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The Band: Live at the Academy of Music 1971

Levon Helm: Ramble at the Ryman

The Band: Three of a Kind

Robbie Robertson: How to Become Clairvoyant

Garth Hudson Presents a Canadian Celebration of The Band

Levon Helm: Electric Dirt

Garth and Maud Hudson: Live at the Wolf

Pulse

Dirt Farmer

Elliot Landy's Woodstock Vision

The Band Guestbook


Entered at Sun Jan 31 23:32:02 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Terry Wogan RIP

Britain's best-loved and longest serving DJ, Terry Wogan RIP. His wit and humour made everything he said on radio and TV enjoyable. I'nm sure John D will know of him.


Entered at Sun Jan 31 19:19:20 CET 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: My Uncle Eddie...

...was a bus conductor.

Not sure if that counts like

:-0)


Entered at Sun Jan 31 17:13:02 CET 2016 from (83.249.161.239)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Subject: Me against Norbert - sort of :-)

This is what really happened with New York Philharmonic - Esa-Pekka Salonen is a Finnish orchestral conductor and composer. (BTW born in the same area in the same city as I, Norbert.) He is currently Principal Conductor and Artistic Advisor of the Philharmonia Orchestra in London, Conductor Laureate of the Los Angeles Philharmonic, Composer-In-Residence at the New York Philharmonic, and Artistic Director and cofounder of the Baltic Sea Festival. He was the favourite to take over New York Philharmonic but he refused. So they chose a Dutch instead. Congratulations anyway.


Entered at Sun Jan 31 16:41:17 CET 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: It's Simple!

A "Conductor" as the meaning of the word implies conducts. Without him? Now that would look really funny. Absolute cayos! Besides...... if some body fucks up they got to have some one to blame it on!

Lisa! you can't go around blaming every thing on "human nature"!


Entered at Sun Jan 31 15:08:58 CET 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Signe Anderson

It is reported that Signe Anderson has died. One of the crowns of creation.


Entered at Sun Jan 31 15:06:40 CET 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Conducting

The conductor is like coach behind the bench. Aside from providing a focus for the tempo etc, the conductor is alert to any potential flaws or concerns and has the wherewithal to provide input during the presentation (like the coach). It keeps the musicians on track. The conductor knows that the musicians know that they are being monitored and that is a good thing.


Entered at Sun Jan 31 10:41:45 CET 2016 from (216.121.189.31)

Posted by:

Sarah MacLean

Subject: practice makes perfect

Hi Lisa.I do understand " the conductor is the leader who decides on such vital things as tempo,intonation,nuance -who shapes the entire sound of piece according to his interpretation of the score " , but are not these the things that would be practiced to perfection during rehearsals before the actual performance ?

It just seems to me that the conductor should tap his baton to get them started , sit down, and then take his bows when it is over .


Entered at Sun Jan 31 03:55:27 CET 2016 from (174.1.58.122)

Posted by:

Lisa

Subject: Des gens

It's human nature, Wallsend.


Entered at Sun Jan 31 00:29:26 CET 2016 from (58.104.14.167)

Posted by:

Wallsend

It is funny how classical musicians play this great music but in their personal relations they squabble about petty things just like everybody else. Scientists are the same. They may be investigating about the origin of the universe but if someone gets a bigger office than them they get so upset.


Entered at Sun Jan 31 00:22:18 CET 2016 from (184.66.107.71)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: SECRET

Bill. Leave it alone. I clicked on it and didn't know where the hell I was. I should know better.


Entered at Sat Jan 30 20:45:46 CET 2016 from (174.1.58.122)

Posted by:

Lisa

Web: My link

Subject: Jaap Van Zweden

Norbert, how great that you were childhood friends! I thought you might be interested in the link - it's from a classical music blog run by Norman Lebrecht, a controversial figure often, who ran an item titled "New York Philharmonic Appoints the Wrong Music Director", which drew a lot of heated response. This is a follow-up. It will be interesting to see what your friend does with the NY Phil, known in the biz as "Murder, Inc".

Sarah, conductors really are necessary. Musicians are not always well rehearsed, do not necessarily know the music backward and forward (huge, huge repertory), and would undoubtedly have differing opinions on how a piece should be played. Most major orchestras have between 80 and 100 players, all with their own personalities, ambitions, backgrounds, etc. The conductor is the leader, who decides on such vital things as tempo, intonation, nuance - who shapes the entire sound of the piece according to his interpretation of the score. This is why you can hear so much variation when you listen to different recordings of the same piece of music. It can be a very ... fraught relationship, conductor to orchestra, with so many competing egos. I can't think of a single conductor who was universally loved by his players, though there have been some who have been universally loathed!


Entered at Sat Jan 30 20:17:53 CET 2016 from (68.171.246.143)

Posted by:

Bill M

Has anyone checked out the 'secret' posted by 'Michael' recently? I'm leery of doing so since the paragraph is to total copy-and-paste of something I posted a couple of weeks ago.


Entered at Sat Jan 30 19:21:32 CET 2016 from (216.121.189.31)

Posted by:

Sarah Mac Lean

Subject: What am I missing ?

I have a question :

Why does the conductor direct the orchestra during a concert ?

I can understand the need for someone or something to get everyone started at the same time , but then why doesn't the conductor just sit down?

After all, these are professional musicians , they have practised until they know this music upside down and backwards !

Do they really need to have the conductor to point at them to let them know when it is their turn to play ,or how softly or loudly they should be playing?

I know nothing about music - so what am I missing about this ?


Entered at Sat Jan 30 17:42:31 CET 2016 from (5.83.99.34)

Posted by:

Peter v

Subject: And Then There Were Four

Picked up a Band CD today in Fopp (HMV). And Then There Were Four, FM Broadcast, Chicago, July 2nd 1983. I am in London with no means of playing it and the sleeve notes go on about just being the four, adding that RR declined to join them "following some unfortunate remarks by Rick Danko" which I think is bullshit and may refer to some 1993 remarks about "one being a dickhead." I think we discussed this before and that the title should e "And Then There Were Eight" because I assume it's a Cate Bros joining them show. There are a whole load of FM broadcasts out now as "semi-legal" releases by various artists.


Entered at Sat Jan 30 17:33:06 CET 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Jaap van Zweden

Norbert, Wikipedia has a very nice picture of your friend in 1981 when he was 21 years old. Born in 1960 he would be about 55 or so now. You are still young men.

Very wonderful memories Norbert. Thank you, always good to hear from you.


Entered at Sat Jan 30 17:25:16 CET 2016 from (87.144.163.143)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: New York Philharmonic to perform The Weight

As no one knows I grew up in a working class neighborhood on the west coast of Amsterdam. Japie was my best friend there, soccer in the car-free streets was our life. Japie also studied the violin and he was good at it. He was a somewhat serious guy, often I said, “Japie cheer up or I bust that old violin to pieces on your head” and he would laugh again. It became a running gag.

At the age of twelve we moved to another town and I only saw Japie so every now and then. Japie became Jaap and at the age of 18, he became the concertmaster of the Concertgebouw-Orchestra —the youngest violinist ever to assume that position. Some years later Jaap van Zweden became a famous conductor.

In one of our sparse contacts I was eager to point Jaap towards The Band and he too became a fan (he even posted here a few times in the beginning of Mr. Hoiberg’s GB). In spite of all his success he remained a regular guy. Now my old friend will take over the directorship of The New York Philharmonic Orchestra.

Till this day van Zweden was always able to transfer his love of The Band to all these different orchestras. Once every two years or so, in something like The Night of the Proms they would perform a Band song. All in the room clapping along …. memorable. Therefore it isn’t WILL The New York Philharmonic Orchestra ever perform The Weight but WHEN will they perform The Weight.

So you Band fan in the NY area don’t miss this please. And if you are able to meet and greet Jaap van Zweden, make him laugh:

”Jaap smile, or shall I bust that violin on your head”


Entered at Sat Jan 30 15:43:41 CET 2016 from (83.59.195.24)

Posted by:

michael

Location: canada
Web: My link

Subject: secret

What remains to be said? So much that it hurts! There's very little in print about the Hawkins days, aside from the superficial, and even less about the pre-Hawkins days


Entered at Sat Jan 30 03:58:08 CET 2016 from (64.229.181.119)

Posted by:

Bill M

basmanlee: Whereas the original Band was a bunch of Canucks and an American drummer, the original Airplane was a bunch of Americans with a Canadian drummer. That little bit of fun aside, the loss of Kantner is sad and seems oddly consequential.

Re the new TLW photos, thanks to PSB for posting the link, and for Pat B for returning to the fold - even if just to echo. (Twice is way better than not at all.)


Entered at Sat Jan 30 01:09:22 CET 2016 from (5.83.99.34)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: I'll Keep It With Judy

It's all subjective. Having seen Judy Collins live twice in three years, and because I really like the backing on her version, she'd be my first choice, followed closely by Sandy Denny with Bob third.


Entered at Fri Jan 29 21:28:42 CET 2016 from (92.226.38.190)

Posted by:

Sam

Ihr seid toll. Sehr super! You are great!!! scharfelanke@web.de


Entered at Fri Jan 29 18:38:16 CET 2016 from (100.2.21.114)

Posted by:

Joan

Sorry hear about Paul Kanter. Surrealistic pillow is one of my favorite all albums I love the A side completely. RIP


Entered at Fri Jan 29 18:19:33 CET 2016 from (100.11.74.162)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love

Subject: I'll Keep It With Mine

Peter, demo schmemo. What makes the song is Dylan's piano and his singing. It's one of the great Bob performances. The stuff on the Collins and in fact all the other versions is tinkly folk rock stuff. The only version I ever heard that did the song justice mainly because it used that piano part was by Asleep At The Wheel at a bar in West Virgina a really long time ago.


Entered at Fri Jan 29 16:22:56 CET 2016 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

bassmanlee

Location: DE, USA

Subject: Jefferson Airplane

Peter, I definitely second your choices. Crown and Volunteers are THE Airplane albums, IMHO. I have memories of blasting Volunteers, in particular, on the family Magnavox console while washing the dishes after school in an otherwise empty house. Up against the wall...

Interesting parallel, maybe, to Our Boys as the 'Plane was one of the few other groups with three lead/harmony singers.


Entered at Fri Jan 29 12:40:02 CET 2016 from (70.193.173.80)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: R.I.P. Paul Kantner

As it happens, I've been listening to "Surrealistic Pillow" this week. It's one of my favorite àlbums and one which I have both mono ànd stereo LP vèrsions.


Entered at Fri Jan 29 09:35:33 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: (More) Blows Against The Empire

Pauk Kantner- today will have to be Crown of Creation and Volunteers. Two essential LPs of their time. The loss of major artists this month is a grim reminder of how long ago the 60s and 70s were.


Entered at Fri Jan 29 06:02:17 CET 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Paul Kantner

Paul Kantner (Jefferson Airplane, etc) has died of multiple organ failure and septicaemia. 74.


Entered at Fri Jan 29 02:48:03 CET 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Tequila Sunrise

Some days, it's just hard to believe our life time has flown by. Losing so many in the last few weeks. David and others and Glenn.\ Thanks Glenn it has always been great...........


Entered at Fri Jan 29 01:28:42 CET 2016 from (82.18.230.252)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: I'll Keep It With Mine

Peter, the publishing demo of "I'll Keep It With Mine" is on THE BOOTLEG SERIES Vol.9. It was recorded some time in the middle of 1964 - in my view, most likely in September 1964.

The version of the song on BIOGRAPH was recorded in the Columbia Records studios on 13 January 1965, the second song recorded during the first of three recording sessions on successive days. If anything, it was more a warm-up, insofar as, though not a "finished version", the song was not attempted again during those three days. From 1965 onwards (possibly from late-1964 onwards), Dylan ceased to go into his music publishers offices to record demos and, in some cases, his music publishers used his Columbia recordings. It was not recorded as a demo but may have been used as a demo.This was not unprecedented.

In 1964, Jim Dickson had requested a demo of "Mr Tambourine Man" after hearing Dylan sing the song at the Monterey Folk Festival in May. At that time, Dylan had not recorded a demo for Witmark and Dickson was sent an acetate from a recording made at Dylan's ANOTHER SIDE OF BOB DYLAN sessions, the one that had Ramblin' Jack Elliott on it. Again, not recorded as a demo but used as a music publishing demo.



Entered at Thu Jan 28 22:30:34 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: I'll Keep It With Mine

Peter SB, when you say it wasn't a publishing demo on Biograph, surely you're not saying it's a "finished version"? OK, not a publishing demo in the strict sense, but (as they suggested) a guide version for Judy Collins's fully realised version?


Entered at Thu Jan 28 21:36:43 CET 2016 from (24.235.131.151)

Posted by:

selrahcyrogerg

Location: at that time Toronto
Web: My link

Subject: the concert at Kleinhans Music Hall

was any one else at that concert in buffalo late 1969 at Kleinhans Music Hall, the Band were in fine form, playing from Big Pink as well as The Band album...amazing!


Entered at Thu Jan 28 20:20:50 CET 2016 from (58.104.11.118)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

A film clip of Levon from 1987 I don't recalled seeing before.


Entered at Thu Jan 28 20:06:01 CET 2016 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Vinyl Numbers

Nielsen/Soundscan reported 11,900,000 LPs sold in America in 2015. Michael Fremer at AnalogPlanet checked with most of the American and European pressing plants, which reported 30,902,000 LPs pressed last year.

Thanks PSB for posting the "lost" photos link!


Entered at Thu Jan 28 19:29:00 CET 2016 from (100.2.21.114)

Posted by:

Joan

Last Waltz photos are a great find


Entered at Thu Jan 28 18:18:26 CET 2016 from (108.88.110.210)

Posted by:

Pat B

Web: My link

A spectacular find.


Entered at Thu Jan 28 18:13:13 CET 2016 from (100.11.74.162)

Posted by:

PSB

Web: My link

Subject: I'll Keep It With Mine

Peter, Bob Fass was no ordinary DJ, and you can read about him in the link above. The version of I'll Keep It With Mine he played was the one released on Biograph which was not a publishing demo. That was the one on the Witmark sessions. Bob Fass played lots of unreleased Bob Dylan long before it ever appeared on bootlegs and was a friend of Dylan. The list of musicians who didn't appear on his show is shorter than the list of who did.


Entered at Thu Jan 28 16:18:28 CET 2016 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: XTC

XTC's 1986 concept album "Skylarking" has always been a favorite of mine. It was produced by Todd Rundgren and mostly recorded at his Woodstock studio.


Entered at Thu Jan 28 16:15:22 CET 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Tug Boat?? naw - naw

Bill, the boat fighting that head wind and swell is not a tug boat it is a fish boat. There is also a youtube vid of a big navy ship rounding that Cape. She lifts out of the water so far you can damn near see the whole keel. When she starts her fall into the trough just watching leaves your stomach up there. You should find it and watch it.

I have to laugh. I have always called those "Great Lakes" puddles just to bug everyone back there. In truth some of the worst weather in the world is on that gawd damn lake Superior. Most people don't understand, fresh water acts much different than sea water and freezes much quicker. It is very deadly and there is no way I would ever work on those gawd damn puddles.


Entered at Thu Jan 28 15:07:09 CET 2016 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Der Kloppmeister is good!! I say once the defending gets sorted out LFC will win the Premiership (in a season or two...at the most)

I will check out that link ASAP.


Entered at Thu Jan 28 15:03:59 CET 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Fred

While you're on here, have a quick Oriental scroll down to the RoseAnn Fino post/link. She's Bob F's daughter and boy is it worth a quick scroll to hear her latest stuff!

:-0)


Entered at Thu Jan 28 15:01:18 CET 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Fred: Nice to see you mate! You like the Kloppmeister?

:-0)

Norm: Thrilled you listened to it and I think you're absolutely right about the progression. I think Jerry mentioned it too. There's a real maturity in those songs. I don't think Bob will mind us all agreeing on that. As you say it's thrilling to see an artist evolving in that way.

I had to laugh when Bill thanked me for the cape Horn video of Whiter Shade of Pale. I knew you'd splurt out your coffee when you read it.

:-0)


Entered at Thu Jan 28 14:57:48 CET 2016 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Rick Danko got a mention on Marc Maron's WTF podcast today.


Entered at Thu Jan 28 14:49:17 CET 2016 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Connecting to XTC

XTC are an acquired taste. It might be an age thing, too. I was around 16 when they appeared on the scene, in that initial onslaught of punk. But they really veered towards crafting better arranged and less punk-ier songs rather quickly.


Entered at Thu Jan 28 14:43:54 CET 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Al & Jerry & Ken Kesey

Al! I forgot to mention. I did as you suggested and listened to RoseAnn's more resent music. You are right. It is wonderful to have the opportunity to be able to watch a young person work hard at their craft and improve. Her band and the production as well as the music improve.

Jerry, I don't think any one is indifferent to your enthusiasm for the music you find. I suspect we are a bunch of lazy bastards. In the outbacks where I exist I'm not able to research a lot of the time. That's my excuse and I'm stickin to it!

When looking at the Last Waltz photos, (thank you PSB), did any of youse notice on the side bar to the right? I clicked up the photo of Ken Kesey and his Pranksters sitting on top of that hippie bus. You gotta love it. Ken Kesey was one of the coolest guys ever. It was no wonder the "Dead" stuck to him like glue.


Entered at Thu Jan 28 14:30:12 CET 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: XTC, Tindersticks etc

Jerry - I'm familiar with XTC through Fred who was very keen on them. I did try quite hard to connect with them and there's undoubted quality there but I didn't manage to achieve any real connection.

Tindersticks I got familiar with through my son who was very much into those "darker" musical areas with The Smiths, Morrissey, Belle and Sebastian and the Tindersticks. Again, I gave it a go but in the end I actually found via them the artist of that sort of genre that I most connected with was an Aussie - Nick Cave.

I'm not conversant enough with any of them to really offer an opinion of any real worth but if pushed I would say that the attraction for me with Nick Cave was the fact that his stuff had a definite "song" orientation with which I was able to hook up to.

Songs like "The Ship Song", "Into My Arms" "Nobody's Baby Now", Straight To You" are just so fucking good they defied me not to hook up. And I couldn't resist.

Hope that helps.

:-0)


Entered at Thu Jan 28 10:16:35 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Elektra

Reading my notes … Little Red Book by Love was the fourth London single. Joe Boyd ran the show, and had Holzman fly over to sign The Move, who he maintains had the best live act of any band in Britain at the time … their live EP bears him out too. He thought they would be bigger than The Doors, but The Move declined to sign on the grounds that none of them had heard of Elektra.


Entered at Thu Jan 28 10:06:22 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: We'll Keep It With Ours

The Ace 1966 collection reproduces the Record Retailer advert for 17 March 1966. “Single File” also gives it as 03 66 (March 66).

Elektra’s odd UK history included this short London-American deal, after deals with Audio Fidelity (a tiny hifi label) and Pye’s budget Golden Guinea series. They finally did a deal with Decca and issued just four London-American singles … but what a start! Judy Collins I’ll Keep It With Mine, Loves 7 and 7 Is and Paul Butterfield’s Come On In were among them. They appointed Joe Boyd to open a UK operation, They then released independently for about ten records, starting with Tom Paxton’s The Last Thing On My Mind and going up to Love’s She Comes in Colours. They realized the need for bigger pressing and distribution and did a deal with Polydor just in time for Light My Fire to become a hit.

I’m surprised at Dylan’s radio play – it sounds like a publishing demo, which apparently it was, and Judy Collins had the full “Dylan sound” in her backing band. As Dylan's was not released at the time, it was in his interests not to erode Judy Collins' sales.


Entered at Thu Jan 28 07:57:18 CET 2016 from (210.86.100.208)

Posted by:

Rod

great pics from TLW!


Entered at Thu Jan 28 05:20:35 CET 2016 from (184.145.67.62)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: Lost pix

Geez, what a discovery!


Entered at Thu Jan 28 02:24:10 CET 2016 from (100.11.74.162)

Posted by:

PSB

Subject: I'll Keep It With Mine revisted again absolutely most likely

Ian, yes "I'll Keep It With Mine" by Judy Collins was released as a single in the US and as such was the first released version of the song. It my memory serves, it was released in late 1965, and received airplay in the New York metropolitan area primarily on Jerry White's nightly folk show.

However, her version was soon replaced by Dylan's version which received quite a bit of airplay on Bob Fass' all night show "Radio Unnameable" on WBAI in New York City. It was hard to care about her version or anyone else's after that. Bob Fass more than likely received his version from the songs' composer.


Entered at Thu Jan 28 02:16:38 CET 2016 from (100.11.74.162)

Posted by:

PSB

Web: My link

Subject: Lost pics from the Last Waltz found

The San Francisco Chronicle recently discovered by accident several lost photos their photographer took at the Last Waltz. Click the link above.


Entered at Thu Jan 28 01:00:44 CET 2016 from (82.18.230.252)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: "I'll Keep It With Mine" and the BIOGRAPH liner notes

Just to expand on what I wrote earlier. "I'll Keep With Mine" is not noted on the tape logs for the ANOTHER SIDE OF BOB DYLAN session; no recording of it from this session has ever surfaced; and it does not appear on THE 50th ANNIVERSARY COLLECTION 1964 (the copyright extension limited release set of LPs, designed to protect against future bootlegging). I regard that as pretty conclusive and the BIOGRAPH liner notes must be wrong on this point.

In respect of BIOGRAPH, I have two versions of the 12” box set, one from the UK and one from the USA. The UK one is the 5-LP version and the yellow sheets come in the form of a stapled 12” booklet. The front and back of the booklet are blank, so that the liner notes for each side of each LP face one another. The box itself has a hinged lid. The US one is the 3-CD version and this comes with 5 separate double-sided sheets, each side of each sheet relating to one of the LP sides, despite it being with the 3-CD version. The box comes with a separate lid.



Entered at Thu Jan 28 00:40:48 CET 2016 from (82.18.230.252)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Judy Collins "I'll Keep It With Mine" single

The above was relelased as a single in the UK following some kind of deal between Elektra and Decca Records.

Just to save me time: did Judy Collins release "I'll Keep It With Mine" as a single in the USA? And, if so, what date was it released? Does that ACE reissue provide the information, Peter?


Entered at Thu Jan 28 00:01:03 CET 2016 from (24.108.163.242)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Indifference

Some of the best music I listen to comes from the UK. I listen to a lot of Americana but I am somewhat at a loss to explain the relative lack of interest shown here for some of the very progressive music that comes from the UK. I have mentioned 2 or 3 groups recently (among them Tindersticks and Shriekback) and there have been no takers to comment on their views (good or bad) and passive indifference seems to have been the response if judged by what has (not) been written. Is it because there is just too much to absorb in the current music world? What I do is watch the lists of new releases at the various sites and then see if I can find out what there is to know when reviews are generally positive. Sometimes, if the genre is not my cup of tea, despite positive reviews, I pass. I am getting on but my excitement for what excites my ears and brain has not diminished. There is great music coming from the UK and so I am interested. This is not a criticism but rather a comment and mostly a question of why? I am interested.


Entered at Wed Jan 27 20:41:10 CET 2016 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: I'll Keep It With Mine

Bill: I believe Fairport Convention recorded the song a year or so before the release of Elvis' "Suspicious Minds." BTW--The flip side of Ms. Collins "Both Sides Now" single was a cover of Sandy Denny's "Who Knows Where The Time Goes."


Entered at Wed Jan 27 20:05:02 CET 2016 from (64.229.14.203)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: I'll Keep It With Mine

As Peter V says, it's an almost impossible choice between Sandy Denny's version and Judy Collins'. In the end, I'll take the Denny, mostly because it seems truer mood-wise. The productions are of course very very different - art-rock vs pop-rock, and they borrow very different bits. Denny has a guitar intro that seems borrowed from Elvis's "Suspicious Minds", while the organ on the Collins is right out of "Positively Fourth Street" - and the tinkly-bell sound was saved for reuse in "Both Sides Now".


Entered at Wed Jan 27 19:42:15 CET 2016 from (64.229.14.203)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: Don Ross

Rockin' C: Thanks for the mention of Don Ross. When I went to YouTube and typed his name, the two top suggestions were a recording at a workshop last decade and a newer one featuring a slimmer, better groomed Don. Both are terrific, but I like the older one, which I've tried linking above. I think I saw him play many years ago, but I know for sure I met him once (at the El Mocambo in Tronno) circa 1980, when he and his wife came up to say hi to the friend I was with; the wife and the friend had gone to art college together. Don had also accompanied my friend at a couple of low-key appearances at the under-the-radar Fat Albert's, an open stage thing that's been running since the mid-'60s and whose alumni also includes Ron Sexsmith - and perhaps even Neil Young.


Entered at Wed Jan 27 19:02:55 CET 2016 from (82.18.230.252)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: I'll Keep It With Mine

There is no evidence that "I'll Keep It With Mine" was ever recorded at the ANOTHER SIDE OF BOB DYLAN session in June 1964.

The Witmark piano demo version, as on BOOTLEG SERIES VOL.9, has been dated in articles and sessions listings as April 1964 and as June 1964. I don't think either is right. If I had to suggest a date, I'd go for September 1964 but the evidence is circumstantial, I have to admit.

Dylan next recorded "I'll Keep It With Mine" on 13 January 1965, at the start of the BRINGING IT ALL BACK HOME sessions. This is the oft-bootlegged recording that I, for one, have come to love. When it appeared on BIOGRAPH, it was given as a 14 January 1965 recording and, when Michael Krogsgaard first reported on Dylan's sessions in details, he wrote that there was a second session that day that included it. This has been repeated in the on-line listing compiled by Olof Bjorner but I have never come across any documentary evidence to support his view (and there's nothing on THE CUTTING EDGE to support this either).

"I'll Keep It With Mine" was also recorded in January 1966 and the version on THE BOOTLEG SERIES VOL 1-3 is dated as 27 January 1966. The notes on THE CUTTING EDGE make this somewhat less clear. however.


Entered at Wed Jan 27 17:21:59 CET 2016 from (68.171.246.26)

Posted by:

bill M

Rockin C: Very sorry to have credited Al E re WSoP. At least you're more likely to have seen Duddy Kravitz. And I'm not saying this because I want back on your island.

BtW, another fandango-raising pop epic is Queen's "Bohemian Rhapsody". Perhaps it was the Baroque word for 'wicky-wacky-woo'?


Entered at Wed Jan 27 15:24:37 CET 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Whiter Shade of Red!

Bill.....BILL!! Redo your home work. I posted the long version of "Whiter Shade of Pale"! Al ....sitting on the gawd damn Edge had never even heard it....which he admitted to.

Yer not even allowed on my island any more Bill. I got to go and drive to Comox and back right now......and it's blowing like hell.


Entered at Wed Jan 27 14:59:16 CET 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: Susanna Hoffs

Susanna Hoffs also does a great version of I'll Keep It With Mine as a guest vocalist on Rainy Day in 1984.


Entered at Wed Jan 27 10:34:51 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Violence in schools

Al, While your teacher hurled chalkboard dusters, our deputy headmaster had a better technique. He was one of the 20% who still wore black academic gowns, and he kept the board duster in the very long sleeve. From a yard he could swing it with such accuracy as to miss your hand by quarter of an inch but still put a terrifying dent in the desk. This is why he had risen to great heights.


Entered at Wed Jan 27 09:57:07 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Vestal virgins heading for the coast

A Whiter Shade of Pale is one of my favourite songs of all time. As to When A Man Loves A Woman, that’s also a great recording, and I can recall the pleasures of the slow dance at the end of a hectic evening in the discotheque to its strains. Of the two, I’d always take A Whiter Shade of Pale. While Percy Sledge’s anguished swain emotes at Olympic standard for emoting, A Whiter Shade of Pale has a mysterious intoxicating feel that is quite different. And the half-grasped lyrics draw you in. In “Music To Watch Girls By” (for the many who haven’t read it, LINKED) there’s a drunken argument over the lyrics, with one guy thinking “As the mirror told its tale” is a Picture of Dorian Gray moment, and gets corrected to “As the miller told his tale.” I love half-grasped lyrics. If you look at the cover collage in the link, that's an original Deram copy at the bottom.

Robbie’s point may be that Percy Sledge came out a year earlier, but if you lift from Bach, you lift from Bach. And nowadays when I hear Percy, I think the emoting maybe had the “lurve” control set at 11.


Entered at Wed Jan 27 09:44:52 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: They'll Keep It With Its

PSB: Right. My “Biograph” is a first day 12” box with those annoying separate yellow sheets. Yes, as to accuracy, the original “I’ll Keep It With Mine” is noted as:

Recorded in New York City 1/14/65/n then in the same section it says:

“The song was cut on a particularly productive night in June 1964 …” (on the same night as All I Really Want To Do, To Ramona and fourteen others), i.e. on the “Another Side” sessions.

So on to “The Cutting Edge” where it says “I’ll Keep It With Mine: Take 1/13/1965 Released on Biograph” “Bob Dylan: vocals., piano, harmonica.” As this was mentioned as “overnight” the 13th and 14th figures, and the whole of Disc 1 of “Cutting Edge”, 27 tracks, come from the 13th and 14th January, and it is “Bringing It All Back Home.”

I’d conclude that the tale of this rumbustious June 1964 session has escaped from a different paragraph. So they didn’t keep that paragraph with its (proper location).


Entered at Wed Jan 27 06:18:17 CET 2016 from (64.229.183.216)

Posted by:

Bill M

Al E: Thanks for posting the long, long version of "Whiter Shade A Pale". Always loved the 45, though I do understand Robbie Robertson's dismissal of it as unnecessary in light of "When A Man Loves A Woman". (A slow dance is a slow dance when you're on the bandstand.) The history was interesting, though some of the footage - especially the tugboat fighting the waves and the waves blasting the lighthouse - made me laugh because they reminded me of the circumcision film-within-a-film in "The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz".


Entered at Wed Jan 27 00:28:40 CET 2016 from (100.11.74.162)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love

Subject: I'll Keep It With Mine revisited

Peter, take a real good look at those Biograph notes again (unless they changed them for the remastered version), but there's a bit of a contradiction. At the top it says it was recorded during Bringing It All Back Home going by the date and at the bottom it says it was cut during a particularly productive night in June 1964 meaning the Another Side session. I'll have to compare that version with the Witmark demos because it wasn't recorded during the Another Side session. The record keeping at Columbia Records was not exactly stellar.

I used to be a staunch defender of Al Kooper's recollections, but the release of "The Cutting Edge" kind of blew the one-take myth of Like A Rolling Stone and Sad Eyed Lady of the Lowlands to bits.


Entered at Wed Jan 27 00:08:03 CET 2016 from (68.171.246.130)

Posted by:

Bill M

This appears to be another of those days when the GB has more personalities than Sybil. Three guys in that corner discuss "I'll Keep It With Mine", two in this corner argue over XTC, and in the middle Jennifer chants paens to Dr Zizi.

Anyway, where's Fred, our resident expert on XTC? BTW, JT, the definitive XTC discography was published privately in the 6ix a couple years ago by the compiler, Shigema Fujimori.


Entered at Tue Jan 26 23:45:14 CET 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Screwy

Some how I got the wrong code. It seems to be very long. Do your selves a favour. Just search Don Ross Klimbim on youtube. You won't regret it.


Entered at Tue Jan 26 23:41:20 CET 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Don Ross - Klimbim

While driving home today, I listened to CBC radio a talk show like I sometimes do. The topic was the Indigenous people of Canada who by "the powers that be" stripped them of their right to speak their own beautiful languages in residential schools. They were humiliated and degraded.

Now as the generation die off, some have the pride of knowing the younger ones are learning their heritage and language. Taught in schools and universities. Now on social media, Twitter, Face Book etc, people teach and help each other to learn.

While this show continued there was a very different back ground music played that then came to the fore front. Now, all my life I have been a great fan of instrumental music by great musicians. Chet Atkins, Flatt & Scruggs, Los Indio Tajeras and on.

If you have not heard Don Ross you need to listen to this. Don Ross is the only person to twice win the US National Finger Style Champion ship. This is so different, and so gawd damn wonderful I can't understand why I have never heard him before. Do Ross was born in Quebec, of Scottish & Mi'kmaq ancestry. His wife is a singer. You need to listen to this song.

Self penned, he had to come up with a name. This man obviously has a sense of humor too. Klimbim is a German word. Translated means, "BAD MUSIC"1 tHAT'S crazy!

David Powell! practise up boy 'till you can do this.


Entered at Tue Jan 26 19:15:45 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: I'll Keep It With Mine

Link to Fairport Convention version. Phew, that's another Sophie's Choice one, David! Fairport has Sandy Denny plus Richard Thompson's guitar is another definite plus. Judy Collins is more conventional, but also sings sublimely. But her version has Al Kooper, the harpsichord and for me, I really like the bass guitar on Judy's.


Entered at Tue Jan 26 18:04:24 CET 2016 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: I'll Keep It With Mine

In his book "Backstage Passes & Backstabbing Bastards" Al Kooper states that Mike Bloomfield was "expressly flown in from Chicago" to play on the Judy Collins track.

I've always been partial to Fairport Convention's cover version of the song featuring the ethereal voice of Sandy Denny.


Entered at Tue Jan 26 17:15:34 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Yes, I thought Ace's notes on Bringing It All Back Home questionable. Al Kooper being the obvious difference. Any idea who the bass player is? If it is based on Blues Project, would it be Andy Kulberg (later of Seatrain)? It doesn't sound like Harvey Brooks somehow.

The YouTube version is from Elektra, whereas the "London-American Label 1966" CD will be as close as they can get to the original mono single.

The Biograph note actually says "This rare tape, recorded for Judy Collins …" which then gets misquoted as "written for Judy Collins." It might be that the tape WAS recorded for Judy Collins as a guide, rather than that the song was written for her. But I wouldn't be surprised if Bob has told more than one female singer that "this song was written for you."


Entered at Tue Jan 26 17:04:10 CET 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Ending a sentence with a preposition

PSB: Thanks for this. Unless Dylan confirms himself (and even if he does, who knows), I never buy into the 'theories' of who he wrote what for. Like all creativity, usually there are multiple stimuli and forces that play into the final product. It could have been 'woman', a woman, women or who knows.


Entered at Tue Jan 26 16:57:27 CET 2016 from (100.11.74.162)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love

Subject: I'll Keep It With Mine

Peter, the general theory that I don't subscribe to is that Dylan wrote "I'll Keep It With Mine" for Nico. However that single (and the version you posted is a remix) was the first version of the song released. It was I believe produced by Al Kooper and if anything it's the Highway 61 band (though there wasn't really a band) as opposed to Bringing It All Back Home. It came out late in 1965 and received play on folk shows in the US. It minimally sounds like Bloomfield. My bet would be on Danny Kalb who had already worked with Collins not to mention that Kooper was the keyboard player in his band The Blues Project.


Entered at Tue Jan 26 16:53:39 CET 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: XTC

Being from Toronto and spending so much time there Jerry, you would have been exposed to far more bands than I sitting on this rock. I looked them up, and I've never heard of them. They obviously been around a long time.

There is a band in the back of my mind right now that won't come out. The lead singer went off on his own and recorded some great stuff I really liked and he sounded just like his band although he played all the instruments himself. It seems to me he got in some trouble with his band over it too. Damn I think I'm loosing my mind.


Entered at Tue Jan 26 16:45:48 CET 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: WSOP

As for 'Whiter Shade of Pale' it is unparalleled.


Entered at Tue Jan 26 16:44:50 CET 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Just a band

XTC: Just a band, Norm, just a band. No drugs here!


Entered at Tue Jan 26 16:43:44 CET 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Lots of Shriek

Since no one else is writing, I will continue: So, lots of Shriek: Barry Andrews, Carl Marsh, Martyn Barker. For me, at my age, 15-20 minutes is a long time.


Entered at Tue Jan 26 16:41:21 CET 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Drugs???

Jerry! whaat are you doing writing about X- TA -SEA!


Entered at Tue Jan 26 16:26:14 CET 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Barry Andrews

For history, go back to XTC.


Entered at Tue Jan 26 16:18:09 CET 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: The Voice and creative force of Shriekback

Barry Andrews


Entered at Tue Jan 26 16:04:09 CET 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Shriekback: Without Any Real String Or Fish

So time for me to return a favour (maybe, if you like it). Shriekback: 2015 "Without Any Real String Or Fish"

Anyone who remembers 'Manhunter' (film) will recall the haunting music by Shriekback (along with the major scene with Iron Butterfly's major opus).

Well, Shriekback's major participant (voice) continues to put out and what an album he has accomplished this time. A great listen for those who liked what they did in the past. The excellence continues.. Try it, you might like it.


Entered at Tue Jan 26 15:52:53 CET 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Elle King

Thank you, Peter. I would have never heard Elle King. Enjoying right now as I write.

Again, as I have said so many times before (a broken record with obsessive tendencies), this is what I love about this sight. Somewhat ordinary people (more or less) exposing (maybe a bad choice of words?) us to what we might appreciate. A source of music news at its most primal but important level.


Entered at Tue Jan 26 15:46:07 CET 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: RoseAnn Fino

A great talent. I can see the progression from the 2013 LP to the 2015 EP. There are already traces in 2013 (Box Wine a great example. There are others). With careful business acumen and exposure, RoseAnn Fino should go places. I'm looking forward to more and perhaps some live exposure in Canada!


Entered at Tue Jan 26 14:41:36 CET 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

As you rightly say simply too beautiful Norm. I have seen it before but inexplicably not for some time. It truly is a performance to savour over and over again. Gary Brooker? Incredible.

His voice is immortal. The range! On Pale, Homburg and Salty Dog he explored places no other tonsils ever dared visit.

I can recall as if it were yesterday my schoolmate Johnny Lawson writing down the lyrics on a scrap of paper for me in class and getting the wooden duster hurled at him by Brother Coleman [Dusty - as we called him!]

On RoseAnn Fino. I may have misinterpreted but from what you said Norm it does seems you're comments were referring to her debut. Not wishing to demean that record one bit for it was a really fine record. However you'll find the girl has progressed to a whole new level with this latest EP.

As I say I don't want to offend her or Bob F regarding that previous record but I'll confidently say we're now talking entirely new territory with these latest recordings. It's truly stellar stuff. Give it a go Norm - once you've unblocked that snitch and dosed yourself with Lemsips and aspirin of course!!!!

:-0)


Entered at Tue Jan 26 14:17:24 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: 1966 and I'll Keep It With Mine

Ace’s “The London-American Label” series reached 1966. As ever it’s meticulously remastered in original mono. They say in the notes that was the year when London stopped sourcing master tapes (or early generation copies) and started dubbing from records … they went back to tapes in those situations, so better than the 1966 pressing.

The first few all have stories. Five O’Clock World by The Vogues was a US hit but sold nothing in the UK. Open The Door To Your Heart by Homer Banks is the highest-priced British single (or was) selling for £15,000. The Detroit label Revilot switched from Decca’s London to EMI’s Stateside just as it was released, and it was thought only London-American promos existed (Stateside copies are not rare), then a proper London release copy turned up. Then there’s Come On In, Paul Butterfield’s one-off attempt to sound like The Spencer Davis Group and achieve pop success.

But the jewel for me is Judy Collins’ version of I’ll Keep It With Mine. Apparently Elektra assembled the Bringing It All Back Home electric band, plus Al Kooper on organ and Mike Bloomfield on guitar. Al Kooper is in full-on “Blonde on Blonde” mode. Someone adds harpsichord. Dylan said he wrote it for her, and it’s a great version. The main thing that stands out is the bass riff is more insistent, funkier if you like, than you’d expect. It’s linked. I think the Ace pressing in mono sounds better than the one on the Elektra box set "Forever Changing"


Entered at Tue Jan 26 13:19:20 CET 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Mystery - A time and place

I meant to say Al. The mystery of the lyrics of that song I equate to "The Weight" and the interpretations by many that have always surrounded that song.

I believe "Whiter Shade of Pale's" mystery is, making love to a beautiful woman, "a trip around the world" leaves room for every individual's thoughts. It becomes what you make of it. The time and place, what you saw, smelled, heard and felt all play a part in revealing the experience. Remember, Gary Brooker and those fellows were very young when they wrote that song. Now........we are a bunch of doddering old idiots :-)......I'm goin' back to bed!


Entered at Tue Jan 26 13:01:16 CET 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Al -:- Re Rose Ann Fino

Hi Al, how goezit? I'm up at 4 AM with a plugged up nose, bit of a cold.

I guess it was a fair ways back when Bob linked his girl's music. I listened to it several times over and gave my impressions then.

The music is well done and produced. The lyrics are interesting, and that girl has a strong voice and sings it well. I very much enjoyed her music and I believe she will have a successful career.

Don't know if you had the chance to listen to "Whiter Shade of Pale" at that out door concert in Denmark. With the full orchestra. I wasn't surprised when I read comments that other men confirmed being so touched they to were brought to tears. It is a magnificent performance.


Entered at Tue Jan 26 10:31:38 CET 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: Hey Norm

Interesting stuff mate - never knew about those missing verses. Still trying to make the link between the lyrics and seducing those vestal virgins tho that Keith Reid talks about!!

As it happens I was digging out some CD's the other day and came across your little gem from way back. Also Jeff's School For Fools. Enjoyed a thoroughly pleasant hour or so reaquainting myself with both after all these years.

On that score I'd be really intrigued to hear your take as a fellow artist/performer on RoseAnn Fino's OUT FROM UNDER EP. I've linked it above.


Entered at Tue Jan 26 09:51:18 CET 2016 from (24.186.163.216)

Posted by:

Ari

50 years as of yesterday that One of Us Must Know (Sooner or Later) was recorded with Rick and Robbie.


Entered at Tue Jan 26 03:36:03 CET 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Classics

For me......there is no more beautiful piece of music. Very close there is a concert in Denmark I believe with a full orchestra and it makes tears roll down my cheeks.

This video gives the full song with missing verses that very seldom have been heard. At the end you get to see what it is really like to round Cape Horn, and the light house. Plus some Cameos of the many covers of the song.


Entered at Tue Jan 26 01:18:43 CET 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Jan H

Who's "you know who" mate?

More info please.

:-0)

Mike N

Re RoseAnn - delighted you followed it up Mike. Superb ain't it!! The best is it gets better with repeated plays. Really excited for Bob, his family and their daughter to see her star rising. As PV say - 2016 - why not. All the ingredients are firmly in place. And it's surely the responsibility of EVERyBODY on this GB to try to their best to spread the word that the daughter of one of their very own cyber buddies is so awesomely good!!

:-0)


Entered at Tue Jan 26 01:07:26 CET 2016 from (184.145.67.62)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: RoseAnn

Never one to ignore Al Edge's commentary on just about anything, and certainly not his thoughts on music, I checked out the RoseAnn Fino link and loved what I heard. (I guess I was asleep when her 2013 CD came out.) Thanks.


Entered at Mon Jan 25 23:55:35 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Phew! Yes, amazing circles. I did pick up one connection. I see Rick Danko explaining it …


Entered at Mon Jan 25 23:37:26 CET 2016 from (24.108.163.242)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Success for the very soft feline

Holy ****, Jan. Mr. Cat is moving in very high circles. Success is clearly being achieved. Congratulations!!


Entered at Mon Jan 25 23:32:36 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Irritating surveys

Link to an article from my blog on the irritating proliferate of surveys - it started out as a short post for here … got longer … so I turned it into an article.


Entered at Mon Jan 25 23:32:12 CET 2016 from (84.215.171.237)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Subject: And now..

...for something completely different, announced yesterday. With the track "Wolves" produced by you-know-who. And, yes, there is a rather interesting Band connection here, too, in addition to the obvious one. But we'll have to wait until a certain young man's debut album surfaces later this year to reveal that one ;-)


Entered at Mon Jan 25 20:29:06 CET 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: RoseAnn Fino [One of our own]

Just a little very gentle re-prompting for Wallsend, Bill, David P, Ian W and any other GB regulars who might be looking in or posting - follow the link and order a copy of RoseAnn's superb EP.

As you have surely read in the posts from Pete and myself, both of us have already done so and have been richly rewarded for so doing with some sublime songs and a glimpse of a huge talent surely destined to procure a longstanding musical career of some real stature.

Go'ead fellas - she's one of our very own GB'ers yer know [via Bob F].

:-0)


Entered at Mon Jan 25 20:28:59 CET 2016 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Vinyl

The top selling vinyl LP for last year was Adele's "25". Since her fan base is predominately female, I wonder who's buying those records? I was in a local record store recently which is located near a high school. A group of female students wandered in after class and went straight to the new release vinyl section, by-passing the racks of CDs.


Entered at Mon Jan 25 20:15:36 CET 2016 from (82.18.230.252)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Stiffed

I either read it somewhere or someone told me it. I wasn't aware of the Stiff connection. Indeed, I wasn't aware of their other slogans, either.


Entered at Mon Jan 25 19:54:32 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Ian, that was one of many Stiff label slogans. From my piece on Stiff:

The Stiff label’s genteel catchphrase “If it ain’t stiff it ain’t worth a fuck” is an immediate clue that it dated from the Punk era of the mid to late 70s. Stiff artist Ian Gomm was nearly ejected from a transatlantic flight because he was wearing the Stiff T-shirt which carried it. Other Stiff slogans included The World’s Most Flexible Record Label; If They’re Dead, We’ll Sign Them – Undertakers to the Industry; Mono Enhanced Stereo; Electrically Recorded; This Record Comes Complete With B-side; and (best of all) In 78, everyone born in 45 will be 33 1/3.


Entered at Mon Jan 25 19:06:38 CET 2016 from (68.171.246.30)

Posted by:

Bill M

I have enormous respect for David P, but his post is Exhibit A in any discussion of why you don't find women at record shows / fairs. Just the occasional new girlfriend eager to support her man in his hobby - and they never appear a second time.


Entered at Mon Jan 25 18:10:55 CET 2016 from (58.104.6.204)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

Highway 61 on Great Drives with Levon Helm


Entered at Mon Jan 25 17:46:13 CET 2016 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Vinyl

"Vinyl" is also the title of the upcoming HBO drama series premiering next month about rock 'n roll in the '70s. The protagonist is a record label executive. Martin Scorsese and Mick Jagger are executive producers, with Mr. Scorsese directing the pilot.


Entered at Mon Jan 25 17:15:25 CET 2016 from (82.18.230.252)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Vinyl jazz

I've not seen these but I have multiple copies of KIND OF BLUE already and a couple of "LADY IN SATIN". It is interesting that the publishers believe that they can make money on this project.

Incidentally, a (sort-of) joke for vinyl collectors of a certain age --- "Those born in '45 were 33 in '78".

[Gosh, I hope I haven't said that before - and, yes, I know 78s were shellac]


Entered at Mon Jan 25 13:21:23 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I read a little further. Issue 2 will be £9.99, then it's £15.99 from issue 3 onwards … basically, normal price.


Entered at Mon Jan 25 13:12:53 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The March of Vinyl

There was a surprise in the supermarket this morning. Lots of a new magazine part-work entitled "Jazz at 33" with the first issue consisting of "Kind of Blue" plus magazine at £4.99. 180 gram vinyl LP with proper Columbia label too. It reproduced the 1959 design and sleeve with notes too. The magazine has a big fold out poster, but a separate leaflet on Kind of Blue designed to slip into the sleeve.

Obviously it's he usual half price first issue. The next one in "Blue Train" by John Coltrane, then Lady in Satin, and they're going to be £9.99. That's still cheap for new 180 gram vinyl, though some classic jazz LPs are £12.99 new rather than the £17.99 of most rock new issues.

But for UK readers, Kind of Blue at £4.99 is a bargain!


Entered at Mon Jan 25 10:40:12 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: RoseAnne Fino and others

I've been playing the EP too. Excellent, as Al says. Link is to the original 2013 album review on my blog.

Just listening to "Devil Says" this morning from the EP, then Night Rolls In (my favourite track, with wonderful violin playing). It started me on a constant muse. Three of my favourite plays last year … RoseAnne Fino, Anna Mitchell, Dan Whitehouse … are all insufficiently known. I reckon that in the 70s / 80s climate they'd all be major-selling singer-songwriters in a universe with Simone Felice at the very top of the pyramid. RoseAnne Fino is the most "Americana" of the lot.

There is hope though, but it needs luck. I hadn't heard Elle King till Friday night's show, and to my surprise, when they showed the album cover, it was one of the twenty that my local supermarket sell. I always glance, though few of the artist that interest me ever get in that limited selection. She's managed to get two Grammy nominations and a Top Ten album without me noticing, and she was playing "The EXs and Ohs" on TV his week which is 2014 for the USA. Not only that she plays the BANJO … though guitar on Friday. She cites Hank Wlliams, Earl Scruggs, Etta James and … er … AC/DC.

So … Britanny Howard (I have to say I found the most recent Alabama Shakes album too raucous for my taste) … Elle King … let's hope 2016 is RoseAnne Fino. She has the talent, the voice and the material.


Entered at Mon Jan 25 06:00:21 CET 2016 from (65.92.195.13)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: more Nina Simone

Serendipity strikes again: I was rummaging around YouTube after something entirely different when I stumbled upon a most interesting Nina Simone 1976 performance of a song that nobody'll go to if I mention the title. Brilliant and interesting - either an artist having an awful lot of trouble keeping it together or an artist responding to a song in a very effective performance-art kind of way. Or both. 10+ minutes.

And if you're not familiar with it, I recommend you then scroll down the YouTube link to hear Nina do my personal favourite by her (and one of my top 30 by anyone, as Al E can attest because we know he kept our entries some years ago), "Sinnerman". Another 10+ minutes.


Entered at Mon Jan 25 02:44:37 CET 2016 from (68.171.246.148)

Posted by:

Bill M

Al E: Don't tell me you've shot your bolt and that all we'll get from you from now on is four words and this smiley thing! :-0)

Anyway, I took a few minutes to listen to the suggested links to versions of "To Love Somebody" and agree that though all are very very good, none beats the BeeGees, and only one comes even close to owning a piece of it - Nina Simone's. As Kevin J points out, Nina's version turns on the opening lines. When I listen to the original I hear a silent 'before' after "never shone on me". And that holds true of all the other versions but Nina's. So where everyone else is indicating that the light now shines on them, Nina's pretty damn clear that such is not the case for her, even if she loves the guy.


Entered at Sun Jan 24 22:06:52 CET 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Lucinda/Factory

Cheers for that Pete.

:-0)


Entered at Sun Jan 24 22:03:16 CET 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: RoseAnn Fino [One of our own]

Pete - I also saw the Elle King performance on Graham Norton.

Definitely some special talent there with Elle May and yeah I too particularly loved the drummer's performance.

Yet the talk of the hugely talented miss King and Lucinda Williams prompts me to return to a post I put up a few weeks ago.

It concerned the 4 track EP [OUT FROM UNDER] by Bob F's daughter RoseAnn Fino.

When I posted it was soon after my initial listenings to the songs on the EP. And whilst what I had to say was always going to be somewhat complimentary for a fellow GB'er, my favourable comments were nonetheless sincere albeit based only on initial impressions.

Yet as we all know initial impressions are not necessarily always that reliable.

So now comes a more considered appraisal.

On his wonderfully eclectic and exhaustive blog Pete Viney reviewed RoseAnn's previous recording. It was her debut record - a 12 track CD. She was backed on it by Professor Louie and Crowmatix. From Pete's review it was clear he was impressed by it.

Since my exposure to this follow up EP I've given a lot of retrospective listening time to that 12 track debut record in order to gain a broader perspective on RoseAnn and her songs.

It's evident that Pete was correct to be so enthusiastic about the debut recording. It is a fine record and not simply because it is a debut.

As I see it there are four really strong tracks on the debut album – Boxed Wine, Packed Up, Change My Mind, Till the Morning. The remaining tracks, whilst to my ears not at the level of the four I've mentioned are nonetheless never anything less than good quality and interesting and certainly nothing that I would term filler. Clearly the accomplished musicianship of the backing players was always going to guarantee quality for that aspect of the record but repeated plays also sees Roseann's talent as fine songwriter, singer and musician shining through on every track.

Assessing that debut CD in its correct timeline it could be said to be more than promising and certainly hinted at more to come.

Having now procured that broader perspective I was seeking of the artist and her offerings by quite intensive listening to both records, I can safely say that in terms of understatement “the hint of more to come" is akin to tagging The Beatles as a fine Merseybeat combo.

The fact is her new EP reveals that RoseAnn has developed starkly and considerably as an artist.

She is now unquestionably the real deal, already attaining a level where I can only use the term consummate artist to convey the quality she offers. It is why I am posting this now. It is why I’m referencing Elle King and Lucinda Williams. Her latest body of songs, albeit only four strong on this EP, displays a quality quite comfortably the equal of artists such as those two. More knowledgable friends have cited Suzanne Vega, Caitlin Rose. In terms of lyrical heart and soul bearing I cited joni Mitchell.

I give you the impressions of a mate of mine, Albie. I loved what he says and his words convey more eloquently than my own words what RoseAnn brings to the table.

"It's immediate but like all quality music has that indefinable complexity that makes it worth playing again. And again. There's no doubting where she's from. Her voice and attitude reek of New York and Americana but there's definitely a real Southern influence. I'm listening to it and whilst I know I've heard it before it still feels fresh and vital and new. There's a lot in here, a bit of country, bit of folk. It's American radio but there's also British influence in here. Punk? It's hard to pin down but it's there. Joni Mitchell yes, but Kirsty McColl, The Pogues, Suzanne Vega, the country music you'd hear as a kid, they’re all there but they tantalise and as quickly as you hear them they disappear."

Thanks Albie lad. Terrific write up.

The thing is the songs both individually and collectively reveal an extremely rare juxtaposition of innate maturity and punk sensibility that takes you aback. Yet another female singer songwriter along the treadmill, RoseAnn is most unequivically not. She sticks out from the crowd. The four tracks on the EP are of a stunningly high standard, demanding repeated listening, their quality unfolding more with each play.

I’ll leave this eulogy there.

I implore every GB’er, however, to go to her site which I’ve linked and purchase this EP. Not merely to support one of our own but because the record is simply so fucking good it demands you to do so.


Entered at Sun Jan 24 20:43:44 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Lucinda

One of the covers on the new album (which I haven;t heard yet) is Bruce Springsteen's Factory. She's been doing it live for a while. Link is to 2014 at The Stone Pony, but there's another version from Perth in 2013 on YouTube.

One for Al too - she sounds like Bruce. She even looks like Bruce.


Entered at Sun Jan 24 15:55:03 CET 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: 'The Waiting Room" Tindersticks

Tindersticks "The Waiting Room" (2016) has received almost universal positive reviews (Meteoritic) with one exception. I'm looking forward to hearing the new Lucinda Williams, as I have enjoyed all her previous albums.


Entered at Sun Jan 24 13:33:33 CET 2016 from (66.249.93.32)

Posted by:

Solomon

Subject: Covers

Two women I love to hear cover other people's songs are Nina Simone and Lucinda Williams.


Entered at Sun Jan 24 12:55:16 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

JT, good short review of new Tindersticks in The Sunday Times today, though as in the magazines everyone is praising Highway 20 by Lucinda Williams to the skies.

I got Love Stuff by Elle King yesterday- she was on the Graham Norton Show on TV Friday night doing Ex's and Oh's which is why. Actually, having got the album, it was even better live. Ice Cube was on the show and complimented the fine bass line - I'd said just before what a great bass player and drummer she had. Kevin Hart was there and added "Black people always talk about the bass lines."


Entered at Sun Jan 24 11:36:49 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: To Love the Sunset

Some ones lend themselves to great covers, others don't. Al quotes Yesterday - and like To Love Somebody, there are many stunning versions. I'd add The Weight … yes, the original is the best, but I love hearing The Staples, Aretha, Spooky Tooth, Travis, Diana Ross, Jackie de Shannon and others trying it.

The contrast is Waterloo Sunset. Another true classic from the era, but though there've been odd quirky attempts, no one would attempt a serious cover. It just wouldn't be worth it.

If you look at the discography there have been a load of covers of The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down. but I wouldn't choose to hear them ever, though I would enjoy most covers of The Weight. Though when I saw Joan Baez and she did it a few years ago, I really, really loved it. I guess it was hearing it live. And she has corrected the words now.


Entered at Sun Jan 24 06:26:48 CET 2016 from (24.186.163.216)

Posted by:

Ari

Subject: Wallsend/Rob Fraboni

Wallsend, I was able to meet Rob at B.B. King's in May of last year, he's one of the nicest guys out there, was amazed that I had seen the interview that was posted on this site a couple years ago and we've kept in correspondence. He told me a pretty great story on Charle Watt's reaction to seeing a double-kick pedal. Also had some great stories about Keith and how he got the sound on Levon's drums for Planet Waves. Really great guy, was pleased to have met him, Buster Poindexter and Josh Manuel all in the same night. I didn't recognize David Johansen at first because he had a pretty crazy mustache, so I asked him if he knew where Garth Hudson was (who was running late), told me he'd keep an eye out. I realized only after we spoke later on. Got a chance to chat with Alexis P. Suter, Byron Isaacs and Brian Mitchell too. A night to remember for sure.


Entered at Sat Jan 23 22:49:50 CET 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: To Love Somebody [part XXVI]

I'd better clear up the fact my disparaging of all the great artists cited was lighthearted before I find myself the precipitator of some GB spontaneous combustion amongst their champions!!

:-0)

The Heebeebeegees will of course have been humbled and hugely flattered that their song has almost as many covers as Macca's most famous offering with some of the covers by true music greats.

But I think Bill M has highlighted the underlying point I was making. Some songs really are owned by the artists who initially record them and especially so if they've also happened to write them. We as Band freaks should be more aware of that than anyone.

It's not a universal law, of course. And sometimes as we know a cover version usurps the original as we've all alluded to so many times on here. Shawn Colvin anybody?

But for me, in the case of To Love Somebody, the simple beauty of the melody is the key to the song's majesty. Sure as Kev says the opening lines are a pair of stop the traffic stunners but it's that aching melody that is the real winner.

And what that translates to in my view is a song which needs no embellishment or soul pained interpretation. This ain't A Change is Gonna Come. It's a simple yet stunningly beautiful pop song. Amongst the best ever. And I'm sure the incredible Gibb brothers knew that as soon as they'd finished composing it.

I most certainly did the first time I heard their original peerless version.

:-0)


Entered at Sat Jan 23 19:22:13 CET 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Total confusion

I put the wrong gawd damn song on there.....I'm so embarrassed.....I' leavin.


Entered at Sat Jan 23 19:10:06 CET 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Again & again

This version is much better. First of all he cut his gawd damn hair! Most importantly with David Foster on piano and his direction and mix the sound is improved greatly.

It's not hard to see that no one can make it sound like David can.


Entered at Sat Jan 23 18:58:25 CET 2016 from (123.25.114.66)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: To Love Somebody

Ah.....forgot to mention that folks should check out a lovely version of the song by Ray Lamontagne and Damien Rice.


Entered at Sat Jan 23 18:52:46 CET 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: To Love Somebody

Bunch a bozos.....600 million women can't be wrong!


Entered at Sat Jan 23 17:51:24 CET 2016 from (78.133.7.41)

Posted by:

Stefan Dahlen

Location: Bergen Norway
Web: My link

Subject: Respect to The Band

Just wanna say - Respect guys keep up the good work and keep rocking!


Entered at Sat Jan 23 17:14:17 CET 2016 from (123.25.114.66)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: To Love Somebody

I also liked Leonard Cohen's version of "To Love Soembody"......at least I know he wouldn't ever had Robert Stigwood in mind while he was singing it........Yikes !

By the way, that revelation might just be the definition of Too Much Information !


Entered at Sat Jan 23 16:54:57 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Tindersticks

Sorry, I meant to reply a couple of days ago. I had to look them up on Wikipedia. Total ignorance on my part.


Entered at Sat Jan 23 16:52:30 CET 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Tindersticks

To briefly change the topic: Tindersticks. Any comments?


Entered at Sat Jan 23 16:15:17 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Psychological move, Bill. I played the Lulu card, and you just raised it with a Zoot Money and Andy Summers. Bournemouth allegiance has to come in here. Not that subtlety of interpretation was ever Eric Burdon’s strongest point. I’m going to have to just repeat your point: Is there a bad version?

In deference to Al, we'd better put the original version in here. Linked above to the Bee Gees. Surely the power of the song is so many great versions?


Entered at Sat Jan 23 15:46:08 CET 2016 from (68.171.246.132)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Subject: to love yet another somebody

The first cover I heard was by Eric Burdon and the Animals from "Love Is" (the album with Zoot Money and future Police-man Andy Summers).


Entered at Sat Jan 23 14:17:20 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Lulu

As Bill M said yesterday, "Is there a bad version of To Love Somebody?" James Carr is another superb take on it.

Jus for completeness, I've added Lulu. She gets the orchestra that she complained EMI declined to put on To Sir With Love. Sill, as the latter was the biggest US hit of the year, she can hardly complain.


Entered at Sat Jan 23 13:21:00 CET 2016 from (86.171.27.62)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland
Web: My link

Subject: To Love Somebody

Enjoyed the posts recently, especially those relating 'To Love Somebody'. I play the Nina Simone version frequently.

My favourite version is by James Carr. I have 'The Complete Goldwax Singles' album.

I never knew about James Carr, but he is a great singer.

It was Bumbles on this site, who put me in touch with the album, after I was saying how much I liked Dan Penn. Since then I have read a few times how well thought of James Carr was by people such as Dan Penn.

I really know little about him, but I play the album a lot.

I have enjoyed all the versions. Thanks.


Entered at Sat Jan 23 08:59:18 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: To Love P.P. Arnold …

I’m curious on how To Love Somebody grew. The Bee Gees original was a much bigger hit in the USA (17) than the UK (41). Wiki quotes a 2011 interview with Barry Gibb which claims it was written for their manager Robert Stigwood:

“It was for Robert. I say that unabashedly. He asked me to write a song for him, personally. It was written in New York and played to Otis but, personally, it was for Robert. He meant a great deal to me. I don't think it was a homosexual affection but a tremendous admiration for this man's abilities and gifts.”

I’d guess the earliest cover was Lulu, on “Loves to Love Lulu” along with To Sir With Love. As it came out in 1967, it apparently predates her relationship with Maurice, or is early on. P.P. Arnold was early too, on her 1968 album “Kafunta.” Like Lulu, she was around on the London scene with the Gibb brothers, and Barry Gibb went on to produce her.

Nina Simone had the biggest UK hit (#5) in early 1969.

The Bee Gees version is gigantic, which is why the song spread. Janis is fascinating because she did it how Otis would have done it, but as well as drama and passion, what I think P.P. Arnold gets is what Barry Gibbs also gets on the original … vulnerability.

I’ve seen P.P. Arnold a couple of times. Then she was on the Sandy Denny Tribute tour, where hey all do the big line-up and swap verses on Who Knows Where The Time Goes, and in that sort of situation, in spite of invariably being the shortest, she absolutely towers over every other singer. From my review of P.P. Arnold with The Manfreds in 2011:

The star – by a mile- was PP Arnold. Thirty-five years on, she sounds exactly the same in both Angel of The Morning and First Cut is The Deepest. A rarity, as on both she improved significantly on the originals. I’d rate her as the best female soul singer I’ve seen. She duetted on “It’s Gonna Work Out Fine” (A song she had performed as an Ikette and a song which Manfred Mann covered) with Paul Jones, and they had a laugh as she kept giving it more until she went past his range for responding and he had to give up. In the interval I went to the foyer to get an autographed CD (the newer Immediate Anthology, First Cut), and told her I’d got both hits as original singles, bought on release. I said, “I hope you’re going to wipe the floor with the Sheryl Crowe version in the second half,’ and she said ‘Just watch me. That’s exactly what I’m gonna do …” And did she do it. Wiped it backwards, forwards and sideways. She said, ‘Does anyone know the Sheryl Crowe version? Well tell her … (full power) “The First CUT is the deepest,” Then she did the same for Rod Stewart. Phenomenal. If only she’d done her Ab Fab special version of This Wheel’s On Fire.


Entered at Sat Jan 23 06:41:48 CET 2016 from (32.216.236.54)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Haven't had a chance to do the soul sister challenge yet, but I just caught a Later With Jools Holland episode, and the lovely Norah Jones slayed me with a performance of 'For the Good Times', which I think she had previously done with The Little Willies. Her voice just melts me.
Crying in my beer now.

I've been on a bit of an Audrey Hepburn kick lately and watched a few of her movies during the holidays. I know that she's not particularly known as a singer, but there's something about her singing 'Moon River' that is very soothing. Such a beauty.


Entered at Sat Jan 23 03:26:14 CET 2016 from (202.151.161.242)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: To Love Somebody

As I said, it's all in the first few lines with this song......"There's a light/a certain kind of light/that never shone on me".........others are too busy to feel it like Janis, others do it with a smile like PP......,with Nina Simone, you feel it to the bone and you know that she knows what is was like to never have that light shine on her...........nothing "jumped up" about her version.


Entered at Sat Jan 23 03:15:15 CET 2016 from (68.171.246.1)

Posted by:

Bill M

JQ: Someone with lower morals would have tried making something of "Hooker 'n' Heat", but not I.

Al E: You're absolutely right. It's such a good song that I'm inclined to think that it's about itself, that is, the guys are demonstrating in the clearest possible way how deep the relationship betweem singer/writer and song can be. And no, as a no-talent I couldn't possibly know what it's like.


Entered at Sat Jan 23 01:40:31 CET 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: To Love Somebody

Love that Blue Rodeo version Joe.

But come on you pretentious shower of twats with all your jumped up versions - the Gibbs felt it, sweated it, wrote it, played it, recorded it and fucking owned it.

One of the all time great songs.

And it was theirs - and theirs alone.

:-0)


Entered at Sat Jan 23 01:23:35 CET 2016 from (24.224.128.101)

Posted by:

joe j

Web: My link

Never a bad version. PP's is so sexy though.

My favourite is the Moonraiders Live at a high school Hallowe'en sock hop when I stumbled through my first slow dance to this song. Debbie O.

Link is Canadian content, a countryish version by Blue Rodeo.


Entered at Sat Jan 23 00:05:17 CET 2016 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Hooker!!

Bill M - I laughed all the way through that! I believe, unlike Hooker, Mr Rooke is still at it; up there by y'all -


Entered at Fri Jan 22 21:16:24 CET 2016 from (68.171.246.5)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: Didn't Bill S also write the lyrics to "What A Piece Of Work Is Man"? In any case, Shakespeare's dog wrote a wonderful posthumous autobiography under the pseudonym name Leon Rooke.

"To Love Somebody" - has there been a bad version?


Entered at Fri Jan 22 21:14:15 CET 2016 from (100.2.21.114)

Posted by:

Joan

Web: My link

This is kind of fun


Entered at Fri Jan 22 20:49:07 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Nina Simone

Great version by Nina Simone … linked. A necessary part of the discussion. Laid back, brilliant piano and organ. The story is that it was written for Otis Redding, who never got to record it. It certainly made a rapid impact. The Bee Gees went on to produce P.P. Arnold's post-Immediate singles, so we can guess that she had a close connection to the writers.


Entered at Fri Jan 22 20:18:58 CET 2016 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: To Love Somebody Countryfied

Gram Parsons also covered the song. It's an outtake from his days with the Flying Burrito Brothers that later appeared on the "Close Up The Honky Tonks" compilation released after his death.


Entered at Fri Jan 22 19:38:37 CET 2016 from (202.151.161.242)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: To Love Somebody

Is it alright to vote for Nina Simone ? It's all in the first few lines and I feel it to the bone with her.......If just between P.P. and Janis, I would take the PP version. Might be the only time I would ever not side with Janis Joplin.


Entered at Fri Jan 22 19:16:19 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

This would be a great one round a good record player to chat about. I like Janis at full pelt too, but somehow with P.P. Arnold it's all there naturally in the voice without any mannerisms (or rather Otis Redding bits) … and I don't know whether this is The Nice or Small Faces backing, but I suspect the latter, in which case I prefer Ronnie Lane's bass too. Or Lee Jackson's if I'm wrong. It's the old white blooz singer question. How did everyone else feel?

i've been listening to Major Lance's Greatest Hits for a day or so … mostly written by Curtis Mayfield. There's effortless soul in there, like Marvin Gaye or Sam Cooke, and P.P. Arnold is effortless. Janis is more like Wilson Pickett … she works at it.


Entered at Fri Jan 22 18:41:56 CET 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

Peter, I couldn't disagree with you more. Janis's version of To Love Somebody maybe my favorite cover of all time. Nobody better. Not then, not now. I remember buying Kozmic Blues and Child Is A Father To The Man on the same day. I don't think I played anything else for months. I still listen to those records all the time.

Thank you sadavid for the link.


Entered at Fri Jan 22 17:56:15 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Comparison time …

Having listened to Janis Joplin emoting at full force … try THIS version instead. All the soul mannerisms are cut away, we probably have The Small Faces backing, but without all those soul singer blooz cliches, I think this one walks all over it. Opinions? It's linked.


Entered at Fri Jan 22 17:52:55 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: To Love Somebody

I followed SaDavid's link, and then opened the Janis Joplin one, which took me to Janis doing To Love Somebody on the Dick Cavett Show. Bear with me … listen to the link (scroll in 50 seconds past the intro). See what you think.


Entered at Fri Jan 22 17:31:46 CET 2016 from (131.137.34.219)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: advice for living

(from the dead)


Entered at Fri Jan 22 16:11:59 CET 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Tinder sticks

Peter and anyone else: What is the reception to Tindersticks in the UK? I have recently discovered them (even though they played in Toronto in the early 2000s 3 times!). I really enjoy their music.


Entered at Fri Jan 22 14:42:04 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

While Bob had a dog called Hamlet, he has never been renowned for his portrayal of the Ghost of Old Hamlet, a role Shakespeare was alleged to have taken.

Did Shakespeare play the lute? He certainly wrote lyrics. The link is to Laura Marling's music to "Under The Greenwood Tree" from As You Like It. Beautiful- don't skip this link!


Entered at Fri Jan 22 12:26:26 CET 2016 from (83.249.161.239)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Subject: 1. Shakespeare and Dylan - or vice versa 2. Pointless stories / Ian W

1. While eating Friday lasagne Ms. NorthWestCoaster said suddenly: "Dylan is a modern Shakespeare, I read an article in The Guardian. Both are listening, remembering, putting things together, signing it in their own name." I said: "I've always found Shakespeare as an ancient Dylan instead."

2. Thanks Ian W for your reminiscences on Joan Baez and Donovan, both were and are my idols. You called your story for pointless. In my mind you were wrong. It was not a pointless story. I enjoyed it.


Entered at Thu Jan 21 20:24:09 CET 2016 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Sebastian Robertson

Maybe I've missed a previous mention of this, but I noticed that Sebastian Robertson and Daniel Davies, son of former Kinks member Dave Davies, composed a soundtrack for the film "The Condemned." A CD soundtrack version was released last week.


Entered at Thu Jan 21 19:17:30 CET 2016 from (24.108.163.242)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: ....perceived resignation

... and the perceived resignation to the inevitable.


Entered at Thu Jan 21 19:16:24 CET 2016 from (24.108.163.242)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Blackstar is haunting

The song 'Blackstar' is haunting me. It plays in my brain at night. Its the opposite of a pleasant 'earworm'. It is the minor notes and the seeming moans that I hear that are painful.


Entered at Thu Jan 21 18:50:42 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Way back in the early 90s, I sat through an entire day discussing how to attach CDs to books. We had a table full of samples from various manufacturers, and looked at some bizarre and complex solutions. Thinking back, I think the issue with "Hiawatha" may be that it's sealed in until you take out the letter box piece of plastic. None of the ESL ones are sealed in.


Entered at Thu Jan 21 18:47:17 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Before you ask, "Blackstar" is still too poignant to add to the 2016 list.


Entered at Thu Jan 21 18:46:05 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Hiawatha & The Peacemaker

It's a beautiful book with the CD packaged with it, and it joins Britanny Howard's "I Feel Free" (from "Joy") as the second entry in my just created 2016 Selections Playlist.

The packaging is a major problem. It's in a plastic sleeve attached to the back cover. There's a removable section, but surface tension means it's very very hard to remove. Having done around twenty books with CDs enclosed, i would say they're using the wrong kind of plastic. I have many ELT / ESL graded readers with audio CDs in a plastic sleeve, and none of them are this hard to get out. A tip: once you've removed the plastic access hole (most publishers just use a flap) you need a thin but firm piece of card to push in and release the surface tension from the top. Then on mine it was still immovable. I got a very thin piece of plastic and after about two minutes managed to lift an edge. Then I slid a thin but stiff card below and released the tension holding it.

It's definitely worth it, but if Sebastian's reading this, before the next impression, take a look in a bookshop with ESL books, Many will have audio CDs in the back. Try them. I think it's definitely the type of plastic that's causing this massive surface tension … though if they're packed tight for transport, it may make it worse. I guess airfreighting could create a stronger electrical charge holding it so tight.

But … congratulations on both the book and the intoxicating song, which has had over an hour playing today. Everyone here needs it!


Entered at Thu Jan 21 08:14:52 CET 2016 from (58.104.8.168)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

Just re-listening to Eric Francis's interview with Rob Fraboni. Quite interesting in light of the subsequent release of the BTs.


Entered at Wed Jan 20 20:53:50 CET 2016 from (82.18.230.252)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Ronnie Hawkins biographical document

Re-reading the document I mentioned before, it must have been written in early 1967: Levon had not returned to the fold and Ronnie is a possible for Montreal's EXPO 1967 later in the year.

The discography from which I quoted in an earlier post is clearly based on the one at the end of this biographical document.



Entered at Wed Jan 20 19:51:23 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Cherry Wainer

Clip of Cherry Wainer & cousin Don Storey doing "Moanin'" as a duo way back … nice bass pedal work.


Entered at Wed Jan 20 18:31:45 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Southern Love

Ronnie Hawkins doing Southern Love from "Boy Meets Girl" is available … it's on The Boy Meets Girl CD. I'm listening to it now. The drumming sounds excellent, and I'd guess it's Levon, because once it comes in it's holding the band, not "joining in." There was a resident drummer, Don Storer, but Levon says he was there.

The CD is on Rockstar, and the notes explain that Joe Brown was approached by someone who had worked on the show, and said they had tapes. Rockstar tracked them down, their main interest being that 90% of Eddie Cochran's performances were on the tapes. The tapes included the Ronnie Hawkins.

The backing girls are very prominent, with a chorus and one wailing.

Over to Ronnie (from "The Hawk" by Ian Wallis):

"(Before we went) I didn't think they could play and they sure couldn't play rock 'n' roll. That was our opinion, and we hadn't even heard any of them. I couldn't have been more wrong. They had one of the greatest horn players I've ever heard in my life. Red Price was his name and he was as close to King Curtis as anybody has been. There was this little girl, Cherry Wainer, who played organ, and she was fucking unbelievable, and a young kid called Joe Brown playing guitar in a pair of boots that Johnny Cash had given him. If I could have taken Joe Brown with me back to Canada when he was 16 or 17 years old, he could have become the greatest picker of them all - as big as Van Halen thinks he is."

The Boy Meets Girl team was so faithful to the record that they wrote in Fred Carter Jnr's bum note in the solo and reproduced it.

It does make you wonder … Cherry Wainer was one of the first rock Hammond players. Did she give him the idea?


Entered at Wed Jan 20 18:06:37 CET 2016 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Stage Fright

When asked about any involvement with "Stage Fright" in a 1999 interview with Lee Gabites, John Simon responded:

"I didn't have anything to do with 'Stage Fright' except that I lived a mile from where it was recorded, so I dropped in once in awhile and listened to the progress of things."

What's left unsaid is that, beginning with The Brown Album, the group had begun producing themselves. And with Albert Grossman's wunderkind Todd Rundgren on board (excuse the pun) as engineer, Mr. Simon was the odd man out. It seems, at least to some, a new approach to their recorded sound was needed. This is further evidenced by the move at the end to have Glyn Johns try his hand in mixing the album. Maybe I'm reading too much into these apparent changes, but the resulting LP certainly had a different sound from their previous two albums.


Entered at Wed Jan 20 18:03:31 CET 2016 from (82.18.230.252)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Hawkins and Helm in the UK in 1960

I've just found some loose papers in the same file as "THE CAMEL WALKER" fanzines. There is a biography of Ronnie Hawkins, printed on foolscap paper, so probably of earlier vintage than the magazines. Against the title "The Biography of Rockin' Ronnie Hawkins", the author has added in pen "From 1935 to 1967", so I would guess late-1960s.

In his autobiography, Levon mentioned the trip to the UK in early 1960. He says it was to appear on "Boy Meets Girl" but says it was a BBC programme; it was, in fact, on Independent Television show. Anyway, this biography says the visit was from 30th January to 6th February and that Ronnie Hawkins performed "Southern Love" with Joe Brown on lead guitar. This document adds that "Levon did not appear".

There may have been a second show because the document says: "Ron did spend some time in Paris though and also in Manchester where the two TV shows were recorded".

It adds that, "When asked about his biggest impression of England, Ron replied, 'The Vernon Girls'". Though some people called them The Vernon Girls, they were really The Vernons Girls, as they were formed at the Vernons football pools company. Here they are:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NRKdD00NZUI

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e8PH8cpLbxA

Now, why would Ronnie remember them, I wonder?

I do not have the Ronnie Hawkins biography, so this may be all known to you. in which case, I apologise.


Entered at Wed Jan 20 15:19:07 CET 2016 from (65.92.195.13)

Posted by:

Bill M

David P: I think it was me who trotted out the Simon quotes from the "Rolling Stone". I still have the photocopy of the interview, but it's filed away somewhere. I remember that Simon, after going through the songs one by one, noted that Robbie was still writing the final song. That last song was likely "Just Another Whistle Stop" - on the grounds that it was the only song left unnamed and undiscussed, and that no additional songs were among the bonus tracks on the remastered CD.


Entered at Wed Jan 20 15:01:47 CET 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto intermittently

Subject: Concord Tavern, Toronto

I continue to search for a photo of a Bloor St. view of The Concord Tavern (now Long & McQuade) in Toronto. There is an album of photos at Vintage Toronto (via Facebook) of no -onger existing taverns in Toronto (beautiful photos) and for Concord, there are only ads and a view of some people sitting inside. Surely, a photo must exist. There is a photo of RH and Hawks on stage elsewhere. There is a photo of the side of the building with a boy looking towards that sign from a distance. But, NO PROPER head-on photo (as there are for Friar's, Le Coq d'Or and so may others). Help for any of you who monitor this site with interest. I have been to the appropriate archives and no luck there either. It is unfathomable that such a photo does not exist on-line.


Entered at Wed Jan 20 11:07:01 CET 2016 from (58.104.11.36)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

A recorded interview with Robbie from a couple of years back. Same old stuff but slightly nuanced.


Entered at Wed Jan 20 08:56:10 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Even though it’s my copy of Forty Days and Who Do You Love? illustrated, I hadn’t checked the discography here. I didn’t know about either EP- each comes with two catalogue numbers, mono and stereo, and Rare Record Guide 2016 rates them at £100 (mono), £110 (stereo). .

You have found three new entries. Five (UK EMI) Columbia singles are listed in Rare Record Guide:

DB4319 Forty Days / One Of These Days (already there)

DB 4345 Mary Lou / Need Your Lovin’

DB 4412 Southern Love / Love Me Like You Can

DB 4442 Clara / Lonely Hours

DB 7036 Bo Diddley / Who Do You Love?

(already there)

Three aren’t on the site. The values are given as £50 / £50 / £20 / £30 / £30. I’d say that for a mint / near mint example of the first two, that’s very conservative at a Rockabilly gathering or Juke Box Fair.


Entered at Wed Jan 20 02:55:56 CET 2016 from (108.122.19.124)

Posted by:

Adam

David P - Of course I remember the Rolling Stone quote/talk awhile back that John Simon was a part of "Stage Fright" 1970 LP, despite that being disputed before. I simply note that John Simon is listed for "special thanks" on that LP cover, is photographed with Robbbie/Jon Taplin/a very annoyed looking Todd Rundgren in A MUSICAL HISTORY photo of the Woodstock Playhouse sessions, and can be heard saying "Ok you wanna come here and listen to it?" after the alternate first version take of 'Daniel & The Sacred Harp'.


Entered at Wed Jan 20 01:17:16 CET 2016 from (82.18.230.252)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: UK singles by Ronnie Hawkins (and EPs)

I have been looking at a copy of "The Camel Walker", a British 1970s fanzine devoted to Ronnie Hawkins. Issue 3 (late 1974) has a discography. I'm not sure if the following is new information but I report in the hope that it is:

The Roulette 4177 single was released in the UK on Columbia 4345 (18 September 1959)

The Roulette 4209 single was released in the UK on Columbia 4412 (29 January 1960)

The Roulette 4228 single was released in the UK on Columbia 4442 (1 April 1960)

On the other hand, the discography says that Roulette 4483 was not issued in the UK - clearly incorrect.

The discography mentions two Ronnie Hawkins EPs:

"Rockin' With Ronnie" on Columbia SES. 7983 (January 1960): Odessa, My gal Is Red Hot, Wild Little Willie, Ruby Baby

"Rockin' With Ronnie No.2" on Columbia SES. 7988 (11 March 1960): Watcha Gonna Do, Dizzy Miss Lizzie, Oh Sugar, Horace



Entered at Wed Jan 20 00:58:15 CET 2016 from (82.18.230.252)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: That Trafalgar Square rally

I meant to say that I did NOT recognise Alex Campbell.


Entered at Wed Jan 20 00:08:35 CET 2016 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

2016 losses

Also the great Arkansas poet CD Wright on January 12 @ 66.


Entered at Tue Jan 19 22:41:04 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

He mentions the rally (though thinks it was June) and adds that "a very young Marc Bolan was there." He mentions an earlier row when Baez wanted to protest agains Vietnam, and Bob declined to join in any protest marches.


Entered at Tue Jan 19 22:22:38 CET 2016 from (82.18.230.252)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Baez and Donovan

There was a rally in Trafalgar Square on 29 May 1965. I noted Baez, Carolyn Hester, Tom Paxton, Donovan and Vanessa Redgrave as performing (Redgrave had a single out around that time, i think). From photos I've seen since, I know that Alex Campbell was there, too, but, though I had met him a few times (indeed, booked him a couple of times), I did recognise him - perhaps because he had shaved off his beard.

Anyway, after the rally, I headed off and, just at the top of Northumberland Avenue (very close tot he square), I noticed Baez, who was wearing one of those bright red plastic macs that were all the rage amongst the "birds" then, arm in arm with Donovan, who was being pursued by a small bevy of young girls. To get away from them, he hailed a taxi and Baez and Donovan climbed aboard and away they went.

A story without a point but my memory was trigered by the earlier posts.


Entered at Tue Jan 19 20:11:38 CET 2016 from (70.15.249.23)

Posted by:

bob w.

"I'm not afraid of dying. I just don't want to be there when it happens to me."

- Woody Allen


Entered at Tue Jan 19 19:53:12 CET 2016 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: David Bowie Tribute

Link to David Bowie tribute from WFDU-FM sourced from vinyl.


Entered at Tue Jan 19 19:39:56 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Right on the nail. She was prattling on about Bobbie (Donovan's -ie spelling) and it put him off.

In the UK, Atlantic didn't bother with sub labels, except for a brief ATCO run, late 1968-1970. It was all Atlantic … as were many STAX singles.


Entered at Tue Jan 19 19:20:42 CET 2016 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: ATCO

According to the discography section here ATCO did reissue the flip side of "The Stones I Throw," "He Don't Love You" in 1968 on a single with "Go Go Liza Jane" from the same 1965 recording session. Since this coincided with the release of "Music From Big Pink," Atlantic was probably trying to cash in on the group's new incarnation as The Band.

Atlantic established itself with its catalog of jazz, soul & R&R music. Initially, here in the U.S., pop and rock artists were signed to Atlantic's ATCO subsidiary label. It wasn't until around 1968 that groups like Led Zeppelin and Crosby, Stills & Nash negotiated deals to appear on the Atlantic label itself.


Entered at Tue Jan 19 19:19:34 CET 2016 from (202.151.161.242)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Donovan.......Silk Sheets.......Joan Baez.......No Nooky.......Ya gotta be kidding...

. .....hmmmm.....was she talking too much? Pratting on about Bobby, again ? Talking about how much better her version of TNTDODD was ? The mind boggles.


Entered at Tue Jan 19 19:17:24 CET 2016 from (202.151.161.242)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Carol Caffin's great 2011 interview with RR in Crawdaddy addresses the LIAC credits.


Entered at Tue Jan 19 18:56:20 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: More than you want to know about Atlantic labels …

I’m positive Atlantic or Atco didn’t reissue The Stones I Throw in the UK. It’s harder to tell from the US singles (see discography here) because ATCO was using the same yellow and white design for years, and American singles don’t carry the year date. Like Motown often did, they could reissue with the same catalogue number and it would be hard to tell the difference.

In the end, I doubt it, because with The Band touring Europe they would have issued it in Europe. The original version is on Decca-pressed “black label Atlantic” in Britain. From May 1966, Atlantic was distributed by Polydor and switched to red centre labels. A lot of back catalogue from “black Atlantic” was reissued on “red Atlantic” but I’ve never seen a red Stones I Throw or heard of it. By the interview in 1971, WEA had its own distribution and pressing here. Atlantic were late joining it in fact, as they had to wait out the Polydor deal, even though they were now part of WEA. But by 1971, any Atlantic pressing was WEA and red / green / white for mainly white artists, but red / blue / white for mainly black artists and red / grey / white for jazz.


Entered at Tue Jan 19 18:27:44 CET 2016 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Melody Maker

That Melody Maker article raises some questions regarding accuracy regarding "Cahoots".

While Rick is quoted saying Robbie "wrote all the lyrics," Levon & Rick received a rare co-writing credit on "Life Is A Carnival." Was it for their contribution to the music composition as the group smoothed out what Robbie presented to them?

The album was recorded at the newly completed Bearsville studio with no added credit for mixing or recording at George Martin's AIR studio in London.

Atlantic/Atco, as far as I know, didn't reissue "The Stones I Throw."

That reminds me of a Rolling Stone article mentioned here a while back that reported on the progress of recording "Stage Fright." It included quotes from John Simon that implied he was involved in the recording. Does anyone here remember that report?

Regarding Levon's money comments -- while they did receive critical praise for their first two albums, the sales figures remained modest at best at the time. The Brown Album recording involved recording at Sammy Davis Jr.'s pool house in L.A. and A&R Studios in NYC. Robbie & John Simon are credited as engineers on the album, while Tony May & Joe Zagarino were the credited for engineering the mixes. It seems quite possible that the overhead recording costs ate a big piece out of the initial gross sales figure.


Entered at Tue Jan 19 18:12:40 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Donovan also explains that he had had two major hits, Catch The Wind and Colours, before Dylan's first single chart entry.

That's true. But there were LPs too.

He also mentions Newport 65:

QUOTE: "(Bobbie) was planning to do a set with the Paul Butterfield Blues Band (of Peter, Paul & Mary)." UNQUOTE. Yes, they both had beards.


Entered at Tue Jan 19 18:05:12 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Davies, Donovan & Dylan

My favourite secondhand record shop had four boxes of rock books today. I picked up a few, including ‘Fleetwood’ by Mick Fleetwood and Stephen Davies. A drummer … Stephen Davies … there has to be dirt in there somewhere.

My first glance and speed read is Donovan’s unintentionally hilarious Hurdy Gurdy Man. I particularly liked Brian Jones pointing out that there were Dylan influences in Donovan’s work. Apparently not. Dylan was just one of a hundred inspirations, and in reality Dylan and Donovan shared the same old influences. And he grumbles, Brian Jones was an Elmore James imitator. He mentions those Talking World War III Blues 1965 performances which added turning on the radio and hearing Donovan.

“The audiences jeered my name. Backstage Dylan told reporters: “I didn’t mean to put the guy down in my songs. I just did it for a joke.’ In their turn my fans were just as vocal in championing me.’

Yes, Sincerity in front of reporters was always Bob’s hallmark.

Then Alan Price tells Dylan: QUOTE: “(Donovan’s) not a fake and he plays better guitar than you.” Alan is right. My guess is Bobbie would accept that. UNQUOTE

Then there’s laying on the silk sheets with Joan Baez but declining what is being offered. I haven’t found anything on composing that great original “Tangerine Eyes” yet!

BTW, I do like Donovan in spite of his almost total lack of irony.


Entered at Tue Jan 19 17:49:14 CET 2016 from (83.249.161.239)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Bakersfield Country - David P

Thanks David P. The last place to hear real country before entering Los Angeles is Bakersfield. The best music is born - in fact in this very moment! - not in the capitals but in the dull industrial and agricultural provincial towns.


Entered at Tue Jan 19 17:34:23 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Another one. This takes place in 1960s Spain. General Franco era.

Everyday an old man shuffles up to the news vendor. He never buys a newspaper. He just looks at the front page, shakes his head, and goes home.

The newspaper vendor gets fed up, and says, 'You never buy a newspaper! Why do you just glance at the front page?'

'I'm just looking for the obituaries,' says the old man.

The newspaper vendor frowns, 'But the obituaries aren't on the front page.'

The old man smiles, 'The one I'm looking for will be.'

(I believe there are Russian versions, but this was told me by a left-wing Spanish friend.)


Entered at Tue Jan 19 17:31:26 CET 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Mirror

I may have said this before: If I have, apologies.

I get up in the morning, look in the mirror, and if I see myself, its a good day.


Entered at Tue Jan 19 16:46:24 CET 2016 from (202.151.161.242)

Posted by:

Kevin J

I love that one, John D ! Reminds me of the Woody Allen line......when asked what he thought of living on forever through his celebrated films, he responded "well, I'd rather live on forever in my Manhatten apartment"


Entered at Tue Jan 19 16:04:31 CET 2016 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

In an interview I saw recently; with the great Carl Reiner, he had a great line. "When I wake up in the morning, I go straight to the paper and read the obituaries. If my names not in it......I have breakfast!"


Entered at Tue Jan 19 14:54:29 CET 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: 'Peaceful Easy feeling'

I remember well the emergence of The Eagles. It was indeed a time when America was reeling on the international scene and young people just wanted to fade into the background with some gentle passivity. Those first 2 albums achieved just that feel and with early CSNY and Jackson Browne and Souther Hillman Furay and a few others, we had our soundtrack for a 'peaceful, easy feeling'. With Dylan relaxing and showing the way and The Band creating Americana, we had a bunch of lovely albums to which to listen. I don't want to leave out 'The Notorious Byrd Brothers', an album whose grooves I wore out.


Entered at Tue Jan 19 14:46:48 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Glenn Frey

Glenn Frey was a premier league player and songwriter. It's an unbelievable month. The rock magazines are getting to be all obituaries. It reminds me of a story where the old guy buys a paper every day and reads the obituaries, smiling. He's asked why he's smiling, 'Because I've survived past another contemporary,' he says.


Entered at Tue Jan 19 13:53:49 CET 2016 from (83.249.161.239)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Melody Maker - Rick Danko playing tuba

I read this article already in August 1971. Me and Ms. NorthWestCoaster had been washing gold in Finnish Lappland a few hundred kilometres north of the Polar Circle. Driving home in an old VW Beetle we were happy to take a break in a village which had a tiny library. It was great to wash your teeth in warm water there. While waiting for Ms. NorthWestCoaster I read this article in Melody Maker and as a schoolboyband bass player his words about playing tuba were very interesting. I understood that he had actually played tuba earlier but it seems to be an misunderstanding.


Entered at Tue Jan 19 13:27:22 CET 2016 from (202.151.161.242)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Take it Easy

I had meant to make note of Glenn Frey's death earlier.....while I was not a big fan of the group's and disliked the way they conducted their business - especially in phase 2 of their career, one would have had to be on another planet during the 70's to not be impacted by their music and the writing team of Henley and Frey. The "One of These Nights" album and the title track is my favourite having a hand in writing "Take it Easy" and "Hotel California" alone gets you a ticket into the Hall of Fame.

Also worth noting that Don Henley's thoughts on Frey's death as issued in a statement were honest and heartfelt. Their's was not an easy relationship but certainly a very fine one creatively.


Entered at Tue Jan 19 12:28:56 CET 2016 from (82.18.230.252)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: MELODY MAKER 1971 - Garth Hudson

In MELODY MAKER for 8 May 1971, there was an article by Richard Williams on Garth Hudson. At the end, he refers to "the most outstandingly original organ style I know".


Entered at Tue Jan 19 12:27:03 CET 2016 from (202.151.161.242)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Melody Maker - Rick Danko

A Melody Maker article on Rick Danko from mid-1976 is more interesting on the subjects being discussed:

Rick on a solo album and not messing with The Band:

"Danko is quick to point out that his solo aspirations will in no way interfere with his position in the Band, a position that will always come first. "Robbie has been writing songs all his life and I just hope he remains writing songs that I can play all my life. It's just the same energy that I can channel everwhere, as I want to tour with Rendezvous as well. I don't want to move to quickly... to rush something out and then have a tour. With the Band we don't rush and I won't rush on my own."

Rick on future Band albums:

"I think, though, that the Band's situation will change soon, and we'll be back to making one album a year ourselves instead of waiting so long as we have done recently. Everbody in the group is now resigned to that commitment, but it's fun anyway. We've been together for 15 or 16 years and I for one wouldn't stop making albums with the Band. Just so long as the Band wants to continue making records, I'll be there."

Rick on Robbie and hooking up with Dylan:

"When I first met Robbie he showed me some songs he had written and I immediatly liked the way he wrote, but when you're playing in clubs people really don't want to hear anything original. But what made the Band special in those days was because we had our own little bag of tunes which weren't Top 40 but weren't original. They were our own arrangements of tunes by our favorite artists."

"We didn't seem to be getting anywhere until we came down and played in New Jersey, which was when Bob (Dylan) got wind of the group. I think he'd played with Levon and Robbie before and was interested to hear us, so he came up to Toronto to talk to us. It was funny because we were taking a little time off for the first time in years. When you play juke-joints, you can't afford to take time off because you live from day to day, and so when Bob first came to hear us our voices were shot and we played all instrumentals. He split and then sent his plane back to take us to Texas were we did three shows with him. We didn't rehearse at all, just went straight on."


Entered at Tue Jan 19 11:23:52 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Rick Danko, 29 May 1971, Melody Maker

Another interchange:

Q: What's on the new album?

Rick: All new songs.

Q: Are they all Robbie's?

Rick: Uh-huh. He wrote all the lyrics. He writes songs for me and Richard and Levon, and he'll bring one over and if we like we'll say "sure.". So we smooth it out and get it going and just get everybody to do it … it's nice that way. He's always been a writer, ever since I've known him. There's not many writers that exist, in my mind.


Entered at Tue Jan 19 10:29:15 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Carol

Review of CAROL linked for the film fans.


Entered at Tue Jan 19 07:28:06 CET 2016 from (210.86.100.208)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: Peter's 1971 post

Interesting comments from Levon. I guess at that stage the Brown Album hadn't achieved it's status as one of the greatest albums of all time. But as Robbie said in a video post here recently The Band (the group) was never a huge commercial success. A sad reflection on the music business.


Entered at Tue Jan 19 05:07:01 CET 2016 from (104.207.136.86)

Posted by:

Calvin

Wow it's been a bad start to the year. Dallas Taylor, Drummer for CSN&Y and Manassas passed away today, as did Mott The Hoople Drummer Dale "Buffin" Griffin.

I always loved Mott the Hoople


Entered at Tue Jan 19 03:43:26 CET 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: ReStones

I didn't know about the idea to release 'Stones That I Throw' again. It is a very underrated song and did not get its due. Thanks, Ian.


Entered at Tue Jan 19 02:30:57 CET 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Glenn Frey

Sorry. Glenn


Entered at Tue Jan 19 01:49:44 CET 2016 from (82.18.230.252)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Robbie and Rick MELODY MAKER interviews - 1971

As a MELODY MAKER reader back then, I have those interviews in my files. There was also an article on their recordings, ending with two bits of information:

1) that "They'll be finishing off their fourth album in George Martin's AIR London studios over the Whit weekend" (that is, over the last weekend in May)

2) that "Ahmet Ertegun is thinking about reissuing 'The Stones I Throw'".

In the following week's issue, Richard Williams (who conducted the interviews, I think) reviewed Dylan's famous 1966 bootleg, saying that, "The Hawks playing, in retospect, is quite magnificent", and there was also a review of The Band's 1971 Paris by Geoffrey Cannon.

Then, the following week again, there was Richard Williams on one of The Band's London shows.

MELODY MAKER reviewed CAHOOTS in its 16 October 1971 issue: " It's very good, though not flawless" .... "But it's still better in every way than most bands will manage in a lifetime and, what's more, it's unique, because it comes from one of the two or three bands of our time, which have been, and are, true originals".


Entered at Mon Jan 18 23:55:38 CET 2016 from (24.108.163.242)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Glen Frey

The news resports that Glen Frey passed away at age 67 from complications of acute ulcerative colitis and rheumatoid arthritis. Pneumonia is also mentioned. A great talent and another tragic loss.


Entered at Mon Jan 18 17:59:37 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: History of Rock 1971

Uncut's part work series reaches 1971 - it's a collection of Melody Maker and New Musical Express materials. This one is especially interesting as it has May 29h 1971 separate interviews with Robbie and Rick from Melody Maker, plus a further article with lots of Levon quotes from New Musical Express the same day.

It's full of stuff to rekindle lots of old discussions here.

Robbie: Canadian music? Well, there is no Canadian music hardly. The only Canadian thing that we share in the music … we did a song called Rag Mama Rag and there's a combination of some kind of music from Canada where they use … we used … tuba and accordion on that … we do it instrument wise rather than song wise … There is no music where you can say, 'Oh, that's Canadian.'

Rick: (Woodstock) … I didn't believe that it would be the sort of film I'd want to look at myself 20 years from now.

Q: What about playing bass in the band? RICK: Well, that's the only time I play bass, when we're recording or performing … I play other instruments. I never think of the bass … I think of it as more of a tuba than a bass. I don't think I play basslines … maybe I do, but it functions. I just try to play where no one else is hitting it. There's always a thousand spaces in our group, so it's not difficult.

Levon: When yer've had two records and yer still can't pay your bills, you get to figure something ain't quite right.

Levon goes on to say they recorded Stage Fright in Bearsville because "Doing it the other way cost us too much money … We jes' took too much time on (the brown album). Nobody was thinking' how much the engineer was gonna cost, things like that.'

Apart from being pissed off about money already by May 1971 the most interesting is his long comment on working with Dylan and how it gave them time to think … nary a mention that he wasn't actually there for most of it. But they all held up that careful omission.

Lots more … well worth getting. John Lennon on the cover.

Lovely ending about Garth giving a 50 minute monologue on jazz at the end.


Entered at Mon Jan 18 13:01:54 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Funny, similar discussion last night ended up with "Changes." But then "Life on Mars" also comes from Hunky Dory. There is something about track 1, side 1 of an album (Changes). It has to set out your stall. Hunky Dory is my favourite album.


Entered at Mon Jan 18 12:06:21 CET 2016 from (202.151.161.242)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: bob w - Rebel Rebel

Thank you, Bob. Great seeing your name here and a wonderful performance by Bruce Springsteen. Love that song........I could probably list 30 or 40 Bowie songs that I truly love but if I had to pick one to take away with me, I'd pick "Changes"......so many points in my life that song was there and I never tired of it - ever.


Entered at Mon Jan 18 06:46:46 CET 2016 from (58.104.20.148)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Interview with Robbie from 2011:

You’re writing an autobiography. How did that come about?

This record had something to do with opening that door for me. People have come to me in the past about writing a biography. In the process of working with them, I came to the conclusion that I need to tell the stories myself. I’m looking forward to rolling up my sleeves, sitting down and telling the stories—and I’ve got a bunch of ’em.

Why don’t you tour anymore?

I got off the road in the ’70s because I started so young that I had learned everything I could. I wanted to be able to challenge myself in other ways, and being on the road made me feel like I was going to be in the same play for the rest of my life. The redundancy of that was not exciting. As much admiration and respect I have for people who go out and tour forever, they have an attachment to the road that I don’t anymore.


Entered at Mon Jan 18 04:46:48 CET 2016 from (98.87.117.233)

Posted by:

jerry

Web: My link

love what yall are doing!


Entered at Sun Jan 17 21:57:29 CET 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: David Bowie....HEROES!

Trying to find the appropriate video of David doing this master piece. At about 2.14 watch , under his foot is a bottle cap taped with a microphone laying just in front of it. Another tasty little piece like John Hartford.

David's young bass player is wonderful.


Entered at Sun Jan 17 17:33:05 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Rebel Rebel

Just sent that link to a dozen people. Thanks for posting it.

It was such a natural choice of song in a way. It's always been one of my Top Ten Bowie songs. It came out in the midst of glam rock … not the Ziggy Stardust kind, but the somewhat lesser (though still fun) #1 hit type from T.Rex. Rebel Rebel stomped in and wiped the floor with all of them. Such a great song, it makes you want (as everyone seems to be doing) to list ten Bowie songs in radically different genres. And they all work.


Entered at Sun Jan 17 16:35:14 CET 2016 from (100.14.105.242)

Posted by:

bob w.

Web: My link

For Al Edge......Springsteen pays tribute to David Bowie.

Best to all.


Entered at Sun Jan 17 16:17:23 CET 2016 from (70.193.140.45)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Bakersfield Bound

Link to fine cover version of "Close Up The Honky Tonks" by Chris Hillman and Herb Pedersen, carrying on brilliant tradition Bakersfield country music. The spirit of Buck, Merle, Red, Rose, and friends lives on from where Leo's Telecaster won the west.


Entered at Sun Jan 17 15:00:56 CET 2016 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: illuminutties

Sadly they lack awareness in the use of proper punctuation. : )


Entered at Sat Jan 16 14:16:51 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Sherlock Holmes would point out that as T is adjacent to Y, it's a likely typo.


Entered at Sat Jan 16 14:01:43 CET 2016 from (184.145.67.62)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: Mood swings

Kevin, I believe JY is the subjunctive mood form of JT whenever he isn't intermittent.


Entered at Sat Jan 16 11:47:15 CET 2016 from (103.19.167.118)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Here's my problem......I'm pretty good on GB trivia and names up until about 2015......Bill M, Mike Nomad, Rockn Chair, Peter V, Bob F........but JY.........No fu*king clue !


Entered at Sat Jan 16 09:25:41 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

JY, there's a phone in quiz on BBC Radio 2, and I often catch it in the car. I'm great up to he mid-80s. Last week a guy was asks to name "three chart hits by Muse." "I couldn't name one," he said. Nor could I. Apparently they have had 4 Top 10, 22 Top 40 and 30 Top 75. Well, they've passed me by. I doubt I've even heard one.


Entered at Sat Jan 16 06:54:12 CET 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: What happened?

Here's the problem: I know who Drake is (Toronto boy, Forest Hill etc) but I wouldn't know 'Hotline Bling" if I was looking at it right in the eye. This is part of a larger issue. Once, I knew all the popular music. I was the ringer for pop music at parties where there were trivia contests and popular music was a major category. That stopped progressively in the 90s and disappeared by 2000. So ask me about Sheb Wooley and The Rivieras and the like. But put 'Hotline Bling' into my ears and ....huh? But I do think Jimmy Fallon is really good imitating Dylan.


Entered at Sat Jan 16 05:17:40 CET 2016 from (103.19.167.118)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Dylan doing Drake

Worth checking out the recent Jimmy Fallon take on Dylan singing Drake's "Hotline Bling".......it's linked at Expecting Rain.


Entered at Sat Jan 16 02:59:39 CET 2016 from (24.224.128.101)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: Close up the honky tonks

Link is to Buck Owen's classic.

My kids usually upload a shitload of music to me right around Christmas time. Highlight this year was one Leon Bridges. Sweet r & b. Check it out. After listening to Buck of course.


Entered at Fri Jan 15 21:06:35 CET 2016 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Passings

It's been a cruel month in the world of music. We've lost managers Robert Stigwood and Giorgio Gomelsky, Canadian jazz pianist Paul Bley and French composer & conductor Pierre Boulez. Bakersfield country music pioneer Red Simpson also passed away earlier this month. While best known for his truck songs, he wrote the classic "Close Up the Honky Tonks," first recorded by Buck Owens in 1964.


Entered at Fri Jan 15 20:24:32 CET 2016 from (92.22.34.186)

Posted by:

Solomon

Subject: RIP Grizzly Adams

Looks like we can add Dan Haggerty to the list.


Entered at Fri Jan 15 20:20:24 CET 2016 from (184.66.227.212)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Happy music

Reminds us (again) of the relentless progression of time and its profound impact. Time for some happy music.


Entered at Fri Jan 15 19:55:43 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Bowie, Alan Rickman, Lemmy … not a good month.


Entered at Fri Jan 15 14:11:53 CET 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: Adherence

I watched youtube and vevo videos of David Bowie early last evening. From absolute joy to profound sorrow (Heroes to Lazarus), the span of emotions was profound. The echoes of Blackstar woke me from my sleep and are disturbing. Bowie's work sticks.


Entered at Fri Jan 15 04:37:37 CET 2016 from (184.66.107.71)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: Sadavid

Thanks for that. I think Levon would love it. I wonder if he ever heard parts of it.


Entered at Thu Jan 14 20:07:04 CET 2016 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Crosby Nash Helm & Szelest

Levon and Stan Szelest played on the song "Fieldworker" on Crosby & Nash's 1975 album "Wind on the Water." The track also featured Tim Drummond, David Lindley and Ben Keith.


Entered at Thu Jan 14 18:13:05 CET 2016 from (131.137.34.219)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: Graham Nash's song for Levon

Caught this episode of "Talks Music" on TV yesterday. Some good anecdotes throughout; toward the end the host (Malcolm Gerrie) asks Mr. Nash to do a new song.

"This is a song I wrote when I found out that my friend Levon Helm, the drummer from The Band, was dying. Called "Back Home.""

This bit begins at about 37:47.


Entered at Thu Jan 14 17:30:51 CET 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Rick Danko and George Harrison vocals hit me the same way when they died.


Entered at Thu Jan 14 15:55:21 CET 2016 from (184.66.251.127)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

I can't listen to his voice again (yet), but I did listen to 'Warszawa' last night. If you've ever been to that area (Poland and environs), you will know that Bowie captured the essence of the dark side as it must have been during WW2. It is as bleak and said as anything I've heard. Appropriate for the grief.


Entered at Wed Jan 13 17:40:49 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Many thanks for that SaDavid … some of the film is virtually word-for-word then. I attached a link to my review.


Entered at Wed Jan 13 16:30:58 CET 2016 from (131.137.34.219)

Posted by:

sadavid

Web: My link

Subject: Bridge of Spies

Peter V: thanks for your link, and the review. [My link] is an excerpt in which Counselor Donovan recounts his first meeting with Colonel Abel.


Entered at Wed Jan 13 13:52:46 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Beautifully put by Robbie. He echoes what so many have said about David Bowie's quiet and unassuming charm. The papers say he had declined a knighthood many times.


Entered at Wed Jan 13 10:50:05 CET 2016 from (60.250.43.148)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Robbie Robertson on David Bowie

"Whenever I ran into David Bowie he was such an incredible gentlemen. He made me feel like it had only been days since the last time we’d seen each other when in fact, many years had passed. He had a massive impact on the evolution of rock music and his imagination was awe inspiring. I was completely shocked when I received the news last night but I have deep respect for the privacy that he clearly cherished during this difficult time. Blessings to his family." - RR


Entered at Wed Jan 13 05:38:18 CET 2016 from (58.104.20.223)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

I was just over at the CBC achieve website and I came across the interview Robbie and Martin Scorcese did for CBC 90 Minutes in 1978. I know this is on youtube but this version seems a bit longer than what I recall seeing before.


Entered at Wed Jan 13 03:32:53 CET 2016 from (60.250.43.148)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Easy Rider: It's actually hard not to break up laughing watching any part of the movie. Unintentionally hilarious dialogue and like many late 60's movies, it has not aged well at all.......a golden age for music, to be sure, not so for film......though, the 70 sure were.

Solomon's clip.........Wallsend asked about its origins.........I have mentioned looking for this film for years on this site. Tracy had mentioned having a copy but we never did connect........Anyhow, Canada's National Film Board made a documentary in 1981, I believe, called "The Hawk". It was broadcast only once that I can remember on the CBC and it was great. At the time, The Band were completely in hibernation and it was the only time I had seen or heard from Robbie Robertson since having seen TLW in 1978........Norm's old acquaintance Johnny Paycheck features in the film as does the late great Carl Perkins saying many great things about our boys. Also Ronnie in mostly sober snd reflective mode rather than the standard party one.

David Bowie: Very saddened by the news of his death. Such a massive part of the 1970's and my life during those times.


Entered at Wed Jan 13 01:22:51 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Bridge of Spies

Link to my review of Bridge of Spies.

Ballad of Easy Rider works perfectly, even if my MCA copy of the OST CD calls it "BALLARD" of Easy Rider!


Entered at Wed Jan 13 00:38:00 CET 2016 from (69.112.112.38)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: Ballad of Easy Rider

Actually Dylan co wrote the tittle song but of course everybody already knows that.


Entered at Wed Jan 13 00:08:07 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Flow river flow …

Bob was right, "It's Alright Ma, I'm Only Bleeding" over the closing credits of "Easy Rider" would have been halfway between crassly obvious and National Lampoon/ Monty Python inappropriately funny. People would have relieved tension by bursting out in laughter.


Entered at Tue Jan 12 21:50:41 CET 2016 from (58.104.16.209)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Solomon, thanks for the link, I have never seen it before either. Robbie looks young so I am guessing early eighties. Does anybody know what it is from?


Entered at Tue Jan 12 18:57:12 CET 2016 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Let's Dance

Recruiting Stevie Ray Vaughan to play on the Let's Dance album really gave a boost to the career of the rising star from Texas. David Bowie had seen him perform at the Montreux Jazz Festival where he offered him the opportunity.


Entered at Tue Jan 12 18:02:04 CET 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Lean on Me - Playing For Change

Just a few short weeks ago my step son and his wife were in Turkey, very near where some maniac just blew up and killed German tourists. I'm saddened with this crazy fucked up world. I have to watch the smiling faces, beautiful voices and wonderful musicians on this video to get my world back into the proper perspective.

I'm out of here for quite some time. Too many things to do. Try and be good to one another. Peace to David Bowie. Cancer is a horrible end to die far too young.


Entered at Tue Jan 12 17:45:26 CET 2016 from (92.22.38.184)

Posted by:

Solomon

Web: My link

Subject: Ronnie and Robbie

R&R talking about life on the road from the 1980s? I've never seen it before.


Entered at Tue Jan 12 17:44:42 CET 2016 from (68.171.246.157)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: Easy Rider

Peter Fonda, in the 1969 "Rolling Stone"that I mentioned yesterday, says the Band attended a special pre-release vewing of "Easy Rider". They watched, left without a word, then called Fonda at 3 AM to say that the music aside from "The Weight" wasn't good enough and that they should be hired to do all the music. Not enough time for hat was Fonda'a answer. (By the way, Fonda wanted to use Dylan singing "It's Alright Ma, I'm Only Bleeding" over the closing scene, but Bob wouldn't go for it - too much of a downer.)


Entered at Tue Jan 12 15:16:08 CET 2016 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: 'Let's Dance'

It was the 'Serious Moonlight' tour and it was presented at Exhibition Stadium in Toronto in perhaps 1983. The album being promoted was 'Let's Dance' and it was a joyous fun presentation. I'd already absorbed mid-70s Bowie and had many of the albums. Carlos Alomar made a huge impact as the designated band 'leader'. The professionalism and the concerts delivery was like nothing I had ever seen.


Entered at Tue Jan 12 15:12:27 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The Marcus correction … shame, I've been lampooning his original misapplied credit for years!


Entered at Tue Jan 12 07:27:14 CET 2016 from (58.104.8.129)

Posted by:

Wallsend

I was never a particular fan of David Bowie but was saddened to hear of his death. When icons of your youth start to die from something resembling old age you know your own time ain't long!


Entered at Tue Jan 12 06:00:03 CET 2016 from (65.92.195.13)

Posted by:

Bill M

I'm truly saddened by David Bowie's passing. I'll have to look at his 100 books, especially as it includes "Mystery Train", which I started to reread but put aside in favour of the Christmas incomings. Am looking forward to getting back to it, a brilliant (though imperfect) book.

Quite coincidentally, this afternoon I dragged home a copy of "Rolling Stone" 41, from September 6, 1969. I bought it because the Peter Fonda / "Easy Rider" feature provides a fascinating, though minor, glimpse of the Band, but also found an interesting Marcus-written correction among the record reviews at the end:

"The review of Ronnie Hawkins' 'Mr Dynamo' in issue No. 38 mentioned that Levon Helm, 'all by himself,' had been the author of that lave Fifties classic, 'You Cheated.' Though Helm is given author's credit on the Hawkins LP and on a later version of the same tune, recorded by the Shangri-Las, he did not write 'You Cheated.' The true story, as detailed by Charley Hines of San Francisco: In the late Fifties, a group of white boys from Austin, Texas, got together and formed a group called The Slades. They included Don Burch, John Goeke, Tommy Kaspar, Bobby Doyle (who has a current LP on the market, 'The Bobby Doyle Introductory Offer', Warner Bros.-Seven Arts S 1744), and Jay Webb. Don Burch wrote 'You Cheated' for the group, who recorded it on the Domino label, a local outfit. The song was published by Balcones Music, Austin, Texas. The Slades, renamed The Spades (!), followed 'You Cheated' with 'You Gambled' and then moved to Liberty, where they recorded 'You're Everything To Me' and 'Baby.' Meanwhile, 'You Cheated' was recorded by The Del-Vikings, and then by The Shields, who took it to the top of the charts. Then Ronnie and the Hawks picked up on it, with Roulette, to be nice, 'assuming' the publishing. Mick Jagger, however, did write 'Satisfaction.'"


Entered at Tue Jan 12 02:48:10 CET 2016 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria and Toronto

Subject: Sometimes it hurts

I tried to listen to BlackStar and watch the Lazarus video today. I couldn't go past 30 seconds with either before I had to stop. This has hit me like the George Harrison passing. It hurts!! Maybe tomorrow.


Entered at Mon Jan 11 23:46:17 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Toppermost just linked to The Guardian - David Bowie;s 100 Must-Read books. Linked. The list includes Mystery Train by Greil Marcus.


Entered at Mon Jan 11 23:37:41 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Lazarus, not Lucifer. As the ITN News suggested tonight, the album was released on 8th January, his 69th birthday. When I bought it on Sunday, my friend in the record store said that Columbia had been asking for 6 months why he was holding the release back. I think we might know. A last act of theatre?

By awful coincidence, The Daily Mail reprinted Angie's various allegations this very morning. Shame on them.


Entered at Mon Jan 11 21:53:29 CET 2016 from (24.224.128.101)

Posted by:

joe j

Subject: Spaceman

I've checked. I don't have a Bowie CD. I did find 'Man Who Sold the World', 'Ziggy' and 'Aladdin Sane' on vinyl, in the attic. Brought down MWSTD. Don't know what happened to 'Hunky Dory' and 'Low', the albums I really liked. Left the latter in Scarborough I dare say, many years ago. I did hear his new single, 'Lucifer', a couple times on the radio this weekend and I liked what I heard.

Other news from Blighty: Shane McGowan's got dentures.


Entered at Mon Jan 11 20:08:55 CET 2016 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Richard & Mimi Farina on Rainbow Quest

Ian W: Other songs performed on the program with Pete Seeger

Pack Up Your Sorrows
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_kwrBiPX_IY

Dopica/Celebrations for a Grey Day
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WdxMG1N5Zgw

Bold Marauder
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6KbSMYRMbDE

Joy Round My Brain/Careless Love
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rJDSjzAk0c


Entered at Mon Jan 11 17:06:32 CET 2016 from (184.66.134.56)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria & Toronto intermittently

Subject: David Bowie

This is sad news indeed. I attended a David Bowie concert in the late 70s or early 80s and even though it was in a large venue outdoors, he made his presence felt and his band was excellent. The new album released very recently is a wonderful and powerful piece of work with its jazz-influenced approach. It soared on the charts (I think before the announcement).


Entered at Mon Jan 11 14:45:48 CET 2016 from (32.216.228.9)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

Subject: Ashes to Ashes

Sad to hear the news about David Bowie this morning. His music was a soundtrack during my college days, and he was still very much relevant in the 1980's and beyond. I never attended a proper David Bowie concert, but I did have the pleasure of seeing him with his group Tin Machine, in a club that held around 600 people some years ago.

Sadly, my daughter attended a funeral this past Friday, for a friend who died unexpectedly at the young age of 24. The following was printed in the handout for her service, and it offers some perspective on loss that seems appropriate.

A wise woman once said about believers:
"When we are born, we come into this world crying surrounded by people full of joy, but when we die, we depart full of joy surrounded by people who are crying."


Entered at Mon Jan 11 14:22:54 CET 2016 from (98.110.49.157)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: David Bowie

The news of David Bowie's passing came as a total shock this morning. Very sad.

I haven't heard his last few albums, but at one point he was one of my favorite artists. Truly one of a kind talent.


Entered at Mon Jan 11 10:58:34 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

There's also a shiver effect to news like this. No amount of wealth can stop the grim reaper … Steve Jobs, George Harrison, Linda McCartney.


Entered at Mon Jan 11 10:55:11 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: David Bowie RIP

Can't absorb this one! His new album came out on Friday. I bought it yesterday afternoon, but being busy, I opened the seal just now to slip it into the computer for first play - the Band site came up, I read Roger's post and went to BBC News. Still haven't played it.

Davy Jones and the Lower Third were regular support band at Bournemouth Pavilion in the 60s. I saw one of the earliest dates on the Hunky Dory tour, Southampton Guildhall. Front row. One of he most brilliant performances I have ever seen.

Every time David Bowie appeared on a chat show his charm filled the room.

And one of the very greatest musicians of the rock era.


Entered at Mon Jan 11 08:10:15 CET 2016 from (77.100.108.167)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham, England

Subject: Too soon gone

A real shock. The death has just been announced of David Bowie. Cancer.


Entered at Mon Jan 11 01:39:52 CET 2016 from (82.18.230.252)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Richard and Mimi Farina

I am familiar with the RAINBOW QUEST programme but haven't watched it in quite a while, so it was good of you to post it here.

I saw Richard and Mimi perform in the mid-1960s, since when I have gathered bits and pieces over the years, as well as their regular albums. I could not recall, and had certainly never seen, the "Let's Sing Out" clip before. And that's why I was enquiring about it here (I should add that it is my assumption that it was from the "Let's Sing Out" programme but it may not be). And I would love to see the complete clip some time

I would also assume that they performed other songs on that appearance but, again, I could be wrong. If I am right, however, I would welcome any information about this.



Entered at Mon Jan 11 00:19:41 CET 2016 from (86.173.56.106)

Posted by:

EDLIS Café

Location: Habana Cuba
Web: My link

Subject: Help sought re "Let's Sing Out" - 1960s Canadian TV programme

https://youtu.be/znUHAXfL3J4

HouseUn-American Blues Activity Dream

This clip is too late to be the one you seek, but remarkable to watch with Pete Seeger looking on, from Rainbow Quest originally broadcast Saturday, February 26, 1966...

"I'm trying to track down a TV clip of Richard and Mimi Farina. It was included in the TV programme "Greenwich Village - The Music that Defined a Generation" and, in the section about black-listing and the House Un-American Activities Committee, the two can be seen performing "HouseUn-American Blues Activity Dream". On the recording I have, the source is not stated but, from the final, brief shot of them and other performers on-stage (who may include The Chambers Brothers), I think it might be from the mid-1960s Canadian TV series "Let's Sing Out", hosted by Oscar Brand. Certainly, historical clips of other performers in the programme seem to have come from this series."

Ian W

Subject: Help sought re "Let's Sing Out" - 1960s Canadian TV programme



Entered at Sun Jan 10 23:49:22 CET 2016 from (70.193.136.234)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: mADmen Love Vinyl

Both Ford and Nissan are currently running TV ads featuring record turntables.

Levon's co-star in The Right Stuff, Sam Shepard, also has a Dylan connection.


Entered at Sun Jan 10 23:09:03 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Suzie Baby

This was first posted here in 2013. Bob Dylan singing Suzie Baby in Minnesota as a tribute to his old boss, Bobby Vee, who was present.


Entered at Sun Jan 10 21:44:12 CET 2016 from (108.2.144.116)

Posted by:

bassmanlee

Location: DE, USA

Subject: Dylan's friends

Bill M - Chronicles Vol. 1 reveals that the mercurial Mr. D had some interesting and unlikely friends, including pop star Bobby Vee, with whom he played some dates on piano. (Both grew up in Minnesota and knew each other 'back when'.) So I doubt if there was any animosity between Bob and Tiny. Both were starving souls looking to make a living from their talents and wits. Musicians are pigeon-holed by their public (and publicists) but often can play and appreciate genres far removed from their promoted persona. It is, after all, show business and they are, well, musicians!


Entered at Sun Jan 10 21:42:57 CET 2016 from (58.104.13.57)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

A radio interview with Blondie Chaplin and Rick from 1985. Not especially interesting but you can hear Rick and Richard recording ads for the radio station.


Entered at Sun Jan 10 13:50:22 CET 2016 from (70.193.136.234)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: The Right Stuff

It shouldn't be overlooked that following Coal Miner's Daughter Levon's role as narrator Jack Ridley in The Right Stuff brought more exposure. Fittingly, that film's title also describes Levon's reputation as a musician's musician.


Entered at Sun Jan 10 13:48:16 CET 2016 from (86.152.159.90)

Posted by:

Simon

Web: My link

I found the linked Rolling Stone piece on Robbie from early December:

"[H]e is secluding himself in order to finalize the first volume of his autobiography, a lofty project that stemmed from a substantial 850-page handwritten draft chronicling events in his life only up until 1976."


Entered at Sun Jan 10 13:19:36 CET 2016 from (173.68.71.190)

Posted by:

Jed

The Miles Davis,Keith Richards,various Jerry Garcia books are good.


Entered at Sun Jan 10 01:06:28 CET 2016 from (219.89.24.90)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: books

I haven't read a huge amount of music books, but when I have the most interesting bits have often been the pre-fame chapters. Stange cause I normally buy them to read about the "fame" years. However they often dissolve into a list tours and "how f**ked up we all were" stories. Robbie won't be able to avoid that sort of stuff but hopefully he can keep it interesting.


Entered at Sat Jan 9 22:04:07 CET 2016 from (82.18.230.252)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Help sought re "Let's Sing Out" - 1960s Canadian TV programme

This is nothing to do with The Band but I thought that, just maybe, somebody reading this might be able to help me.

I'm trying to track down a TV clip of Richard and Mimi Farina. It was included in the TV programme "Greenwich Village - The Music that Defined a Generation" and, in the section about black-listing and the House Un-American Activities Committee, the two can be seen performing "HouseUn-American Blues Activity Dream". On the recording I have, the source is not stated but, from the final, brief shot of them and other performers on-stage (who may include The Chambers Brothers), I think it might be from the mid-1960s Canadian TV series "Let's Sing Out", hosted by Oscar Brand. Certainly, historical clips of other performers in the programme seem to have come from this series.

Richard and Mimi Farina performed at the New Gate of Cleve in Toronto around late May or early June 1965, though this may not be indicative as "Let's Sing Out" was recorded at universities around Canada, mainly to student audiences.

"Let's Sing Out" was initially sponsored by Proctor and Gamble and only later, after Richard Farina had died, did it transfer to CBC.

I am trying to track down a complete version of the clip and wondered if anyone might know where copies of "Let's Sing Out" are archived. It's a long shot, I know, but I thought I'd ask.


Entered at Sat Jan 9 20:32:53 CET 2016 from (68.171.246.31)

Posted by:

Bill M

bassmanlee: You mean "Positively Fourth Street" is about Tiny Tim?


Entered at Sat Jan 9 19:52:10 CET 2016 from (198.209.226.131)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland Tx

Subject: I did it MY way....

Well, with Robbie's book coming out, the question is begged "how many of those Show Biz or Rock Biz life stories are actually worth reading?

I think Bob did an admirable job of finally telling the story from his own POV but somehow remaining his usual cryptic self. Geoff Emerick's take on the Beatles is to my mind just about the best Beatle's book. Marlon Brando's tell all was a disaster for the publishing company but rather sweet and poetic to my mind.

If you want to understand the carnival and B movie business in the postwar U.S., one of my big favorites is Dave Freidman's wonderful "A Youth IN Babylon: Confessions of a Trash Film King". This is Tom Waits America, Freidman lived it and loved every minute of it. Still a good buy on Amazon.


Entered at Sat Jan 9 16:52:54 CET 2016 from (65.95.177.223)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto & Victoria intermittently

Subject: Details please.

I agree with Bill M. It is the details that some of us are interested in with respect to the evolution of The Band. Things like what rehearsals were like, the actual development and studio visit to NYC for 'The Stones I Throw" (etc) and how that evolved, the interactions with John Hammond Jr., and other such early events. I'd also like to hear about how Robbie grew up in early Toronto (Riverdale) etc and his earliest experiences before he left Toronto and then what led to the return. Some of this has been written in other books, but to my mind, it is superficially dealt with.

So now if I think about the 'business end' of writing a biography, this book has to be written for the masses and not for me who has different wants and hopeful expectations.


Entered at Sat Jan 9 16:22:52 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Death of A Clown

I don't know, Calvin. Those aliens invading your brain are hard to deal with. Especially the little green ones with four arms. You've got to sympathise with Dave on that.


Entered at Sat Jan 9 13:50:51 CET 2016 from (65.189.212.146)

Posted by:

Calvin

Haven't read Clapton's Bio Peter, but it sounds very much like Dave Davies self penned effort. I remember one review saying something along the lines as the question that arises from Kink is how older brother Ray has been able to not beat the hell out of this self centered, whiny ass for all these years.

Of Course the part he starts talking about how his mind has been invaded by an alien consciousness is pure crazy, way too much drugs for even a rock star gold.


Entered at Sat Jan 9 13:32:36 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Guitar metaphysics

Keith Richards got pretty technical on his tunings and 5-string guitars in "Life". I found it fascinating, even if only half understood. It made me put on tracks he mentioned to check it out.


Entered at Sat Jan 9 12:54:15 CET 2016 from (86.152.159.90)

Posted by:

Simon

Robbie's book will inevitably have different value to Band fans according to personal predilections. I anticipate that it won't clarify every missing detail and those among us who love the minutiae of who-did-what-and-when may come away disappointed. On the other hand I'd like to see some in depth musings on the metaphysics of playing the guitar (for want of a better expression). Other folks might find that boring, especially if they don't play an instrument.

I'm sure there will be stuff about the creative process and whatnot but I don't think there will be anything like a point by point refutation of claims made in Levon's book. I'm looking forward to the cinema and literature stuff and that whole delayed self-education thing. I'm sure he will provide a vivid portrait of the times and he evidently won't flinch when it comes to discussing booze and drugs. And I don't believe he'll be self-righteous about that either.

The real pleasure will be in the offhand details and observations but I'm not expecting Robbie to illuminate every aspect of the Band's history.


Entered at Sat Jan 9 12:53:01 CET 2016 from (83.249.161.239)

Posted by:

NorthWetCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest
Web: My link

Thanks Bill M, Ragtime and Rhytm Jimmie for response. Congrats bassmanee to have figured out it completely.

Because The New York Times has introduced Scania as a place you should go to in 2016 I can't help to link to a picture in The New York Times which happen to be our Sunday morning walking tour scenery.


Entered at Sat Jan 9 09:15:01 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The autobiography is a double-edged sword. Clapton's is the primary example of what not to do. I started out liking him, then thought he was something of an arsehole and by the end, he'd come across as extremely unlikeable. Reviewers who know him said they were surprised at how he portrayed himself. Perhaps it was a confessional clearing out of past misdeeds. It may have benefited his soul, but not his image.

Then Sir Paul's "official biography" is so official it must be close to an autobiography, and is intent on settling who wrote what, who was hippest, who was the most creative, who hung out with the most interesting people. It turns out that Paul wrote more than John and was way cooler. That's a route to avoid, the "defensive autobiography". Given Levon's book, it's a path Robbie should strive to avoid, and hopefully he will. He used to say he'd never read Levon's book, but in the light of doing his own, he'd be daft not to. He just shouldn't try to refute it point by point.

I can't see him following Levon's basic error, which was employing a first-rate muck-raking co-writer, then chatting away and leaving the co-writer to assemble it all. He said he was surprised how bitter he sounded in it. It seems Robbie, as a natural writer, is doing it all himself.


Entered at Sat Jan 9 07:44:13 CET 2016 from (219.89.24.90)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: Robbie's book

this could well be the definitive book on The Band. He was probably more involved with the whole process than anyone else - certainly up to 78 anyway. But would love to hear a bit more about the 78 to 83 period. Just hope it's not a PR thing.


Entered at Sat Jan 9 00:43:02 CET 2016 from (108.2.144.116)

Posted by:

bassmanlee

Location: DE, USA

Subject: Rock biographies

Adam,

For a musician (in this case country) biography with an interesting childhood, try Rodney Crowell's "Chinaberry Sidewalks". "Grew up in Houston on the Wayside Drive..." is no joke.

I would also recommend Sting's "Broken Music". In the literal, not figurative, sense the Milkman's son...his father owned a dairy and he would go on early morning runs with him on weekends and school holidays.

Mrs. lee was very moved by Patty Smith's "Just Kids" and is chomping at the bit to read her follow-up.

Rock auto-bios are a bit of a crapshoot, but in most cases let you see a little more when you hear their music afterwords, IMHO, giving a sense of where they were before fame, or when they made THAT record.

My favorite scene is Bob Dylan and Tiny Tim sharing a can of fried baked beans in the kitchen of the Cafe Wha? in "Cronicles Vol. 1".


Entered at Fri Jan 8 21:51:08 CET 2016 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Speaking of trilogies...

Try the Brendan Gleeson/Brothers McDonagh run of In Bruges,The Guard and Calvary -


Entered at Fri Jan 8 21:43:18 CET 2016 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Ethan Johns

Anybody here listening to his records? I've got The Reckoning and If Not Now Then When. There's a Band connection to Glyn Johns. I came on his stuff through his production of the recent and fantastic Tom Jones trilogy -


Entered at Fri Jan 8 16:31:03 CET 2016 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: The Crossing Guard

I just saw a bit of this the other day and Robbie was pretty dang good and well out of his normal self /


Entered at Fri Jan 8 16:09:13 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Acting is a bit like being in a band. You're away from home for long periods, and a vast amount of time is spent waiting around, basically ligging about, then when someone calls "Action!" you have to be instantly on the ball and focussed. You try blowing a line with a whole crew watching you. It's freezing cold. The crew are about to run into overtime (so the director is looking at a watch), but everyone would rather finish for the day and eat, and just because you've screwed up a word, they have to do it all over again. And then again. And again. It's astonishing pressure compared to live theatre in fact (where you can keep going past a mistake).

As a co-producer, Robbie would have had an uncomfortable time in Carny. You'd be constantly watching and thinking about everything else that's going on rather than just doing your part.


Entered at Fri Jan 8 15:58:00 CET 2016 from (118.143.21.5)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Levon the actor was first rate

Levon was a damn fine actor.....right from the get go with that fabulous portrayal of the father in Coal Miners Daughter to the character in The Right Stuff to that slightly off kilter gun guy in Shooter decades later, he was consistently great in roles. A natural actor. Robbie has charisma to burn and always has but that great presence of his never really translated in the limited acting roles he took. I'm not sure he was ever a guy comfortable with taking direction - which all actors have must do.


Entered at Fri Jan 8 15:21:57 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Levon could have done a lot more acting, I suspect. He came across very well in the roles, though I guess they were carefully chosen.

Carny … I think it’s a much better film than critics gave it credit for. At one level it may seem Robbie is playing Robbie, but I suspect he’s playing “the public perception of Robbie” which may not be the same thing. Likewise Levon’s grizzled Southerners on film are a role as well.

One of the key things about casting character actors is getting the right guy. That doesn’t mean the actor is actually like that in real life. I mean, De Niro does a great inappropriate wedding speech as a party piece on film (see my review of "Joy") but that doesn't mean he does it at real weddings!


Entered at Fri Jan 8 14:12:11 CET 2016 from (98.110.49.157)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: Wallsend

Wallsend, Your comments that the other guys had nothing but the road after the last waltz is false.

You may not be aware of it, but both Rick and Levon launched solo careers in 1977. The two of them returned to the road, but it's a standard practice for a musician to tour behind a new album. So, I don't understand why that should have raised any eyebrows. Unfortunately, neither album was a commercial success, but I think they are both fine pieces of work.

Over the next few years, Levon recorded a few more albums and started acting. Rick recorded part of a follow up album and focused on touring. Garth focused on session work and Richard kept a pretty low profile.


Entered at Fri Jan 8 11:18:06 CET 2016 from (58.104.4.89)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Robbie's comments about why he gave up acting were pretty funny. I think neither he nor Levon did much acting, they just played themselves. I couldn't take Robbie seriously in the few of his films I say. When I saw him it was like, that's not a character in the story, that's Robbie Robertson. As you suggest Peter, I guess the reason Robbie never went out on the road again was because he had other things in his life whereas the other guys didn't.


Entered at Fri Jan 8 10:54:14 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Robbie- Testimony II

It’s a hard call, Wallsend. I mean, why would anyone prefer to be in a movie with Jodie Foster rather than playing in a dilapidated theatre somewhere in upper New York state? Surely very few of us would prefer sitting in a screening room with Martin Scorsese trying to match music to a great film to playing The Weight in public for the 2000th time. Or how about going to New Orleans and recording an album with a bunch of great musicians you hadn’t worked with before? Surely it would be more fun doing Caldonia again with the same people? Then there’s going to Italy to do a show with Native Americans? Must have been such a dull life after TLW.


Entered at Fri Jan 8 09:37:21 CET 2016 from (58.104.4.89)

Posted by:

Wallsend

One reason I find Robbie such an interesting character is that by 33 he had done so much and just walked away from it all. Unlike so many others who retire, he never came back. Seems like he has things he values and being a travelling musician just isn't one of them.


Entered at Fri Jan 8 09:01:18 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: If you ever get famous …

On childhood in bios. Keith does quite a bit. The one that stands out is Bill Graham, where I found the bits before he became a promoter even more interesting than his later career. It depends on the writer. I would guess Robbie wlll pull out enough to make it interesting.


Entered at Fri Jan 8 08:53:32 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Auto biographies

Rock auto-bios … The two I enjoyed most, and re-read, are Levon and Keith Richards. Both had co-writers. Bill Wyman might have said of Keith, that it’s enjoyable and “nearly half is true” but it has insights. Other very good ones are Ian McLagen’s, and Rod Stewart’s. In both cases you can “hear” their distinctive voices through the text.

One I picked up very cheap was Status Quo. I had almost no interest, but at 30p I thought it would have quotable stuff on their record labels – and it did. But the main interest was the structure. Parfitt and Rossi did alternate chapters, each going over the same periods and events, but from their personal points of view. It would have been fascinating if that had been done with Robbie and Levon.


Entered at Fri Jan 8 06:27:33 CET 2016 from (118.143.21.5)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Childhood stuff in rock bios boring ?

...not when as a child you are writing songs for a wildman like Ronnie Hawkins and hanging out on Yonge Street attending all sorts of rock n roll shows visiting town and on and on and on......not may in rock n toll had the experiences Robbie did as a child between the ages of 13 and 17.....no wonder he seemed like a wise old man capable of writing a song like Rockn Chair at just 25 or 26 years old....and perhaps why he wanted done with the whole lifestyle at just 33.


Entered at Fri Jan 8 05:00:13 CET 2016 from (76.118.186.205)

Posted by:

haso

Location: Seacoast NH

Subject: robbie's memoir

JT and Wallsend: I think some of your earlier comments are pretty "on the money", as Garth might say. I do think Robbie will add quite a bit to what we already know. I suspect he may have a pretty encyclopedic memory, despite the serious blow times w/ M. Scorcese. I do recall Jonathan Taplin saying Robbie was the most self-educated person he'd ever encountered. Definitely some more on the formative years up to Royal Albert Hall w/ Dylan would be interesting. My only fear is that he do too much name-dropping. I just wish it'd get published for God's sakes, so I can order it at the local independent bookstore.

Thanks for keeping this thing going, Jan.


Entered at Fri Jan 8 04:48:15 CET 2016 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: RR's book

I suspect the extra-knowledgeable folks here are not the intended audience. I'd bet we're outnumbered 1000-to-1 by the interested, less aware, mostly former and likely from the 70's only, fans.


Entered at Thu Jan 7 23:52:10 CET 2016 from (99.16.133.205)

Posted by:

Adam

The childhood stuff in rock bios is usually quite boring. Levon's was good, but the was entertaining in the deep south with his humor. I want 1960-1978 from Robbie's book...


Entered at Thu Jan 7 19:38:38 CET 2016 from (58.104.4.89)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Robbie's book being about his childhood would make sense. In recent interviews that is something he talks about so it is obviously on his mind. Also, his two recent children's books maybe a hint as to where his mind is at. I just re-read the lyrics of Testimony and that seems to be about his childhood. Rather than the book being named after the song, maybe both are a reference to something from his younger years. Presumably he is not going to the trouble of writing a book just to repeat what he has said in interviews over the years.


Entered at Thu Jan 7 17:18:37 CET 2016 from (108.52.119.37)

Posted by:

Luke

Location: PA

Subject: Robbie

Well, I hope Robbie is much more expansive in the book than in the recent interview where Levon and Rick were not even mentioned by name.


Entered at Thu Jan 7 16:10:51 CET 2016 from (118.143.21.5)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: A Donald Sutherland story.......

There was this politician in Canada, his name was Tommy Douglas. While he was campaigning, someone yelled at him, "Tell us all you know, Tommy. It won't take very long." And Tommy yelled back, "I'll tell you what we both know, it won't take any longer."

Stevie Wright.......Late, I know but I just read of his death. I loved the "Hard Road" album and thought ""Evie" to be easily one of the very best things on 70's rock radio. From the land of dlew !


Entered at Thu Jan 7 15:18:04 CET 2016 from (66.249.93.26)

Posted by:

Jim

Subject: Book

I think the book will focus more on Robbie`s childhood than The Hawks days or even The Band.


Entered at Thu Jan 7 12:04:04 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Fecking autocorrect. That was booed, not booked. Though both are true of 1965-66!


Entered at Thu Jan 7 11:00:29 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I do fear the "(chuckle) … and they booked us everywhere we went!" imparted as fresh news, but I agree with Kevin. I would expect Robbie to dig deeper in his own memories and own unique words rather than batting back the same answers to the same interview questions. And of course the 1965-66 tour and where they booed is interesting anyway, but needs to be angled rather than repeated. We know that some booed, but what I'd hope for is how did they feel afterwards? What did Bob Dylan say? What did Levon say?

But listening to the 1965 archive stuff, Forest Hills feels edgy and rough but by the Hollywood Bowl a few days later they had improved significantly and it sounds like they were flying. And as Levon said, they didn't get booed in Texas.


Entered at Thu Jan 7 09:23:33 CET 2016 from (83.160.180.22)

Posted by:

Ragtime

Location: Low countries

Subject: Mrs. Richardson

Now I remember how Ilkka always made me laugh...


Entered at Thu Jan 7 05:17:46 CET 2016 from (118.143.21.5)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: RR's Bio

"First met Richard when I was 17. This was months before he joined The Hawks. He liked to laugh more than anyone I knew. He wore his gentle soul on his sleeve... and could sing like Bobby Blue Bland." - Robbie

Rest assured, Robbie's biography will of course contain so much of the familiar but it will have been WRITTEN by him. Read the above words from RR on Richard and that unique touch and soul of his is exactly the appeal for me. Of course, if I had my choice, there would be 500 pages on just the Yonge Street Hawks days....but alas the buying public will want the "going electric-booing-Bob Dylan" stuff.....as will the editors.


Entered at Thu Jan 7 04:41:06 CET 2016 from (68.171.246.3)

Posted by:

Bill M

What remains to be said? So much that it hurts! There's very little in print about the Hawkins days, aside from the superficial, and even less about the pre-Hawkins days. There's nothing but a dismissive footnote in "Mystery Train" about the Dianne Brooks record (and how he came to be involved). There's nothing about the days on Yonge Street with four horns (including Garth and Jerry). Only DCT's book mentions DCT's days with them. There's nothing about their influence on the regional music scene, only the Yonge Stree Stories documentary sheds any light on how surprisingly early Robbie was travelling with Hawkins, nobody's wasted ink on the memories of Robbie's many surviving (and easy enough to find) pre-Hawkins bandmates,or even to do the most rudimentary research into where Robbie lived and when. Like most people, Robbie seems to need an informed 'prompter' to tease out long-neglected memories, and I don't know that he would have taken the trouble to find such a person. "What did you do next, Dad?" Isn't going to be enough, I fear.


Entered at Thu Jan 7 04:34:58 CET 2016 from (65.95.177.223)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: What has been written...

Ben: Yes, those books had info... but I hope Robbie will add significantly with his recollections of the good, the bad, and the ugly. I know that it was tough in Toronto during those years and the boys worked hard and the hours were long. We shall see.


Entered at Thu Jan 7 04:29:53 CET 2016 from (58.104.1.50)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Ari, for us old timers the last few years has been a golden age. First comes the internet that allows us to access masses of stuff that we thought we would never hear and, better still, stuff we did not know even existed. Then comes the official releases like Another Self Portrait, BTs and The Cutting Edge (haven't got past the first of the eighteen cds yet). Then there is bonus stuff like Elliot Landy's recent book. I know on this site the same stuff gets rehashed over and over again but the transformation of the Hawks from a bar band to The Band under Dylan's influence is a topic of endless fascination. I am sure that in Robbie's book there will be some new insights.


Entered at Thu Jan 7 02:57:38 CET 2016 from (97.127.48.23)

Posted by:

Rhythm Jimmy

Subject: Northwestcoaster

Thanks for the transcript, It clears up several mysteries.


Entered at Thu Jan 7 02:28:50 CET 2016 from (24.186.163.216)

Posted by:

Ari

I hear you Wallsend, but I'm pretty sure it's going to be a revelation and complete the ever unfinished portrait of The Band. Robbie has always been tight-lipped, only recently has he loosened up. For the holidays my girlfriend got me an issue of Crawdaddy from 1974 with an illustration of Robbie on the cover with his shadow resembling Dylan. The headline is: ROBBIE ROBERTSON INTERVIEW: The Band's Man Steps Out of Dylan's shadow...Keep in mind that this 1974, I would say that that headline is belated at that point in time.


Entered at Thu Jan 7 00:03:50 CET 2016 from (98.110.49.157)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: Robbie

JT, Hasn't the period from 1960-65 been covered in detail in several books already? Both Hoskyn's and Levon's books covered those years and there have also a been couple of Robnnie Hawkins biographies which cover the period until the Hawks left Ronnie.

I agree with you that it will be interesting to read Robbie's recollection of the period in his forthcoming book.


Entered at Wed Jan 6 22:20:27 CET 2016 from (58.104.1.50)

Posted by:

Wallsend

I hope there is something new. Robbie is obviously a very smart guy. Not well educated in a formal sense but a guy that soaked up everything around him. Of the various things he has said in interviews. I always found it most interesting when he talked about the the creative process especially the link between music and film. I think people tend to take the TLW for granted. Coming up with the idea and executing it the way they did was real genius. I am not a massive fan of his post-Band work but he clearly puts a lot of thought into everything he does so hopefully the book will also be good.


Entered at Wed Jan 6 21:53:00 CET 2016 from (65.95.177.223)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Anything left to say?

I don't think we really have a feel for what it was like for these 5 from 1960-1965. My impression is that Robbie Robertson has a very good memory and if he thinks hard and recalls those nights in bars in Toronto and in southern Ontario and northeastern US and the interactions he had with other musicians and with owners and bookers, we may learn something finally about what it really means to 'pay your dues'. I hope he spends a lot of time on this part of their career. My fear is that he will think that everyone will want to hear about the Dylan and post-Dylan period. That I believe is well documented and in that regard, there may not be that much more to say. For the period before that there might be great insights possible if he puts his mind to it.


Entered at Wed Jan 6 21:42:39 CET 2016 from (58.104.1.50)

Posted by:

Wallsend

I am looking forward to Robbie's book but I wonder if there will be anything new in it for hardcore fans. He has given hundreds of interviews over the years. Is there really anything left to say?


Entered at Wed Jan 6 20:42:54 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The link didn't work, but I found it. Well-trodden is an understatement. You have read every word before.


Entered at Wed Jan 6 19:05:17 CET 2016 from (58.104.1.50)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

An interview with Robbie covering well-trodden ground.


Entered at Wed Jan 6 17:26:16 CET 2016 from (98.195.110.115)

Posted by:

Laura Holt Rice

Location: Houston, Texas

Subject: Your'e still there huh?

WOW! It's been a long time since I have been in this room with you guys! I guess that is what time consuming kids will do. LOL! I'm just glad to see that a lot of the original posters are still around and that Jan still has the time and the patience to keep it going. Hello to Diamond Lil in NY and Donna in PA if your out there! Hello to Jan. It's been 10 years!!! I still think about the last Ramble Adlea and I went to in 2005 and finally met you and so many others it was nice to put a face and name to. Too much work and not enough time to hang around. I look forward to peeking back in to read so many interesting posts. Happy New Year to all! This Texas gal has gotta git back to work! :)


Entered at Wed Jan 6 16:49:36 CET 2016 from (68.171.246.23)

Posted by:

Bill M

Thanks for posting the transcript, NorthwestCunster. It explains a lot.


Entered at Wed Jan 6 15:22:10 CET 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Web: My link

Subject: OUT FROM UNDER - a new EP by RoseAnn Fino [daughter of the GB's Bob F]

This past week or so I've been listening to the new EP by the hugely talented daughter of the GB's own Bob F.

Actually 'hugely talented' may well be an inadequate term for representing the artistic gifts RoseAnn Fino provides on all four tracks on this record.

Each is a delight. Out From Under - the title track - is possibly the stand out. However, repeated plays render the making of any such distinction immaterial. As the seamless quality of the song quartet grows with each play, what is revealed is an inspired record logging a personal journey embracing sorrow, joy, friendship and kinship.

It is the well-trodden territory of Joni Mitchell style openness yet delivered in a starkly contrasting street weary smoky tone that lends it a freshness that draws you in and dares you not to play the track again.

I don't wish to embarrass Bob by eulogising too much and it might seem that such eulogising stems from the fact that Bob is one of our cyber buddies on here.

But that is emphatically not the case. This is an extraordinary strong recording in its own right. The musicianship - principally RoseAnn's own guitar with sympathetic backing on piano, drums, bass and occasional viola from her producer and bandmates who clearly feel the emotion of every sinew of the songs RoseAnn has penned - is highly accomplished and just enough to enrich RoseAnn's sublime and distinctive vocals and aching melodies.

If I were to have a single criticism it is that the record is only four tracks long. Would that it were a full album of such musical treasures.

So go buy a copy fellow GB'ers. You will be amply rewarded. The link is above.

:-0)


Entered at Wed Jan 6 13:06:37 CET 2016 from (83.249.161.239)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Ms Richardson's real identity

This is what Bob Dylan says about The Band Guestbook in Martin Scorsese’s new motion picture ”No Direction Home Vol. 3”. To get a second opinion I asked my long time gb friend Mr. LEON DENER's comment to this sensational leak. The answer was "IT'S BULLSHIT !!!!" - So it must to be true.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

MARTY SCORSESE: - No Direction Home volume three. Bob Dylan speaking about The Band Guestbook. Take one.

BOB DYLAN: - Is it rolling, Marty?

MARTY SCORSESE: - Yes. How did you get to guestbook?

BOB DYLAN: - I rode a freight train to look for money and love.

MARTY SCORSESE: - Oh c'mon Bob, start again! No Direction Home volume three. Bob Dylan speaking about The Band Guestbook. Take two .

BOB DYLAN: - Someone had told me to go there. This gb was like a subterranean tavern, liquorless, ill lit, ugly painted in dark brown. JAN HOIBERG was the Master of Ceremony and the Maestro in Charge. I asked him if I could post in gb. He answered “go to Hellsinki”. He could have been nicer.

MARTY SCORSESE: - Did you find your place among other contributors easily?

BOB DYLAN: - No. Gbers were a disjoined and awkward collection of collegiate types, suburbanites, rock journalist wannabees, female lunch-hour teachers, ventriloquists and rabbit-in-the-hat magicians and a guy wearing a turban. Nothing that would change your view of the world.

MARTY SCORSESE: - I don't understand. There were regulars like PETER V.

BOB DYLAN: - Everybody posted ten or fifteen lines. He would post for however long he felt, however long the inspiration would last. He had the flow, dressed conservatively, with an enigmatical gaze and an angry and powerful baritone voice. He was the emperor of gb. You couldn't touch him. Peter V was a man down there. Still I would not have had Jan's job for anything...

MARTY SCORSESE: -... but why, Bob, why is that?

BOB DYLAN: - ...because Jan was constantly pestered and pressured by moocher types who wanted to post one thing and another. The saddest character of all was a Finn named ILKKA. He also called himself for NORHTWESTCOASTER . I believe he was an early bird because Jan would usually let him post sometime during the morning when gb was empty. He’d spent sixteen days and nights in asylum but on the seventeeth he burst. Also burned a mattress there. Sailing on Titanic I would not have wanted to share lifeboat with that fella. SUNDOG posted in gb, too, but most of the time he played bamboo pipes and silver bells.

MARTY SCORSESE: - There has never been that many female regulars, right?

BOB DYLAN: - Tell me about it, they were mistreated by these people. Constantly. My favourite was JOAN. She is a white blues singer. Funky, lanky and sultry. I'd actually met her, run across her the previous summer outside of Reno. She has a voice like Billie Holiday's. We did a couple of country songs together in a local folk club.

MARTY SCORSESE: - Did you stay in Little Pink when NORBERT was in charge?

BOB DYLAN: - Norbert is a trip. Being ladies man and living in Andalusia in Spain he has scars on his hard bitten face after several duels.

MARTY SCORSESE: - Did you ever get to meet JAN HOIBERG?

BOB DYLAN: - No. We never talked personal at all. Hardly being polite and absolutely not friendly. I heard stuff about him, that he was an errant sailor, harboured a skiff in Norway, had hooker friends and shadowy past. Whatever it was, it wasn't a huge story. He always tried to make a place for most gbers and was as diplomatic as possible. I believe gbers sympathized with him, would likely had given him pocket change and say "Here... so you'll keep out of trouble."

MARTY SCORSESE: - Your identity is a well-kept secret in gb. Could you tell us who you are?

BOB DYLAN: - CHARLIE Y posted that I write about same issues in my “CHRONICLES” as some gbers used to do. Charlie made me nervous. He came close.

MARTY SCORSESE: - That was not an answer to my question.

BOB DYLAN: - I am the pathetic female imitator and ventriloquist Miss RICHARDSON. Did you get everything you need now, Marty?


Entered at Wed Jan 6 09:30:52 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Fascinating insight, Bonk. We're just listening to Boris Akunin's "Winter Queen" on car journeys, and it's set in 1870s (?) Russia. Russian Roulette is central to the story, hough they call it American Roulette … which is the title of a Robbie Robertson song.

Which makes me think … if his autobiography stops with TLW, why would he give it the title of a mid-80s song?


Entered at Wed Jan 6 06:42:29 CET 2016 from (68.171.246.26)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronno

I've never seen HG, as not even the prospect of seeing Ronnie Hawkins on the big screen ("Big time, Bill, big time!") could induce to watch a western. I did see "Deer Hunter" though, at a workplace showing at MCA Canada's HQ here. (I worked in MCA Records' warehouse at the time, late '78.) I don't recall a thing, aside from a sense that there was a lot of washed-out green in the landscapes and that I found it very tedious. I can't imagine having stayed past the intermission, assuming there was one.


Entered at Wed Jan 6 03:28:21 CET 2016 from (184.66.107.71)

Posted by:

Carl(Bonk)

Subject: The Dear Hunter. Long time ago and what the world was really like!

It's 1976, I'm 24 and taking karate classes. At the time I'm a green belt in Shito Rue karate and getting pretty good. But my Sensei tells me I have to get bigger and stronger. Lift some weights, do something. I'm 5 foot 8 and 140 pounds and getting the shit pounded out of me in tournaments. At the time I'm working up in Willowdale, north of Toronto and all of a sudden this gym opens up right next door to our shop. I wander in one day and meet Dave. He's from Ohio, a Vietnam Vet and built like a brick shithouse. So I start pumping iron with this guy and we're yaking back and forth and I ask him about Nam. He tells me this story about him and a couple of friends that got captured by the viet cong and were made to play russian roulette. At the time I thought he was full of shit, Two years later a movie comes out called the Deer Hunter and there's a scene in it where the cong are making soldiers play russian roulette. I want to be careful here, but it was the most awesome eye opener for me in my life at that time. Dave was telling the truth. I still remember where I seen that movie, In the TD center. Right around this time the Band is wrapping it up as a band, and as usual we got the radio going in the shop and this DJ, who I swear was Donabie, starts to interview all the members of the Band in Frisco, or some where in California. They were all taking turns talking to John and I don't remember any angst between them. Including Levon.


Entered at Wed Jan 6 01:41:01 CET 2016 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: The Weight

Kevin J - I'm with you on Amy's take; maybe not quite so severe. I'm sure we've all heard tons of versions but I have always gone back to the original. And I've never ever stopped enjoying it. Even over the LW version with the Staples. There's a newer one by Ricki Lee Jones that I recall liking though -


Entered at Tue Jan 5 22:40:03 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Joy

Link to review of "Joy" very much his year's successor to "American Hustle" - but can a tale of a better mop on a shopping channel enthral?


Entered at Tue Jan 5 21:24:33 CET 2016 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Heaven's Gate

In the last few years the Criterion Collection has released a Blu-ray version of Heaven's Gate featuring a restored version of the original director's cut supervised by Michael Cimino, along with a 5.1 surround soundtrack. Not long ago I saw this restored print aired on the Turner Classic Movie channel. Zsigmond's cinematography is stunning and David Mansfield's soundtrack sounds great, but for me the story line fails to rise to the level of the visual imagery


Entered at Tue Jan 5 21:14:06 CET 2016 from (207.239.162.230)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Long version HG brutalized

I knew that you were referring to the long version of HG, Ben. The critics were brutal, having only negative things to say about the film.


Entered at Tue Jan 5 21:09:00 CET 2016 from (98.110.49.157)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: Heaven's Gate

JT, The awful reviews were for the 3 plus hour version. I'm sorry if that wasn't clear from my previous post. The movie was pulled immediately, edited significantly and then the edited version was released several months later. I saw the edited version at that time.

From my understanding there were serious issues with the production of the movie. The movie went way, way over budget and schedule. And Of course, HG also became infamous for sinking United Artists.


Entered at Tue Jan 5 20:53:07 CET 2016 from (207.239.162.230)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: John D: Heaven's Gate

And yes, John D, it was gorgeous no matter what else you think of it.


Entered at Tue Jan 5 20:45:46 CET 2016 from (207.239.162.230)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Short attention span

The premiere was the original long version, Ben. I then saw the shortened version months later (I think it was months later or maybe even a year or two) and it ruined the flow of the movie. Michael Cimino was more or less ruined by the perceived failure. There are not many better movies than 'Deerhunter'.


Entered at Tue Jan 5 20:16:56 CET 2016 from (98.110.49.157)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: Heaven's Gate

JT, I was about 11 or 12 when HG was released, but I distinctly remember the pre-release hype and then the horrendous reviews in New York which killed the movie. It was pulled from release cut down significantly and re-released a few months later.

I haven't seen the full length version of it, but I would like to see it someday. Michael Cimino was a very promising director, (The Deer Hunter is a masterpiece) and it's unfortunate that his career was nearly ruined by HG. I don't think that he directed another movie for 4 or 5 years after HG and has basically worked sporadically as a hired gun.


Entered at Tue Jan 5 20:02:03 CET 2016 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Web: My link

Subject: Heaven's Gate / JT

I was there that night JT. Ronnie Hawkins and Kris Kristofferson were there as well. If memory serves me. The movie lasted about a week. The movie had gone way over budget; but when you look back at today's costs, it was nothing. Don't think the costs had anything to do with the early closing. I just remember that every scene was like a beautiful painting.


Entered at Tue Jan 5 18:55:06 CET 2016 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Web: My link

Subject: Freddy, why don't you let me go, I'll make us some coffee...

Link to scene from Crossing Guard featuring Jack Nicholson, Anjelica Huston and Robbie in a headlock. Vilmos Zsigmond cinematographer.


Entered at Tue Jan 5 18:48:27 CET 2016 from (73.253.168.54)

Posted by:

Dave H

Web: My link

Bad news from the Woodstock scene: Donald Fagen has been arrested for assaulting Libby Titus, who says she's leaving him (link).


Entered at Tue Jan 5 18:28:38 CET 2016 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Row faster boys, I hear a banjo!

Almost all the scenes in Deliverance were filmed on location in north Georgia near the town of Clayton. This created a challenge for Vilmos Zsigmond relating to the aspect of lighting.

While many remember the film through the "squeal like a pig scene," the dueling banjo/guitar scene is one of the most memorable presentations of music in film.


Entered at Tue Jan 5 17:03:14 CET 2016 from (66.55.188.178)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Again!! Michael Cimino

Sorry: Cimino. Correction corrected.


Entered at Tue Jan 5 17:01:38 CET 2016 from (66.55.188.178)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Cumin's 'Heaven's Gate'

Ben: 'Heaven's Gate' was lauded in Europe (Cannes) and panned in USA as plodding etc. It told the story slowly and in somewhat of a scholarly way of the country's expansion. It was always majestic in its vision. It was the acting and the way the story was told that American theatre goers found lacking. You're right, Ben. Further criticism has become positive and it is now much more highly regarded. Michael Cimino had a rough time with this film and it hurt him immeasurably at that time. I saw the premiere in Toronto and loved it from the moment I saw it. My kind of film! But my impression was not shared at that time by many who were there that night.


Entered at Tue Jan 5 16:52:47 CET 2016 from (98.110.49.157)

Posted by:

Ben

Location: New Jersey

Subject: Heaven's Gate

Interesting comments about Zsgimond and 'Heaven's Gate'. From my recollection that move was destroyed by some initial bad reviews, particularly a scathing review in the New York Times.

In the intervening years, the movie's reputation has been upgraded considerably.

Another Band connection to HG is that Ronnie Hawkins has a small part.


Entered at Tue Jan 5 15:39:30 CET 2016 from (118.143.21.5)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Todd: The last time you linked an Amy Helm performance was that truly - truly - transcendent version she and band mates did of TNTDODD. I was much less impressed with this run through of "The Weight". In fact, I thought it quite awful but in fairness, it was New Years Eve, probably the last song of the night and as so often happens with this song, everyone thinks they know it...they will all say they do ( I've been there ) but, of course, they don't !

......the part I did love was the guy stage right as he starts "I picked up my bag....." Watch it again, the haircut in the shadows is Rick Danko EXACTLY........wild ! And thanks to Solomon for that Rick Danko cartoon snippet.


Entered at Tue Jan 5 13:58:50 CET 2016 from (32.216.228.9)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT

John D, I'm not sure of her name, but I'll let you know if I find out.

Regarding Robbie's book, I think a bio covering his entire career to date, would make more sense. On the other hand, the 16 years of Hawks & Band activity is probably enough to fill a book.


Entered at Tue Jan 5 13:14:53 CET 2016 from (66.55.188.178)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: The lesson: autocheck

Accuracy is befouled when the correction feature kicks in and the author of the post is so careless that he misses the error. Sorry, it is 'Vilmos' (not Villas as the automated correction insisted),


Entered at Tue Jan 5 12:20:26 CET 2016 from (66.55.188.178)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Vilmos Zsigmond

After I saw "McCabe And Mrs Miller", I thought that the cinematography and the music fused so well that it was truly a work of art. Then, I saw "Heaven's Gate" and again it had the same impact on me. What can anyone say about the first hour of Deerhunter and its depiction of small town America on celluloid. Villas Zsigmond was a true genius who painted America with his eye.


Entered at Tue Jan 5 11:02:05 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Simon: I keep getting "pre-order" suggestions from Amazon for "Testimony" Robbie's autobiography, but it seems premature to pre-order a book 9 to 10 months early. I often book up to a year ahead for theatre, but if you get lots of pre-orders for a book, you just print more, unlike a concert or play with a finite number of seats.

I don't recall reading that it went to 1976, but it makes sense to end Part 1 with TLW - and I'd think he'd easily get a full book's worth by TLW. The question would be higher sales for part one. Having seen that UnCut 200 Greatest, I went to look a my notes on The Brown Album. Its reputation is holding up well with time. This is how it did in previous polls:

CHRISTGAU: ESSENTIAL 250 PRE-1980 ALBUMS

CHRISTGAU: A +

ROLLING STONE: * * * * *

ROLLING STONE 1992: * * * * *

Q: * * * * *

Q (2000): * * * * *

UNCUT * * * * *

GAMBACINNI 100 1977: 13

GAMBACINNI 100 1987: 24

R.S. TOP 100: 19

GUINNESS ROCK 250: 27

GUINNESS 1000: 33

VIRGIN 1000 (1998): 49

MOJO CRITICS 100: 15

MOJO READERS 100: 26

CANADIAN POLL 100: #22

ROLLING STONE BEST 200 1997

BBC1/VH1: CLASSIC ALBUMS 1997

Q 1997 (RE-RELEASE): * * * * *

SUNDAY TIMES: 1000 MAKERS OF MUSIC

Q TOP 100 IN UNIVERSE, 1998: #76

CHANNEL 4/ HMV MUSIC OF THE MILLENIUM TOP 100, 1998 POLL: #60

ROLLING STONE 500 2003: #45

UNCUT 200 GREATST 2016: #17

In other words, #13 is its best poll result (1977) and it's not far off it now. My 17 year old great-nephew told me he just bought a second-hand copy.


Entered at Tue Jan 5 10:36:06 CET 2016 from (86.152.159.90)

Posted by:

Simon

Web: My link

Robbie's autobiography is due October but I seem to recall reading that this will be just the first volume going up to about 1976. Does anyone else remember reading this? I'm also wondering if the CD spoken word version will be read by Robbie himself.

Al - I'm doing fine, thanks. Hope all's well with you and yours. I'm not as involved with the footie as I used to be. I gave up my TV license about 6 years ago - through boredom and a disgust at Al-Beeb's bias - so I have to go around to a friend's house to watch games. I've got a lot of faith in Klopp. Patience is the key.

Solomon/Todd - Thanks for those clips. Always good to hear Rick's voice.

Roz - They say a picture says more than a thousand words (link). Can't argue with the sentiment.


Entered at Mon Jan 4 22:51:50 CET 2016 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Todd

Todd whose the young woman standing next to Amy. Notice she's using a lyric sheet to sing The Weight. Just wondering. Never saw her before.


Entered at Mon Jan 4 20:47:38 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Thanks, Solomon. A fine rendition of The Weight by Amy Helm et al. Great to see the song passing through the generations.


Entered at Mon Jan 4 19:48:29 CET 2016 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: Making the UNCUT Cut

I took a quick glance at the list and notices only eight albums released since 2000 made the list. Of those, only two made the top 100, LCD Soundsystem's Sound of Silver at #72 and Gillian Welch's Time (The Revelator) at #79.


Entered at Mon Jan 4 19:08:15 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I missed that one, David. I keep glancing through. The screamingly obvious missing is Bob Marley & The Wailers … no albums listed in the Top 200, whereas I'd say two or three are essential.

It made me think about the ALBUM rather than the LP. possibly a fine distinction … but for example it would place Sergeant Pepper, conceived as an album, way up there instead of #21. It also promotes The Band, Paris 1919 (99), What's Going On (13), The Village Green Preservation Society (37) though I'd say Pet Sounds and Astral Weeks and Blonde On Blonde all fit the idea of being a whole.


Entered at Mon Jan 4 18:31:19 CET 2016 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Peter: Levon played drums on one track of Mercury Rev's Deserter's Songs.


Entered at Mon Jan 4 18:14:26 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Best Albums of All Time Again

UNCUT has resorted post Christmas to that old page filler, the Best 200 Albums of All Time.

THE BAND comes in at #17

Music From Big Pink is #66.

Blonde on Blonde is #7 (Robbie all over, The Hawks on one track …)

Neil Young On The Beach #34 (Rick, Levon 2 tracks)

Joni Mitchell Court & Spark #111 (Robbie one track)

Mercury rev Deserter’s Songs #198 (Garth Hudson)

Interesting facts they bring out: eight of the Top Ten were released 1965-1968.

1968 has 15 albums in the Top 200

1971 has 13 albums

1969 has 12 albums

1970 has 11 albums

1972 and 1977 have 10 each

1973 has 9

1967 and 1979 have 8 each

1974 has 7

The 1970s provide 43% of the Top 200

The 1960s provide 23.5%

The 1980s provide 17.5%.

George Martin is best producer with six entries. John Simon of course has two.

Pet Sounds -1 / Revolver - 2 / Astral Weeks -3 / VU & Nico - 4 / The White Album - 5 / Forever Changes - 6 (recent discussion!) / Blonde on Blonde - 7 / The Queen Is dead (The Smiths)- 8 / Highway 61 - 9 / Marquee Moon - 10.

No, I don't agree either.


Entered at Mon Jan 4 17:48:31 CET 2016 from (83.249.161.239)

Posted by:

NorhWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Thanks for the response

Thanks Ms Richardson for reminding me that David P is posting here again after - what seems to have been - a difficult period. He is one of us.'


Entered at Mon Jan 4 17:03:17 CET 2016 from (156.47.15.10)

Posted by:

David P

Subject: R.I.P. Vilmos Zsigmond

The great cinematographer Vimos Zsigmond has passed away. Best known for his work on such films as McCabe & Mrs. Miller, Close Encounters of the Third Kind, The Deer Hunter, Deliverance, Heaven's Gate and so many more. He was also behind the camera at The Last Waltz as an additional director of photography. Later he was the chief cinematographer for Sean Penn's The Crossing Guard, which featured Robbie Robertson in a small role opposite Jack Nicholson and Anjelica Huston.


Entered at Mon Jan 4 15:18:09 CET 2016 from (92.22.49.101)

Posted by:

Solomon

Web: My link

Subject: Happy New Year

The best way to start 2016? I think to hear the unmistakable voice of Rick Danko from an 1980 unreleased soundtrack.


Entered at Mon Jan 4 15:03:29 CET 2016 from (32.216.228.9)

Posted by:

Todd

Location: CT
Web: My link

Subject: NYE at Levon's Barn

Nice performance of 'The Weight' from Amy Helm and friends from New Year's Eve at Levon's barn. See link above.
Starts off a little slow and reverential, but then they kick it up a bit. A fine solo from Cindy Cashdollar as well.


Entered at Mon Jan 4 13:27:51 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I was trying to remember why we deleted stuff on Little Pink … it's coming back to me …


Entered at Mon Jan 4 04:42:36 CET 2016 from (46.165.223.217)

Posted by:

Ms Richardson

well, well, well, This prompts me to retort. I have never paid any attention whatsoever to this wanker who calls themselves northwestcoastkardashion so I don't know whether they have their heads up their own ass or up someone else's ass but cacording to him (or her) I lack warmth and humor in my posts and I am cruel..... ah, sorry sweetheart precious pink-berry. I'll be kind. (just for you) And if no one will read the guestbook if my posts went away then that doesn't bode well for you few who stretch and strain to be admired as big-brained, book-learned, music geniuses like that dave jerk from Georgia who used to sweep up some law office, and that high-hipped Brennan guy the Chicago gunfire keeps missing I think Norbert stopped speaking to you eastwestborderboy because you were and still are a CUNT.


Entered at Sun Jan 3 21:56:28 CET 2016 from (68.171.246.20)

Posted by:

Bill M

I too am getting older. So much so that I misread the tiny print on my handheld as "NW Chester". I prefer that, actually.


Entered at Sun Jan 3 21:49:31 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The years are rolling by me, we are rocking easily

I’m older than I once was, but younger than I’ll be

But that’s not unusual … No, it isn’t strange

After changes upon change

We are more or less the same.

And so we drift towards The Band Care Home at Big Pink, Woodstock. I see myself, NW Coaster and Norbert enjoying a class of schnapps (Finnish) followed by Dutch Genever. Through the haze, Roz is rooting through the chicken carcasses in the skip outside the kitchen with the intent of lobbing one at me and NW Coaster. It’s water under the bridge, and those days were more fired up. BUT we were quite right in those fiery days to delete posts that were cruelly offensive to other posters, libellous to Band members, and never, never mentioned the music.

Fill up my glass, NW Coaster … I’ll have another one.


Entered at Sun Jan 3 13:11:03 CET 2016 from (83.249.161.239)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Why I banned Miss Richarson in Norberts Band GB / something to the forthcoming history of the GB

I fooled around in a short period of time as a Deputy Moderator - Mr. Viney being The Big Guy - in Norbert's The Band GB while Mr. Hoiberg's The Band GB was down. I did not want to see Miss Richarson's posts the way they were. Not only beacause they were cruel but because they lacked humor and warmth. Made me worried. So, it was not Miss Richarson herself but it was Miss Richarson's post which was the issue.

The tragic matter here is a mail from Norbert where he asked me to accept Miss Richardson "because no one will read the gb without her entries". I didn't answer to this mail. I wish even today that it was a false virus mail but it shattered my relation to Norbert for ten years.


Entered at Sun Jan 3 05:42:48 CET 2016 from (65.92.195.13)

Posted by:

Bill M

Thanks Lisa. I one had (and may still have) a relatively recent LP that Dal Richards released on Vancouver's Aragon label in the '70s or even '80s. The label really existed by that time, but I guess the owner, a lovely old guy named Al Reusch, must have done it for old time's sake. In the late '50s Reusch recorded a suprising number of the really early Canadian rockabilly 45s - and even before that, in '54, released the earliest proto-rocker that I know of, "Teenage Boogie" by the Peace River Rangers, who later went on to considerable success in the '60s as the Canadian Sweethearts, an early signing to A&M records.


Entered at Sun Jan 3 00:57:37 CET 2016 from (213.61.149.100)

Posted by:

roz

Subject: Did She Mention My Name?

Even if I do have to use that underground Tor browser in order to post here. I spent a little time watcher the funeral precession for Mr. Toussaint.. It's on yu-tube. Well, we're all gonna die soon..


Entered at Sat Jan 2 20:16:05 CET 2016 from (174.1.58.122)

Posted by:

Lisa

Subject: Dal Richards

I thought I would mention the passing of a legendary Vancouver musician and band leader, Dal Richards. A well-known and much beloved figure in this city, he and his band were a New Year's Eve fixture - they played every December 31 for 79 consecutive years! He had been booked to play this New Year's too, but failing health caused him to miss what would have been his 80th New Year's performance. In what has to be some sort weirdly significant coincidence, he died in the arms of his wife twenty minutes before New Year's midnight, several days short of his 98th birthday .. he was a most remarkable gentleman, with many, many wonderful stories of his long career, and will be very missed and mourned here.


Entered at Sat Jan 2 13:40:53 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Hope Carmen is reading this and returns.


Entered at Sat Jan 2 11:21:49 CET 2016 from (77.102.201.158)

Posted by:

Al Edge

Subject: Returning to the fold

I agree Si.

Bring back Carmen and the devil!

Only messin' Roz - you know you're really the GB's brightest star ever.

Which doesn't exactly say much like but still!!

:-0)

PS How's it going Si? You on the Klopp einekleinebandwagon? :-0)


Entered at Sat Jan 2 06:29:04 CET 2016 from (65.92.195.13)

Posted by:

George Griddle

Wallsend: Thanks for the shout-out!

Rockin Chair: Thanks for "La Bamba". Hopefully the producers will use a clip of JT and his Medical Instruments when the record a version of "The First Cut Is The Deepest.


Entered at Sat Jan 2 05:23:13 CET 2016 from (86.161.3.84)

Posted by:

Simon

Web: My link

I'd like to see Carmen return to this Guestbook. Perhaps he feels he's in a minority here by having views that might be more on the conservative end of the spectrum. I got the feeling that he felt outnembered when he declared he no longer wanted to post. I wish Rosalind would post more often too.

Anyway here's a bit of rare-ish Pink Floyd for Carmen. I hope he enjoys it.

Happy New Year to all.


Entered at Sat Jan 2 05:07:58 CET 2016 from (24.164.132.250)

Posted by:

jh

A Happy and Healthy New Year to everyone who contributes to this place.

We celebrated the end of the old and the beginning of the new on Manhattan, where we have spent the Holiday season with our son that we hadn't seen since last July. Sitting here on my own now with a few left-over cold ones -- the "kid" has been playing a few New Year gigs in CA and IL and then went to LA again for more studio work, wife is sound asleep after a late last night -- in this lovely 7th Avenue apartment that a middle-aged state employe like yours truly never could afford (so much for education...). We have a lot to be thankful for. And music sure changed our lifes. Lev...uhm... God only knows where this latest adventure will take us.


Entered at Sat Jan 2 01:33:30 CET 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Instruments

Jerry! I meant to say, at 6:40 on the Guantenama vid, there is a guy in the street with a car brake drum in his hand and a piece of steel he's hitting it and keeping time with! So be innovative boy! you can come up with something.


Entered at Sat Jan 2 01:19:23 CET 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Stand By Me

That one is wonderful John. Are you aware Roger Ridley is dead?

In an interview one of the guys asked him, "Why are you playing out here in the street? Why aren't you recording?" He replyed, "I'm in the business of having fun."


Entered at Sat Jan 2 00:58:01 CET 2016 from (99.244.8.134)

Posted by:

John D

Web: My link

Subject: Stand By Me

This is my favorite "Playing For Change" video. It was their first.


Entered at Fri Jan 1 23:27:39 CET 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Guantanamera

Jerry T! I want you to watch this and don't give up hope. The amount of tools and equipment that are used for music here, I'm sure you would fit in. I saw a guy playing a triangle on "Down By The Riverside". There are those teak sticks you keep rythmn with here.

Near the end there is a very beautiful Cuban lady singing in front of a nice looking bar in Miami. See if you can find her for me while yer down there OK!


Entered at Fri Jan 1 21:21:50 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Twist & Shout …

La Bamba – Thank you so much for that link. The greatest moment of Boxing Day for me was all sixteen of my mum and dad’s descendants sitting in a circle. playing Pass The Parcel. The parcel was assembled and the game was demanded by the second youngest, my four year old granddaughter. Because it’s the favourite of the younger ones we used the Trini Lopez version of La Bamba from “Live at PJs.” BTW, she won Past The Parcel. Some accused me of fixing it.

Obviously there is a Band connection. Mickey Jones played drums. See the link.


Entered at Fri Jan 1 19:39:14 CET 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest
Web: My link

Subject: Playing for Change - La Bamba

Happy New Year Mike, and every one else. Lets make this the year of music and fun.

You will never hear La Bamba played like this again. Watch the old guy play that gawd damn harp. He blows my mind. Playing that fast...must be good for the arthritis.


Entered at Fri Jan 1 19:11:05 CET 2016 from (58.104.11.110)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

Whenever I hear 'Christmas Must Be Tonight' I always crack up when it comes to the word 'swaddling' recalling the linked sketch by Peter Cook and Dudley Moore.


Entered at Fri Jan 1 18:32:43 CET 2016 from (184.145.67.135)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Happy New Year to one and all here, and espy to my pal Ray in N.J. (Hey, Ray, I tried to send you a greeting but my email bounced back, so send me a hit so I can capture your new address.)

I passed through Gibsons once a few years back but didn't spot Norm. Good thing, too, cuz I wudda wupped him good. (HNY, Norm.)


Entered at Fri Jan 1 16:52:15 CET 2016 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The cellist of Sarajevo & Sundry High School Musings

I expect some of you are familiar with "The Cellist of Sarajevo". My daughter Amanda bought me the book by Steven Galloway. I'm getting started at it. Looking it up on Wiki the man who it is about, and it is some what fiction is apparently very upset with the author for using his name and life without permission.

In 1960 - 61 I attended Elphinstone High in Gibsons. I joined the school marching band. I played snare. The instructor we had was a very strict and not very friendly man. Before he would even allow us to play those drums or horns or anything we had to completely dismantle and clean and polish them perfectly. He would accept nothing less than perfection.

I live at Roberts Creek about 8 miles from Gibsons. The way the school board worked it out we were the first ones to school in the morning and the last ones to leave at 4 PM. We spent our time playing ball. On lousey days about 5 of us would get into Mr. Pete's (Peterson's) class room and play music. My beginings of playing the guitar. We started learning harmony singing. The Kingston trio's music. Hang Down your head Tom Doully and other tunes. Mr. Pete had an old reel to reel recorder and he would record us and we would learn with his encouragement. He was a great guy and he kept those tapes and he would play them for his classes and tell them, "Some of these boys may become famous some day." Those were treasured days.


Entered at Fri Jan 1 15:50:55 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I had a long discussion with a musician friend about this sort of thing, JT. I reckon more than half a dozen people I knew as a teenager became pro musicians. I used to come top or second in music, because I could remember things like Mozart's date of birth (which unfortunately I've since forgotten), Bach's number of works (gone too) and imitate a rhythm pattern on the triangle. It got me nowhere. All the ones who became musicians were below the middle of the class, It reflects on how misguided music lessons were, not musical ability. We had a band in the Combined Cadet Force, but I believe shortness of hair and smartness of uniform were the main criteria. The band wore white belts and gaiters which needed massive work with a tin of blanco. Those with any musical aptitude were already plucking out the Shadows hits on a youth club stage in the evening, and had no time for boot polishing and blancoing. I was too, but I was crap.

One could say the same of Divinity where I always scored well basically being good at history helps with … er, dubious history. I never became Pope or Archbishop of Cantebury as a result though.


Entered at Fri Jan 1 15:12:55 CET 2016 from (66.55.188.178)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto and Victoria intermittently

Subject: Hope I don't blow it

Yes, sad, North West Coaster, but true.

I heard the horns and strings

But Seashore blocked the way

And that decision brings

No opportunity to play.


Entered at Fri Jan 1 13:02:01 CET 2016 from (83.249.161.239)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Sorry, "it can't be" instead of "it can be". Devil's in the details.


Entered at Fri Jan 1 12:58:03 CET 2016 from (83.249.161.239)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: The saddiest post in 2015

JT posted the saddiest post in 2015: "But I'm still angry to this day that I didn't end up in the school band." My first thought was: why not let JT to recitate Bob Dylan's lyrics between instrumental parts?

The life takes us to strange places. There was a time when I sat on the chair of the headmaster in a high school. I thought to myself: My headmaster in my school in the sixties was a TERRORIST (taking part in raids against cilvilians in Sovjet Union in the twenties) and WORSHIPPING THE DEVIL (being a member in ILLUMINATI "something")...hmmm.

I have a dream which gives JT the chance to go to the history of rock'n'roll as a triangle player. - The Band Guestbook printed as a crowd funding project: The Best Of The Best and Creme De La Creme of all posts. Not only this but even a CD with The Most Loved Band Songs played by the "The Band GB Band". With today's technical sollutions it can be too diificult. We don't need to be in the same studio... and JT playing triangle, of course!


Entered at Fri Jan 1 12:27:35 CET 2016 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Happy New Year. A fresh and virtuous start to 2016 - we went to a party last night and I drove so an alcohol-free New Year's Eve. Just went to buy bread feeling bright and cheerful and watched zombified people wincing at the sound of soft bread dropping into a wire basket.


Entered at Fri Jan 1 04:20:30 CET 2016 from (24.224.128.101)

Posted by:

joe j

Location: The Rock
Web: My link

Christmas Must Be Tonight.

Link is to Bahamas. Couldn't find Ennis Sisters.

Happy New Year all. Peace, Prosperity and Health.


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