, Randburg and elsewhere in South Africa. We are hoping to visit again in the next year or two. Where are you?


Entered at Tue Jun 12 16:54:16 CEST 2012 from (24.218.16.94)

Posted by:

Dave H

Web: My link

More sad news, as we've lost another participant in The Last Waltz. Dennis St. John, longtime drummer for Neil Diamond who sat in on "Dry Your Eyes" with Diamond at Winterland in '76, has died at age 71.


Entered at Tue Jun 12 16:52:24 CEST 2012 from (198.179.198.1)

Posted by:

Calvin

Brubeck soft in the Genre? You know I have read some late 50s article taking him to task for being a band that played to the college crowd. Time Out changed that all though, cant remember the last Top Ten Jazz Albums of all time, hell Top 5, Ive seen it wasnt one. Funny how 60 years ago playing in 9/8 or 5/4 was considered so revolutionary. They group says they got the idea from listening to Turkish Street Musicians while on a European Tour.


Entered at Tue Jun 12 16:37:47 CEST 2012 from (41.162.7.114)

Posted by:

Nux Schwartz

Web: My link

Subject: Sleeping

Thanks everyone for your good wishes.Here is an oldie I found and it is something I am not getting much of at the moment!

Brown Eyed Girl and JT:it would indeed have been great to link up with you in Africa,when is your next trip?


Entered at Tue Jun 12 16:31:24 CEST 2012 from (68.172.215.87)

Posted by:

Dennis

Location: West Saugerties/Quarryville

Subject: Getaway Inn

Ms. BEG, as a stroke of my good fortune (to have lived in the area and attended most Getaway Country Inn show), I might note that the show you've refered to was actually from the St. Patrick's day weekend of 1985, and if my memory serves me well, was on Sunday, March 17th, 1985.

There WAS another show in July of 1985, also at the Getaway, and I believe may have been on the 17th (a Wednesday), but there's no Danny Boy on the July show.

The Getaway was a terrific "road house" of a tavern where many shows took place, most notably featuring Levon and some concoction of both Stan Szelest and The Ravens and/or The Woodstock All-Stars. The Getaway was also my opportunity to first see Jimmy Weider and "Rambo" Ciarlante.

Another note from the times (1985-ish), Mr. Butterfield was something of a hero to many of us local Getaway attendees, and if he wasn't playing, he would be hanging out with the crowd....and local fans knew he could play a lot more than one note: he played the audience and was a master at his profession.

Finally, I think there's a gal over in Woodstock that has many fond memories of The Getaway Country Inn (or New World Home Cooking, as it's been known for years).

And thanks again for stirrin' up many fond memories!


Entered at Tue Jun 12 16:27:14 CEST 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Love

Love was a group in the mid 60s from LA. 'Seven and Seven Is' is a great piece of garage band music. Arthur Lee and Love predated Sly and the Family Stone by a few years. The Dave Brubeck Quartet broke ground as a jazz band but, like Butterfield and his band, they were considered 'soft' in the genre by some. They nevertheless did well and sold well.


Entered at Tue Jun 12 16:27:09 CEST 2012 from (63.88.115.195)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: PA
Web: My link

Subject: Levon Tribute Tonight at World Cafe Live

Philadelphia Area fans may want to check this out.

Ron & Marley Present: A Commemorative Tribute to Levon Helm

Join us for a tribute to the incomparable Levon Helm. A portion of the proceeds will benefit the Levon Helm Studios. Confirmed artsits include; Toy Soldiers Eric Slick (of Dr. Dog) and friends Levee drivers Kalob Griffin Band Up the Chain Brad Hinton Wadsworth Sisters Birdie Busch The Lawsuits Josh Olmstead Bob Beach Steve Adrien Reju John Francis Chris Kasper Pete Donnelly & more to be announced… Please Note: Hoots & Hellmouth will no longer be performing Tuesday, June 12th, 2012 Doors 7 pm | Show 8 pm | Downstairs Live Advance Tickets: $10 + processing fees Day of Show Tickets: $12 + processing fees


Entered at Tue Jun 12 15:47:37 CEST 2012 from (206.18.100.1)

Posted by:

Calvin

Web: My link

Joni always struck me as a musician in the here and now. Meaning when she does play live it isnt about the "Hits", it absolutely about what she is working on at that moment. Wasnt she knee deep in her association with Jazz Musicians at the time of TLW? When did she try and collaborate with Mingus? Yeah, wasnt exactly in the Boy's power alley.

In all fairness Graham some of the "criticism" of Butter came from responses that claimed he was a Blues Great-Significant Impact on the Genre was a comment I believe. It boils down to some of us think that the Young White Man Playing Blues Genre of the late 60s was pretty bad, and although the first Butterfield Band is argueably the best of that genre on the whole he's a solid, but not significantly above average Blues Muscian-frankly his odd style of Hamonica playing made emulating him, and thereby being influenced by him, quite difficult. He did have an eye for talent as an young man through, those first few bands were loaded with Talent. Bloomfield might be my pick for the "Most Talented Wasted by Drug/Alcohol ABuse" in the history of RnR. I dont think saying that is hating on him. Solid player, with a unique style and a great eye for talent isnt quite an insult.

One odd sort of off shoot question though-I cant think of another charting band in 1965 that had a mixture of White and Black Musicians. I know it wasnt that many years ago that the Paul Brubeck Quartet caused a stir because they were 2-2 so to speak. Can anyone think of another group? Or remember if it was spoken to?

BTW, for those of you who go back a few years and followed my transition from Camera Store Owner to Archivist Im releasing my first book, albeit an Arcadia one, the Amazon Link is above if anyone cares to look at it.


Entered at Tue Jun 12 15:36:05 CEST 2012 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

mike h

Web: My link

Recenty uploaded / posted by Randy - "One for the Ricky Fans. A rare take on a ballad Ricky co-wrote for his trio album entitled Driftin Away. We mostly did this tune on Rick solo gigs so I'm glad I found this version with all the boys on it. Plus there's a quick Levon and Rick interview before we kick it off."


Entered at Tue Jun 12 15:21:04 CEST 2012 from (68.198.166.204)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Michael McDermott

Pat B, it's a very cool small world sometimes! What albums of his did you play on?


Entered at Tue Jun 12 14:06:54 CEST 2012 from (67.71.2.184)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Rick Danko, Levon Helm & Paul Butterfield - Live at The Getaway, West Saugerties, NY 17 July 1985

Walkin' Blues
Mannish Boy
Let Me Ride in Your Automobile
Spoonful
They'll Take Everything You've Got
Danny Boy
Louisiana Blues
Getaway Inn
Willie and the Handjive
Crazy Mama
Mystery Train


Entered at Tue Jun 12 13:52:42 CEST 2012 from (67.71.2.184)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Tom Ellis Interview
By Dennis Carelli
Mel Bay’s HarmonicaSessions® eZine
August 2005

"Part 2 of our interview with Tom Ellis, one of the co-founders of HOOT (Harmonica Organization Of Texas), owner of Tom's Mics, a leading supplier of vintage harmonica microphones to players all over the world, an excellent harp player for over the past 30 years and the author of a series of articles on the music and personal journey of Paul Butterfield"......Article all about PB.

Hey Graham: imagezulu and myself are with you on anything Van. I have all his recordings but I did sell his country ones this year...I'm always downsizing now. I don't care about being a completist anymore. I've seen him perform a few times as well but the last time he was too greedy with ticket prices....I had to say noooooo.........His performance at TLW was absolutely magical for me....and yet some people talk about his attire at the time rather than the magic that transpired.


Entered at Tue Jun 12 11:14:30 CEST 2012 from (58.104.5.117)

Posted by:

Graham

I just went to take my garbage out and the guy building a house across the road had the radio on and they were playing All Along the Watchtower. I remember when Hendrix died too. Peter, you must be a few years older than me. I was sitting in our lounge when my dad came in and said 'Have you heard of a pop singer called Jimi Hendrix?'. Even though I wasn't a huge Hendrix fan at that time hearing that he had died had a really strange affect on me. After that I became a massive fan. I remember the Cry of Love, Rainbow Bridge and then Hendrix in the West coming out. Absolutely stunning. I think with all the repacking of the Hendrix 'product' that has gone on something has been lost. All three albums had great covers too.


Entered at Tue Jun 12 10:08:52 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Paint My Mailbox Blue

My habit of checking the iPad in bed with a cup of tea in the morning leads to thought association. Graham’s tale about housepainting with his dad started me off. I saw this very bright blue. Around 1965 I painted our house with my dad. He was in the motor trade and was forever doing deals. This very, very bright blue paint was an excess purchase by a large car showroom (I assume Ford by the colour). It was left over, and I guess that he’d done a deal for it. When we moved house in 1958, our garage was full of snow chains. He was a sales rep for tyres and tyre technology had improved, the weather had got better and some garage had wanted to dump its stock. They said there was no call for snow chains anymore. He took the pile and I walked round it to get my bike for years. Then came January 1963, the worst snowfall for a century, snow on the ground till late April, and he sold the lot.

Anyway, I then fast forwarded to painting my mum’s house in 1970. A sudden sharp recall. They announced Jimi Hendrix had died on the radio. I know they then played Tears of A Clown by Smokey Robinson & The Miracles, then re-released and the UK #1 single. Hendrix’s death hit me more than earlier rock deaths. I was too young to feel Buddy Holly or Eddie Cochran. Brian Jones had drifted out of the centre. But Jimi was a BIG one. The same month Al Wilson died, and Janis two weeks after Jimi. But I liked Canned Heat without knowing who was who really, and only knew a couple of Janis tracks from samplers. Everytime I hear Tears of A Clown I think of standing there paintbrush in hand, numb, while it played out.

JONI on TLW

Absolutely right on Big Yellow Taxi or Both Sides Now being appropriate. It was odd that she got three songs, putting her in a status below Dylan but above Van, Muddy, Neil Young, Clapton with two each. I think The Band did a great job on Coyote, with the odd bustling backing. However, listening to the Complete Last Waltz, Amelia and Furry Sings the Blues were both dire. Levon mentions that she dropped the pace and temperature of the show, but Van then rescued it, so he felt the same. I remember reading years ago, I think after the concert, that The Band had stayed up rehearsing with Joni who was getting increasingly tetchy because she felt The Band “couldn’t play her stuff.” I was affronted at the time, but in retrospect, they really couldn’t get the feel of her own band. They had decided on which songs to film in advance, so they knew Coyote was the one for the movie (and it is one of her best songs) and must have devoted more time to nailing it.

BUTTERFIELD

I think what happened was that several of us had quietly disliked his TLW performance, or were just indifferent to it, and got interested to find we were not alone. I'll take Elvis or Little Junior Parker on that one.

VAN

Nice 1982 version of “Into The Mystic” live on the “Old Grey Whistle Test LIVE” compilation just out. Also Elton doing Tiny Dancer.


Entered at Tue Jun 12 09:02:20 CEST 2012 from (122.59.251.42)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: Mystery Train

MT is one of my favourite songs on TLW and the MM version is great as well. I never did like what the 80's Band did with it - I much preferred Levon singing it.


Entered at Tue Jun 12 07:00:12 CEST 2012 from (108.200.220.97)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: A Few Random Opinions

Butterfield good. Mystery Train was on Moondog, on Butterfield's first album, and also done by Elvis.....Seems appropriate.

Don't happen to own Saved, but every Dylan album has charms to be found in the nooks and crannies.

Neil Diamond is fine, but has many great, great songs in his catalog that would have been nice to choose from.

I'm a vocal Dylan vocal supporter, but his "shouty/yelling" style on tour 74 isn't my favorite from his oeuvre. It worked better for some reason on the Rolling Thunder tour...more nuanced, but still powerful.

Love his singing on 'Ballad in Plain D'. Is it a mean song? Well, maybe, but it's a beast of a song, and interesting to listen to. Best thing I ever did was buy the Mono Dylan box a year or two ago. Got reacquainted with a lot of his early work.

Good Blues is never boring...but sometimes you have to be in the right mood for it.


Entered at Tue Jun 12 05:20:48 CEST 2012 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Did Paul Butterfield ever offer his opinion of The Band?


Entered at Tue Jun 12 04:46:04 CEST 2012 from (58.104.5.117)

Posted by:

Graham

Dlew919, Thanks for your concern, I'm OK, I am not offended. It was just first one person said something negative about Butterfield, then someone else joined in and before you knew it there was a lynch mob after him! I thought he fitted in perfectly in The Last Waltz both musically and culturally especially with his Woodstock connection (I thought the first Better Days album was great although it sounds a little dated now). It never occurred to me that people on The Band website would think otherwise. I just hope people don't start laying in to Van Morrison as well - that would be too much to take.


Entered at Tue Jun 12 04:24:41 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

that song was from From The Inside. Great , and produced by Steve Cropper. i thought the sound was perfect,Furay was disappointed. wanted soemthing brighter, more hit like.


Entered at Tue Jun 12 04:01:55 CEST 2012 from (203.35.170.209)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Subject: Graham

I hopei never give the impression that I think that yours or anyone else's music taste is bad, good or otherwise. I love coming here and yakking about the band and other associated acts. The friendly disagreements make it fun, otherwise it would just be 'I like the band.' 'yeah, me too'. So if I have, my deepest apologies.


Entered at Tue Jun 12 03:22:41 CEST 2012 from (31.193.15.198)

Posted by:

belstaff and tory burch outlet

Location: UK
Web: My link

Subject: belstaff and tory burch outlet

As the warmer 2012 belstaff jackets sale months approach, designers generally revel in their ability to again utilise bright colours and floral prints. Belstaff, being belstaff leather jackets outlet Belstaff, pay notory burch outlet attention to such seasonal whims. Theirs is a label that continues to play to the brand’s 1920s heritage, a heritage belstaff jackets outlet born on the back of belstaff jackets a motorcycle cutting its way across tory burch sale the English countryside. Enter the website : http://www.belstaffjacket-s.com/ or http://www.toryburch-ny.com/ to find a suitable confidante jacket and tory burch.


Entered at Tue Jun 12 02:45:03 CEST 2012 from (99.236.202.207)

Posted by:

Sereniy

Subject: NUX & John Fogerty

NUX: Congrats to the new addition. Love the name. It's sooo original, and nice..

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Love John, but not too sure about Jennifer. Too big an ego, and don't care for her singing..

Rolling Stone

June 11, 2012 12:15 PM ETJohn Fogerty is re-recording Creedence Clearwater Revival's classic "Proud Mary" with Jennifer Hudson, reports Ultimate Classic Rock. The pair met up in New Orleans last week to work on the re-recording, which will appear on Fogerty's upcoming collaborative album Wrote a Song for Everyone. The former CCR frontman is also working with Kid Rock, the Foo Fighters, My Morning Jacket, Bob Seger and more on the record.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

CYA soon xoxoxo


Entered at Tue Jun 12 00:09:05 CEST 2012 from (58.104.5.117)

Posted by:

Graham

BEG, I wish Joni Mitchell had just sung a couple of her more famous songs during the Last Waltz. Not that the songs she did were bad but I just think Both Sides Now or Big Yellow Taxi would have fitted in more with the vibe of the concert. Its great that we can all come here from around the world and discuss music but in the old there was a kind of culture associated with hanging out at the local record shop where you could meet up with people in person who had similar interests. You would go down there and find out what had just come out. That's where I first encountered music by people like Paul Butterfield so I have a kind of emotional attachment to that music. To others his music may well be boring but it is part of the soundtrack of my life. While I do have that kind of nostalgia for days past the internet is fantastic for music lovers. I could never have imagined back then that a time would could when I would be able to access The Band's Woodstock performance at the touch of a button. A few posts back, Peter V was saying how his father didn't like Bob Dylan. My father was the same. He especially didn't like Dylan and Janis Joplin. I sometimes used to work painting houses with my Dad and I remember once telling him about the line in the Dylan song about how 'even the birds are chained to the sky' which he liked. Later we were talking to the person whose house we were painting and my Dad some how worked that line in to the conversation. The woman was shocked because she had never met such a philosophical house painter! We laughed about that later.


Entered at Mon Jun 11 23:58:52 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Nux: Congratulations!

Peter M: Too bad that's what comes to mind. What comes to my mind is some schoolmate singing the song softly to himself in the hall and another one turning around and saying "Great song, eh?" None of us were friends or even acquaintances, but the song was something we shared.


Entered at Mon Jun 11 21:47:10 CEST 2012 from (64.105.104.78)

Posted by:

Pat B

Good Feelin To Know or Indian Summer? Both great albums.


Entered at Mon Jun 11 21:42:36 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Poco

Currently listening to Poco live in 1972 on "The Old Grey Whistle Test - LIVE" CD (Just For Me & You).


Entered at Mon Jun 11 21:36:28 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Saved has seriously nasty lyrics. Can't take it. Foul stuff.


Entered at Mon Jun 11 20:38:25 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: 1965

Calvin: There's also John Hammond Jr.'s "So Many Roads" release in 1965. I can still recall the impact that album had on me, along with The Paul Butterfield's Blues Band debut, when they were first released.


Entered at Mon Jun 11 19:01:44 CEST 2012 from (99.236.202.207)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: Bob Welch

This is such sad news on Bob Welch, May he now RIP.

Bob Welch's Suicide Note: He Didn't Want to Burden Wife By Mike Fleeman

Friday June 08, 2012 Bob Welch

Note: He FacebookTweetFearing that spinal surgery would leave him an invalid needing constant care, Bob Welch told his wife in a suicide note: "I'm not going to do this to you," according to a friend.

The body of the former Fleetwood Mac member and successful solo artist was found in his Nashville home Thursday by his wife Wendy. The musician, 65, had shot himself in the chest, police say.

Family friend Bart Herbison, executive director of the National Songwriters Association, says Welch underwent spinal surgery about three months ago, The Tennessean reports.

"It had become apparent to Bob that he was not going to recover, that he was going to become an invalid," Herbison says. "He had seen his father become an invalid and watched his mother care for him for many years."

A member of Fleetwood Mac from 1971 to 1974, Welch had solo hits with "Sentimental Lady" and "Ebony Eyes."

CYA soon xoxoxoxo


Entered at Mon Jun 11 18:03:31 CEST 2012 from (64.105.104.78)

Posted by:

Pat B

Bob F, I've known Michael McD for decades and played with him for three years through a couple of albums. Great singer songwriter and a fine Irishman.


Entered at Mon Jun 11 16:18:07 CEST 2012 from (124.170.227.33)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Subject: Thanks bob f.

Great stuff. Will share.


Entered at Mon Jun 11 16:14:21 CEST 2012 from (68.198.166.204)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY
Web: My link

Subject: Michael McDermott

If anyone has a minute, check out these 4 songs from Michael McDermott's new record that is going to be released in September. They're all great but These Dreams About Trains is classic. This guy is such a great talent but he has had the worst luck getting people to hear his music. I know there is no Band connection but you folks here have great musical taste and I think some of you would really like his music.


Entered at Mon Jun 11 13:51:22 CEST 2012 from (99.245.17.243)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Bob F. Wish List.

OK. Bob said the secret words, wish list. That means I get to drag out my big wish for Bob's 30th Anniversary Concert to please come out on DVD. I know. Royalty problems. But its been 19 years . Maybe it's one of those "Bob doesn't want it out things." Also I wonder if any video was shot on Tour 74? Now that I would love to see.


Entered at Mon Jun 11 13:26:19 CEST 2012 from (68.198.166.204)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Saved

JT, I agree with you. Saved is loaded with beautiful songs. Solid Rock, What Can I Do For You, Covenant Woman, In The Garden and the majestic Pressing On. The band with Drummond, Keltner, Spooner, Fred Tacket, Clydie King and Regina Havis was one of his best. The shows he did to support this record are legendary especially the ones in Canada. After the complete Basement Tapes, a Bootleg Series box set of live music from this era would be next on my wish list.


Entered at Mon Jun 11 13:23:54 CEST 2012 from (65.95.182.31)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Cathy Smith and Jackie Burroughs (she is seen on train during FX).

Sending out positive vibes to you and your family Nux! Wow...When you name your child after a musician......Your love for the musician is deep....so happy for you.

Btw, Bryan Ferry named one of his sons Otis after Redding. I know a Toronto musician who named his son Miles. The late sweet Paul Godfrey from this GB named his son Levon.

Of course our opinions are just that. I honestly find BF's "Mystery Train" boring just as some of you find other musicians boring like Louu and reggae and......Anyway, I don't know Butters' early work at all so that's why I asked imagezulu as he really appreciates the bluezzzzzzz so much so that some mornings on the weekends he's blasing it throughout our home. He has the same appreciation with jazzzzzz music. Interesting that growing up his mother always had classical music on and wouldn't even allow him to play any other kind of music at home. In my collection, I only have John Lee Hooker, BB King, Sumlin, Robert Cray, Etta James and a compilation CD with Howlin' Wolf. Whereas he's listening to Johnny Shines, JB Hutto, etc....

If I wanted everyone at TLW to sound like The Band then only The Band should have been on stage. One thing that really gets under my skin (not really...just being dramatic here....lol)....is when people here want everyone to sound like The Band.....Are you kidding me? There was only The Band that sounded like The Band. The fact that Joni Mitchell was a very creative and skilled songwriter and player in her own right in a testosterone filled world........makes her appearance at TLW evern sweeter. When I saw her on the same bill with Dylan, they didn't even perform one number together. I wonder why?.....Another time was at Dylan's Rolling Thunder Review......


Entered at Mon Jun 11 08:27:41 CEST 2012 from (41.162.7.114)

Posted by:

NUX SCHWARTZ

Subject: LEIGHVON

HI EVERYONE LEIGHVON SCHWARTZ was born on Tuesday 07,beautiful girl!


Entered at Mon Jun 11 07:29:02 CEST 2012 from (72.78.37.222)

Posted by:

PSB

Subject: Come on

Calvin, while Jimmy Reed's The Legend the Man was released in '65, all it is is a greatest hits or best of album with some interviews thrown in between the songs. At least half of it was recorded in the '50s.


Entered at Mon Jun 11 06:30:04 CEST 2012 from (58.104.7.148)

Posted by:

Graham

It surprises me that people here are so hostile to Butterfield. On the one hand I like talking about this kind of think because I love music but on the other hand it is sad that people are so judgemental. I think you can say I LIKE this musician's playing or I DON"T LIKE that guy's playing but how can you say it is good or bad music. There is no objective standard by which you can judge music. Surely, if music makes people happy, it is good music. What other function can music possibly have?


Entered at Mon Jun 11 04:11:51 CEST 2012 from (209.116.12.5)

Posted by:

Peter M.

Subject: Atlantis

Donovan's Atlantis will always be linked in my mind with seeing a psychotic Joe Pesci pummel the crap out of a fellow wiseguy in the bar in Goodfellas.


Entered at Mon Jun 11 03:35:01 CEST 2012 from (76.188.45.173)

Posted by:

Calvin

Yeah Jeff, I was perfectly OK with Poco when it was Rusty, Paul and George-that was legit. When it was Paul and Rusty it was still close enough, I mean Jack has been there what? 15 years? But Rusty along with a bunch of guys who have 1 Poco Studio album between them? Yeah, I'll Pass. Thing is Id probably pay the say amount "Poco" is charging to see a Rusty Young Show with these guys as the backing band. I dont know, there really should be some sort of a rule about billing yourself as an entity when there is maybe 1 or 2 significant members in it. I mean there are times it doesnt matter, we all can name some favorite bands where really the other 3-4 guys where carried but I person and it wouldnt have changed the sound a bit if they were replaced. But that isnt Poco.

I respect your opinion JT, and the first Butterfield album is quite good, and the 2cd and 3rd are legitimate Blues albums. But to say he made a significant contribution to the Genre is just a claim that cant be backed up-if you talk to serious blues fans he is a minor footnote at best-and frankly you'll find as many Blues fans who consider him an adequate Harp Player who got carried by Bloomfield and Bishop (Who have better reps in the Blues community) than think highly of him. Frankly you cant argue that point unless you want to totally disregard fact and documented opinions of other blues artists.

And I love Joni, but her musical stylings at that time didnt mesh well at all with the guys. I know a couple of the guys are on record as saying so as well.


Entered at Mon Jun 11 03:01:54 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Peter- is it Duane Eddy that you are a big fan of? If so, get a excuse ready.He and Dan Dugmore are recording a new record at Music Producer's Institute in Nashville.Less than two weeks away, and it is open to people who will pay to watch the sessions.Spooner Oldham is on the session too

Calvin,Rusty Young's vewrsion of Poco is playing here (st Louis, yes,I'm still in the Diaspora) Thursday and if I can gte work wrapped up in time, I may go. Kind of afraid to, never had a Poco experience I coudln't recover from, and don't want to have one now. But, i still love rusty. so,. maybe I'll brave it out and go, hope for the best.


Entered at Mon Jun 11 02:57:29 CEST 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Rating

I don't think 'rating' as to who is 'best' or in the 'top 5' accomplishes anything. I've said this before and sound like a broken record. Giving credit to Paul Butterfield for being a very good musician who contributed substantially to this genre of music is enough. Like all, including Dylan, he has some excellent recordings out for us to enjoy. Enough said.


Entered at Mon Jun 11 00:48:14 CEST 2012 from (198.179.198.1)

Posted by:

Calvin

Jeez, I opened up a can of worms talking about Butter, didnt I.

Here's the deal-he was a unique Harp player (He played it upside down and rarely went past the 6th hole on a 10 hole piece)-so he had an interesting sound. And his first album, inside the Blues community, is considered very good-and far and away one of the best by the hord of young white blues artist in the 1960s. But the ones that followed were considered OK. Certainly nobody thinks the first four are great.

But 1965 was a great year. BB King's Live at the Regal, and Jimmy Reed's The Legend the Man are all time great albums. Throw in Sun House Father of the Delta Blues, and the album many consider the best Blues album of the 2cd half of the twentieth Century-Junior Wells' Hoodoo Man Blues-and even Butter's Best probably didnt make the top 5 of the blues albums of that year.

He doesnt deserve some of the scorn I unintentionally started-but he certainly doesnt deserve the Blues Great status some think he should have.

I mean seriously, listen to 6-7 Butterfield Albums, and follow it up with say 6-7 Keb Mo and then 6-7 Taj Mahal Albums and tell me who is better.

Some friends of mine have been streaming me Video/audio of the Chicago Blues Fest that is going on right now. Seems there is a much larger group of young artists there this year than most.


Entered at Mon Jun 11 00:29:33 CEST 2012 from (99.236.202.207)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: Les Paul's guitars

Something interesting...

Les Paul guitar, memorabilia auction fetches $5M, sets records for historical guitars

BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. - An auction of guitars and memorabilia owned by the late Les Paul, known as the godfather of the electric guitar, has raised nearly $5 million for a foundation in his name benefiting music education and innovation.

Julien's Auctions of Beverly Hills said Sunday that the two-day sale fetched record-setting prices for guitars. The items most coveted by rock musicians, museum curators and collectors included a 1951 Fender No-Caster, which sold for $216,000, a 1982 Gibson Les Paul that went for $180,000 and a 1940s Epiphone Zephyr that fetched $144,000.

Other Paul memorabilia included a recording console ($106,250), research notes ($28,125) and guitar schematics ($40,625).

Paul invented one of the world's most widely played guitars, the Gibson Les Paul. The sale concluded Saturday, on what would have been his 97th birthday.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

CYA soosn xoxoxo


Entered at Sun Jun 10 21:51:56 CEST 2012 from (58.104.7.148)

Posted by:

Graham

I thought it was Levon that Robbie was trying to get away from!


Entered at Sun Jun 10 21:22:40 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I can believe it was guys like Butterfield that Robbie was trying to get away from. It makes sense. I'd go with Robbie on that one .


Entered at Sun Jun 10 21:10:24 CEST 2012 from (69.156.28.57)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Favourite verse on "What Can I Do For You?" from "Saved"

I know all about poison,
I know all about fiery darts
I don't care how rough the road is, show me where it starts
Whatever pleases You, tell it to my heart
Well, I don't deserve it but I sure did make it through
What can I do for You"

Joni Mitchell? Didn't she say or some Band members said that they had a hard time keeping up with her because of her open tunings????'
For most Canadians her background vocals with The Band and Neil Young is sacred. Her own songs were just great because she's such a confessional singer-songwriter.

I asked imagezulu about Butters and I was surprised as he seems to only listen to black bluezzz guys.....He knew of Butterfield and said he was ok but the bluezzzzz artists he digs go waaaaaay back......names I never even heard of and never mentioned here....


Entered at Sun Jun 10 20:47:44 CEST 2012 from (174.1.247.160)

Posted by:

Neonquartz

Location: Metro Vancouver

Subject: Bob Dylan's voice/parents

Al Kooper from "Backstage Passes":

"I'd been aware of Dylan since the beginning; you could feel his presence in the air ...I also quickly discovered that if I played a Bob Dylan album too loud, it would bring my mother storming into the room in exactly twelve seconds. 'Who is that? That's terrible. It sounds like a fingernail on a blackboard. Turn that crap off.' His singing definitely struck a discordant note in parents; they were extremely intimidated by the sound of his voice. This helped it all make sense to me (and to millions of others my age, I'm sure, as well)."


Entered at Sun Jun 10 20:05:56 CEST 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: 'Saved'

I will get tarred and feathered and maybe even pilloried and who knows, 'crucified' for this, but I think there are some good songs on 'Saved' and my hope would be that people would leave the "I don't like it because it is so religious and sanctimonious' behind and just listen to the songs. Like many of Dylan's 'lesser' albums, there is some very worthwhile material on 'Saved'. It is worth a listen IMO.


Entered at Sun Jun 10 19:35:48 CEST 2012 from (70.181.180.113)

Posted by:

Nick

Location: SoCal

Subject: Paul Butterfield @ TLW

C'mon now, Mystery Train certainly wasn't the best song at TLW but I'd rather watch it 10 times in a row than watch Joni Mitchell's set once. Talk about boring.


Entered at Sun Jun 10 19:11:56 CEST 2012 from (68.198.166.204)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Paul Butterfield

Sometimes an artist reputation depends on what part of the world your located in. Growing up in upstate New York, The Paul Butterfield Blues Band was huge. Bloomfield, Elvin Bishop, Sam Lay on drums, it was for many of us our road map to Chicago blues. I'll play their music for the rest of my life happily. I feel the same away about The Blues Project and the original Blood Sweat and Tears. The shows I was lucky to see with Butterfield and members of the Band were always a treat. As far as The Last Waltz maybe guys like Butterfield was what Robbie was trying to get away from, while Neil Diamond was where he was heading, Hollywood.


Entered at Sun Jun 10 19:00:55 CEST 2012 from (99.236.202.207)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: Pete Cosey, guitarist dead at 69 [RIP}

Sunday greetings to you all. This was in my Yahoo!

Pete Cosey, innovative blues, R&B and jazz guitarist who played with Miles Davis, dies at 68

CHICAGO - Pete Cosey, an innovative guitarist who brought his distinctive distorted sound to recordings with Miles Davis, Howlin' Wolf and Muddy Waters, has died, his daughter said. He was 68.

Cosey died May 30 of complications from surgery at Vanguard Weiss Memorial Hospital in Chicago, said his daughter Mariama Cosey.

Pete Cosey's musical journey began early, his daughter said, noting that Cosey's father died when he was 9 years old.

"That's how he dealt with his father's passing ... and if I had to pick one instance in his life that just really rocked his world, that was it," she said. "I think he tried to spend his time trying to communicate with my granddaddy."

In the 1960s, Cosey was a member of the studio band at Chess Records in Chicago, where he played on Waters' "Electric Mud" and Howlin' Wolf's "Howlin' Wolf Album." Cosey also worked with Etta James and Chuck Berry.

He took a creative approach to stringing and tuning his guitars, and liberally applied the distortion pedal to his licks. He started to develop his unique sound as a teenager in Arizona, where he would play in the mountains near Phoenix, according to a Chicago Tribune article.

His explorations of sound drew the attention of one of jazz's legendary minds, Miles Davis.

In an interview with music writer George Cole, published on Cole's "The Last Miles" website, Cosey said Davis sought him out, wanted him at the front of the band and told him to turn up his guitar's volume.

Cosey ended up playing on many of Davis' boundary-pushing recordings in the 1970s, including "Dark Magus," ''Agharta" and "The Complete on the Corner Sessions."

Cosey was also in Martin Scorsese's 2003 blues documentary, "The Blues: A Musical Journey."

In recent years, health problems had slowed Cosey, but he had been playing music in children's hospitals and schools, according to the Chicago Tribune.

Cosey's daughter said that, to her father, music was a language.

"He taught me that music is not genre-specific. It's one way that everyone around the world communicates," she said. "It wasn't about being black or white, but it was about making notes universally."

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxox



Entered at Sun Jun 10 15:58:10 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I did the same, John, and left it at official albums, and skipped "Saved." I didn't worry about iTunes Genre column. You get stuff like "Alternative" for the Swedish Band First Aid Kit for one track I downloaded, but indie Rock for the same track from the actual CD.

Still, now that there are fewer sections in HMV (making way for all the games, headphones, and blu-ray) you see odd things on genre. Bigger HMVs have "Rock & roll" sections, but smaller ones believe Chuck Berry and Little Richard should go in "Easy Listening." In the ancient days of Tower Records I spent ages looking for The Dillards, who weren't in country, rock, or folk or Americana. I had to ask:"Bluegrass." I see on the iTunes list I'm using today that Rumer is 'pop', but Rumer's Welcome Back free download is 'folk,' The Beach Boys 'rock', Simone Felice is 'indie rock', Dr John is R&B, and The Decemberists 'Traditional' (a song from the Chieftains collaboration). However Lady Maisery doing the traditional "The Changelings Lullaby" are singer/songwriter.


Entered at Sun Jun 10 15:01:33 CEST 2012 from (99.245.17.243)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Dylan & iTunes

OK. Don't snicker. I just finished putting in my entire Columbia/Sony Dylan catalogue into my new Dylan library. iTunes does not make this easy.

First they think his Genre is mostly Folk Country. So I go in and manually change that. Dylan sometimes released more than one or two albums in the same year. I found out how to put them in the correct sequence; by putting a number before the Album Title. 01 space 02 space etc.\Compilations are the hardest. iTunes have worked hard enough to list each track by year. However if I do it that way everything will go out of sequence. Therefore you change all those individual dates to the year it actually was released on CD

. Finally this morning I discover a "Release Date" column you can put in. Boy am I happy. Till I realize there ain't no such thing in the Get Info box. I Googled over and over and according to the experts the programmers haven't utilized it yet. Well the life of a semi-retired guy. Thanks for reading.


Entered at Sun Jun 10 13:56:59 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I always liked Ballad in Plain D, perhaps amazed at his ability to rhyme 'lamb' with 'faun.' I don't recall him doing Black Crow Blues much. Has he? That was the offending piano at the folk club, and a pointer of things to come. This chat had me playing Motorpsycho Nitemare again. I loved that:

Then in comes his daughter whose name was Rita

She looked like she stepped out of the Dolce Vita.

Listening again, I think the talking blues, I Shall Be Free No 10, was the other that perplexed my dad.

I said Fee Fi Fo Fum

Cassius Clay here I come.

While he recorded it in one day, the ballads had been stewing for a while, I'm sure.


Entered at Sun Jun 10 11:56:13 CEST 2012 from (67.71.3.220)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

I've posted before that when I watch TLW, It is Butters' song that makes me skip it and move on. At least Neil Diamond's song flows along and I respect that he was himself at the concert. He didn't have anything to prove but sing a song that Robbie produced.

Dylan was cruel in PD....or C.....However, he did apologize for it.

"According to her autobiography, Rotolo became pregnant in 1963 by Dylan and had an abortion.[15] Their relationship failed to survive the abortion, Dylan’s affair with Joan Baez and the hostility of the Rotolo family. [9] Suze moved out into her sister’s apartment in August 1963. They finally broke up in 1964, in circumstances which Dylan described in his “Ballad in Plain D”.[9] Twenty years later, he apologised for the song, saying: “I must have been a real schmuck to write that. I look back at that particular one and say, of all the songs I’ve written, maybe I could have left that alone.”[16] Video Rating: 4 / 5

Electrohome? My uncle worked at the factory for a time before he opened his own business. I'll never forget one Christmas Eve, I opened my gift and there it was....a small electrohome record player! I think my first 45's were "Hey Jude" and "Whole Lotta Love".....


Entered at Sun Jun 10 10:18:05 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Another Side of Bob Dylan

I bought mine on 7th November 1964 … it was released three months later in the UK. It was the first one I bought on initial release, though I see I'd bought the earlier three in this order: Freewheeling … Bob Dylan … Times They Are A-Changin'. I'd also bought all three in two months, which must have been a major financial stretch

I was playing Dylan obsessively (in my case on a royal blue / cream Dansette). My dad couldn't take it. He'd sung as a boy until his voice broke on 6BM, one of the BBC's first six radio stations, which was opened in Bournemouth in 1923. As the others were in huge cities, a guess is that it was located in Bournemouth, then a small town, because Bournemouth had a full-scale orchestra who performed regularly, and the Winter Gardens, where I later did lights, always had a studio control room below the stage for recording classical music. The call-sign was "Listen you can smell the pines" because the town was and is famous for its pine trees. Anyway, we have a picture of my dad inscribed "O For The Wings of A Dove 6BM." Suffice it to say, he considered himself an expert on singing, and also singing in tune. He'd found the earlier Dylan hard, but Another Side was a step too far for him. I think "Motorpsycho Nitemare" was the turning point, not helped by the spelling of "nite" on the cover. "But he can't sing!' was told me several times a day.

The folk club was also dismayed by "Another Side" because of the piano playing. The first of many Dylan "shock horror" innovations.

I've just taken out my original LP, where it's clear that Bob had spent some considerable time at the hairdresser for the heroic cover stance.

I was convinced that a band could find fame and fortune by adding bass and drums to Dylan, then I went to the usual Saturday dance at the Pier and saw The Freewheelers doing just that … this was pre-Byrds. They featured Tim Mycroft on Hammond organ. Tim appears briefly in "Don't Look Back" . He was also in The Gun, and had a major hit with "Love At First Sight" a hastily cobbled together version of Je t'aime … mois non plus. The BBC had banned the Serge Gainsbourg / Jane Birkin version, but as it was #1, needed an instrumental version to play on Top of The Pops,


Entered at Sun Jun 10 04:05:12 CEST 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Ballad in Plain D

Dylan in the 80s is said to have expressed regret about this one. It was, as far as I know, never been performed live. This is a wonderful song. Though personal and intense, it is pure Dylan despite its background sources. "Another Side" is a great album. It is not held in the high esteem reserved for some of the others but for me it is right up there. John D-- It was my second Dylan after "Times". The first and then 'Freewheeling' came after I had heard "Another Side" and "Times". We had an Electrohome piece of furniture as far as I can remember by the time I listened to these in 63 and 64.


Entered at Sun Jun 10 02:23:00 CEST 2012 from (99.245.17.243)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Bob F

Thanks for the Dylan reminder. "Another Side" was my first Dylan purchase. My Mother couldn't believe the sound coming from my Seabreeze record payer.


Entered at Sat Jun 9 23:50:48 CEST 2012 from (58.104.11.170)

Posted by:

Graham

I liked Butterfield's playing but I would be the first to admit that he also played a lot of stuff that was not so good. I think we should judge people, if indeed there is a need to judge people, on their best material not their worst. I think as fans we tend to have too higher expectations. It is hard to come up with even one good song let alone heaps of them. That's why people like Dylan are so amazing. Not just that he wrote so many songs but so many good ones. As fans we should be more tolerant if our heroes stumble and fall (that's a good line, I wonder if I could turn that in to a song).


Entered at Sat Jun 9 22:44:26 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

With the greatest respect, Peter, if some of us find Paul Butterfield boring,. that's not foolishness, that's personal taste. And many people do find him dull. The ability to hold one note for a long time may be technically fascinating to people who've played mouth organ, but an unpleasant and rather tedious noise to the general listener.


Entered at Sat Jun 9 19:00:37 CEST 2012 from (68.198.166.204)

Posted by:

Bob F.

Location: Hudson Valley, NY

Subject: Another Side of Bob Dylan

48 years ago today Bob Dylan recorded the entire 'Another Side of Bob Dylan'. Can you imagine someone doing that today? Take a bunch of songs as great as Chimes of Freedom, My Back Pages, It Ain't Me Babe, To Ramona, I Don't Believe You, go in the studio and create a masterpiece in one session. Like beating Joe D's hitting streak, it seems impossible.


Entered at Sat Jun 9 17:32:19 CEST 2012 from (72.78.37.222)

Posted by:

PSB

Subject: Correction

That was supposed to be those who would knock Paul Butterfield.


Entered at Sat Jun 9 17:30:58 CEST 2012 from (72.78.37.222)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love
Web: My link

Subject: Butterfield

Those who would know Paul Butterfield only show their foolishness. There were few players in the so-called blues revival that came close. Yes, his later albums left a lot to be desired, but his first four albums were brilliant.

The pairing with Rick Danko was probably a matter of convenience more than anything else. Butterfield was a blues player and a blues Danko simply wasn't.

Amos Garrett's best work was not the blues either. It was his more adventurous stuff with Maria Muldaur or Ian & Sylvia and on the Geoff & Maria albums. Geoff Muldaur is better on country blues than he is on Chicago blues.

Having said that, Butterfield's version of "Mystery Train" on his first album is way better than the one he did with The Band. However, is harp on "Mannish Boy" where he holds one smoking note through the entire song while appearing not to take a breath is stunning. If Garth Hudson can't be heard, he was either providing ambiance or they didn't turn him up in the mix. And while Butterfield was at the Last Waltz because of his Levon and Woodstock connection, the person who should have been there remains John Hammond.


Entered at Sat Jun 9 16:56:27 CEST 2012 from (90.233.233.255)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Nordic Countries

Subject: British blues

Blues is sin. British blues is plenipotentiary - yet frivoluos - sin.


Entered at Sat Jun 9 15:54:15 CEST 2012 from (124.170.227.33)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Best British Blues Band...

I'm still inclined to think the stones, though I recently read the new Jeff Beck biography (very good, btw)... it posits the Jeff beck group was the best blues band... I thought about this: Rod Stewart - great vocalist (at his best, one of the very best - too inclined to sing rubbish to make him one of the all-time greats, but certainly could be...), Ronnie Wood on the bass... and ... the drummer...)... On top of this, you have the most sublime, creative and brilliant electric guitarist of them all.

Yet, the stones get it in a way the JB band didn't...As great as Beck is... as great as Stewart can be (and there were moments with JB, I think the Stones rhythm section can't be beat...

Graham: I do enjoy 'Born in Chicago', mainly due to it's pretty great guitar playing and audacious lyrics... so I'm not a complete barbarian.. ;)


Entered at Sat Jun 9 15:00:47 CEST 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: "On the Beach" and Dylan's blues

I cannot forget "On The Beach" and Dylan's blues in any such discussion.


Entered at Sat Jun 9 14:50:15 CEST 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Practitioners of the Blues

Paul Butterfield Blues Band and John Hammond Jr. added to a largely unknown (to that time) body of music that had been 'out there' unheard by all but a few for many years. They were excellent practitioners of the blues in the 60s as blues finally reached the ears of the white western world. With the Rolling Stones and others, including early Led Zeppelin, these musicians brought us this superb music form. Paul Butterfield and Michael Bloomfield were excellent musicians and John Hammond Jr. was and continues to be in the elite of the blues artists. I listen again and again. Of course, there are others who followed, including our own McKenna Mendelson Mainline and other Canadian bands who did not quite reach the levels of popularity of Butterfield or Hammond.


Entered at Sat Jun 9 12:39:56 CEST 2012 from (69.158.30.221)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

If you click on Rick's photo, you'll see he liked wearing polka dots too as did Robbie and Levon and of course....Dylan at TLW.
There's a photo of Levon on page 3.


Entered at Sat Jun 9 12:33:02 CEST 2012 from (69.158.30.221)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

For those of you who don't have this recording. Here's Bob Dylan Friday #101: The San Francisco s.n.a.c.k Benefit Concert

"This collaboration between Bob Dylan and Neil Young and The Band for the S.N.A.C.K Benefit held at San Francisco’s Kezar Stadium in 1975 is a hit and miss type live recording. The inherent fucking up of Bob’s vocals is evident on some songs, but when it comes together — it’s really a thing of beauty and with the artists on stage, it should be mind blowing. The spirited and powerful version of ‘I Want You’ is pretty breathtaking, as is the heartbreaking harmonica solos and country twang on ‘Knockin’ on Dragon’s Door. This is probably another one for the exclusive collector, but it is a great addition for any Bob Dylan/Neil Young/The Band fan."


Entered at Sat Jun 9 11:37:56 CEST 2012 from (58.104.9.198)

Posted by:

Graham

When it comes to bass players, I used to like Larry Taylor who played with both Canned Heat and John Mayall. His style was really simple, just walking bass really, but he used to do it well. I though jazz players like Ron Carter and the guy that plays with Keith Jarrett (whose name I have forgotten) took bass playing to a whole new level.


Entered at Sat Jun 9 11:22:51 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Ah, but Jack Casady's magical bass lines! Compare it to that Groundhogs bass player.


Entered at Sat Jun 9 11:09:52 CEST 2012 from (58.104.9.198)

Posted by:

Graham

When it comes to blues I don't think you can go past the great acoustic guitar players like Blind Blake, Gary Davis or Bill Broonzy. I used to listen to Hot Tuna but I thought they were a pale imitation of above mentioned players. Also, I was never all that keen on their vocals.


Entered at Sat Jun 9 10:57:57 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Boom Boom

I was looking for the Groundhogs Planet stuff, but found John Lee Hooker with The Groundhogs doing "Boom Boom". This is a UK tour I saw. In fact, the effect is much better than I remembered … this is enjoyable, but they do steamroller him.


Entered at Sat Jun 9 10:51:45 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Ah, John Lee Hooker is the yardstick that explains the difference. Blues is repetitive, but John Lee shifted slightly all the time to push the words and feeling. People who backed him say he never played a 12 bar, but an eleven and a half or thirteen as the mood took him, which is why he sounded way better on his own. The white guys picked up on the repetitive nature, did it louder and more solidly and steamrollered the subtlety out of it.

Ultimately, you get metronome beats and disco, then drums 'n' bass and dance. But the start of that slippery slope was stuff like Butterfield, and the British blues bands (who were mainly not as good as Butterfield).

The late 60s, seeing John Lee Hooker, Muddy Waters, Otis Spann etc was a revelation. The difference was spectacular.

It may be why some of the best white blues … the first Hot Tuna album, Mayall's Laurel Canyon period, guys playing on their own like Davy Graham, early Bert Jansch, do it without a drummer. That first Hot Tuna album has always been a favourite … yes, Rob, even better than "Burgers" (another favourite).

The best white blues band ever remains The Rolling Stones. i think that's down to Keef having the necessary "lurch" and probably "lack of discipline."


Entered at Sat Jun 9 10:37:01 CEST 2012 from (58.104.9.198)

Posted by:

Graham

I can't believe you guys are all bagging Paul Butterfield! I really liked his playing. That kind of music by its nature is very repetitive. John Lee Hooker got by with only one riff as did Lightening Hopkins. Canned Heat was another repetitive band I really liked until Al Wilson died. By the way, quite a few people I've read about said that at a personal level Butterfueld was an unpleasant guy. One more musician whose life was destroyed by heroin.


Entered at Sat Jun 9 09:05:31 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

Agreed, Butterfield was the American John Mayall. found great players, publicised the blues effectively, but also produced a lot of dull stuff. Mayall's drummerless band was the exception, and the It All comes Back line up was for Butterfield.

On horns, I largely agree, but the Groundhogs, a boring bunch if there ever was one, made two or three really excellent horn laden tracks in their brief incarnation as John Lee's Groundhogs on Shel Talmy's Planet label.

I like Donovan in his hippy dippy phase a lot. Also Catch the Wind and Colours.


Entered at Sat Jun 9 06:55:24 CEST 2012 from (101.119.15.120)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Subject: Butter field

His harp drives me nuts in an otherwise iconic performance and presentation. I'm sure he was a lovely bloke. But I nearly always skip through I'm a man. You can't hear Garth as well as you should. I've said this before. But I'll say it again. The best us white blues guys of the 60s and 60s were the country guys.


Entered at Sat Jun 9 05:11:42 CEST 2012 from (65.95.95.111)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

"Jennifer Juniper" was my introduction to Donovan's music, so I'm partial to it - and like it far better than either "Mellow Yellow" or "Sunshine Superman". The Donovan desert-island EP would be "Catch The Wind", "Colours", "Hurdy Gurdy Man" and "Atlantis". I think if the latter came on the car radio I'd pull over to hear the chorus without having to focus on stuff like driving. The Arbors' version of the "The Letter" just entered my head as a song that would have ths same effect - though the chances of it hitting the airwaves this century is very very remote.


Entered at Sat Jun 9 04:30:40 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Pete, between iTunes Match- Americsas and iTunes Match- Europe, i've now been paid 15 cents this month.

Butterfield made great contributions to the cultre and music of the 60s, 70s, and beyond.Some points: He had a nose for talent, was a fine band leader, his early bands being the breeding ground for some amazing talent.Plus, he helped bring the blues to a wider audience, and was one of the white players who weas welcomed into the chicago blues scene in the early or mid 60s.. i haven;t summarized well, but he was a musical catalyst and socio catalyst for the blues and rock scene. And one helluva harp player.


Entered at Sat Jun 9 01:06:22 CEST 2012 from (69.156.28.92)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Ronnie Hawkins & The Hawks (w/ Rick Danko)
Terry Danko
Buzzz Thompson
Live on Late Night w/ Conan O'Brien
NBC-TV - Circa 1997.


Entered at Sat Jun 9 00:07:28 CEST 2012 from (92.238.33.140)

Posted by:

RTO

Subject: Tried to have a "back to work" chatroom sabbatical...

...but seeing as PV was having one of his periodical "chucking our homegrown blues heritage under a passing bus" sessions, thought I'd better roll my sleeves up and join in. Savoy Brown? Pah! You need a Steamhammer LP to really appreciate that unaccountably lauded Brit Blooze turgid, lumpen-ness.

No, Butterfield was never my favourite on TLW either: everybody else at the peak of their game and he comes out and does a predictable bar-band cover to predictable bar-band standards. One day I might pen the nemesis of my piece on British acts that avoided blues in favour of Americana: ie American acts that DID play blues and boy did it have all the swing of a British act. It need not be said that the early moments of Canned Heat will feature, but certainly post-East West Butter might get a mention

I've said this before: for me the harp work and guitar playing on The Lovin' Spoonful's "Night owl Blues" ensures that cut is as good a piece of white boy R&B as anything, and compared to the length of pieces from the very slighly later albums by Mac, Shack, was just long enough that you enjoyed every note, and no more.

And when they all started adding horns they got even more tedious! More soloists to sit through. Thinking about it, you can maybe blame Butter for that horn section addition.

Got to dash; REALLY want to hear Stan Webb's hilarious impressions again before bedtime...


Entered at Fri Jun 8 23:49:30 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

The relief! It's like coming out of the closet. I always thought Butterfield dire. Today's link, where Rick Danko was brilliant, left me thinking 'kick the idiot with the harmonica off the stage'

I treasure 'It All Comes Back' because of Amos Garrett and Geoff Muldaur, but anything else by Butterfield is terminally boring. There! I've said it at last. I feel better.


Entered at Fri Jun 8 23:31:51 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

We agree. I have to put my hand up and say Paul Butterfield would have thrived on the British Blues Circuit, being just as dull and tedious as the locals. The low point of TLW wasn't Neil Diamond, who could at least pen a hummable tune, but Butterfield who couldn't, and never did. There IS good white blues (Geoff Muldaur? Jorma Kaukonen?) , but Butterfield wasn't it.


Entered at Fri Jun 8 22:36:45 CEST 2012 from (24.252.147.174)

Posted by:

Calvin

Savoy Brown, according to a friend of mine who is a huge blues enthusiast and the reason Ive been to the Chicago Blues Fest 8 times, only had a smidgeon of popularity in the US because they were always on tour and offered an acceptable bar band to those willing to go seem them in the clubs they played. They were always there, always without risk, sort of like grabbing lunch and McDonalds. Good management as opposed to good playing.

I live about 15 minutes from a bar/club that seems to be on the national Blues Circuit. Ive seen some good acts their. Cocoa Montoya, Debbie Davies, Walter Trout-but it seems to me that the genre itself has a such a narrow definition allowing for little experimentation that its hard to excel in-the whole adherence to the 12 bar blues format. Eh, just my two cents.

I dont know that many of the Young White Americans Blues Musicians from the 1960s were all that good either Peter. Frankly as the years go by I become less and less impressed by the first two Paul Butterfield Albums, although I still think Bloomfield has some incredible moments when he could stay sober.

I liked a like of Donovan's stuff, but he seems just a tad crazy in interviews over the last decade. I always get the sense he seems annoyed we dont all realize what a genius his is,which sort of annoys me. And as good as his best stuff is "Atlantis" has got to be one of the most unlistenable hits ever.


Entered at Fri Jun 8 22:02:51 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

But "Jennifer Juniper" was way better than any British blues boom band ever produced. Discuss.


Entered at Fri Jun 8 22:01:37 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Savoy Brown rank as one of the worst rankest bands I've ever seen. The definition of dull British boogie. I have zero sympathy for anyone who was ever in Savoy Brown. I'm still shuddering at the thought of having seen them twice. Ugh! Exactly what Sonny Boy meant. Those British guys want to play the blues so bad … and they do. Actually, being a curmudgeon, I add quite a lot to that … early Fleetwood Mac, and lots of Eric Clapton.


Entered at Fri Jun 8 20:37:08 CEST 2012 from (24.252.147.174)

Posted by:

Calvin

I wasnt really intending to bring up "dirt" per se JT. More I was commenting, brought about by Welch's death. how unfair I thought it was the Fleetwood and McVie kept Weston and Welch;s name out of the HOF for purely financial and personal reasons.

On a more positive topic, has anyone else listened to Alejandro Escoveda's new album? It's quite good.


Entered at Fri Jun 8 20:12:14 CEST 2012 from (96.54.171.63)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: The 'Dirt'

The 'Dirt' that get dredged up at this site! My goodness. Human beings certainly do misbehave. Its still about the music so... I did like Jennifer Juniper as a song but then I've always been partial to Donovan Leitch.


Entered at Fri Jun 8 19:54:25 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Another Jennifer

sadavid: And Jenny Boyd's nom de chanson was "Jennifer Juniper" with hair of golden flax.


Entered at Fri Jun 8 19:00:32 CEST 2012 from (24.252.147.174)

Posted by:

Calvin

Peter, Dave Walker probably is best known, if at all, for being the Lead Singer of Savoy Brown during the couple years before he joined Mac (and all parties quickly realized it wasnt a good fit), and then fronting Brown again for several years in the late 80s and early 90s on the oldies circuit (when yours truly saw them). Oddly enough Walker had a similar Mac Like experience with Black Sabbath, joining them original 3 Sans Ozzie during a short time he had quite the band, although never recording anything except a live show broadcast on the BBC show in the late 70s. I picked up a boot leg of this show a few years ago and sort of spent the weekend researching who the hell this guy was. Which is how I know the odd story of Doug Walker. The guy who was in two major Bands for a weekend.

Ive been led to believe though that Savoy Brown was a much bigger draw here in the states than in native UK? That True?

The "Fake" Mac story is incredible. Clive Davis claimed he owned the name, and basically put his own band on the road, but released the story that Fleetwood and Christine McVie would be joining the new members of the band on the road very soon. The story goes that some of the veteran road crew who had worked with Mac over the years realized it was a scam and took step, up to making sure "equipment got lost", to stop the travesty.


Entered at Fri Jun 8 18:18:56 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: shall we call it boffing, then?

sadavid: Well done - keeping all that data in your head and then relaying it to us without a trace of envy! Imagine how few people would have been onstage if Mac had been so vengeful as Fleetwood and barred entry to all those who'd boffed HIS wife outside the bounds of holy matrimony.


Entered at Fri Jun 8 16:47:10 CEST 2012 from (131.137.35.83)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: Bob Welch . . . and Layla Jr.

Bob Welch's "Future Games" is a really nice pop song and the core of the same-titled LP (which had enough strong material for a good single, or maybe an EP, and could have used a real producer . . . . ) The key line of the song is one of those Desiderata-ish profundities that can strike one as real heavy under the right circumstances . . . but perhaps a suitable epitaph for a fellow who chooses the Gonzo Exit: "you invent the future that you want to face."

Fleetwood Mac has the great tabloid stories . . . Mick Fleetwood's missus (who dallied with Bob Weston, so anguishing Mick that a tour was cancelled only to be revived with a 'Fleetwood Fake' lineup of stand-ins) was none other than Pattie Boyd's little sister Jenny. Mini-muse Jenny began her career with Donovan Leitch, married and divorced Fleetwood twice. She had something of a line in drummers rather than guitar gods - she also married and divorced King Crimson's Ian Wallace . . . . Not quite the Huxleys, maybe, but these English dynasties are impressive . . . .


Entered at Fri Jun 8 15:32:59 CEST 2012 from (217.5.150.254)

Posted by:

JTull Fan

Subject: Doane Perry on Levon

I asked Doane Perry, Jethro Tull's drummer since 1984, his thoughts on Levon and thought I would share his response: Doane, I'm curious if you were a fan of Levon Helm's as a drummer and if so do you have any thoughts on his passing? LikeUnlike · · See Friendship. Doane Perry Sorry for such a laggard reply. Levon had an enormous impact on my playing. He had a simply beautiful, unique feel and sound and I loved his singing and mandolin playing too. Levon was a legend and a true giant, not just of his instrument but of music. And The Band were one of the greatest groups.......ever. I am going to be writing more about him in the future. See: www.doaneperry.comDoane Perry - The Official Website doaneperry.com A professional musician since 1972, Doane Perry has been called one of the most prolific drummers in contemporary music. Full bio…..


Entered at Fri Jun 8 15:21:35 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I've never even heard of Dave Walker! Yes, that's very unfair then, though I'd only have thought the 1976 five + Peter Green.


Entered at Fri Jun 8 13:51:19 CEST 2012 from (24.252.147.174)

Posted by:

Calvin

Actually Peter, Welch being kept out of the HOF is a bit more simple than that. 8 of the 11 "official" members of Fleetwood Mac from 1967-1987 where invited, and listed as members, when they were inducted into the Rock n Roll HOF. One of them, Dave Walker only appeared on two songs-so yeah. Welch had filed a lawsuit just a couple years before suing Mac and the McVie's for conspiring to keep royalties from him and Bob Weston had been kicked out of the band for sleeping with Fleetwood's Wife. Welch was not on speaking terms with the McVie's or Mac at the time. And supposedly still hadnt even spoken to McVie at the time of his death.

So they found room for everyone essentially except for the guy suing the current members and the guy who had boffed one of their wives.


Entered at Fri Jun 8 13:44:21 CEST 2012 from (184.144.105.216)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Click on high res photo of Robbie cuddles up to Levon.


Entered at Fri Jun 8 13:40:26 CEST 2012 from (184.144.105.216)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Robbie and Tassya Van Ree.


Entered at Fri Jun 8 13:26:41 CEST 2012 from (184.144.105.216)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Scroll down to see Robbie and Bob in a car.
Go to next page and there's another photo of both of them by a car.....and then they're shopping together and many, many more pages of photos....


Entered at Fri Jun 8 12:39:00 CEST 2012 from (92.18.190.141)

Posted by:

Solomon

Web: My link

Subject: Bob Welch R.I.P

Peter Green and the piece of cheese story.


Entered at Fri Jun 8 12:31:52 CEST 2012 from (92.18.190.141)

Posted by:

Solomon

Web: My link

Subject: Bob Welch

Never seen this before - Bob Welch w/Rick Danko & Paul Butterfield "Mystery Train" LIVE on U.S. TV 9/7. Rick looks like he is enjoying himself)


Entered at Fri Jun 8 09:51:36 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Fleetwood Mac. Pity about Bob Welch. I didn't know they'd kept him off the R&R Hall of Fame. There is a degree of logic though. You'd induct Peter Green separately, because The Green Years were really "Peter Green and some guys". Then there were the Wilderness Years when no one was very keen on them (in spite of having Cristine Perfect). Then there's the megastar years with Buckingham-Nicks.


Entered at Fri Jun 8 02:50:13 CEST 2012 from (96.30.174.20)

Posted by:

joe j

Location: South Island

Subject: Fred in Japan

Fred, it's Japan next week. We're based out of Saitama for two weeks. Women have this holiday carefully choreographed. Hope to get a couple days to wander by myself. Would appreciate any dos and donts at jjenningsatpersonadotca.


Entered at Fri Jun 8 00:46:00 CEST 2012 from (99.236.202.207)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: PETER

PETER: Forgot to thank you for your link. I have Barry McGuire's 2-parter of "Destruction", which I love.. The link showed a few other goodies by: Buffy Sainte-Marie, Johnny Horton,Cat Stevens, etc.

Thanx to all for your links. You never know what is going to show up on them...

CYA xoxoxo


Entered at Fri Jun 8 00:38:06 CEST 2012 from (24.252.147.174)

Posted by:

Calvin

I was never what you'd call a fan of Welch's, but I always thought Fleetwood and Mcvie Preventing him from being inducted in the HOF as a member of Fleetwood Mac was complete crap. Sure he was only on thee albums, but everyone knows there was the Green Era, The Welch Era, and the Buckingham/Nicks Era.

Now that is a feud.


Entered at Fri Jun 8 00:23:37 CEST 2012 from (99.236.202.207)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: Bob Welch [Fleetwood Mac] dead at 65..

Hi guys!!

BEG: thanx for the links. I keep a lot of goodies on disks.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Former Fleetwood Mac Guitarist Bob Welch Dead at 65 in Apparent Suicide

Today 3:00 PM PDT by REBECCA MACATEE

Bob Welch, a former member of Fleetwood Mac, died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound in Nashville, E! News confirms. Welch, 65, was found by his wife in their home around 12:15 p.m. on Thursday, Nashville police spokesman Don Aaron said.

Welch was a guitarist and vocalist for the British-American rock group from 1971 to 1975. He then went on to form another group called Paris in 1976 and eventually embarked on a solo music career. Police said that Welch had had health issues recently and left a suicide note.

CYA soon xoxoxo


Entered at Thu Jun 7 19:35:41 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Mickey's monkey ...

David P: True, but it was all so secret that, as Dylan said, "Something's happening here, but you don't know what it is, do you, Mr Jones." The guy actually missed a lot, including the domestic goings-on behind his back with Billy Paul.

Up here, one of the most-heard Sloan (and Barri) songs is "Unless You Care" - and a string of other Sloan/Barry compositions that Terry Black recorded between '64 and '68. Black was from Vancouver, so it's CanCon. Black had a good run in LA, but came north again circa '68. I'm just speculating, but it may have been to avoid the possibility of being drafted and sent off to Vietnam. He did an LP backed by the Mandala on some cuts and an embryonic Lighthouse on the rest, had a role in the local production of Hair, turned up in the original version of the Doctor Music ensemble and had a string of hits with his wife, Laurel Ward - the biggest hit ironically being "On The Road To LA".


Entered at Thu Jun 7 19:02:04 CEST 2012 from (70.50.65.228)

Posted by:

Kevin J

BEG: Thank you very much for your efforts but alas no………not the one. The documentary I am looking for was early 80’s because I recall being surprised at seeing Robbie in it as it was during his invisible period ( after TLW and before he re-emerged to much fanfare in 1987 )………Johnny Paycheque is also featured prominently as is the late great Carl Perkins.


Entered at Thu Jun 7 18:37:45 CEST 2012 from (68.164.6.188)

Posted by:

Pat B

Ahh, right-wing 60's folk rock. A small and horrid subsection, although two of the Spokesmen wrote At The Hop.


Entered at Thu Jun 7 18:12:42 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Ballad of a Not So Thin Secret Agent Man

As for connections -- Mickey Jones went from playing "Secret Agent Man" (co-written by P.F. Sloan) with Johnny Rivers to accompanying Dylan & The Hawks on "Ballad of a Thin Man".


Entered at Thu Jun 7 17:04:07 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Rumer's on Atlantic, and judging by the huge bands on her live videos, someone thinks she's going to be a major star.

On Jimmy Webb and P.F. Sloan I found "Up Up & Away" LP by The Fifth Dimension (1967) in a charity shop today. Produced by Johnny Rivers. Four (?) songs by Jimmy Webb, who also plays keyboards alongside the usual suspects … Joe Osborne, Hal Blaine, Larry Knechtel. Also a song by P.F. Sloan. The actual P.F. Sloan.

I believe the point of the song P.F. Sloan is songwriters stepping up to perform themselves. However, it makes me think of Sloan's best known song, Eve of Destruction, and the appalling cover, Dawn of Correction, by The Spokesmen, which was first introduced to me here. And which fails to credit P.F. Sloan, in spite of having an identical tune with reverse lyrics. Don't sing that song. It belongs to P.F. Sloan indeed! The link is to Dawn of Correction.


Entered at Thu Jun 7 16:29:13 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: P.F. Flyers

Haven't been able to locate my copy of "Jennifer" yet. I guess it's a sign that I have too many LPs stored in various places. Did find P.F. Sloan's 1968 Atco LP "Measure of Pleasure", produced by Tom Dowd and set it aside for future listening.

I'm not that familiar with Rumer, but found out she's also covered Townes Van Zandt's "Flyin' Shoes", which further earns my respect.


Entered at Thu Jun 7 13:54:25 CEST 2012 from (64.231.177.15)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Performing and hanging with Rick Danko of The Band. To hear mp3's of Duane and Rick Danko playing together click on the following links:

C.C. Rider
Chest Fever
Shape I'm In

Duane, Tim and Bob with Garth Hudson after working on tracks for Duane's album "American Boy".

Post show with Levon Helm of The Band.


Entered at Thu Jun 7 13:50:00 CEST 2012 from (64.231.177.15)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Levon photo...Robbie wore polka dots in one of his videos as well. Great minds think alike. ;-D


Entered at Thu Jun 7 13:48:28 CEST 2012 from (64.231.177.15)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Rick photo


Entered at Thu Jun 7 13:46:28 CEST 2012 from (64.231.177.15)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

You're welcome Serenity. Here's a Hawk Interview for you.

Mb: "And what about your new record? Have you been filming the making of it?

Ronnie: We have footage of everybody doing everything. Levon (Helm) and Robbie (Robertson) are playing together, but not at the same time. (Laughs) Robbie thinks it’s great, but Levon may never talk to me again! I don’t care. It’s time they got back together. This is the new millennium. Love and forgive and forget your troubles. We’re going to have enough troubles these days. So let’s have some fun before it’s too late."

I also read online that Levon's manager had contacted Robbie's manager and everyone was hoping the story would end differently?


Entered at Thu Jun 7 12:08:56 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Link to the Unicorn version of P.F. Sloan which started me getting interested again. I prefer Rumer, but this is pleasant.


Entered at Thu Jun 7 07:57:03 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

Jeff, that's a 450% increase in revenue in just a day. If you can maintain that rate of growth, you'll be able to a Facebook style float in a year or so.


Entered at Thu Jun 7 04:52:27 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Yes,Peter,Streamline Video being the title of that instructional is the height of irony.

Today I had a windfall.31 more streams were identified, and paid 9 cents!


Entered at Thu Jun 7 03:12:40 CEST 2012 from (99.236.202.207)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: Beach Boys

Jay Leno has the Beach Boys tonight..Brian doesn't look well. Seems to have lost a lot of weight?

CYA soon xoxoxo


Entered at Thu Jun 7 00:07:02 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Thanks, David. The early 70s is no guarantee of individual credits. I think Jimmy Webb wrote "P.F. Sloan" in 1970, and there's a clear chorus similarity to the people singing "No no no no" and the people singing in the chorus of The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down. Nothing wrong with being inspired.

Sir Andrew Motion, the Poet Laureate for ten years in the UK, chose "Music From Big Pink" in the latest edition of MOJO as "the record that changed my life." He cites the lyrics and the allusions which he is still trying to unravel (like us). So, he found the lyrics of Big Pink was what set him on the path to being an acclaimed poet. Pretty impressive.


Entered at Wed Jun 6 21:10:54 CEST 2012 from (99.236.202.207)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: Anna & Kate McGarrigle

Hi all;;

BEG: That's the show I meant with RONNIE. There was one on ROBBIE too.

"Alive and Kickin" was a good show too. Thanx for the link and info.. I wonder what happened to the guy that said he "cured" Ronnies'cancer? He was out west in BC I think?

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

This came in my inbox today..

Anna McGarrigle says her late sister wished she had made more of an impact

By Nick Patch, The Canadian Press | The Canadian Press – TORONTO - Anna McGarrigle says her dearly departed sister, folk singer-songwriter Kate McGarrigle, wished for more widespread prominence in her music career.

So the elder half of the esteemed pair hopes that tributes like the multi-disciplinary programming planned at this year's Luminato help spread the word of Kate McGarrigle's achievements.

"In some ways, I think she wished she had made more of an impact," Anna McGarrigle said in a recent telephone interview.

"I think she would have liked to have had more notoriety."

Luminato — which begins Friday and runs through June 17 — is doing its part to toast the legendary songwriter, who died of cancer in January 2010 at the age of 63.

On Friday, Anna McGarrigle will discuss her sister with Booker Prize-winning novelist Michael Ondaatje at a lunchtime session at David Pecaut Square in Toronto. On June 13, the arts festival will screen Lian Lunson's documentary "Sing Me the Songs That Say I Love You," which chronicled the all-star tribute held in Kate McGarrigle's honour at New York's Town Hall Theatre.

And finally, June 15 will mark the third such charity concert (proceeds go to the Kate McGarrigle Fund, created to further sarcoma research), with a heady lineup of musicians — including Emmylou Harris, Bruce Cockburn, Ron Sexsmith and Broken Social Scene's Kevin Drew — on hand at Massey Hall to salute her life and work alongside Kate's family, including her sisters (Anna and Jane) and children (Martha and Rufus Wainwright).

In fact, Anna McGarrigle said it was her sister's devotion to her family that might have kept her musical profile from soaring to the heights of her peers.

The McGarrigles' created such well-loved tunes as "The Work Song," "Cool River" and "Lying Song," as well as the distinctive rendition of Wade Hemsworth's The Log Driver's Waltz" that was featured in an iconic 1979 animated short by the National Film Board.

Yet while her sister was invested with the Order of Canada, received the Governor General’s Performing Arts Award and saw her songs covered by the likes of Linda Ronstadt, Elvis Costello and Judy Collins, Anna McGarrigle says she always prioritized motherhood over her career.

"It was very difficult, for one thing, being a woman performer, but also trying to raise children — and (trying to) make sure that you don't have (screw-ups) by the end of it," she said.

"She was very conscious of that. Because my mother and father, they were always around for us. So she tried to be around as much for her kids, or else take them with her whenever she could.

"So when you're not giving 100 per cent to your career, then of course you're not going to be known by the entire world."

Still, as lovingly depicted by her sister, Kate McGarrigle didn't seem to spend that much time worrying about her relative position in the music world.

McGarrigle remembers the way her sister — who nurtured a passion for maps and geography — insisted on planning their tours and often handling the driving, pointing out drumlins and moraines as they cruised. She remembers how Kate loved to stay up all night talking, "plumbing the depths of people" after a few glasses of wine, an experience that actually inspired Harris to write a song.

And she remembers how Kate relished performing even when wracked with pain in her later days, when the stage provided the only respite from a disease she spent years fending off.

"When she was onstage, I don't think she could feel any pain," Anna McGarrigle said, before clarifying. "I'm not saying she didn't feel the pain, but I'm just saying she forgot about all that stuff when she was onstage.

"If anybody deserved to live, it was her," she added. "She loved life, this woman, she was never depressed.... I think she just always knew that she had one kick at the can and this was it, and she took every opportunity to bite into the apple of life, for better or worse. She was like that. I've always been much more cautious."

Anna McGarrigle says tributes like those taking place at Luminato were initially difficult to get through. She was moved to tears during the first — held at London's Royal Festival Hall, months after Kate's death — an occasion which marked the very first time Anna performed onstage without her younger sister by her side.

At the time, her sister's death was still too close. "I have to say that during the whole time that she was ill, I only wanted to be in one place — I just wanted to be with her, all the time, at the hospital, wherever," she recalled.

"It's almost like we could overcome all this stuff. Until reality sort of kicked in about a month before. And then I think we both realized she wasn't going to get out of this. And then I just, I fell apart at the same time. I couldn't be a hero anymore."

Those feelings are a little more distant for Anna McGarrigle now, and she says subsequent tributes have been less emotionally draining.

She's used to answering questions about her sister patiently and thoughtfully, as she does on this day and will do at Luminato. And she's hopeful that the magnitude of her sister's accomplishments will only grow over time.

"I'm not the first one to say it — my sister was a genius," she said. "She was really original and a wonderful musician and a great songwriter.

"It's hard being a genius," she adds with a laugh, "when you're surrounded by mere mortals."

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxo


Entered at Wed Jun 6 20:01:00 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Jennifer

Peter: Can't recall if the LP had individual credits for each song. Will have to see if I can dig up my copy.


Entered at Wed Jun 6 19:23:03 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Listened to the Jennifer Warnes & spent ten minutes trying to find out if I really do recognise Russ Kunkel that quickly. He's on the album, I found out that much after a few minutes googling, but is he on the track P.F. Sloan?


Entered at Wed Jun 6 16:33:45 CEST 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: P.F. Sloan

P.F. Sloan: the song by J.Webb (studio and live) and by Jennifer Warnes can both be found on You Tube.


Entered at Wed Jun 6 16:22:14 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Vinyl Siding: Jennifer & P.F. Sloan

My favorite version of "P.F. Sloan" was recorded by Jennifer Warnes and included on her 1972 Reprise LP "Jennifer", which was produced by John Cale and featured many of L.A.'s finest musicians. Her version featured the St. Paul Cathedral Boys Choir (link above). It sounds to me that Rumer's recent version may have been influenced by Ms. Warnes. Among the other highlights on "Jennifer" were covers of Jackson Browne's "These Days" and Procol Harum's "Magdalene (My Regal Zonophone)". I don't think this album has ever been reissued on CD, but several of the cuts, including "P.F. Sloan", appear on compilation CD released by the Raven label.


Entered at Wed Jun 6 14:32:10 CEST 2012 from (174.44.139.55)

Posted by:

Jed

Hope Ms. Crow gets well. Paul was vocally struggling while squawking for little Queenie--sad to hear his voice deteriorate so over the past 3 years since i saw him last. Brown Eyed girl--love pic of Rick & bass--thanks. Lightshow & fireworks for queenie were way cool.


Entered at Wed Jun 6 13:18:03 CEST 2012 from (124.170.227.33)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Web: My link

Subject: George Martin as hostage

From an old sketch show. I found it funny.


Entered at Wed Jun 6 12:35:37 CEST 2012 from (70.29.29.5)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

The three musketeers in The Band.

The $20 Drawing Project — #45
Posted on April 24, 2012
by admin

"Brian Breighner requested Richard Manuel, Levon Helm, and Rick Danko (from The Band). The lyric is from Long Distance Operator, a song The Band performed on The Basement Tapes, although it was written by Bob Dylan: Everybody wants to be my friend, but nobody wants to get higher."


Entered at Wed Jun 6 12:28:07 CEST 2012 from (70.29.29.5)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

"Memories - with Rick Danko and the 5-string hollowbody bass we made for him.
In this photo:
The Band
This is a photo from trond tufte's album Mine bilder"


Entered at Wed Jun 6 12:25:17 CEST 2012 from (70.29.29.5)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Rick and Levon


Entered at Wed Jun 6 09:23:25 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

For "quiet" read "quite" … I have a sore finger which means I'm typing differently!


Entered at Wed Jun 6 09:21:27 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: P.F. Sloan (song) CONTINUED

This second link takes you to a different version by Rumer. This one is live on Jools Holland with Jimmy Webb on piano and vocals too. Like Simone Felice, she has the confidence to present a song in quiet different versions. A lovely voice, a lovely song.


Entered at Wed Jun 6 09:19:02 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: P.F. Sloan (song)

I always liked Jimmy Webb's song "P.F. Sloan" and a couple of weeks back I picked up the British cover 45 by Unicorn. I hadn't then heard Rumer's new single. There are two versions on YouTube. This link goes to a live version.


Entered at Wed Jun 6 08:20:35 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: broadcasts, streaming

Jeff, I’ve been asking a similar question. We licensed back two of our early educational videos when they went out of print (link is for the curious!). We publish them on DVD. We got non-broadcast rights. This is because this is all our publisher was entitled to sell, because the original actors’ contracts were non-broadcast.

This often blocks the sale of old TV material. On such contracts a sliding scale of payments kicks in if something is broadcast. The scale is gone from memory, but USA, UK and Germany used to be 100 points. I think France was 50 or 60. South Korea was one point. I remember one of ours was broadcast in Germany years ago and as writers we got about £300, then it was broadcast in Korea the same month and we got £3.

We investigated this because we wanted to sell downloads. These are assumed by US precedent to be non-broadcast. They are specifically delivered to one user who has requested it and paid per item, so are a “sale” by different means of delivery.

Our later series are harder to license because we used copyright tunes … I Heard It Through the Grapevine and Louie Louie as theme music, which would also mean royalties on sales. OK for a big publisher, but a lot of admin for us.

So what’s streaming? If the user is paying a blank subscription for unlimited use (or a set time / number of unspecified items), I don’t think it’s been tested. I’d say it’s “broadcast” too, in the same way a subscription cable TV or satellite TV is “broadcast.” You’re not paying for the specific item you watch or listen to, but generally for access. Yes, you choose the item, but here 100,000 songs is just a different scale to 100 TV stations.

Ironically, the videos we licensed were originally subtitled "Streamline Video". Though no longer in our edition.


Entered at Wed Jun 6 04:39:32 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

Whatever the hell iTunes Match Americas is, they have now reported about 160 streams of my songs and have paid me a total of 2 cents.

Streaming a song, or a stream of a song.Not sure it is a good word fit either as a verb or ss a noun.I think of a stream as a beautiful body of water in the mountains, or a good piss.A stream of a song, nah. It is a broadcast, albeit a inferior sounding digital broadcast.It is not a stream.


Entered at Wed Jun 6 02:42:33 CEST 2012 from (70.24.109.197)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Kevin John: Tall Tales from the Long Corner: The Life and Times of Ronnie Hawkins?

Or was it the doc I previously posted? Ronnie Hawkins Still Alive and Kickin'?

There are parts 1 and 2 on youtube.com.

Run Time: 66 minutes and 90 minutes
Director: Anne Pick
Producer & Executive Producer: Anne Pick
Broadcaster: CTV Television Inc.
Copyright: Real Hawk Productions To his friends, he’s Mr. Dynamo. To his doctors, he’s a miracle. To the rest of the world, he’s The Hawk, the Arkansas-born King of Rockabilly who made Canada his home and his stage for more than four decades. He’s still rocking the house today – against all odds. In this feature length documentary, director Anne Pick spends a rollercoaster year and a half with The Hawk, from his diagnosis of terminal pancreatic cancer in 2002 through to his mysterious recovery. He was told he was a dead man.


Entered at Wed Jun 6 02:12:25 CEST 2012 from (58.104.6.29)

Posted by:

Graham

Subject: Royalty

Peter V, I still cannot forgive the royal family for what they did to Diana. How quickly people forget. I thought Paul's voice was a bit rough but otherwise in fine form. He has been in so many of these kind of shows but I see Eric 'when is he going to get knighted too' Clapton wasn't there this time.


Entered at Wed Jun 6 01:03:18 CEST 2012 from (99.236.202.207)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: Sheryl Crow

Hi all!!

KEVIN: I remember when Anne Thompson [?] had CBC shows on Ronnie and ROBBIE. They were very good shows. I have them both on a video somewhere in my collection. She did others too..

Good news for Sheryl Crow.

Sheryl Crow has a benign brain tumor, the singer revealed in a new interview.

"I worried about my memory so much that I went and got an MRI. And I found out I have a brain tumor," Crow tells the Las Vegas Review Journal.

"I haven't really talked about it," she adds. "In November, I found out I have a brain tumor. But it's benign, so I don't have to worry about it."

The singer's rep says that the Grammy winner, 50, is healthy and happy. The tumor is a meningioma, which is typically benign and develops from the brain and spinal cord linings. It should not require surgery.

Crow, who has two young sons, says she recently forgot some of the words to her song "Soak Up the Sun" while performing in Florida. "I'm 50, what can I say? My brain's gone to [expletive]," she cracked at the time.

Crow battled breast cancer in 2006. "I think it was a great release for me, just going through the experience," she told PEOPLE that year.

"It's what you do with the experience that really defines who you become … I let go of a lot of the pressure I used to put on myself."

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

CYA soon xoxoxo


Entered at Wed Jun 6 00:10:56 CEST 2012 from (96.54.171.63)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Neil Young

Neil Young said it best with Crazy Horse. Indeed... "God Save The Queen".


Entered at Tue Jun 5 23:16:20 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

What the Queen said so well today is that the value of such occasions (the Jubilee, the Bicentennial, whatever) is that people get together and organize events as a community, and that these events are then imprinted on our memories as landmarks. For me,the joy of yesterday was seeing twenty-five kids (six to eight years old) having fun with their parents, but also assembling to sing God Save The Queen. I’ve never been an ardent monarchist, but on these sorts of days, it kind of works. I also think the national image of the figurehead as a mother figure works better than the alternative.


Entered at Tue Jun 5 21:54:45 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: The Queen may well be a pretty nice girl, but the snatch of God Save The Queen that follows the Manchester version of "Like A Rolling Stone" on "Live '66" is enough royalty for me.


Entered at Tue Jun 5 21:17:36 CEST 2012 from (70.50.65.228)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Most welcome Joan…………..Serenity…..I was not as clear as I could have been…….”The Hawk” I’m looking for is a National Film Board documentary ( or perhaps just a CBC production ) that I really enjoyed…….Tracy did have a copy of it on tape but I do hope that it surfaces on disc at some point. Thank you for the thought though.

George Harrison: I rented the Scorsese/George Harrison doc ‘Living In The Material World” a few nights ago………..Watched it over two nights…..Enjoyed it very much in that it has given me quite a different take on George…..a more substantial character than I had thought. A major flaw in the film is that there is almost zero discussion of guitar…which is mind blowing considering the subject. Martin Scorsese is a master film maker but he either doesn’t know or didn’t care to explain that a man’s character can just as clearly be projected through his playing as by the chanting he might do with spiritual men and women.


Entered at Tue Jun 5 20:28:17 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Elvis: June 5, 1956

It was 56 years ago today that Elvis created quite a stir with his appearance on the Milton Berle Show. Link to video clip including Levon's narration from the Elvis '56 documentary.


Entered at Tue Jun 5 20:22:57 CEST 2012 from (99.236.202.207)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: Herb Reid dead at 83 [The Platters]

Hi all!! Thanx for all the great posts.

BEG: You amaze me with all your links/findings. Great to get into them. Others too.

KEVIN: I have Ronnie Hawkins' "The Hawk". I've had it for a long time. I purchased it at a 2nd-hand book store. We have a few really good stores here, but they don't pay well for books I'm trying to get rid of.

NUX: Hope everything goes well with the new baby. Congrats to you and your wife.

Sad news: I saw this group many moons ago and they were really good. They came here with Bill Haley & the Comets and Chuck Berry. Good show, but really noisy..

BOSTON - Herb Reed, the last surviving original member of 1950s vocal group the Platters who sang on hits like "Only You" and "The Great Pretender," has died. He was 83.

Reed died on Monday in a Boston area hospice after a period of declining health that included chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, manager Fred Balboni said.

Reed was a Kansas City, Mo., native who founded the Platters in Los Angeles in 1953. Then a quartet, the group won amateur talent shows, and performed nights and weekends up and down the California coast while the members worked days at a car wash and at other odd jobs.

Reed came up with the group's name, inspired by '50s disc jockeys who called their records platters.

The group underwent several lineup changes, even adding a woman singer to become a quintet, before signing their first major recording contract in 1955.

Reed sang bass on the group's four No. 1 hits, including "The Great Pretender," ''My Prayer," ''Twilight Time" and "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes."

The Platters were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1990 and the Vocal Group Hall of Fame in 1998. Their recordings are in the Grammy Hall of Fame.

The group's popularity reached across racial lines and genres, "achieving success in a crooning, middle-of-the-road style that put a soulful coat of uptown polish on pop-oriented, harmony-rich material," according to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's website.

Reed credited his survival in the music industry to the poverty he experienced as a child in Kansas City. While other members of the group spent frivolously, he used his first big royalty check to buy a house.

"I never thought that it would keep going, and I never wanted to assume we'd keep getting checks," he said earlier this year.

Reed also waged long legal battles with other artists who performed and recorded under the name the Platters. He finally won a court decision in Nevada last year giving him rights to the name. He called the court victory every bit as big as the gold and platinum records he had earned, Balboni said.

Reed had homes in Atlanta and Miami but had called the Boston area home since the 1970s "because the people were always so nice to me," he told a biographer. He had most recently living in Arlington.

Reed was the only member of the group to appear on all of their nearly 400 recordings. He continued touring, performing up to 200 shows per year, until last year, often performing with younger singers under the name Herb Reed and the Platters or Herb Reed's Platters.

Reed is survived by a son and three grandsons.Funeral arrangements are pending.

Until next time LOVE AND PEACE xoxoxoxo


Entered at Tue Jun 5 19:47:09 CEST 2012 from (108.54.247.103)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Sir Paul

Kevin, thanks for the link. A great lightshow, and it looks like Paul's daughter Stella designed his suit.


Entered at Tue Jun 5 18:51:15 CEST 2012 from (96.54.171.63)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: The Best

I have a problem with 'The Best' lists. Sgt Pepper is a wonderful album. My issue is not with its excellence. It is the phenomenon of making lists with a sequence that ultimately suggests that there is a 'Best'. I don't mind lists documenting excellence. It is the numerical sequencing that implies that 'Sgt Pepper' is somehow 'better than' 'Pet Sounds' or " Blonde on Blonde' or "Music From Big Pink". Moreover, the lists often ignore what is not popular as if sales alone somehow defines excellence. This rant was brought on by the recent appearance of lists in a couple of the music magazines and the even more recent article (well written) in the National Post about Sgt Pepper. There is a popular enjoyment by the masses of such lists, but I can live without them. That having been said, there is validity for anyone criticizing me from looking at them. What I do is shuffle the deck and ignore the numbers. There is no 'best' for me when arts are at issue.


Entered at Tue Jun 5 18:25:52 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The one who imagined it all -- All those years ago...

And last Friday was the 45th anniversary of the release of Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Heart's Club Band.


Entered at Tue Jun 5 18:24:22 CEST 2012 from (70.50.65.228)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Above Link - Joe Cocker doing "Out of the Blue"


Entered at Tue Jun 5 17:53:07 CEST 2012 from (70.50.65.228)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: Paul's Full June 4 Set


Entered at Tue Jun 5 17:49:30 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Thanks, that was it. I had "Her Majesty" running through my head every time Paul was about to start a new song!


Entered at Tue Jun 5 17:47:36 CEST 2012 from (70.50.65.228)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

….………I enjoyed Paul’s performance and “Ob La Di, Ob La Da” turned out to be a good choice for the kind of lightness of the whole affair………..Put it this way, Sir Elton and Sir Cliff would not as felt as comfortable holding each other in their arms and dancing to “Helter Skelter” ……Paul’s drummer is great…………….and indeed that Twist & Shout from almost 50 years ago was a really strong performance. I really miss John Lennon – the person really more than the musician and would have liked to hear his takes on society as we’ve moved along…..hard to believe he has been gone almost 32 years….


Entered at Tue Jun 5 17:02:17 CEST 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT and LvdB

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Corgies

"Her Majesty asked me to ask you all to leave in an orderly fashion or she will be forced to unleash the corgis"


Entered at Tue Jun 5 16:40:15 CEST 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT and LvdB

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: "A pretty nice girl...'

'Her majesty's a pretty nice girl...' There were fireworks a couple of nights ago here in Victoria. I don't know who was responsible but the jubilee was remembered by someone.


Entered at Tue Jun 5 16:36:44 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

To be nitpicking, John suggested people should rattle their JEWELLERY. YouTube has the US spelling too. But what an astonishing performance that 1963 Twist & Shout is … Lennon's voice, and even on YouTube, Paul's bass driving the show. Paul had a mild quip last night, which I don't remember, but anything other than very mild humour in the mood last night would have been as they say in the vernacular, farting in church.


Entered at Tue Jun 5 15:46:48 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Royal Performance

So sad that John Lennon wasn't there urging the royals once again to rattle their jewelry :-)


Entered at Tue Jun 5 14:27:05 CEST 2012 from (124.170.227.33)

Posted by:

Dlew919

Subject: Queen's concert

Just watching it now. Ran the gamut from (omg, what were they thinking?) to some good to great performances. Liked Tom jones. Liked Shirley bassey. Elton puts in a solid performance. Will I am does what he usually does for music, that is nothing. The comics were dire. Just waiting for macca.


Entered at Tue Jun 5 14:17:28 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Of course I blame King James I (or VI).


Entered at Tue Jun 5 14:16:01 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Wasn't there a minor contretemps a few years back (at least here in England) when it was realised the younger royals supported Scotland in rugby games? They were seen applauding a try against England, I think!


Entered at Tue Jun 5 13:54:23 CEST 2012 from (31.53.175.226)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Lighting

I had never seen the way light flowers opened on Buckingham Palace before and the accompanying lights to Madness were fantastic.

Great holiday weekend. Gentle walking down the Clyde Coast on Friday and the hills around Glasgow yesterday. The Royal links with Scotland are genuine because of the Queen Mum.

The one downpoint was that I looked for a concert to go to, but I felt there was nothing catering for me.


Entered at Tue Jun 5 13:34:23 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Dunc, just read the note that Kate was wearing the Strathearn tartan scarf (as Countess of Strathearn). These guys do know what they're doing!


Entered at Tue Jun 5 13:31:48 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The lights and fireworks were incredible. I'm sure that's why Paul did Live & Let Die … it's made for that sort of dramatic effect. Mrs V, watching him next to the Queen, suggested he must be related to Ken Dodd. He's beginning to look like him!

It struck me that Sir Cliff was already in the charts a mere six years into her reign, Dame Shirley Bassey, a mere five. Sir Paul was doing the Royal Variety show 49 years ago.


Entered at Tue Jun 5 12:07:29 CEST 2012 from (31.53.175.226)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

As an ex lighting man, Peter, wasn't the lighting at the Jubilee concert wonderful, adding very much to the occasion.

Any news, Nux?

Thanks, Adam, for Levon and the Hawks.


Entered at Tue Jun 5 11:13:43 CEST 2012 from (70.29.28.124)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Drummer Jerome Avis who is Levon's Godson and Bill Avis' son.....In Cobourg he's telling me to save my pennies and go to a Ramble. :(


Entered at Tue Jun 5 11:01:27 CEST 2012 from (70.29.28.124)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link


Entered at Tue Jun 5 10:59:32 CEST 2012 from (70.29.28.124)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Sunday August 8, 2004 Newport Folk Festival...Garth Hudson photo

....just as in NYC...."On the big stage, next it was the Dixie Hummingbirds, billed with Garth Hudson and Levon Helm. But alas there was no Levon, but it was a great start to a sunny day, especially hanging with pals Meg Griffin and Claudia Marshall. "


Entered at Tue Jun 5 10:53:24 CEST 2012 from (70.29.28.124)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Giancarlo Vulcano: Ve Tro: Portrait of Richard Manuel, for guitar, clarinet & piano


Entered at Tue Jun 5 00:48:05 CEST 2012 from (71.184.194.88)

Posted by:

Tim

Location: Boston
Web: My link

Subject: Play about Richard

anyone know anything?


Entered at Tue Jun 5 00:01:55 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Diamond Jubilee

Congratulations, Nux. A fortuitous day, too.

We had a children’s party for the Diamond Jubilee and we’d just finished packing up and washing up in time to see Paul McCartney. One great pleasure was in All My Loving where they cut away to Princess Anne and the Archbishop of Cantebury, side by side, both singing along to it. The power of the Beatles (and as is always said, when Paul is present there is no argument about who closes). Interesting choice of closer … Ob La Di, Ob La Da, which fitted the multi-ethnic feel, and we saw Elton John and Cliff Richard waltzing to his side! Unusual set … Magical Mystery Tour, All My Loving, Let It Be (well, that was expected), Live & Let Die and Ob La Di, Ob La Da.

Our big surprise came in God Save The Queen … we both stood up as it started by reflex without thinking about it. I don't think I've ever stood up in my own living room for the National Anthem before. Mind you, the Queen must have enjoyed Sir Tom Jones giving it full voice right behind her, as well as Sir Paul and Sir Elton within two yards.

I'm not a flag waver, but some days you're glad to be British!


Entered at Mon Jun 4 22:12:53 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: SDTCR Really Live

Here's a link to Robbie actually performing SDTCR on Saturday Night Live years ago, backed by the same musicians from the studio recording.


Entered at Mon Jun 4 21:40:58 CEST 2012 from (108.54.247.103)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Nux

Congratulations! Little girls are wonderful. And what a lovely name.


Entered at Mon Jun 4 21:10:04 CEST 2012 from (70.50.65.228)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: LINK: Kevin Hearn doing "You Ain't Going Nowhere" in front of Eaton Centre?

David: Thank you for that article. I think I probably read hundreds around the time of Levon’s passing but missed that one…….A great point made about the impossibility of recreating The Band’s songs……tributes are almost always from the heart so a bit chintzy to criticize them but I find myself almost always turning them off – if on youtube ( like today’s TNTDODD ) – or tuning out if I am in a bar……….. Some recordings of Band songs have worked well but only a few…….Little Feat’s “Rag Mama Rag”, Mary Margret O'Hara’s “Out of the Blue” and Neil Young & Sadies “This Wheels on Fire” top the list for me.


Entered at Mon Jun 4 19:06:00 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: The Gap

Kevin: There was that year & a half gap in live performances between the ROA concert on New Year's Eve and Watkins Glen in July 1973. Levon took advantage of the hiatus to attend Berklee College of Music for a semester in 1972. As Tom Millsop wrote in his obituary of Levon from a drummer's perspective (see link), "I pity the kid that sat next to him" in classes at Berklee.


Entered at Mon Jun 4 19:05:35 CEST 2012 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

mike h

Happy b'day, Zzzzz.


Entered at Mon Jun 4 18:33:09 CEST 2012 from (70.50.65.228)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

BEG……………..and the laugh at the end OF SDTCR was a nod to the lip-syncing……….by the way……you might be the only person around able to find it but there was an excellent biography of Ronnie Hawkins dome in the early 80’s called “The Hawk” which featured Robbie and others from the Band, I believe. Also, it would be fun to see Levon doing “Acadian Driftwood” in the great “Floating Over Canada” – A Murray McLauchlan TV special also from the 80’s.

Caught Gregg Allman on the what used to be Larry King show ( now hosted by a makes your skin crawl host ) and it was so uncomfortable and different that it was actually compelling TV.

Seeing The Band/Hawks live…………………..by preference……….1. Early 60’s Yonge Street, 2. At or around ROA 71/72, 3. 1974 tour, 4. Festival Express period, 5. 1976 on a good night.


Entered at Mon Jun 4 17:51:26 CEST 2012 from (38.116.192.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Solomon: Yes thanks. I saw the name Wogan but it didn't register. Thanks so much.


Entered at Mon Jun 4 17:46:21 CEST 2012 from (38.116.192.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Robbie again in Crossing Guard....part 2
Check out other parts as I'm sure there's more from what I remember when I saw the movie.


Entered at Mon Jun 4 17:43:22 CEST 2012 from (38.116.192.105)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Congrats Nux!
A great children's male author and illustrator who has written some books where the female character is the one who is brave, clever, resourceful and saves the day is Robin Muller. A british writer...Babette Cole wrote the book Princess Smartypants...The main character is very independent and isn't interested in marrying anyone.
Too bad we weren't able to hook up in South Africa. Apparently JT was there too and small world we were both in the same suburb of Cape Town...

Robbie in Crossing Guard.


Entered at Mon Jun 4 15:47:01 CEST 2012 from (41.162.7.114)

Posted by:

NUX

Subject: Leighvon

I am of to the hospital now to await the birth of my baby girl.We have named her Leighvon Schwartz.Will keep you all posted!


Entered at Mon Jun 4 15:18:17 CEST 2012 from (92.18.171.239)

Posted by:

Solomon

brown eyed girl - It's from the Terry Wogan chat show which ran on the BBC in the 1980s until the early 1990s. Thanks for the links.


Entered at Mon Jun 4 14:54:30 CEST 2012 from (216.114.128.38)

Posted by:

mike h

Web: My link

"TNTDODD" 06/02/12 - MT Jam (NY) - Levon Helm tribute by Govt Mule & Levon Helm Band w/ Howard Johnson's tuba entrance.


Entered at Mon Jun 4 13:41:01 CEST 2012 from (70.54.133.16)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

neil young - interview 1991 part 2


Entered at Mon Jun 4 13:11:41 CEST 2012 from (70.54.133.16)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Does anyone know who's show this is where Robbie is singing SDTCR (incomplete)?


Entered at Mon Jun 4 13:06:54 CEST 2012 from (70.54.133.16)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Neil Young - Interview in Northern Cali by Kim Clarke Champniss (who we know here)
Nov. 6, 1991
Part 1
Discussing Soap Box Preacher

Robbie Robertson around 6:19.


Entered at Mon Jun 4 10:26:22 CEST 2012 from (75.34.61.120)

Posted by:

Adam

Pat - It's amazing you were there. It must have been wonderful. What a perfect time period to see The Band. Later in the month they'd record "Rock Of Ages", and they're in such great form. The performance is smoking.


Entered at Mon Jun 4 04:47:55 CEST 2012 from (99.115.145.68)

Posted by:

Pat B

Adam, yes I was at Arie Crown for that show. Taj Mahal opened. Interesting in retrospect: that was the last time I saw the OQ in a good indoor hall. After that, Watkins Glen, the Chicago Stadium with Dylan, and Washington Park Racetrack outdoors.

Four songs from Cahoots, so I'd say they liked that album. And I can honestly say I don't recall WDWGFH. Different arrangement from the album, somewhat like Bessie Smith.


Entered at Sun Jun 3 16:32:07 CEST 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Treasure Trove

I rarely go to You Tube. I decided to see what was there for Mike McKenna-Luke Gibson Band and I was amazed. Pages and pages of films of the recent songs presented in 2010 and 2011 and the chance to hear see the older connections (Luke and the Apostles, Kensington Market, Jon and Lee and the Checkmates, McKenna-Mendelson Mainline, Rhinoceros, etc). Don't miss this chance to see what came out of our fair city.


Entered at Sun Jun 3 16:27:03 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Sorry, been away in Stratford-upon-Avon and missed the debate. The reason it was "Middle-Eastern males" was because they were the only all-male classes we had, on special contracts. 90% of our classes were mixed, but the Secretarial English classes were all-female (and largely Swiss) in those days. Single gender classes are way more likely to comment on a teacher of the opposite gender than mixed gender classes. I meant it being more problematic in single gender classes.

When I started teaching in 1971, female teachers had just been given permission to wear trousers and it was a big new thing, but the administrative / marketing / secretarial staff had to wear skirts and that was still true in 1980. Well, not the men.


Entered at Sun Jun 3 04:02:14 CEST 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: McKenna-Gibson Band

McKenna-Gibson Band are scheduled to play Hugh's Room 13 July 2012 evening. Truly exciting, and an album is said to be in the works. Hopefully both will occur. If you are in the Toronto area, Hugh's Room is an excellent venue. I hope I'll be able to make it. Listen to McKenna-Mendelson Mainline and Kensington Market to understand the importance of these musicians to the Canadian musical landscape. They are among the pride of Toronto.


Entered at Sun Jun 3 00:10:28 CEST 2012 from (99.141.62.222)

Posted by:

Adam

Referring to the new uncirculated bootleg, Arie Crown Theater Dec. 1 1971.


Entered at Sun Jun 3 00:09:36 CEST 2012 from (99.141.62.222)

Posted by:

Adam

I posted this uncirculated live recording on Dime today. I was so happy to get in touch with the taper and share this one. It's a great recording, and a great piece of Chicago history!

It's worth noting that for the Cahoots tour, a few new songs made the cut for live performances. Life Is A Carnival of course, but the live Where Do We Go From Here, Shootout In Chinatown, and Smoke Signal are great. It really raised my interest in the songs knowing they felt the best were good enough to offer live.

Pat B, were you at this show?


Entered at Sat Jun 2 22:06:22 CEST 2012 from (74.101.166.28)

Posted by:

Ari

Web: My link

Here are most of the tapes from Port Dover 1964.


Entered at Sat Jun 2 20:38:14 CEST 2012 from (58.104.9.174)

Posted by:

Graham

Subject: Chuck Berry

People have some complaints about The Last Waltz but I thought Hail Hail Rock and Rock was a much more flawed movie. Julian Lennon really seemed out of place. Clapton later said that he found Berry so mean spirited he didn't enjoy playing with him.


Entered at Sat Jun 2 13:48:32 CEST 2012 from (70.54.135.16)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

RE/P Files: The ‘Planet Waves’ Sessions - Recording Bob Dylan At The Village Recorder

From the archives of the late, great Recording Engineer/Producer (RE/P) magazine come interviews with Rob Fraboni and Dick LaPalm on recording a legend which first appeared in the March / April 1974 issue.

November 04, 2011, by Gary D. Davis


Entered at Sat Jun 2 13:34:59 CEST 2012 from (70.54.135.16)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Chuck Berry Week, part 2: Hail! Hail! Rock and Roll"One feature particularly stands out, a 30-minute conversation between Berry and Robbie Robertson that was entirely left out of the finished film. At one point, while master and student flip through one of Berry’s old scrapbooks, Berry points to himself in a picture of his church choir. When Robertson says he recognizes the young Berry, Chuck replies “how can you tell? They all like alike there.” Not picking up on the racial reference, Robertson hastily replies: “Well, everyone but you.” Berry laughs, and it’s hard to imagine that he doesn’t understand the double joke he’s just played on Robertson. After all, Berry is the “Brown-Eyed Handsome Man” who signified his way through “Jo Jo Gunne,” “The Promised Land” and so many others, and here–like with Richards and “Carol”–he once again gets the best of his white admirer."

Claire: Weren't you one of the first to talk about this DVD? Where are you and Jersey Girl these days? I'm taking a break very soon....Come on out! :-D


Entered at Sat Jun 2 13:28:19 CEST 2012 from (70.54.135.16)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Neil Young - The Old Homestead with Levon Helm On Drums

Hawks And Doves
(November 1980, Reprise HS 2297)
Neil Young

Thanks Jon for the additional info.
Btw, wasn't it too bad that when we saw The Dixiehummingbirds with Garth in NYC that Levon was a no show?? Sometimes....It just ain't gonna happen.


Entered at Sat Jun 2 04:47:33 CEST 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Rock n Roll Historionic

Awwww....Bill yer such a gawd damn show off. One a these days when yer out here, I'm gonna find yuh........and shake yer hand....take you for a boat ride maybe.

You probably hang out with that other foreigner....that pill pushin...Dr Jerry Tenenbaum.

Weren't those hot pants gawd awful.....I'm sure in hell glad I wasn't a woman. Some of the things they had to go thru.....fashion statements??????????? Yikes.


Entered at Sat Jun 2 01:08:37 CEST 2012 from (99.236.202.207)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: Queen Elizabeth II

Diamond Jubilee Concert:

Ten years ago, to mark her 50 years on the throne, Queen Elizabeth was serenaded by the likes of Ozzy Osbourne, Ricky Martin, Eric Clapton, Tony Bennett, Sir Paul McCartney and Queen's Brian May, who played a rock guitar version of "God Save The Queen" on the roof of Buckingham Palace.

Come Monday, besides a return appearance by Sir Paul, Her Majesty will find an entire band up on her roof, when the British pop-ska band Madness plays its hit "Our House" as the centerpiece of that day's Diamond Jubilee celebration.

Other name attractions set to perform, as confirmed by the BBC: Elton John, singing "Your Song, I’m Still Standing" and "Crocodile Rock"; Robbie Williams, "Mack the Knife"; boy band JLS, "Everybody in Love" and "She Makes Me Wanna"; as well as Kylie Minogue, Stevie Wonder and Shirley Bassey, with her classic (and highly appropriate for this occasion) "Diamonds Are Forever."

Williams's Take That band mate (and organizer of much of the royal entertainment), Gary Barlow, will team with former X Factor judge Cheryl Cole, for "Need You Now."

Joked Williams, "If this doesn't get me a knighthood, nothing will. I can't wait for the show." Stevie Wonder was more direct. Said the music legend: "The time is overdue that I meet Her Majesty."

Where was Engelbert?

CYA soon xoxoxo


Entered at Sat Jun 2 00:56:41 CEST 2012 from (171.98.126.83)

Posted by:

payday loans in Arkansas

Location: USA
Web: My link

Subject: payday loans in Arkansas

payday loans in Arkansas


Entered at Fri Jun 1 23:57:09 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Hot Pants - One of James Brown's worst records, and one of fashion's most hideous errors. Blues Image's guitarist, Kent Henry, replaced Larry Byrom in Steppenwolf (in the final days of the band's first run, and was then in John Kay's own group with Whitey Glan and Hugh Sullivan from the Rogues / Mandala / Bush - two guys who would have known and (in Whitey's case at least) played with our guys at the Bluenote in Toronto in the early '60s.


Entered at Fri Jun 1 23:39:32 CEST 2012 from (24.108.242.146)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Ride Captain Ride!

73 men sailed out.....from the San Fransisco Bay.....sailed off in their ship and here's what they had to say.........

Callin' everyone to ride along.....to another shore...we can laugh our lives away and be free once more.......

I don't know.........I was just walkin up the wharf from workin' on that Rockin Chair, (got the name just finished on the transom...little rockin chairs for quotation marks, gold lettering with navy blue blocking...really cool). That song came into my head........I couldn't help it!

Hey! what about "Hot Pants??"


Entered at Fri Jun 1 22:47:54 CEST 2012 from (75.34.62.143)

Posted by:

Adam

I watched The Last Waltz once again last night. Of course we've all seen it a million times. But this was the first viewing since Levon passed. A feeling of pure joy came over me when I saw Levon, Rick, and Richard together again.


Entered at Fri Jun 1 21:56:02 CEST 2012 from (75.34.62.143)

Posted by:

Adam

Subject: The Band - Arie Crown Theater 1971

I posted this uncirculated live recording on Dime today. I was so happy to get in touch with the taper and share this one. It's a great piece of Chicago history!

Pat B, were you at this show?


Entered at Fri Jun 1 21:53:59 CEST 2012 from (99.236.202.207)

Posted by:

Serenity

Subject: Great Perfomances on PBS,,,

This one looks good. Should be an hour..

Tony Bennett's Duets II

Great Performances : Tony Bennett: Duets II

(First Aired: January 27, 2012)

Tony Bennett sings his greatest hits with contemporary artists. Performers include Amy Winehouse, Lady Gaga, Norah Jones, Faith Hill, Carrie Underwood and Willie Nelson.

All Upcoming Times for Tony Bennett: Duets II

Fri 6/1 .... 9:00PM-10:30PM

PBS....Sun 6/3...9:00PM-10:30PM...PBS

Thanx to all for the links, responses and great posts.

LUVYA all xoxoxo


Entered at Fri Jun 1 21:17:10 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

Ah, Kevin, the Andy Warhol look. Good luck with that here in 2012.


Entered at Fri Jun 1 21:05:07 CEST 2012 from (70.50.65.228)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: Peter Tosh

………note to self before heading out for Friday drinks………..get home early and look for a “brown skinny leather tie”………


Entered at Fri Jun 1 20:50:47 CEST 2012 from (108.54.247.103)

Posted by:

Joan

Subject: Minis

I came of age in the mid to late 60's. There were some who wore them and looked great and others had "Thunder thighs" and looked like they had tree trunks for legs. I student taught in 1968 at a regional HS in Ohio at West Virginia border. I dug out my longest skirts that I could find. Probably knee length, and was told my the supervising teacher that he didn't like my "mini skirts". When I wore them at home (New Jersey) I was sold I looked"frumpy".

My first job was at a large insurance company and we were not permitted to wear pants. Some where around 1970 they finally relented and said we could wear pants but only "Pants suits". Tops & bottoms matching fabric. Nowadays they are lucky if people wear shorts.

One of the biggest negatives of the mini was winter. Even with a maxi length coat it was freezing. Also not easy to sit in. On a very practical basis Feminism had some great benefits.


Entered at Fri Jun 1 20:29:17 CEST 2012 from (67.71.0.249)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

The year I saw Bob and his Band.
Bob Marley & the Wailers 7-21-1979 Live Full Show at Harvard's Stadium.

I visited Harvard last summer as imagezulu's neice graduated last year and now is doing grad work at Carlton U in Ottawa....another full scholarship to boot!

It was years later I saw Peter Tosh at Ontario Place and Judy Mowat solo free at Harbourfront.

Bill M...imagezulu even says I'm too intense at times...but then again it's a case of the pot calling the kettle black. ;-D
Btw, my major was in political science. I alwasy sought out the radical profs as they were into reggae and helped me understand my condition as a working class woman trying to navigate in the tower of the elites....apparently only 14% of us came from blue collar families. Most of my classmates in high-school married their sweethearts and the few of us who had different aspirations took a different path...not necessarily better.....just different.


Entered at Fri Jun 1 19:38:01 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

BEG: Those sociologists - there's always an angle! In my day, at my school, they tended to be tone-deaf leftists. One was even a surprisingly successful recruiter for the CPC. The recruit I knew best left the party shortly after it hit her that postering mailboxes was pretty pointless - and now she's a Bay Street lawyer. Her husband was a huge Band fan who accompanied me to both the premiere showing of "The Last Waltz" in '78 (where John D wore a tux - ask him!) and the BARK-led TLW tribute a couple years ago.


Entered at Fri Jun 1 18:40:09 CEST 2012 from (67.71.0.249)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

dlew919: I had a huuuge crush on a Sociology prof at the University of Toronto because he was a feminist. The first one I ever met....and nope....He wasn't gay.....sheeeeesh....opened up a whole other world for me as my culture and religion is so macho based....

When my friends pushed me into being on the Sociology hiring committee so we could try and get more left wing profs, I had another crush because it was during the new wave time and his brown skinny leather tie caught my attention.....yeah....and he liked my punky hair at the time.....but he was more realistic....He told me straight up that it wouldn't work because we had different politics....I was so young at heart then......Another progressive prof called him "crater face" when he heard about it.

Oh we partied in our twenties and thirties.....One party I remember oh so well was because all night James Brown's music was blasting away and the food was great because the hosts were caterers and we kept going around the room looking for those who were catching a fire....another time the person who cuts my hair was also into music and would close her shop and bring local musicians and we would dance the night away....small world as the guitarist was my former manager at a record store I worked at part-time....and when Platinum Blonde was at one of my friend's parties...He's actually the only one I know who was at Woodstock.....sometimes it was a very small world because we were around the same age and we were open to all genres of music......well....I could write a book.

Just as an aside...We were always around for the music....We never dated or wanted to be groupies with the musicians we knew.....We were friendly but not party girls....We had our own dreams......My feminist hero was probably Germaine Greer....not Gloria Steinam.

Legacy from Wiki "Rock Against Sexism's musical and political legacy was many more women playing in bands, working as promoters, and an increased awareness of women's and queer perspectives in the punk rock community.[citation needed] Many trace the riot grrl movement in the 1990s to RAS roots. It challenged heterosexism, homophobia, sexism and elitism, while challenging stereotypes of women, and the way they are represented.[citation needed]"


Entered at Fri Jun 1 17:34:41 CEST 2012 from (70.50.65.228)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: Just Like a Women

LINK: Van covering Bob D

News Item: June I, Phil Collins to Retire……………May was a truly awful month…………..so far…June is looking great!

Mini…Maxi: Apropos of nothing really because I support equal rights on and at all levels but has anyone ever had fun with a declared feminist at a party? It was a bit like the Punks in the late 70’s…the ones that wore the uniform and thought it a sin to really learn how to play an instrument had a lot less to do with changing music and society than others that pushed forward with shaved legs and more chords.


Entered at Fri Jun 1 16:22:57 CEST 2012 from (24.108.143.105)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Cervical vertebral problems and the hands

Phil Collins is reported to have had surgery to his cervical spine to deal with vertebral problems in his neck. These can affect via nerves to the hands exiting through foramina (holes) between joints in the vertebrae of the neck and reduce function in the hands. Weakness and reduced function is the potential result and it sounds as if this is the issue even after the surgery.


Entered at Fri Jun 1 16:08:00 CEST 2012 from (124.168.60.236)

Posted by:

dlew919

Subject: Feminism...

I grew up in a time where it's really not an option not be supportive: as I'm told: 'Don't be sexist - chicks hate that...' ;)

I read with much interest the debate between the older feminists, and younger ones, who wish to return, more or less, to being able to stay at home (as a friend of mine put it: we got jobs. They sucked. We've got better things to do.) There's still sexist attitudes around: and I must say, I tend to side iwth the more militant older women, as the argument 'we fought for all this, and now you want to give it back' seems to me ethically sound... (of course, being male, I'm most probably wrong...)

Also, Serenity: thanks for the marvellous Phil collins link: does anyone know what's worng with his hands?

Jeff: at some point, I'll post you the streaming figures - essentially, it's thousands of plays a month to earn the US minimum wage on spotify (12, 000, or some such...). It's a goddamn impossible way of life...



Entered at Fri Jun 1 16:05:19 CEST 2012 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Delaney & Bonnie

Nice quality video of Delaney & Bonnie performing in 1969 with Eric Clapton, Dave Mason & Bobby Whitlock.


Entered at Fri Jun 1 15:09:52 CEST 2012 from (204.138.59.92)

Posted by:

Bill M

BEG: Thanks for the indulgence. You must recall the maxi-skirt that followed. Even I could see it was a godsend for the mennonite girls, who for the first time ever could come to school dressed fashionably.


Entered at Fri Jun 1 14:02:29 CEST 2012 from (67.71.0.249)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

Bob Dylan - After The Crash - 1966-1978
(Part 1 of 12...You can access the other parts as well).mp4



Entered at Fri Jun 1 13:44:03 CEST 2012 from (67.71.0.249)

Posted by:

brown eyed girl

Web: My link

I've previously posted the Bob Dylan and The Band videos at the Isle of Wight, but here's another perspective of the event. If not patient go to around 10:30.

Graham....You've now "met" a feminist from the seventies......I actually have more to contribute than mini skirts in case you haven't noticed.
I've met Bill M and I communicate with Peter V so they'll get a pass for now, but that could change too....lol
Someone else I met from this site actually stopped posting here because of sexist comments....She's an art teacher from Europe and found a job in Toronto at our Feminist School for Girls. The friend of mine who has also a home in South Africa sends one of her daughters to this school as well.


Entered at Fri Jun 1 11:46:30 CEST 2012 from (76.98.218.136)

Posted by:

Carmen

Location: PA

Subject: Bob Dylan & The Band in Rehearsal

BEG's Link to Bob Dylan & The Band in Rehearsal is all the evidence that you need to confirm that the Band was all that. Compare to the Beatles in 1965 - not even close.


Entered at Fri Jun 1 09:07:20 CEST 2012 from (58.104.9.78)

Posted by:

Graham

Peter V, Funny story. Now you would also get in trouble for ethnic profiling. Not sure why they would think it was only distracting for young men from the Middle East.


Entered at Fri Jun 1 08:50:12 CEST 2012 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Blackboards & mini skirts

Time for an irrelevant sidetrack. These adolescent memories do haunt us. In the 1970s the RSA exam for English teachers (now CELTA) had a checklist for examiners for observed lessons. One category was “Appearance” (FAIL / PASS / DISTINCTION were the check boxes.) We discussed this heatedly at teachers meetings. Should it be there? The example of a FAIL given was a teacher in a mini-skirt teaching a class of young males from the Middle-East, where it was held to be culturally insensitive, and distracting. Another was men in sandals, bare feet and unkempt toenails, though this caused an argument that only the British wore socks with sandals. Anyway, the female teachers got quite angry about their right to wear what they wanted. My then boss pointed out that stretching to write on the top of the board caused an embarrassing display of thigh. But you can’t win. He then got into deeper shit, because it was decided that all the boards were fixed to the wall at an average male height and should be lowered to an average female height. He argued in front of twenty female teachers that three inches didn’t make a lot of difference to women, a remark that caused hilarity I remember to this day. He never lived it down.


Entered at Fri Jun 1 03:31:50 CEST 2012 from (99.89.226.221)

Posted by:

PutEmUp(Friend0

i just saw something new on my CD Baby page.Apparently there is now a iTunes Match America's streaming site or some such thing.Anyway, in the recent past, songs of mine were streamed 69 xs that i did not even get paid a cent for.The fraction per stream is so amazingly low, that when they add it up, it still comes to nothing.This is really screwy..


Entered at Fri Jun 1 01:05:24 CEST 2012 from (99.236.202.207)

Posted by:

Serenity

Web: My link

Subject: Phil Collins done performing

Q&A: Phil Collins on His Alamo Obsession, Retirement 'I don’t want to be a shadow of what I was' Good reading for his fans and beyond...

CYA soon xoxoxo


Entered at Fri Jun 1 00:29:05 CEST 2012 from (58.104.9.78)

Posted by:

Fraham

Bill M, then the feminists came along and they didn't want women to be treated as sex objects so the mini-skirt had to go. I don't begrudge the women-folk equal rights but the demise of the mini-skirt was a terrible price to pay. Those 70's feminists have a lot to answer for ...


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