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The Band: Live at the Academy of Music 1971

Levon Helm: Ramble at the Ryman

The Band: Three of a Kind

Robbie Robertson: How to Become Clairvoyant

Garth Hudson Presents a Canadian Celebration of The Band

Levon Helm: Electric Dirt

Garth and Maud Hudson: Live at the Wolf

Pulse

Dirt Farmer

Elliot Landy's Woodstock Vision

The Band Guestbook, April 2017


Entered at Sun Apr 30 19:11:58 CEST 2017 from (83.249.177.82)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Sorry for fake news

The name of this dog was 'GOOBER' (RIP), not Boomer as I posted previously.


Entered at Sun Apr 30 18:11:43 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Jonathan Taplin

Jon Taplin gets a long interview in the Sunday Times. on his new book "Move Fast & Break Things: How Google, Amazon & Facebook have cornered Culture and What It Means For All of Us." The article is headed with a picture of Levon & Rick. He starts with Levon, who he says was earning $100,000 a year in royalties in 1998 (£100,000 now), and that between 1999 and 2001 it all dried up, and suddenly he wasn't.

Taplin says "Later you would see that there would be millions of streams of The Weight or The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down, and he had no money."

If you Google thetimes.co.uk and search Jonathan Taplin you'll find it. It's subscriber only, but I think you can read a single article if you register a few details. The book is on Amazon - due out this week.


Entered at Sun Apr 30 18:03:47 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I'd have had The Band doing Holy Cow too, not because it's the best version (that is Lee Dorsey) but because it reflects the range of Allen Toussaint's style. Equally the Frankie Miller is a good choice, even if Betty Wright's version of Shoo-Rah is easily definitive.


Entered at Sun Apr 30 17:40:15 CEST 2017 from (67.246.38.157)

Posted by:

Joe Frey

Location: Saratoga Springs

Subject: Allen Toussaint

I agree Peter. Although I would have preferred Lee Dorsey doing Working in the Coal Mine over The Judds and The Band then picking up Holy cow. joe


Entered at Sun Apr 30 14:18:01 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Rolling With The Punches

I thought I had a good collection of Allen Toussaint, but I had failed to see The Allen Toussaint Songbook in the Ace Songwriters Series from 2012. I picked one up on Saturday. No Band sadly, but there are several versions I hadn't heard … Solomon Burke on Get Out My Life Woman, Frankie Miller on Shoo-Rah, Bill Medley on Freedom For The Stallion, Warren Zevon on A Certain Girl. It's a first rate compilation … Lee Dorsey, Ernie K Doe, Benny Spellman originals are all there too.


Entered at Sun Apr 30 13:54:37 CEST 2017 from (83.249.177.82)

Posted by:

NrthWestCoaster

Location: The same

Subject: Politics, bitterly.

Instead of posting here I have been politically (anti-EU, anti-globalist) active. The politically correct chief editor of the leading south-swedish newspaper called my writings only as "empty words" and "rethorical". I was warned before. She is like a police officer in a cheap Hollywood movie: "Anything you say can (and will) be used against you!"

Are my previously words on Norbert "empty" and "rethorical"? - Better to return to the gb!


Entered at Sun Apr 30 13:23:42 CEST 2017 from (83.249.177.82)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Norbert

My friend Norbert is like "TheOfficialWelcomingCommittee" was at Glenn Ellen Wineries in California in the nineties. The dog Boomer that is (or was :-(

"Cold nose but warm heart".

Tom T. Hall would have enjoyed his alphabetical post. - What the h..l post it to him, Norbert. The good old Tom might still be able to write a song of your text!


Entered at Sun Apr 30 11:51:38 CEST 2017 from (62.251.71.189)

Posted by:

Norbert AI

Hello Fuck


Entered at Sun Apr 30 11:50:17 CEST 2017 from (62.251.71.189)

Posted by:

Norbert AI

Fuck


Entered at Sun Apr 30 11:35:44 CEST 2017 from (62.251.71.189)

Posted by:

Norbert AI

Hello


Entered at Sun Apr 30 11:34:27 CEST 2017 from (62.251.71.189)

Posted by:

Norbert

The real challenge of true Artificial Intelligence (AI) is acceptance by the masses, as I have stated earlier. This is meanly the reason Google asked me to use AI to post here; to build acceptance and create support for AI in broad sense.

Guess, with the number of posters here decreasing rapidly, a win win situation for both Google and The Band.

Yesterday a small black box packed with sophisticated processors and experimental software arrived from the Google headquarters. You can easily tell it’s still a test model and it’s complex algorithm definitely needs some finetuning cause it consumes loads of energy and warms up dangerously.

Anyway I’m thrilled let ‘AI’ make its first post here, what would make it the first AI post in the history of this GB. But first I have to give my AI a few instructions between dotted lines.

----------------------------------------------------------

::Assignment: [Create post; Band GB]::
::Name: [Norbert AI]::
::First word: [Hello]::
::Minimum number of words: [1]::
::Maximum number of words: [100]::
::Banned words; [Fuck you]::
::Attitude: [positive] ::
::Pitfalls: [learn]::
::Intelligence adjustment: [155]::
:: Speed: [14 set 1.2]::

----------------------------------------------------------


Entered at Sat Apr 29 23:51:08 CEST 2017 from (73.119.115.178)

Posted by:

Dave H

Jan: This is great. You must be very proud!


Entered at Sat Apr 29 21:30:20 CEST 2017 from (84.209.147.226)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Subject: Shaping the future of pop music

And he grew up to the sound of Levon & the boys. I'll never forget the time when he met Garth back stage in Norway 8 years ago, the old maestro and the ambitious youngster discussing keyboards and synth effects. There was talk about Honey Boy working his magic on a track or two on CC's new debut album, but unfortunately it didn't happen...


Entered at Sat Apr 29 21:02:43 CEST 2017 from (174.1.36.190)

Posted by:

Lisa

Subject: King Harvest

I've always found it a very ominous song, capped off by that stinging solo that seems to embody all the conflicts of a tough life.


Entered at Sat Apr 29 15:10:11 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: King Harvest

Ben Pike! Thanks for coming in with King Harvest, it relates to part of my trip in Australia's out back.

102 Kilometers east of Long Reach, is the little town called Barcaldine. On our return trip it was mid afternoon. The train stopped for 15 minutes and we were allowed off to take a look. Getting off on the platform you walk around the station building and you are right on the front street. A couple old tired little hotels and stores. You could damn near throw a rock from one end to the other.

Right close to the station is an old dead tree all white with a roof built over it about 30 feet high. A plaque on the side of the station reads, "It was under the tree of knowledge next to the railway station that an organisation was formed in 1891 that later became the Australian Labour Party.' As I read this, "King Harvest" was playing in my head.

This was also where the shearers and land owners came together to discuss their grievances and work out wage and conditions of work. A very historic place.

Some of you may have known, at the time I was down under, Cyclone Debbie struck causing heavy damage to northern Queensland. On it's passing we had one night of extreme wind in Brisbane. Across the street the fellows garage door blew off. Shortly after when I left on my train trip, there was a speed restriction on the train due to worry of track damage.

The town of Rockhampton we reached late at night on our way out. In the moon light it looked like a big lake from the flooding. I was going to go to an Island lodge up near the Great Barrier Reef, but Debbie cancelled that. My brother Lorne text me to see how I was in the "Hurricane". I text him back and said, it's not a hurricane, it's a gawd damn cyclone. He text me back and says "Oh yeah, cyclone Debbie, I used to be married to her." Of course his x is named Debbie. :-)


Entered at Sat Apr 29 14:50:42 CEST 2017 from (67.84.78.86)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Bob, i didn't want to hurt our feelings, but Norm also said- Ain't neither of you two ever did a honest days work in yer life. If you did, you'd know root beer don't float........now one time, my band....we was .....I was serenading this here bunch of wimmin that just got re - leesed from the currekshennel facilititty, they were shovin them there beers at us so fast , my gums were a floatin.....twoo this day they still taste pekerculiar....


Entered at Sat Apr 29 14:29:06 CEST 2017 from (67.84.78.86)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Saddle Up

Saving Norm the trouble Bob. -Once & fer awl now... both of you fersaken American landlubbing Noo Yawkers......if it ain't writ by a cowpoke , it ain't no gawdamn cowboy song... Cain't you get nuthin wright?

Bob, maybe they're all Western songs. My Rifle, My Pony & Me" was written by two pretty heavy guys." Dimitri Tiomkin & Paul Francis Webster ." Their bios are on All Music.


Entered at Sat Apr 29 14:05:33 CEST 2017 from (62.251.71.189)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: 26 little warriors that conquered the universe

I want you to meet some friends of mine. Some call it the alphabet, I call it something close to God. I love them all from A to Z, my little army of friendly warriors.

If you put them in the right order they can work miracles. Okay when you use the wrong they can cause trouble, but mostly they’re just your friend.

I knew a man who was down and out and was through with life, but the 26 helped him back on his feet. And when he fell they picked him up again, time after time, never giving in.

Another time the 26 warriors saved a child by providing the right cure just in time.

During the darkest time in war they gave hope and saved whole nations. Sometimes they just cheer you up in a simple song.

Anyway, never underestimate these 26 fellows and only fools say they are just words, know one day they will be the masters of the entire universe.

But what’s probably more, and what’s already been written in the stars long ago, someday, just in time, they will save you.


Entered at Sat Apr 29 13:48:10 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Walkway & Cowboys

Jeff, great! I'll be there by 10AM. I got a couple of Nathan's and a root beer float with your name on it.

By the way, the songs you listed the other day were all great but not cowboys songs. I think they would be classified as folk songs about cowboys. Dylan has a bunch of them, JWH, Wanted Man, Pat & Bill soundtrack, Romance in Durango. His cowboy song would be All The Tired Horses.


Entered at Sat Apr 29 06:30:07 CEST 2017 from (67.84.78.86)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Americanadana

Ben Pike. i guess "corn in the fields", well, RR musta been referring to Norm's Deluxe 38s. King Harvest, well, had to be Norm.

Bob, in the morning I might be headed up to Albany, then back later. If so, I'll try & stop & say hello to you guys on the bridge on the way up.


Entered at Sat Apr 29 05:27:41 CEST 2017 from (165.20.114.249)

Posted by:

Ben Pike

Location: Cleveland Tx

Subject: Corn in the Fields....

Do you find "King Harvest" warm and celebratory, or dark and foreboding? Or something else?


Entered at Sat Apr 29 02:06:30 CEST 2017 from (174.95.199.216)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: Working equipment

Norm, you old sea dog . . .


Entered at Sat Apr 29 01:47:22 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Bunch-a-Snowflakes

My pony, my rifle and me???? What a bunch a crap!!

Anways, my brother and 3 other bullies we played music with for over 40 years now ganged up on me. It goes like this. In Sechelt, that little town nestled on the sunshine coast is a real cool building. About 1972 the local Royal Canadian Legion opened those doors. In 1973 my brother Lorne and I started playing music there. Back then it was the only watering hole in town. The nearest bar was about 4 miles away. We used to pack that place.

When they had their mortgage burning party, my old friend Harry Casey called me. He said Norm, you and Lorne pretty much helped us pay the mortgage on this place. We would like you to come and play the music for this party, and this time only they paid us "huge".

The place was sold to a private enterprise some time ago. These people searched us out and we had to go and play music for them. What I'm coming to is this. Just a short while back, we lost Chuck Berry. Well Lorne and I played his music always.

We are kicking ass. I finish a song and this Deluxe thing comes up and puts those 38's in my face with a very low cut front end. She says, "Hi big boy I'm Carol can you play a song for me". My brother is standing pretty close to me, (enjoying the view). He just launches right into that Chuck Berry intro of, "Oh Carol", so I sing the song, I mean what was I to do. She has got all that equipment of hers working and...............to be continued.......


Entered at Fri Apr 28 18:25:59 CEST 2017 from (184.146.92.220)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Jeff & Dunc: See Fred's Link from a day or two ago which had just made reference to a picture of the Band but was more than that as is was a review of a new book out by Johnathan Taplin on the very subject you are discussing.

JQ: All of my purchases in recent years have been through a video store that I still frequent....they either order titles for me if I think of something I want or I sometimes buy a used copy...I've yet to join Netflix. I'll ask them where they go for the best prices on hard to find old movies.


Entered at Fri Apr 28 12:42:49 CEST 2017 from (173.3.49.249)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Dunc, i've been bitching about streaming since i entered here in 02. The royalties for royalties to songwriters & sound recording owners are all between a tenth & nine tenths of a penny. Artists royalties are part of the label or sound recording owners problem,(unless possibly set up differently) or the digital royalty for artists domain, Sound Exchange. But it's next to no money. And the sound sucks- you're likely dealing with mp3s, but even if not & it's a better file, it's still digitally transmitted, accepted, & rebroadcast.

Downloads killed physical distribution of sales of recording. And the need to buy the whole thing. Then streaming killed even sales of downloads. Who earns- the streaming companies, who are now heavily shareholded by the labels. the money is made in subscriptions and advertising, allowing the companies to have found a legal way to avoid paying the artists, songwriters, today, many or most of the sound recording owners.


Entered at Fri Apr 28 10:12:28 CEST 2017 from (86.173.65.98)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Thanks

Thanks Bill. I'll not buy that album just now because it's 50 pounds minimum just now. But I was interested because these musicians are on the Cale album.

Thanks, Peter. I think the two Cale albums I had are great. What's Artificial Intelligence like?

Thanks Bob F. The interest in Garland Jeffreys was because of the link to John Cale, although I noticed you and BEG like him. A post of yours a couple of months back that interested me was when you mentioned Amazon Prime.

My wife joined Amazon Prime (God knows why...but sssh) but I investigated and was astonished at the music I was able to access. First time I streamed. I always buy and play CDs. Never had any time to investigate any other way of accessing music when I was working.

Jeff, thanks for links, I enjoy them. After looking at Amazon Prime, I can't see how artists get rewarded for their recorded work. Although, Amy MacDonald and Paolo Nuttini from this neck of the woods seem to be making money.


Entered at Fri Apr 28 04:39:12 CEST 2017 from (173.3.49.249)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Yes, Bob, & an aside, all the Dino / John Wayne movies were great. My favorite was El Dorado.



Entered at Fri Apr 28 03:52:49 CEST 2017 from (173.3.49.249)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Location: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZULVnHykadQ

Subject: Me & My Uncle / Big River


Entered at Fri Apr 28 03:51:22 CEST 2017 from (173.3.49.249)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Mexicali Blues


Entered at Fri Apr 28 02:59:09 CEST 2017 from (173.3.49.249)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Chestnut Mare

this could go on.


Entered at Fri Apr 28 02:57:39 CEST 2017 from (173.3.49.249)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: The Cowboy Song

Here ya go Bob. :-) LOL


Entered at Fri Apr 28 01:00:17 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: My Pony, My Rifle and Me

Jeff, can we agree that Dean and Ricky doing My Pony, My Rifle and Me from Rio Bravo is a great cowboy song?


Entered at Thu Apr 27 22:31:03 CEST 2017 from (24.114.99.209)

Posted by:

Bill M

Dunc: I wouldn't want anyone to buy Grinder's Switch just because I'd did. It's Bandish, but not particularly enjoyable. I spent $6.95 on the LP, and did so only because it's of historical and personal interest. Not for the music. I always loved Garland Jeffrey's "Wild In The Streets", and have always been disappointed that he doesn't usually (ever?) sound like "Wild In The Streets".


Entered at Thu Apr 27 21:40:56 CEST 2017 from (173.3.49.249)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

But, Rock & Roll Cowboys is catchy. Trite, cliched, catchy.


Entered at Thu Apr 27 21:32:48 CEST 2017 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: J Demme - Swimming to Cambodia

Kevin J - A great reminder - I wonder how I could find that? I don't see it on Netflix. And Demme's a great loss.


Entered at Thu Apr 27 21:05:34 CEST 2017 from (173.3.49.249)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

I listened to Rock & Roll Cowboy. I find the lyric trite, & never cared for the analogy of rock & rollers to cowboys. Questioning the place & purpose of old rock & rollers is one thing, comparing em to old cowboys another. He took the easy way. To me, it's schlock. But, who am I to critique Davies? Just another putz with a keyboard, just stating my opinion.


Entered at Thu Apr 27 19:18:27 CEST 2017 from (184.146.92.220)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: The Merkle Blunder

...A bit harsh I was last night....more than a bit really....I had heard the title track "Americana" and was not impressed and then seeing that video where the director seemed to relish in having Ray portrayed as a bit of a stumbling mess really got to me....and well I teed off on the whole album without really giving it a fair listen.....I have now and can better understand what Mr. Davies was up to....and travelling as much as I do and having more and more time to sit and reflect on life I can relate to much of the sentiment and charm that is in many of the songs......The title track really is quite awful in my view but there are lots to like in "Along Drive home to Tarzana" and "Rock n Roll Cowboy" and "The Great Highway" and "The Deal", "Wings of Fantasy" and others....Thank you, Peter for the link to the album....and Bob F for a nudge to dive back in.

Johnathan Demme: RIP........Many here will be very familiar with his many famous movies "Silence of the Lambs", "Stop Making Sense", etc. but my favourite movie of Demme's was his collaboration with the late great Spalding Gray "Swimming to Cambodia"........a monologue extraordinaire with brilliant touches of direction that creates a movie like story escape that is impossible to properly describe. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED.


Entered at Thu Apr 27 15:56:39 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Web: My link

From The Guardian. Nice photo of The Band.


Entered at Thu Apr 27 13:02:30 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: Rock N Roll Cowboys

Kevin, I really like this song from the new Ray Davies.


Entered at Thu Apr 27 12:59:41 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Garland Jeffreys

Dunc, to each his own but if you wanted to get into some Garland, I would go with Ghostwriter, Escape Artist, American Boy and Girl, One Eyed Jack, Don't Call Me Buckwheat, The King of In Between. Garland has a new record called 14 Steps to Harlem coming out next week.


Entered at Thu Apr 27 10:52:58 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: John Cale

Difficult. Vintage Violence and Paris 1919 are the masterpieces. Some 70s stuff is very thrashy and aggressive, and the melodies aren't there.


Entered at Thu Apr 27 10:27:30 CEST 2017 from (86.167.98.226)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Bill M

Thanks, Bill M. I was going to go with you and buy the Garland Jeffreys and Grinder's Switch. I don't know Garland Jeffreys, but BEG champions him. I read up on the album this morning.

So I was ready to buy, but the two copies of the album on CD I found cost 60 pounds and 160 pounds, both used.

So c'mon our much more musically knowledgeable members than me, what's my next John Cale to be. Paris 1919 is a brilliant album.

Kevin, you've sewn a doubt. I wish I was going to a Ray Davies concert tonight. It's a good show.

Enjoying my first Jessie Winchester also.


Entered at Thu Apr 27 09:56:54 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Ray is Randy or randy

Different strokes for different folks, Kevin. I see the song Americana and most of the album as Ray in Randy Newman territory. The album isn't Americana as a genre musically, but a view of Americana. The cliches are deliberate. There's the question of personna. Is the character in The Deal Ray himself, or is it Ray acting out an older rock star? I was a little troubled by the fact that in 'The Deal' cappuccino is sung almost in contemptuous inverted commas, as if it was a pretentious word in itself, which it would have been maybe 30 or 40 odd years ago, but hasn't been for decades.

Otherwise it's good to hear him set against a female singer, the Jayhawks are solid and there is a lot of humour … like the You Really Got Me riff. Listen to the start of The Great Highway, for example. Ray is having a lot of fun. I'm in two minds about narrative bits, like the meeting with Alex Chilton, because they pale with repeated listening … unless you're Frank Zappa. But at least it has its own track ident.


Entered at Thu Apr 27 08:55:11 CEST 2017 from (173.3.49.249)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Canadian Softwood.

Norm, all those years you were logging & then later tugging those logs around, you & yer buddies been startin these problems between our countries. Troublemaker! Twitler's comin for ya.


Entered at Thu Apr 27 06:48:20 CEST 2017 from (24.114.68.76)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Not good, Ray....In fact Awful

Weird when the junk mailers are responding to posts faster than the regulars !

The Kinks and Ray Davies: I think everyone here knows how much I love The Kinks and Ray Davies......I have everything they have ever released.....and sang from the rooftops about that overlooked and glorious period from Sleepwalker to Think Visual - including the masterpiece Word of Mouth - but this latest from Ray Davies is really causing me pause....... I had only heard the title track "Americana" and it is truly awful........"My baby brother and me" and "I want to make my home where the Buffalo roam" and all sorts of other cliched and horrible lyrics presented in an accent not quite "american" but so far away from his real accent that it tramples completely on his one truly identifiable signature personality..........Imagine the horror of Johnny Cash late in life pretending to be Ray Davies and all things British and you might just grasp how truly terrible this song is......I have since listened to 3 or 4 other songs and all equally dire........Time to get back with Dave or someone, anyone who can tell you right from wrong..


Entered at Thu Apr 27 04:40:18 CEST 2017 from (24.114.99.209)

Posted by:

Bill M

Dunc: Just last week I finally picked up the Grinder's Switch album on Vanguard, which is pretty much the "Vintage Violence" group but with Garland Jeffreys rather than John Cale - two sometime Hawks (Sandy Konikoff and Stan Szelest) and another Buffalonian who knew our guys very well, Ernie Corallo. Grinder's Switch is very Bandy; is VV?


Entered at Thu Apr 27 02:35:45 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Sheryl Crow Be Myself

The new Sheryl Crow record has some good songs as well. Not the record I was hoping for though. On some songs she sounds more like The Bangles then her old sound. Nothing wrong with The Bangles but it's not The Globe Sessions. It's always hard to recreate something that was really great. Cat Stevens had the same problem a few years back when he tried to find that old magic. The Sheryl Crow team has obviously spent a whole lot of money on the record and promotion leading up to it's release. It's going to be interesting to see how many copies she sold in the first week.


Entered at Thu Apr 27 02:12:14 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Americana

I like it more with each listen. Some of the melodies seem familiar but at this point so what. I really love Rock N Roll Cowboys and A Long Drive Home To Tarzana. The Jayhawks sound really good with Ray.


Entered at Wed Apr 26 18:41:22 CEST 2017 from (86.167.98.226)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland.

Subject: Play it again, Sam

After you've played Ray another couple of times, Peter, report back and I'll get it, if you still think the same.

Playing John Cale Paris 1919 and Vintage Violence today. Great music. Always knew Paris, but Vintage Violence was an 'accessible' recommendation from Peter. What's the next 'accessible' John Cale album I go for?

Yesterday I played 'How To Become Clairvoyant?', 'MFBP', and 'The Last Waltz'. Really enjoyed Eric Clapton yesterday. Then I played Leonard Cohen 'Old Ideas' and then Bert Jansch 'The Ornament Tree'. Although it was recorded in London, I always think of it as Bert's Scottish album.


Entered at Wed Apr 26 18:36:13 CEST 2017 from (24.114.99.209)

Posted by:

Bill M

Rockin C: With diving skills like that, the guy has a future in Italian soccer if that Jays thing doesn't work out. Or Portuguese.


Entered at Wed Apr 26 16:35:51 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter 5th

Web: My link

Subject: Americana

Anyone else got Ray Davies' Americana album? After 3 days play, I think it's a very strong album indeed, sure to be in my Top 10 of the Year (best so far). Link to the title track.


Entered at Wed Apr 26 16:27:34 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Holy old flyin'!!

Did you Toronnie guys see what Chris Coghlen did last night? Looked kind of like a Bobbie Orr move. Football on the goal line.....yeah, or the high flying Orr, but baseball??.......yeah what a move.


Entered at Wed Apr 26 15:48:17 CEST 2017 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

b.lee

Location: DE, USA
Web: My link

Subject: Willie, the Energizer Bunny...

He just keeps on tickin'. Willie Nelson's upcoming release 'God's Problem Child' can be heard at the NPR First Listen page (link above) but only for a limited time. Pretty solid, only a few guests, including the late Leon Russell on one track, but not (thank goodness) another duets project. Hear it while it lasts.

Wish I had an in with NPR. Would love to see Cashmere Cat up there so we could hear his work. Probably not my cup o' tea, but you know...curiosity?


Entered at Wed Apr 26 13:26:35 CEST 2017 from (67.246.38.157)

Posted by:

Joe Frey

Location: Saratoga Springs, NY

My friend sent me the following email. I thought you folks would enjoy it.

There is twitter war started by Nate Silver of 528 on the US/Canada trade war. It's over Canadian retaliation for the softwood import tariffs Trump is imposing on Canada.

The best post by a Canadian so far is: You keep Justin Beiber and Celine Dion. Give us back Neil Young and The Band.

Gotta love it.


Entered at Wed Apr 26 12:50:00 CEST 2017 from (87.117.204.2)

Posted by:

Jan W

Web: My link

Peter, Bob Fass was no ordinary DJ, and you can read about him in the link above. The version of I'll Keep It With Mine he played was the one released on Biograph which was not a publishing demo. That was the one on the Witmark sessions. Bob Fass played lots of unreleased Bob Dylan long before it ever appeared on bootlegs and was a friend of Dylan. The list of musicians who didn't appear on his show is shorter than the list of who did.


Entered at Wed Apr 26 09:27:20 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Bill, were you thinking all these years that it was Peter Vee? Everyone else here knew it was Peter the Fifth.


Entered at Wed Apr 26 07:10:06 CEST 2017 from (173.3.50.131)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Magnus. The Curious Life of Cashmere Cat.

Lotta press.

Includes brief incorrect information regarding the Band website.


Entered at Wed Apr 26 02:11:00 CEST 2017 from (24.114.99.209)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: if the shuffling madness ...

jh: Nice article. The answer is yes; 45 years ago, Ian Anderson called it "Locomotive Breath".

Peter V: Holy shit - right there like that in Henry fucking Vee!


Entered at Wed Apr 26 01:21:19 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

Subject: Henry V

There's another one in Henry V where Katherine of France is getting her lady in waiting to teach her English, and mispronounces and says it, then just in case anyone missed it, comments that English is a very rude language.


Entered at Wed Apr 26 01:19:38 CEST 2017 from (85.164.127.169)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Subject: CC (and The Band web site)

They certainly did their research ;-)


Entered at Wed Apr 26 00:11:02 CEST 2017 from (184.66.224.75)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: 'Mal' volio

Peter V: I looked this issue up in Google. Amazing what one can learn. Malvolio is named well.


Entered at Tue Apr 25 23:51:46 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Twelfth Night

JT, it's the bit where Malvolio is trying to puzzle out the coding in Olivia's letter. He finds a C … then a U … what can the word be? … Ah!, and here's a T …. so …

There are four major productions due in the UK this year, and the first two have both milked that one to great laughter. In Hamlet it's "Let us now speak of country matters" to Ophelia, and most often Hamlet pauses very slightly after the first syllable of "country."


Entered at Tue Apr 25 21:23:01 CEST 2017 from (24.69.133.64)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: Who knew?

Studied 'Twelfth Night' in grade 7 junior high school. This was not emphasized. Who knew?


Entered at Tue Apr 25 18:33:37 CEST 2017 from (184.146.92.220)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

LINKED: Robbie interview with Mitch Melnick - interesting in that he discusses his ties to Montreal....and the schedule for writing Volume 2......Melnick - as a by the way - is one of Canada's finest broadcasters with exquisite musical tastes.

The fact that a Fox News exists is bad enough.....the fact that we have a POTUS that actually sets policy based completely on what he has just heard on Fox News is mind blowing....Scary times.


Entered at Tue Apr 25 16:50:21 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Jeff's comment, though robust, seems perfectly fair.


Entered at Tue Apr 25 16:34:51 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Swearing.....The straight goods

The onliest thing needs saying........ "Oh Jeepers!....this is extremely upsetting!!"

Can't yuh see a guy dancing around holding his foot waist high exclaiming that?

What I've never been able to figure out is how Jesus Christ got hisself dragged into this all the time....gawd damn it! :-)


Entered at Tue Apr 25 16:31:27 CEST 2017 from (80.3.236.231)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham UK

Subject: Sensing hostility...

Reading between the lines, and correct me if I've got this wrong, I'm picking up some dissatisfaction with your President Jeff...


Entered at Tue Apr 25 16:12:53 CEST 2017 from (173.3.50.131)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Hey you Northern Canadians, I think Twitler thinks he is declaring war on you this morning. I doubt you have anything to worry about in that general regard. But I'm not sure you don't have to worry about him provoking North Korea into sending nukes this way.

Man, i never watched cable news till about a year ago. Now i;m addicted to MSNBC mainly because i'm worried insane. There's been plenty of times i;ve beeen concerned about what could happen in this country, int he late 60s, in the early 70s, in Reagan's bubble, and when 9/11 happened, and then in 2008 when the bubble burst.But nothing like having this man in the PResidency with a conscienceless Tea Party Mentality Republican Congress. I've understood Twitler from Day One. He's never surprised me.( Throughout my life I have known & dealt with many conscienceless desperadoes who will do & say anything to attain their desires. The difference is that most were far more intelligent, some just a little more. And though some were wealthy, none had the kind of resources he has) What has surprised me is how people & politicians have reacted to him, & the fact that these Republican fucking bastards in the govt are allowing every fabric of our society & government be shredded by a treasonous criminal & his team of treasonous lowlife bastards..


Entered at Tue Apr 25 13:25:49 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Robbie interview

The latest Record Collector (May 2017, "1967" cover) has a major Robbie Robertson interview as the lead article, along with a Chuck Berry tribute. The article as usual ends with a price guide to Band / Ronnie Hawkins collectibles. Looks like the Ronnie Hawkins LPs have fallen in value in recent years … this is true of other rock classics from the late 50s.


Entered at Tue Apr 25 12:07:05 CEST 2017 from (86.167.98.226)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Happiness and swearing

Swearing up here is widespread. I love it.

But one of my happiest memories relates to London swearing. I worked as a bin man in London for about 6 months back in the day.

I loved it when my bin lorry with six men aboard passed other bin lorries to the shouts of 'You faakin' waankah!" with accompanying hand gestures like Roman chariots saluting each other. Happy days.

I remember reading in the Observer television review a writer saying that everybody knows Rodney and Delboy don't really say Plonkah. I hadn't thought about it until then.


Entered at Tue Apr 25 10:15:37 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: More on cussin'

A bit more. The champion swearers in my experience are the Irish. They also get away with it. I was with the Irish sales director of my august and ancient educational publisher, a man known for rarely completing an F-word free sentence. I was due to speak at a large Catholic Teacher Training College. We walked in to the hall, and it was surrounded by realistic statues of crucifixions, gruesome martyrdoms, Madonnas.

‘Fuck me!’ he exclaimed, ‘You can smell the fucking piety in here …’

There was a little cough behind us. He whirled round.

‘Ah, Mother Superior! What a delight it is to meet you …”

I have to say the nun seemed totally unphased by his turn of phrase and her English was perfect.

Afterwards, I said, ‘Well, I’m amazed you got away with that..’

‘Fuck off, you C-,’ he said, ‘I’m not totally fucking insensitive. You’ll note that I never fucking took the name of the Lord in vain while we were there.’


Entered at Tue Apr 25 10:04:23 CEST 2017 from (173.3.50.131)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Link

Donald Fagen is taking four locally well known twenty something Ulster County musicians out as his backing band on a solo tour. I imagine there will also be a horn section & female backup singers but i could easily be wrong. For these guys it's a shot at national music industry exposure.


Entered at Tue Apr 25 09:38:19 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Discussin' Cussin'

In my review of David Tennant in Don Juan In Soho, (LINKED) I mentioned that the play has many F and C words, but that they were dwarfed on the post-football Saturday evening train home … not by the male fans who used the F-word once or twice, but by a group of girls in their early 20s. They were very drunk at 8 pm, and had clearly been fuelling up before hitting the clubs … they got off at Southampton. This is what kids do because prices are high in the clubs … vodka from the supermarket before they go.

One of my late co-authors spoke many languages and could hold forth on swearing in different cultures. He believed German to be frustrating because the sexual words are the everyday words, so you could only be obscene though creative combination. Spanish he held to be the very best language for swearing (he was bilingual and had lived in Madrid for years) but he said swearing in Madrid was expected to combine the sexual, the divine, the excretory, a family member, perversion AND the diabolic in one sentence to carry any weight. I half recall an example, but it is too obscene to list.

This is advice when wielding heavy mallets in the event of an accident.


Entered at Tue Apr 25 09:13:33 CEST 2017 from (173.3.50.131)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Ringo

Suggested reading. And there's some things germane to many discussions in here.

I love this truth ( and there are other great facts & observations) "There is little question that the invitation to join the Beatles was the single luckiest thing that ever happened to Ringo Starr. But Ringo’s acceptance of that invitation was also one of the luckiest things that ever happened to the Beatles. "


Entered at Tue Apr 25 06:12:47 CEST 2017 from (62.251.71.189)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: Robert M. Pirsig

Although we never met, I’m proud to call you my friend, RIP Robert M Pirsig. Thanks for making this world a better place.

“Mountains should be climbed with as little effort as possible and without desire. The reality of your own nature should determine the speed. If you become restless, speed up. If you become winded, slow down. You climb the mountain in an equilibrium between restlessness and exhaustion. Then, when you're no longer thinking ahead, each footstep isn't just a means to an end but a unique event in itself....To live only for some future goal is shallow. It's the sides of the mountains which sustain life, not the top.”


Entered at Tue Apr 25 03:43:05 CEST 2017 from (96.54.61.38)

Posted by:

BONK

Subject: JQ

HaHa. Sorry to laugh JQ but that reminded me of what my long gone Dad said when he dropped a 5 pound mallet on his bare foot. "jesus, jumped up, bald headed, cross firing canadian fucking christ, that fucking hurt!"


Entered at Tue Apr 25 01:32:19 CEST 2017 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: F and C

PV - I wince when I hear young teenagers using fuck conversationally; although it's used that way, by all ages, more frequently now too. The sad thing is that it worked so well as an exclamation for most of my life and now it's fast becoming like pshaw. I think telling someone to shut the fuck up might be its most powerful use still. C is the worst word (apologies again Norm) but doesn't work as an exclamation/expletive, it only works as a noun. Maybe an adjective if you add "ish". So what's left to shout when you drop a 3lb sledge on your bare foot like I did yesterday? Actually shouting fuck 3 times in a row did help.


Entered at Mon Apr 24 22:27:05 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Just watched Grantchester, a nicely mild 1950s detective series.

Well, Shakespeare gets close to using the C-word (deliberately to shock) at least twice … Hamlet and Twelfth Night. There's a swing between religious profanity and obscenity from generation to generation. we just happen to be in a more obscenity oriented era. A British court ruled that "fuck" was no longer offensive when said to a police officer. So there you go. The weight of words change. To the 17th century, "naughty" meant "evil". It lost its power. Currently the F-word is losing its power in the same way. "Bugger" has always been extremely mild in British English, though is clearly stronger in meaning than "the F word".


Entered at Mon Apr 24 21:24:42 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Knicks Forever

I don't know anything about hockey so I can't join that conversation. However, as a life long Knick fan, I know sports suffering. That's why it's going to be so much sweeter when they do win. The entire Tri State area is going to have a smile on it's face for weeks. It will be the biggest sports moment in New York history. The fact that the big guy from Latvia is going to lead the city of immigrants to the championship will make it even more perfect. Dreams go on forever.


Entered at Mon Apr 24 20:36:37 CEST 2017 from (24.108.163.242)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: Blessing in disguise

For hockey fans of Habs and Leafs (Kevin et al): Maybe a blessing in disguise. Read Cathal Kelly in the Globe and Mail. Habs like the Leafs but a little more developed and further along, both teams are continuing to grow. (Look at what the Oilers have accomplished with patients, the superstar notwithstanding) New young players need time. Leafs are behind Habs in this regard but the future is bright (I gotta wear shades). Fans require patience during growth. Its not easy when you achieve some success. Just a thought, though. Predators thriving with Subban. Penguins getting a lot out of Kessel. Could they have made a difference? Who knows. We'll never know. (One thing for sure: I never saw Phil smile in Toronto... he's smiling at times on camera in Pittsburgh.)


Entered at Mon Apr 24 20:21:01 CEST 2017 from (174.1.36.190)

Posted by:

Lisa

Bob, I read those books when they first came out and really enjoyed them. Got quite fond of the characters.


Entered at Mon Apr 24 19:43:24 CEST 2017 from (86.167.98.226)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Thanks Kevin. Really enjoyed lawrence Block.

Thanks Bob F. you'll really enjoy the books. The first series of Rebus was a dreadful flop.They started again with Ken Stott in the leading roll.


Entered at Mon Apr 24 19:14:02 CEST 2017 from (24.108.163.242)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: F

Kevin: You bring up an interesting point. There are many movies and TV shows where people use profanities like the F-word. I am not certain at what date these words evolved but like you, I would be surprised if they existed 100 years ago and if they were used at all. So we have to give the writer and the filmmaker some slack. If I were making films or telling stories of events in the past, I'd find out what profanities were used in the time of the events portrayed. But that's just me...a stickler for detail and accuracy.... (glass houses...stones)


Entered at Mon Apr 24 19:05:54 CEST 2017 from (184.146.92.220)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Yes….I also very much like crime stories and the detective-investigator genre. In the 80’s, read all of Lawrence Block’s Scudder detective books and the early great James Elroy books and then right around that time PBS started airing the Sherlock Holmes with Jeremy Brett and also the Inspector Morse series. Now, it seems every country has gotten into the business of doing productions based on detective fiction books….I am picky though, just as I could never tolerate singing cowboys or any kind of deviation from the standard Western movie plot ( realism, humour in a Western – no thank you ! ) I really dislike detectives that have families……They all should be single and preferably drinkers and smokers……..not quite but no families please. Though not a detective series, I blame the Soprano’s for introducing this family silliness. While it worked in that series, the parts involving the son and daughter were always the least interesting parts of the show and producers all over television started introducing this into all types of shows. The dirty secret is that it is just a device to pad a script and fill 90 minutes more easily….The last thing I want in a detective/Inspector ½ way through solving a crime is to see him at home dealing with his daughters headache or his wife’s complaint about the neighbours !

The Inspector and the Sea really suffers from the "singing cowboy" problem.....and funnily enough, I almost stopped watching one of the true A+ series of all-time - Deadwood - at episode 1 just because I had never heard a cowboy swear before. It was jolting - but I got over it.


Entered at Mon Apr 24 17:58:25 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: Loneliness Road Iggy Pop

Check out this great music Iggy Pop recently made with Jamie Saft's jazz trio.


Entered at Mon Apr 24 17:44:03 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Dunc

Dunc, thanks for the tip. We're going to watch Department Q as soon as we finish the new season of Bosch. We tried Rebus awhile back but didn't care for it. However, I believe the first season had a different actor in the lead role. I'll keep it in mind. I'm definitely going to check out the books by Maj Sjowall and Per Wahloo. I love crime stories.


Entered at Mon Apr 24 13:35:34 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Just reading "Homeward Bound" the incredibly detailed Paul Simon biography. New to me: he met Carole King when she tutored him in maths. They formed a duo doing demo records for others commercially as The Cosines (maths tuition!) and Paul played bass and guitar and Carole played piano and drums. Did any of those demos survive?


Entered at Mon Apr 24 04:50:14 CEST 2017 from (24.69.133.64)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: Better team

Unfortunately, the better team won. Go Oilers.


Entered at Sun Apr 23 19:58:30 CEST 2017 from (24.114.68.76)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Rockin Chair

Norm.....Thank you and I know you are right on that. It's just hard sometimes. Imagine how Steve would have felt these days with the double whammy of Habs out and the Trump madness !


Entered at Sun Apr 23 19:44:07 CEST 2017 from (24.114.68.76)

Posted by:

Kevin J

JT: Thank you. Beautifully written and thought out....it really is all of those things isn't it....I had decided last night that just turning the set off temporarily and taping/pvr would help. I had even convinced myself that checking the scores at either 11 minutes past the hour or 33 mins would help. I also had a theory on the volume levels I was working with since it had worked during the last Olympics and Canada's gold medal winning game. Madness!

.......and JT, I wish you a more relaxing and happy night tonight.

Thank you, Dunc......I am currently watching "The Inspector and the Sea"... A German series set in Sweden.....Not brilliant by any stretch but very good.


Entered at Sun Apr 23 19:25:00 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: It's in yer blood!

Kevin and Jerry. Kevin, we've shared the same disappointments time and again. You can't stop caring no more than you can stop breathing. Jerry, there is no need to wonder why, it's in your blood.

What I can never stop wondering about, is how we cannot teach the world to share the caring. If you go to a hockey game and as you move through the crowd and in to your seat, you can see just about every ethnic type of person you can name on this planet. All sharing and honestly caring about the same thing.

The folks who work at "Playing for change" never stop trying to bring people together thru' music. Still we are manipulated by an American president who vows to put an aircraft carrier in front on North Korea as a "show of force" and a Korean lunatic who says he'll blow it out of the water as a "show of force". I think these loonies would really do this. So what do our lives mean?


Entered at Sun Apr 23 16:58:27 CEST 2017 from (99.229.224.79)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Correction

Greg Iles. With apologies to Mr. Iles. Also a member of the author's rock band that includes Stephen King.


Entered at Sun Apr 23 16:52:15 CEST 2017 from (99.229.224.79)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Excerpt From Greg Isles New book, "Mississippi Blood." The third in a Trilogy.

"Every now and then there’s a juddering thump as I round a curve and smash over the broken armor of a dead armadillo, yet my daughter, Annie, sleeps on beside me, one hand resting lightly on my forearm, which I’ve left on the console to reassure her. Exhaustion keeps her sedated through potholes and roadkill, exhaustion augmented by the drone of the engine and whine of our tires, plus the voice of Levon Helm and the Band singing “The Weight,” the live version from The Last Waltz.

As Pops and Mavis Staples begin singing harmony like dark angels floating down from heaven, some semblance of peace washes over me. How much soul and conviction must a white man have to sing lead in front of angels like that? Levon is an Arkansas country boy as rail-thin and tough as the bastards who killed Caitlin, yet he somehow sings with the wounded humanity of a man without a tribe, a man who has known both love and grief and understands that one is the price of the other."


Entered at Sun Apr 23 14:38:11 CEST 2017 from (24.69.133.64)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: Caring

Kevin J; I know how you feel. The phenomenon of collective and personal emotional caring for a team is an enigma. I have been a Leaf fan since 1958. It gets all tied into one's childhood and one's dad and playing the same game yourself and getting involved in something that is both in you and outside of you simultaneously. Then you share it with others who also care and the success becomes an addiction. It feels good. And the failure is a profound disappointment. There's more to this but as I say, its an enigma. I just can't figure out why its so vital to those of us who care. I'll wear my Leaf shirt tonight and hope the boys can live to see another day. I understand and I am sorry for your loss.


Entered at Sun Apr 23 13:24:51 CEST 2017 from (83.249.177.82)

Posted by:

NWC (again)

Location: The same, fortunatelly

Subject: Sorry for my poor Anglish

Before my smart gb friend 'Rocking Cher' is wondering about cows _sleeping_ free I would post correctly: "due to the regulations on ecological farming the cows will be _SET_ free today". I feel more comfortably posting in Finnish: "määräykset ekologisesta karjanhoidosta tekevät sen että tämä sunnuntai on lehmien ulospääspäivä." Got it?


Entered at Sun Apr 23 12:42:19 CEST 2017 from (83.249.177.82)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Norbert and fake news

No one reacted here in gb when Norbert told us all about EAST GRONINGEN for a few months ago. This is the monotonious and depressed area in Low Countries where you can get closest to Finland ... have been there for several times. - As an ecological farmer in East Groningen Norbert knows what is the most special day in the year: today is the Sunday when the cows will be slept FREE!


Entered at Sun Apr 23 09:34:12 CEST 2017 from (86.167.98.226)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Yes, couldn't agree more, Kevin. Interesting leading characters. Watched the third film last night. Make sure you catch the series, Bob. We're lucky we get a foreign crime series on BBC 4 on Saturday evenings. But there has been a bit of a debate about this in the press. Some people think too much money and time are given to crime series. Make sure you see Shetland, Kevin.

Interesting musical experience yesterday. Lovely atmosphere in the town - beer and food festival. And it would have been Gerry Rafferty's 70th bithday yesterday if he was still alive. So to celebrate Baker Street, the song was played by a decent band a couple of times in the open air with twenty to thirty saxaphone players playing the sax parts. Brilliant sound. I thought back to the LA Olympics with all the pianos playing Rhapsody in Blue. Baker Street has had over five million plays worldwide on radio.


Entered at Sun Apr 23 08:22:59 CEST 2017 from (24.114.68.76)

Posted by:

Kevin J

That's it.....I'm done ever caring or cheering for a team sport again...all my life and all the great joys shared with family and friends were special...but enough - no more. Only Formula One from now on........So much easier to just blame a machine when things go wrong.

Department Q & Dunc: very dark story lines but I loved the series mainly because I thought the detective team included the two most original and well cast leads in a long long time.


Entered at Sat Apr 22 19:34:02 CEST 2017 from (62.251.71.189)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: The Garth behind the Norbert

In the seventies I met Garth briefly at the Amsterdam Hilton (yes, the one Herman Brood later jumped off). Garth signet a (Hilton) serviette for me (we couldn’t find anything else to write on): “For Norbert with love, Garth” ……

I framed that napkin and put it over the fire place next to the painting of my mother in law. Since then there hasn’t passed a single day that I didn’t looked up at Garth’s words.

In 2016 I bought the classic book about handwriting on eBay: “Handwriting Analysts’ Profit Guide” by Prof. Dr. Ing. Erika M. Karohs Professor Emeritus of the Graphological Institute in Zurich. Dr. Karohs is the world leading expert in Graphology.

I finished this intriguing book in the middle of a cold night last November in front of the fire place. After I closed the book I looked up to the Garth napkin and thought, sipping some wine, …… could it be that hidden in those 5 lovely words was Garth’s real personality? Was the man Garth, his past and his future, hidden in the Norbert over the fireplace? Could that be?

I took the framed Garth from the wall, removed the napkin out of the frame and made a 3D digital scan of it. With a direct modeling program on my laptop I separated Garth from the napkin. Now I enlarged the words and my quest for Garth started by examining the hugh 3D words.

With Dr. Karoh’s book in one hand and my computer mouse in the other for weeks I studied the pressure of the N, the curves on the O, the slant of the R, the baseline of the B and the E, the size of the R and last, but not least, the spacing of the T. Just looking at everything Norbert would reveal about Garth. Last week I finally finished my examination with a report and send that to Maud asking: Is this the real Garth? Yesterday I got an email back from Maud stating: “Yes” …

So with a clear conscious I can now and here share the real Garth, the man behind the brilliant musician:

Garth you have a need for other people to like and admire you, and yet you tend to be critical of yourself. While you have some personality weaknesses you are generally able to compensate for them. You have considerable unused capacity that you have not turned to your advantage. Disciplined and self-controlled on the outside, you tend to be worrisome and insecure on the inside. At times you have serious doubts as to whether you have made the right decision or done the right thing. Garth you prefer a certain amount of change and variety and become dissatisfied when hemmed in by restrictions and limitations. Dear Garth you also pride yourself as an independent thinker; and do not accept others' statements without satisfactory proof. But you have found it unwise to be too frank in revealing yourself to others. At times you are extroverted, affable, and sociable, while at other times you are introverted, wary, and reserved. Some of your aspirations tend to be rather unrealistic, but others are obvious realistic Garth.

Have a good weekend dear Band fans.


Entered at Sat Apr 22 19:30:26 CEST 2017 from (62.251.71.189)

Posted by:

Norbert

This post is intentionally short


Entered at Fri Apr 21 23:05:57 CEST 2017 from (86.158.93.48)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Welcome back Rockin' Chair. Enjoyed your post. My daughter travelled and worked in Australia for a year - loved it.

Thanks, Bill M. Never tried another album after me choosing the wrong one initially. But he was interviewed by Ricky Ross on Radio Scotland last year and I liked the songs played. Just too much music, Bi;ll.


Entered at Fri Apr 21 22:55:21 CEST 2017 from (86.158.93.48)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Bob F

I was just about to recommend the series to you, Bob. - real coincidence. I've just watched the first two series again - finished them on Monday. Waiting for Amazon to deliver the third. Very popular here. Glasgow is a tough city in places.

I've never been to Shetland, Bob. Always meant to get there. I was talking about going yesterday to my friend, who is going up there to work. Still working and he's my age. He's off shore and will live on Shetland and travel to the rig by helicopter every day. Normally stays on the rig.

As you'll probably know, I liked travelling about Scotland and Europe. I always wanted to do the holiday using ferry from the mainland to Orkney, from Orkney to Shetland, from Shetland to the Faroes, and then on to Norway then home. Orkney is brilliant. I still have to get to the Outer Hebrides also. But time and enthusiasm are running out. You see I've got a beautiful island an hour away. Other than those two areas I've spent quality time in most parts of Scotland.

Like Peter and Roger (hi guys), I see myself as a European and can't stand Brexit.

Here's a recommendation. I really enjoyed the Rebus series. But it has to be the Ken Stott series. They are set in Edinburgh. Edinburgh is one of the most beautiful cities in Europe.

Also I am working through the Maj Sjowall and Per Wahloo ten books again as another retirement project. Martin Beck is the detective. They are a must if you haven't read them. A husband and wife team of writers, the books were written in the sixties and they are seen as the beginnings of Scandic Noir. Great books. Am I correct North West Coaster?

Musically I'm spending a lot of time with Dylan and Michael Marra. Give Michael Marra an evening on YouTube, Bob. Mike Nomad will vouch for the quality of his songwriting. Before he died, he would open for people like Van and shared a concert with Patti Smith. Somebody told me that Patti thought a lot of him.

Still enjoy Roseann's music, Bob.

I just watched the latest series of Scandinavian crime series 'Follow the Money' and 'Department Q'. But am now rewatching the Sopranos. First time in many years.

Always enjoy your posts, Bob. Thanks.


Entered at Fri Apr 21 19:23:03 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Punch!! Kick!! Hit...Hit

Bob, you may find this on your computer under the title, TRUMP PICKS FIGHT HE'S UNLIKELY TO WIN.

Canada, Mexico and China are all the dirty rotten guys picking on The Don's boys in the poor little USA.


Entered at Fri Apr 21 17:49:39 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Norm, don't go that way. He's building one very big, very amazing wall, he can build another one. Plus he'll make you pay for it. The Don hates cry baby's.



Entered at Fri Apr 21 16:44:12 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: The gloves are off!

Bob, not sure if this news is in your neck of the woods. Now Trump is gunning for Canada's dairy producers.

New York and Wisconsin producers are whining Canadian producers aren't playing by the rules of NAFTA. Our government official said, not true. USA producers supply 5 times as much to Canada as our producers do. The Trump, Trudeau honey moon is over.


Entered at Fri Apr 21 16:02:34 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Family Ties

We do share the MLB, NBA and the great Neil Young. That has to count for something.


Entered at Fri Apr 21 15:56:43 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Shetland

Dunc, we recently finished 3 seasons of a really great television show from Scotland called Shetland. Wonderful actors, terrific storylines and amazing landscapes. Wondering if you're familiar with this show and is it popular in Scotland?


Entered at Fri Apr 21 15:30:57 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Americans

Years of teaching Mexicans, Guatamalans, El Salvadoreans, Panamanians and Quebecois, let alone the whole of South America, have made me wary of calling anyone from outside the USA “Americans”. I found everywhere else in the Americans objects to calling inhabitants of the USA "Americans" though logic insists that long usage make it fine. However, NORTH Americans is the PC term. Dictionaries used to mark American English with US, but some have changed it to NA to reflect that much (but not by any means all) also applies to Canadian English.


Entered at Fri Apr 21 15:16:33 CEST 2017 from (70.26.123.234)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Jeff, like B'rer Rabbit, I'm layin' low.


Entered at Fri Apr 21 15:08:32 CEST 2017 from (173.3.50.31)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Mike, You Trucked Up America's Longest Lasting Truck

Now you did it Mike. Norm's gonna be gunnin for you man. That CBC paper you linked with the "Soil Your Undies" ad, well, the ad directly to the right was for Dodge Ram 2500 Series Pickup, and declared that the truck was America's Longest Lasting Truck. So there you go , you are responsible for providing printed testimony from a respected Canadian source that Norm is an American. A fishy American, but an American.


Entered at Fri Apr 21 14:46:05 CEST 2017 from (173.3.50.31)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Mike, are you contused? Cause you're contusing me. Norm laid himself off finally. About time. If the old fucker gets himself to NY & brings some dough to pay some musicians & a studio, years ago I wrote the song that can make him a household name. Other than that, if i ever finish this one i have in the can, i'll get to that song on the second or third record in line.


Entered at Fri Apr 21 13:24:49 CEST 2017 from (70.26.123.234)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Web: My link

Subject: Beavers

Jeff, here's another example (linked).

But you should really lay off Norm.


Entered at Fri Apr 21 04:22:33 CEST 2017 from (64.229.183.2)

Posted by:

Bill M

I saw in today's NY Times that Allan Holdsworth had died at 70. 70 struck me as a big number, but made sense when I did the arithmetic.


Entered at Fri Apr 21 04:16:50 CEST 2017 from (173.3.50.31)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: "The most Canadian thing ever."

Linked.

How to understand some Canadian posters.


Entered at Fri Apr 21 03:16:09 CEST 2017 from (173.3.50.31)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Cuba Gooding, 72, lead singer of Main Ingredient, died of drug overdose in his car today. Father of Cuba Gooding Jr, & NYC based bassist Thomas Gooding .


Entered at Thu Apr 20 23:34:50 CEST 2017 from (70.26.123.234)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Subject: Joe Reisman

Bill M, thanks for the Hawks connection. I was unaware.


Entered at Thu Apr 20 23:24:57 CEST 2017 from (173.3.50.31)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Bill, you wrote that you saw Levon perform three times. Could it be you must have forgotten the times with The Hawks?


Entered at Thu Apr 20 23:24:22 CEST 2017 from (86.25.242.77)

Posted by:

Ian W

Web: My link

Subject: 8mm colour footage of The Last Waltz

This was on Expecting Rain today:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p7LxSaBBIkI


Entered at Thu Apr 20 22:24:12 CEST 2017 from (64.229.183.2)

Posted by:

Bill M

Mike N: Joe Reisman went on to work with Hawkins and the Hawks - a step up from the 3 Haircuts, I'd say.

Saying rather than mating? I guess it depends on who's involved.


Entered at Thu Apr 20 21:49:18 CEST 2017 from (69.159.60.251)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

LINKED: Liverpool songwriters Sodajerker and just a great podcast with RR on the songwriting of The BAND songs - and some post Band songs. A wonderful way to spend an hour......Hell, the world might be coming to an end soon, so you should all take the time and listen to this.


Entered at Thu Apr 20 20:23:06 CEST 2017 from (70.26.123.234)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Web: My link

Subject: Band names, tonsorial div.

Back, back, back many years ago, back in the '50s, there was a NYC-based TV show called Your Show of Shows featuring a comedian named Sid Caesar, of whom some of you may have heard. It was during the dawn of Rock 'n' Roll and some atrocious music was being recorded and hitting the charts. On several episodes, Caesar joined up with two regulars on his show, Carl Reiner and Howie Morris, the trio donning wigs and then-snazzy R&R apparel and performing songs with mindless, simplistic lyrics like "You Are So Rare (To Me)" and "Goin' Crazy." Caesar called his group the Three Haircuts and achieved some moderate success, I believe, recording the same songs on 45s.


Entered at Thu Apr 20 19:52:54 CEST 2017 from (69.159.60.251)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Fred....Thank you for that list you linked. I don't remember seeing it before and very much enjoyed reading it. Not my 10 but not bad.......oh, and Ferrari 2 of the first 3 so far this season ! Loving it.


Entered at Thu Apr 20 18:43:32 CEST 2017 from (69.159.60.251)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Looking at things from the sunny side of life, at least Kim Jong Un does have a better haircut than the Orange Clown.

Favourite band names of all time:

1. Haircut 100

2. Half Man Half Biscuit

Least Favourite:

1. Tragically Hip

2. Prefab Sprout

Welcome home Norm. Glad that you had a fun time.


Entered at Thu Apr 20 18:35:00 CEST 2017 from (173.3.50.31)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

In South Canada a slider is a pitch, slide guitar player, or a small greasy burger. /n Rather than mate we say buddy, pal,guy, man, or brother. A while ago people have begun frequently using "boss" which I've never cared for.


Entered at Thu Apr 20 18:03:20 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Impossible to forget

It is of course good to note the loyal respect shown Levon Helm on a difficult day of his passing. It is however impossible to not remember him when his voice is heard almost every day in my life on my own collection of the works of the Band. Also a multitude of radio stations. Watching the many shows on youtube, also interviews.

I expect there will never be a time in our lives when all the members of the Band will not be with us in some form and to me that is the best of social media that we have now.


Entered at Thu Apr 20 17:46:35 CEST 2017 from (72.69.195.161)

Posted by:

Jed

Subject: Remembering Levon

Many thanks for so much joy you gave us.RIP.


Entered at Thu Apr 20 16:40:33 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Without Malice or Forthought

Bob! I yam what I yam and that's all what I yam...... You are right of course however my point is, to those morons, example..... if some one is from Europe then they are not French, German, Italian, Swiss, Dutch or what ever. They are just Europian. That's just stupid.

Without trying to offend.....the thought of being in the same country with Dick head Don terrifies me. It's bad enough being in a country with his cuddly buddy Justin.

In our countries you may hear a variety of replies from people. "No problem" "No sweat" and many other replies. In Australia only one "No worries mate". I've never had so many mates in me life.

A side walk is not a side walk. It's a foot path. What we call a cresent wrench, or adjustable wrench is a "slider". It's a whole new life for me and I'm too gawd damn old to change :-)


Entered at Thu Apr 20 16:34:44 CEST 2017 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC

My thanks to Levon. His music/their music has made my life much richer.


Entered at Thu Apr 20 16:24:48 CEST 2017 from (24.69.133.64)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: Fascinating Rhythm

Bill M: Thanks for the advice re record stores. I'll check out Fascinating Rhythm in Nanaimo some time and when in Toronto, will find time to get to the hinterlands for those noted.


Entered at Thu Apr 20 15:16:15 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Norm

"They called me an American. I said are you fucking crazy?! I'm not an American"

Norm, why so angry, we're practically cousins. Everyone knows your Prime Minister and our President are best friends forever. I hear they're planning golf dates in Florida and Montreal weekends with the wife's. When The Don gets us into WW3 your kids are going to be right there fighting side by side with our kids. We're stuck together like glue, don't try to disown us. The Don won't like that.


Entered at Thu Apr 20 11:41:19 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Billy Fury

In doing the Toppermost link, I saw the new and hugely comprehensive article on Billy Fury. Definitely worth reading.


Entered at Thu Apr 20 11:06:20 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Web: My link

Subject: Ten best

Link to Toppermost "Ten of The Band" - it was only Toppermost #3, and at that point it was just a list with no comment. However, I think it's a better selection.


Entered at Thu Apr 20 08:38:15 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Web: My link

Subject: 10 of the best...

This may have been posted before (maybe even by me---I don't remember), however it doesn't hurt to look over it again. ; )


Entered at Thu Apr 20 05:10:13 CEST 2017 from (24.114.64.233)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: record stores

JT: The most impressive used record store I've encountered (and also the favourite of the late great Stuart McLean, is (was) fascinating Rhythm in Nanaimo. Hope it's still around. In Toronto I go a lot to Pandemonium in the Junction, which turns up lots of great records and whose owner is very knowledgeable. But my favourite still has to be Village Vinyl in New Toronto (Lakeshore and Islington). Go on a Sunday afternoon when there's live music 2:00-5:00.


Entered at Wed Apr 19 23:15:29 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Hey it's good to be back home again

Got back yes-a-day Bill. Scroll back a bit. I gave an account of my travels. I'll send you some pictures a little later.


Entered at Wed Apr 19 22:59:29 CEST 2017 from (184.66.224.75)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: Vortex

OK: Since we are reminiscing about the places we went, let me note the closing a few months ago of Vortex Records at Yonge and Eglinton just north of Eglinton. It was a go-to used record and cd store for me for many years. Not too far from there was a place called Ed's Records but that disappeared many years ago, only to show up for a while on Bloor St on the south side. It too has disappeared years ago. If I wanted to buy cds or lps in Toronto now, I wouldn't know where to go. I'd call Bill M for advice. (he knows the right people and places, I am sure) There still must be a few places with knowledgeable people. I also used to go to 'Record Shows' where people congregated and brought their records and cds to sell (Do they still occur?)

I often went to Around Again Records, Kevin, when I was downtown. It was among the largest stores of this kind. There were great stores like this in Vancouver, in San Francisco, and of course, in NYC. But when I was last in NYC, there wasn't much around compared to 10-15 years ago. We've all seen stories of longstanding establishments closing over the years (NY Times etc)

But, as I said before, in Victoria, where I spend some time, we have Ditch Records and also Lyle's Place where there are knowledgeable folks and lots of good selections. There is also the small record store in Fan-Tan Alley. Hopefully, those will remain for a while.


Entered at Wed Apr 19 22:33:41 CEST 2017 from (70.26.123.234)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Thinking today of Levon brings on a smile. The man was capable of brightening my day.


Entered at Wed Apr 19 22:26:16 CEST 2017 from (65.92.192.116)

Posted by:

Bill M

Rockin' Chair: Speaking of progress, how's your trip going now that you've seen Longreach? I thought of you when I watched a newsclip of a herd of curious heifers in Saskatchewan following a beaver across a field. Something you'll never see in Australia. However, if you get out to Perth (which I'd recommend to anyone) and take the ferry out to Rottnest Island (ditto), you'll see the local quokkas (which look like little beaver / mini-wallabee crosses) hopping around. (Or at least they did back when I was young.)


Entered at Wed Apr 19 22:04:59 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Progress????

You crazy old bastards should all be dead now anaways, 'stead of whining away about all those ancient places that should have fell down awready.

Just stay the hell outta the way........it's Progress!!!!


Entered at Wed Apr 19 21:51:42 CEST 2017 from (65.92.192.116)

Posted by:

Bill M

Kevin J: Nor can I. When I worked in Mississauga I pined for excuses to go downtownm where real life happened and where lunch choices were more than McDonalds versus sports bar. But now I can't be bothered - all 'my' record stores and used-book stores have vanished and so many of the interesting streetscapes have been demolished or pablumised. Even Around Again on Baldwin, which I first visited in September 1974 when there was still a chicken eviscerater across the street - has closed its doors.


Entered at Wed Apr 19 21:35:00 CEST 2017 from (67.84.77.92)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Buckingham McVie linked


Entered at Wed Apr 19 21:01:32 CEST 2017 from (69.159.60.251)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Yes, Bill M and it's not just the loss of music venues but mom and pop sandwich places all over the city and a good number of pubs....the affect on communities caused but what is now almost 10 years of free-money/zero interest rates is profound.......like a sugar high to developers. Bigger and more isn't always better...I really can't stand it.


Entered at Wed Apr 19 19:54:56 CEST 2017 from (65.92.192.116)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronto

Subject: love is the drug

Kevin J: It's all very sad - Yonge Street and the decline of venues across the city. A total cynic might say that bars have always been drug stores, existing principally to sell the drug called alcohol. That's true even if patrons come principally for other 'drugs' - rock&roll, love ...


Entered at Wed Apr 19 19:27:14 CEST 2017 from (69.159.60.251)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Web: My link

Subject: Friar's Tavern-Hard Rock Cafe to close it's doors to music forever !

Read it and weep......a corner rock n roll institution that Levon and the boys knew so well and where even the corporate guys at Hard Rock Café were smart enough to keep a plaque to honour The Band is being forced to close - not able to cover the over $2 Million in rent per year.......very sadly, another live music venue is not taking its place. Friar's will now be a Drug Store - Shoppers Drug Mart has taken over the lease....one step closer to Mongolia all the time.....If Massey Hall ever closes, I am leaving this city.

See LINK - some cool pictures as well.


Entered at Wed Apr 19 18:27:24 CEST 2017 from (65.92.192.116)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Terronno

JT; I like your characterisation of Levon's singing. I saw him three times - with the Band at the CNE in '76, in '77 or '78 when he (with Jerry Penfound et al) joined Ronnie Hawkins onstage at the Beverly Hills Hotel in North York, and in '80 (?) with the Cate Brothers Band at the Le Coq d'Or on Yonge Street.


Entered at Wed Apr 19 18:08:19 CEST 2017 from (67.84.77.92)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Jerry, outside of in theory, not all so called "advances" in reality accomplish more than degradation or actually advance anything but theory or destruction. Nuclear power & digital recording belong in the same class


Entered at Wed Apr 19 17:47:42 CEST 2017 from (84.209.147.226)

Posted by:

jh

Web: My link

Raising a glass in memory of the late, great Levon Helm tonight. Five years gone. Meeting Levon and spending a little time with him, in Woodstock and on his home turf in AR... high points of our lifes. The music will live forever.


Entered at Wed Apr 19 17:02:12 CEST 2017 from (67.84.77.92)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Jerry, there is sound quality. And in that regard there is no sense pressing digitally recorded music to vinyl. If you record analogue, or mostly analogue, dump it to digital to edit & mix digitally, then print mixes to tape, it will sound almost as good as if you went analogue the whole way. But start out digital, then mix digital, but press vinyl, there's no point .


Entered at Wed Apr 19 16:39:13 CEST 2017 from (24.69.133.64)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: Vinyl

As to pressing to vinyl: there are mysteries in the world. It closes a circle. Maybe not so crazy?


Entered at Wed Apr 19 16:23:15 CEST 2017 from (24.69.133.64)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: Gear

Jeff:About Lacy and his iPhone and iRig. Its the evolution of sound and gear and it will continue. Technology marches on and the Luddites will be left behind. Its what emerges that ultimately determines impact. In the end, he still has to play the notes on his new guitar and vocalize the words in a tune or a rap. He has to connect it all together and see if it works and pleases him. The human touch (possibly) can never be removed. Someone has to 'push the buttons'.

Before the pencil and paper, we scratched and etched on cave walls.


Entered at Wed Apr 19 16:09:41 CEST 2017 from (24.69.133.64)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: Experiencing Levon Helm

I experienced Levon Helm: Concord Tavern many times in 1964: At Massey Hall Nov. 15, 1965 with Bob Dylan: Jan. 10, 1974 with Dylan and with The Band at Maple Leaf Gardens and then finally Dec 4, 1993 at Convocation Hall U of T with The Band and Richard Bell and Colin Linden. "I can't help it if I'm lucky."


Entered at Wed Apr 19 15:45:12 CEST 2017 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

b.lee (aka bassmanlee)

Location: DE, USA

Subject: Levon

Had the pleasure of seeing Levon twice, once in a small club with the Barnburners, and once at the Capitol in NYC with the Ramble band plus guests. Both memorable shows.

The thing I remember about Levon is that he was almost always smiling, laughing and joking. Wherever he was, he lit up the room.


Entered at Wed Apr 19 15:09:11 CEST 2017 from (24.69.133.64)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: Levon Helm

Levon Helm had a unique voice. It was joyous. You couldn't mistake him or miss him. The absolute joy he put out when he sang and played was infectious and so he reached his audience in a way that few artists can ever achieve. That is my take on Levon Helm. He was special.


Entered at Wed Apr 19 13:47:46 CEST 2017 from (74.75.157.7)

Posted by:

Far East Man

Location: Rockport, ME

Subject: Levon

I'll tip my hat to Levon today. I traveled to Woodstock over 10 years ago to see him play, shook his hand, what a show. I'm putting together a collection of music for a celebration of a friend's life, and he wanted ""Rag Mama Rag" on it. The live version from The Last Waltz is going on - what a song, what a vocal. Love to Levon and all.


Entered at Wed Apr 19 13:30:35 CEST 2017 from (99.229.224.79)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Levon Helm; who died 5 years ago today

As this is a Band site, I would like to remember Levon Helm today. Drummer and one of three lead singers of The Band. He died 5 years ago today. Keep On The Good Foot Levon.


Entered at Wed Apr 19 13:20:31 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Enjoyed your report, Norm. More please when you think of other things!


Entered at Wed Apr 19 08:03:37 CEST 2017 from (67.84.77.92)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Location: The planet formerly known as Earth
Web: My link

Subject: "How Steve Lacy & His iPhone Are Taking Over The Music Business"

You got to read this. Kid is recording & producing & "mastering" on his iPhone.. And producing for Grammy winners. Twitler is in the White House. Why not?

What is even more ridiculous is morons will be recording/producing on iPhones then pressing the product to vinyl.



Entered at Wed Apr 19 05:16:04 CEST 2017 from (24.114.71.13)

Posted by:

Bill M

Just looking at my UK 45 of Dylan (& Hawks) performing "Just Like Tom Thumb's Blues". "Recorded live in Liverpool" it says, sensibly seeing no need to add "England" like Columbia did over here. Maybe most Canadians would have assumed Liverpool, Nova Scotia? Maybe I would have thought Liverpool Ontario, the nearest hamlet to me at the time?


Entered at Wed Apr 19 04:49:56 CEST 2017 from (70.59.84.106)

Posted by:

Rhythm Jimmy

Location: South of here

Subject: In these times

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=iBoxjZmqLMI


Entered at Wed Apr 19 01:09:57 CEST 2017 from (208.181.205.134)

Posted by:

Rockin Chair

Location: Pacific Northwest

Subject: Not the "Festival Express".........but

First of all Jerry, I respect your loyalty to Bob Dylan and the multitude of music he has given over all these years. However he is not without sin. I believe I may remember some comments on this site before about his last gigs in Australia. I can tell you first hand I met a lot of people who paid a lot of money to see him down there.

They were (in some cases) irate over the way he came on stage extremely drunk and did a short and very bad show. This was some die hard fans of his down there.

Re: Festival Express. I took a train ride, (my first) 800 miles into the out back to a little town called "Long Reach". A small insignificant but very important and interesting place. There is a huge hanger where Qantas started building their first airplanes which is now a museum. Just across the highway is the Stockman's, (Australian Cowboys) museum. These are wonderful tributes to the pioneers of both cattle and sheep ranching and the pioneers of the air.

Australia is pretty ok. I was right in love with Hobart, Tasmania. I went there to visit my friend Peter. Beautiful little seaport town. I spent four days on Moreton Island just off the coast of Brisbane. We took a little boat ride far up the Brisbane River that too was a treat. Lots of good pictures.

On the north side of Brisbane River, right down is "Eat Street". Just about every ethnic food you could image and all wonderful tastes and smells. Five live music venus going on. Susan and I were leaning on a standup table having a beer and eating a burger watching a super good reggae band. As luck would have it a little black man and his white lady shared our table across from us and this fellow and I struck up a conversation. He too is a musician. He plays internationally in a very big band. He plays the didgeridoo. His name is Jupe and he just returned with the orchestra from playing the Queen Elizabeth Theatre in Vancouver and in Banff and Calgary.

He explained to me that he was there that night because the drummer of the band was his nephew. He said to me, "you see that bass player Norm? He hides behind the key board player like that because he is autistic, but him and that drummer nephew of mine wrote all this original music they are playing. Well shit! you should have heard some of the bass lines this young guy was playing.

They then played "I shot the sheriff" you can't believe how good they did that tune. I got my phone out and made a video. Some how I screwed up so the sound didn't work. I DON'T GAWD DAMN KNOW! I fucked it up some how, but it was great.

Well Australia is pretty ok. Very! expensive for every thing and imports, like a bottle of Crown Royal that cost me $26 in Port Hardy, cost me $59 in Brisbane. Fuel and just about every thing is very expensive there.

One particularly odd (I thought) thing about a lot of Australians, but when I think about it maybe not. They called me an American. I said are you fucking crazy?! I'm not an American. Now here is their take on this "Well you come from North America". Of course their continent is all Australia. So the way they say it, "Well it's all one chunk of land over their, so yer all Americans." yuh just got to give up and shake yer head.

Now the one thing that is insane is the way they drive. It's worth your life to try and cross the street. They don't even slow down. In BC if some one is waiting at an intersection to cross the street, if you drive by them it is a $165 fine. In Australia every one is fair game.

When I was down in Hobart, Tasmania, my friend there, Peter took me for a drive. There was over 30 road killed wallabie. Peter tells me, then the Tasmanian Devils come out at night to eat them as they are nocturnal and they get runned over. I said to Peter, "Well if the devils are workin nights to do cleanup and they get runned over, how come they don't give 'em high viz vests"?? Peter says I'm goin' to council about that!:):):)

Across the street from our daughter and son in law's place, a neighbour Scott brought his guitar over one night. Scott is early sixties I guess. Him and I got to playing some tunes. At one point I never said any thing to him, I just did that chord turn around that repeats in the Weight. He just fell in and started playing it with me and we sang it and that was fun. So it was a worth while trip.


Entered at Wed Apr 19 00:50:03 CEST 2017 from (65.92.192.116)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Dunc: Thanks for the shout-out. Been wondering how your exploration of the music of Bruce Cockburn has been going. I'm sure I've said here before that my favourite of his many many albums is "Nothing but a Burning Light", which is a line from a key song on the album (and in music generally, I believe), Willie Johnson's "The Soul Of A Man". Produced by T-Bone Burnette, so has a certain feel to it. Given the comparatively spare instrumentation and merciful lack of synths, I wouldn't be surprised if the ensuing tour is when Cockburn hired Colin Linden's band (including Richard Bell) to recreate the album's sound. But many brilliant songs are strewn across the rest of his records too. Thought of you when I was pulled out a long-neglected album by the Brothers Cosmoline, an Toronto C&W album of late last millenium. Maybe alt.country - I don't really know. Anyway the linked Rodney Cowell-is song stuck me as something that BaRK would do a great job on, with Tom Wilson singing.

And then another neglected CD by Kashtin, a group you may know from their appearance on Robbie Robertson's "Native Americans" album. They mostly sing in Innu and French, but they do a nice cover of Willie Dunn's powerful "Son Of The Sun" - but I'd go with the original - see youtube.com/watch?v=4v1a0OxW18s


Entered at Wed Apr 19 00:41:46 CEST 2017 from (203.10.111.131)

Posted by:

Doug

Subject: Taj

Thanks for the Taj clip Jon. I used to love seeing him when he visited us here in Oz, which he hasn't for a long while now. And yes, he seems to have been grazing in a very good paddock.


Entered at Tue Apr 18 22:35:53 CEST 2017 from (24.108.163.242)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: Revival and Education

Peter V: Dylan is reminding us of what was and is doing it with respect and dignity. That stands for something. I agree that the songs are not being covered in a 'timely manner' but I think the motivation is different than the reasons that songs are covered. I in turn respect and appreciate what Dylan has done and I feel personally that he has done this as an artist who needed to do this not primarily for his audience but for his art (like his paintings for example). He knows that there will be some financial gain but I really don't think that this his primary motive. I believe he has a genuine interest in promoting what came before and what may be forgotten. Much like some of the lesser known classical pieces that might benefit from revival.

Again, I don't think Bob Dylan is done yet with creating his own songs. He surprises and given that he can do this revivalist thing, I believe he will bring us more primary Dylan.


Entered at Tue Apr 18 20:33:40 CEST 2017 from (65.92.192.116)

Posted by:

Bill M

Peter V: It's not whether or not She screws up, but what your people do with this unexpected opportunity.


Entered at Tue Apr 18 18:15:21 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Taj

Always great, but talk about The Shape He's In … he was half that size last time I saw him.


Entered at Tue Apr 18 17:42:22 CEST 2017 from (86.167.98.183)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland
Web: My link

Thanks, Solomon. I agree, but there's just too much music. For example, I know all the artists you list, but not all of their work. I followed Sandy Denny after she left Fairport, but Richard Thompson adds to her work undoubtedly. Had some Planxty on cassette, but have really missed out on Christy Moore. I really like what I've heard, but somehow missed him.

Peter, constantly amazed about your collection...to collect continuously and having discarded hardly anything.

Thanks, Roger. I think you have been better placed than me over the years to access concerts. I remember you saying you had seen Family several times, whereas I had seen them once only. But at times, I saw Scottish bands Get on and finish your Toppermost, mate.

Agreed JT, but lost in translation - the bowling clubs I was alluding to are green bowls, which may be seen as a symbol of age. I linked a song you like (I think!) being sung by Paul Brady. Hope you enjoy it.

Finally bought a Jesse Winchester album today, entitled Humour Me. Had never heard of him until I came across this site. I'm supporting the last CD/vinyl shop in my home town and first time I have noticed a Jeff Winchester in a shop. This site for many years has been where I find my music. So keep recommending, guys.

There was another link with Jesse Winchester. The album is from Sugar Hill records and features Jerry Douglas and Bela Fleck. Maura O'Connell is often produced by Bela Fleck and Jerry Douglas and they play on some of her albums, when she moved to the USA. I think this music is part of the 'new grass' movement, but I really only came across this because of our old friend, Dlew's Toppermost on Bela Fleck. I really treasure Maura's American albums. I really like the Jesse Winchester playing away here.

Thanks everybody.


Entered at Tue Apr 18 17:31:11 CEST 2017 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Web: My link

Subject: "Shape I'm In" live 4/13/17 -- Last Waltz tribute

Taj Mahal on vocals!


Entered at Tue Apr 18 17:29:06 CEST 2017 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC
Web: My link

Subject: "The Weight" live 4/14/17 -- Last Waltz tribute

Some wonderful piano noodling from Garth, then an ensemble "Weight" from Taj Mahal, Warren Haynes and others.


Entered at Tue Apr 18 17:03:26 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Good points, JT … there's also an aspect of such homages to the Sinatra era being long after the point. I made up a standards playlist after a couple of days with Triplicate … Julie London on Cry Me A River and Desafinado, Dakota Staton on My Funny Valentine, Sinatra on All The Way, a couple of Andy Williams etc … and it has an authenticity of being "from and of its time" which just isn't there on Dylan's forays into the forties and fifties.


Entered at Tue Apr 18 16:59:13 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Location: Poole, EU

You never know, Roger … if she's screwed this one up, we might be back!


Entered at Tue Apr 18 16:30:15 CEST 2017 from (80.3.236.231)

Posted by:

Roger

Location: Birmingham EU

Subject: Paul Brady

NWC - I'll ask about The Renegades around here. I don't know them. Dunc - I do know Paul Brady and The Chieftains and plenty of other celtic artists. I guess I have most of Paul Brady's catalogue and a fair few Chieftains albums. I first saw them at Croydon Fairfield Halls around 1977. Actually, I last saw them there too, at exactly the same gig. I've seen Paul Brady several times and notice he's doing a concert later this year which I'll try to get to. I've got a half completed Toppermost post on Paul Brady that maybe I'll now get round to completing.

I recently bought tickets for Daniel Lanois - gigging at a small venue in Hackney in August. I love his songs but can tire of the electronic stuff. It's music that's better to play than to listen to.


Entered at Tue Apr 18 15:34:21 CEST 2017 from (24.69.133.64)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: 'Owning music' (not borrowing it)

Dunc: You hit the mark when you commented on bowling alleys etc. I listened to Dylan back to back with other music (Jake Bugg, Paul Deslauriers Band etc). and realized why there is so much negative reaction to the current albums. Its not because they are not good or well made. As Peter V and others said or implied, it is because it is the music of 'old people'. Not that I am not among them at almost 69. It is because it was our parent's music and it never 'belonged' to us. Yes... we never took ownership of Frank Sinatra and Tony Bennett and others. That coupled with the energy of current musicians (Americana, Jake Bugg, Beck, many others for me) ...these I continue to take ownership of (oh my, hanging participle). Truth be told, ownership emotionally counts. If one feels detached from the music, it is hard to love it. One can admire it, but to really enjoy anything, you have to 'own it in your limbic lobe'. That's about as close as I can get to this issue. While I have admired Bob Dylan's last 3 albums and while I can hear the good that is played by the band and the creativity of the interpretation, it is not 'getting to me' like so many of his original songs have gotten to me. Because, after almost 60 years, I own them.


Entered at Tue Apr 18 13:07:59 CEST 2017 from (89.242.81.115)

Posted by:

Solomon

Many of the guy's who came from the folk traditions like Martin Simpson, Paul Brady, John Martyn, Christie Moore and Richard Thompson are all world class. I don't think anyone can dispute that in terms of songwriting and musicianship.


Entered at Tue Apr 18 11:23:30 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I have a few Paul Brady … I haven’t dusted them off in a decade. Will do so! Bert Jansch is always great … they’re reissuing everything on CD currently. Dunc introduced me to Mauro O’Connell and Michael Mara too. The Chieftains, The Dubliners, Bap Kennedy all get played. I used to play The Clancy Brothers but rarely now as Mrs V considers them to be fake “stage Irish” in comparison to The Dubliners or Chieftains. I have been pulling out the old Alex Campbell stuff … he recorded all the classic folk stuff. Just found a secondhand "The Next Night Will be with Robin Hall & Jimmy McGregor" LP but haven't played it yet.


Entered at Tue Apr 18 10:45:01 CEST 2017 from (86.169.218.6)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Differences in different countries

I wondered when the GB was busy and now, if collecting habits in different countries showed variation.

I think most people on the GB like folk/country/Americana, blues, soul and rock. Hard to categorise.

Looking at another axis, I see my collecting habits as similar to the Canadians(Hi Bill M) here. I have a collection maybe described as Scottish/British/American, but my favourite band is four fifth Canadian. Canadians would have Canadian/British and American bands in their collection.

I couldn't really discern accurately, regional variations in the USA contributors, but I think there are.

Although I have other Scottish music, these are the Scottish artists, which are important to me - John Martyn, Average White Band, Michael Marra, Stealers Wheel, Danny Wilson/Gary Clark, Frankie Miller,Jock Tamsons' Bairns, Bert Jansch and Rab Noakes. All are excellent.

In addition, I play the Irish acts Paul Brady, The Chieftains and Maura O'Connell very regularly. JT, look up Brady's verion of Arthur McBride and you'll see where Bob got it from.

I play other Scottish and Irish acts, but these are my 'big ones'.

I know Peter plays AWB, but I wonder if anybody else plays these artists.


Entered at Tue Apr 18 10:20:18 CEST 2017 from (86.169.218.6)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: Bob F

Hi Bob F, I'll maybe seek them out, but there's just too much music. I don't keep up, which is maybe sad, because the last twenty or so years has been seen as a very good period in Glasgow music.

I filled up the blanks in my Steely Dan collection and after spending a lot of time listening and really enjoying them, I'm now listening to Bob Dylan a lot. Although I quite enjoy the last two albums, I see it as old music for older people. I think of Fallen Angels as a competent band playing at the local golf club(an accessible sport here) or bowling club on an oldies night. I'm going to stop collecting Bob now and won't buy the new triple collection.

I think that a lot of the artists I like are releasing their retirement plans to leave their estates healthy.For example the recent Stones album I enjoy, but it could have been done by any competent blues band. I wish I hadn't bought 'The New Basement Tapes' and I never bought a complete collection of John Martyn after his death. I had everything.


Entered at Mon Apr 17 22:19:16 CEST 2017 from (173.3.48.90)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

By the way Norbert, that tag is genuine old authentic 300 even. No .99 bupkis. The Lower East Side schmata schleppers didn't play footsie with 99 cent pseudopsychology. They went right for the deal.


Entered at Mon Apr 17 22:06:20 CEST 2017 from (173.3.48.90)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Norbert, I was buying your presentation for a minute. But everyone knows, even I know that "price tagger federation" is the first sign of an impostor of "Price Tagger Federation."


Entered at Mon Apr 17 20:01:15 CEST 2017 from (100.34.127.122)

Posted by:

PSB

Web: My link

Subject: Langhorne

The above link is to a really nice article on Bruce Langhorne by David Hinckley that suggests the whole "Mr. Tambourine Man" thing is probably another great example of Bob Dylan's penchant for telling stories.

As to where Langhorne bought/found the instrument, probably at Music Inn on West Fourth Street which had all kinds of instruments from around the world.


Entered at Mon Apr 17 19:53:35 CEST 2017 from (62.251.71.189)

Posted by:

Norbert

Dear Jeff, I knew I could count on you.

This is the way it’s done:
1) Send me the jacket first, if it’s a bogus I’ll throw it away and the deal is off.
2) If it’s a genuine expensive leather jacket (as you stated) I’ll send it back to you with the money in one of the pockets (I’ll add an extra $ 100,- cause I love you).
3) You receive everything.
4) You Check and you double check if all is in good order and ONLY then you send me your expensive price tag.

This is the standard price tag procedure (defined by the price tagger federation). It’s there for your own protection. Don’t worry Jeff, I do this for many years and can only say it works just fine.


Entered at Mon Apr 17 18:41:48 CEST 2017 from (173.3.48.90)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Norbert. I have a price tag from a down filled leather jacket I bought in 1999 for a great price ($300.00) on the Lower East Side. If you want to add to your collection you can purchase that tag for $150.00 less a twenty percent GB discount.


Entered at Mon Apr 17 18:32:00 CEST 2017 from (173.3.48.90)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Bob, it's real possible the videos come from the same label, or uploader, or get viewed by similar demographics, ..... Or maybe whomever else uses your computer was watching those other artists last (ha ha , doubtful)

I didn't care for Louis Berry's vocal delivery, but there's other good stuff there I guess .


Entered at Mon Apr 17 18:04:49 CEST 2017 from (62.251.71.189)

Posted by:

Norbert

As some already know, I’m a collector of pricing-tags. Today I want to share a part of my collection here.

In random order:

$ 0.99
$ 1.99\[stamp]
$ 2.99 [handwritten]
$ 3.99
$ 4.99 [handwritten, scooped paper]
$ 5.99
$ 6.99\[stamp]
$ 7.99 [handwritten]
$ 8.99
$ 9.99 [handwritten, scooped]
$ 10.99
$ 11.99\[stamp]
$ 12.99 [handwritten]
$ 13.99
$ 14.99 [handwritten, scooped]
$ 15.99

Thanks.


Entered at Mon Apr 17 17:52:06 CEST 2017 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

b.lee

Location: DE, USA

Subject: Louis Berry

Norm, thanks! Quite a talent there! (No relation to Chuck.)

(An aside, does anyone know how the hell UTube decides what to play next? What the heck does Ed Sheerhan, let alone Miley Cyrus have to do with Louis Berry?)


Entered at Mon Apr 17 16:11:31 CEST 2017 from (83.249.177.82)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Welsh rarebit (continued)

... not to mention "La Petite Anglaise", Peter V. Mrs NWC just discovered the site which shows how to do make-up a la 60's Jane Birkin. After all these years she's going strong in the whole wide world. C'mon Peter, stiff upper lipp! Welcome back to Europe, among free European nations.


Entered at Mon Apr 17 15:13:21 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Dylan/Dead Rehearsals

Dunc, the Dylan/Dead rehearsals for the shows they did together can be streamed on line. Really good stuff. I saw three of the stadium shows, Foxboro on July 4, Philadelphia and Giant Stadium the following week. I remember it being extremely hot and Dylan looking and sounding like he was just going through the motions. The highlight of each show was the Dead doing Touch of Grey which had recently come out. Later that year Dylan toured Europe with Petty and The HB's and was amazing.


Entered at Mon Apr 17 15:00:34 CEST 2017 from (83.249.177.82)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: English self-consiousness

(Especially to Peter V) Good to see an English band mentioned here ... says the poster himself.

On a serious side: lack of English self-consiousness makes me sad. 'Renegades' was not the only for the many Englishmen unknown popular band up here. The leading Finnish progressive band BLUES SECTION had an Englishman as the leading vocalist: Jim Pembroke. Later on this band became WIGWAM with nothing but Band songs in their festival repertoire. I believe this band was mentioned in as a related band even here.

I don'need to mention Carnaby Street or Mary Quant or Vivianne Westwood or Malcolm McLaren or British blues, do I? The good news is that Mistress Therese will cick in your masochist ass with her leopard shoes!


Entered at Mon Apr 17 13:12:40 CEST 2017 from (83.249.177.82)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Cadillac - the music!

While almost unknown in Britain, Birmingham's own 'Renegades' had much success in Finland and Italy during the 1960s where they attracted a large following of fans. Incredibly, the group's popularity in those countries was to rival that of The Beatles! Their best known hit was 'Cadillac'. They weared clothes from South States army. They were _very_ funny. Girls liked them, too. The _g_ in the middle inspired the group 'Hurriganes'. Some say that 'Hurricanes' was already occupied. (BTW the same happened with 'Beatmakers'. There were Danish Beatmakers, Finnish Beatmakers and Norwegian Beatmakers.) Former 'Renegades' members started 'Kim and Cadillacs' in Italy. - These facts come from my vodka-clear memory and Wikipedia.


Entered at Mon Apr 17 11:30:04 CEST 2017 from (62.251.71.189)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Subject: Country on the Mersey: Louis Berry

….. his father on heroin .... and he himself was drowning in a pool of crime…... but it looks like he has saved his soul (link).


Entered at Mon Apr 17 06:57:54 CEST 2017 from (173.3.48.90)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Ray Davies interview.

Quite a Ray Davies interview linked.


Entered at Mon Apr 17 05:34:09 CEST 2017 from (65.92.192.116)

Posted by:

Bill M

Ian W: You think Bruce Langhorne received his tambourine as a dowry? Anyway, he and David Rea traded lead guitar duties on the first LP I owned, Gordon Lightfoot's first. Even now, 50 years after it was somehow scratched, I can't even think of "Long River", which seems to have been Langhorne's big moment on the album, without getting stuck in one particular groove.


Entered at Mon Apr 17 02:05:51 CEST 2017 from (86.25.242.77)

Posted by:

Ian W

Location: Bruce Langhorne and that 'tambourine'

I believe Bruce Langhorne's instrument is actually a dayereh or ghaval but the name varies with the country/culture and thus the language. It is found in Turkey, the Middle East and the lands east of that It's basically a simple frame head drum usually with some jingles fixed to it.

I don't know where Bruce Langhorne got the instrument. I do know that you can find, in print, the story about him buying it in Greenwich Village. I've seen it in an interview with him, though written in a way that leaves it unclear whether Langhorne actually said this or whether the writer inserted into the article after the interview.

June Skinner Sawyers, in her "Bob Dylan New York" book, wrote that Langhorne bought it in the Folklore Center. She gives n o source and I don't ever recall Izzy Young mentioning it and he has rarely been slow to blow his own trumpet about such things.

Bruce Langhorne was interviewed for what became "No Direction Home" and, though I'd have to check, I don't recall him saying anything about where he got the instrument in that film. Maybe it never came up in interview. Maybe it did but was edited out. Maybe my memory is playing me false. What I am saying is that I can't recall any occasion when Bruce Langhorne has stated, in plain language, where he got the 'tambourine'. I'd be pleased for anyone to plug the gap here.

Meanwhile, let me advance a possibility - no more than that - just a possibility. In 1962, Bruce Langhorne and Brother John Sellers were sponsored by the State Department to take American culture to far-flung places. I don't know the precise dates, nor the specific countries involved. I believe it involved parts of North Africa, parts of the Middle East and parts of Asia. Bruce Langhorne went away single and returned to the USA married! Perhaps it wasn't just a wife he gained on that trip.

John D mentioned that he performed on recordings by Richard and Mimi Farina. There is also a photograph of him performing with them (and Al Kooper) at one of the Newport Folk Festival workshops. The 'tambourine' lies is at Bruce's feet in the photograph.

Finally, let me end by blowing my own trumpet a bit. I have both seen Richard and Mimi Farina perform live and also seen the 'tambourine' in question (at the EMP exhibition in Seattle when it was displayed there).


Entered at Sun Apr 16 22:59:59 CEST 2017 from (114.75.194.96)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

If you scroll down the linked page there is an image of the MFBP cover signed by all five members of The Band.


Entered at Sun Apr 16 20:11:14 CEST 2017 from (173.3.50.206)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

JQ, my father woulda preferred new cars. In the 70s, 80s, he bought used cars & worked on em cause he had to. But he was pretty good at knowing what to buy & fixing em...


Entered at Sun Apr 16 20:06:48 CEST 2017 from (173.3.50.206)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Nothing wrong with leather interiors in cars, but for someone in the car all the time, -1) you slide 2) in what's more often than not a work vehicle that you're throwing samples, materials, possibly dirty workers, wet dogs, maybe sticking 12' long lengths of siding in once in a while, leather just ain't a great idea. My grand caravan, i actually once in a while had a sq or two of siding inside. Even my suburban, i had cloth... Last leather interior i bought was the 83 Coupe de ville. Did I write 85 before? I had just woken up. It was 83, i got rear ended in it in July of 85. I bought it Aug 83, in St Louis, i got creamed in it in NYC.


Entered at Sun Apr 16 19:31:14 CEST 2017 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Keeping those cars running

Jeff - You're right that there's likely plenty of cherry old caddys out there now but the amount of work required in keeping them that way is huge. Same for most classics. The image of back then spending the weekend working on cars with your buddies is true but pretty dam romantic - that level of attention was strictly required and not that much fun, just work. Anecdotally, my 2001 Honda has 300,000 miles on it now. It's a perfect car and all of the '01 bell & whistles still work. Mostly, I hate cars, so longevity potential is the biggest selling point for me. How come you don't like leather?


Entered at Sun Apr 16 18:50:52 CEST 2017 from (173.3.50.206)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

I bight a 85 Coupe De Ville brand new & it was delightful Pete. That might have been the last big year, or was close to the last. Once they downsized, Caddy's were awful. I can't speak for today's Caddy sedand or coupes, but about 5 years ago, I almost bought a one of the mid size Caddy SUVs. I rented one for a few days, & was in heaven. They are phenomenal.....Then I found a sweetheart deal on a new one. I don't recall why i talked myself out of it.... but i think it was the combination of only leather interiors being available & the fact that the interior was kinda small for hauling around what i was hauling around....


Entered at Sun Apr 16 18:44:03 CEST 2017 from (173.3.50.206)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

You can't judge Caddys by yours JQ. A used car is a used car is a used car. There's people that bought 71 Caddy's that kept em running years. But when it came to to used cars in the past, it paid to know what you were doing. My father used to cherry pick old Caddys, pick em for 100 - 200 bucks, work on em, & run em for 5- 6 years or better. Other periods he had a few Lloyds, other periods, he'd pick up Opal Cadets for 25 bucks, run em a few years...


Entered at Sun Apr 16 18:12:03 CEST 2017 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: My Caddy

I got a 1971 Coupe de Ville in 1978/79 and it too was a dream when cruising (cruise control too!) at speed in a straight line. Otherwise it was shit, most of the high tech gear didn't work: the clock and the deal where you could ould set any temp you want! The dashboard top had split open and the 8-track gave out quickly. Even though it had low mileage and was only 7 years old I think it cost under a grand. Back then if you got 100k miles out of a car you were very happy; most started having problems at around 40k. Except VWs, which were everywhere in SoCal then. Those 1950s and 60's cars were fun but no match for the easy longevity of today's.


Entered at Sun Apr 16 18:06:00 CEST 2017 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Caddy

I got a 1971 Coupe de Ville in 1978/79 and it too was a dream when cruising (cruise control too!) at speed in a straight line. Otherwise it was shit, most of the high tech gear didn't work: the clock and the deal where you could ould set any temp you want! The dashboard top had split open and the 8-track gave out quickly. Even though it had low mileage and was only 7 years old I think it cost under a grand. Back then if you got 100k miles out of a car you were very happy; most started having problems at around 40k. Except VWs, which were everywhere in SoCal then. Those 1950s and 60's cars were fun but no match for the easy longevity of today's.


Entered at Sun Apr 16 17:34:19 CEST 2017 from (99.229.224.79)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Jerry Garcia

Spent some time this weekend listening to the Jerry Garcia Band. Man can he interpret other people's material. The Band, Dylan and Clapton to name a few

Also remembering Levon Helm this week. Wednesday will be the 5th Anniversary of his passing. We all know what an extraordinary singer musician he was; but he was also one of the kindest and loyal friends a person could want. As he said to me many times. "Stay On The Good Foot Son." Plan to watch the film, "Love For Levon" this week.


Entered at Sun Apr 16 16:00:47 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Caddys and Lincolns

By the time we got to the 90s, I couldn’t see much if anything to distinguish a Cadillac from a Lincoln. In those days we were in Florida a lot, and the car hire people always had a “sucker deal” for British tourists which was to upgrade from “full size” to “luxury” for $50 for the week, so I rented both at various times. Both in European terms were awful cars that were like driving a rowing boat in heavy seas, not a match for a Mercedes or a Jaguar. I still recall trudging round a San Francisco car rental lot trying to get cases for a family of five into Cadillacs and Lincolns and failing, and ending up with a much smaller (outside) Lexus 300 which took them all with ease … no tyre taking up half the trunk, no wheel arches taking up the sides, and our hard cases would stand upright in a row. The Lexus also went round corners effortlessly, a feat Cadillac nor Lincoln managed to achieve.

But then we used a 1958 turquoise open top Cadillac for filming on Long Island and it was a thing of wonder. It looked great and appeared to float when in a straight line (and we lined up to drive it). The trouble was that by the mid-90s, Cadillacs didn’t look great anymore, and the driving experience of the competition had changed radically.


Entered at Sun Apr 16 14:34:32 CEST 2017 from (86.170.251.56)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Subject: JT

Thanks JT. I'm spending a lot of time with Bob just now. I like the atmosphere on the Dylan and the Dead. About eight years ago, I filled up the gaps in the Dylan collection (about 7 albums dotted in time from before Time Out of Mind) and am finally getting some time to listen closely to them and those which had been underplayed (when not babysitting).

I read somewhere that the remaster added a lot to the album, but I'm not an expert, and it's a long time since I heard the vinyl album, which I never owned. I remember reading negative reviews.

Playing and enjoying the album just now.


Entered at Sun Apr 16 14:04:27 CEST 2017 from (24.69.133.64)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: Dylan and the Dead

Dunc: You are not alone. I always liked their work together.


Entered at Sun Apr 16 13:43:35 CEST 2017 from (62.251.71.189)

Posted by:

Norbert

Web: My link

Thanks all

Someone asked me if I would ever go back to TLW…. take all the effort and the risks again for only 14.3 seconds?

I don’t know ….. maybe someday at the end of my life ….. I would do everything the same, only this time I would hug Rollie those 14.3 seconds and, with tears in my eyes, tell him to live his life to the max, to enjoy every minute, as I couldn’t tell him that he would die much too young ….

Maybe I would even stay for good there at TLW …. and perhaps I have already done that …. who can tell what we have done in the future? … could be some of us will do the same ….. thus, as Peter already said …. keep watching TLW dvd and if, one day, you see yourself, you know you’ve been there too … just like Rollie.

Although the Band is long gone, even now, it brings wonderful people together. Thanks Jan for keeping it in the air and you all for your contributions.

Time to walk the dog and in my head hike Mike Nomad’s path, just for the music.

... and Aretha Franklin still can sing.


Entered at Sun Apr 16 12:14:56 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: Back in them there old days..when Cadillac was King & Queen

Why would anyone in their right mind (or even if they weren't in their right mind) have chosen (or wanted to choose) a Lincoln over a Cadillac?

These days...yeah sure I guess the choice can be debated in a logical manner....back back then...I don't think so. Unless you worked for or had stock in Ford, that is. ; )


Entered at Sun Apr 16 11:10:38 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Cadillac (Records)

Thanks for more on Chess & Chuck. The $100 for clothes seemed like a rather more tight-fisted version of the old Cadillac stories, where the artist has the temerity to ask for earned royalties and is given the keys of a Cadillac with an arm round the shoulder and a pat on the head. Ten years later when the artist gets a lawyer, they discover that the Cadillac was charged against earnings at full price (no sign of the 20% bulk discount from the Cadillac dealer), plus a 10% arrangement fee, and 10% annual interest on the outstanding amount. Which they still owe.

Beware of generous label owners, managers and agents. In the brief period I worked in this, every item the artists ate or drank, paid for by the management, was recorded in a notebook to be set against future earnings. This went down to a cup of coffee on the motorway at 3 a.m.

In other words, I’ll bet Chuck repaid that $100 plus. Chuck was a very savvy business guy and learned that fast.

The Cadillac was a surprisingly powerful bait. A luxury GM car with added chrome … I mean it wasn’t a Rolls-Royce. And the artist didn't get to choose the colour, or say, 'Can I have a Lincoln instead?'


Entered at Sun Apr 16 08:35:11 CEST 2017 from (83.249.177.82)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Tedham "Norbert" Porterhouse

Thanks for posting your Nobel Prize lecture here.


Entered at Sun Apr 16 05:23:35 CEST 2017 from (74.12.50.181)

Posted by:

Bill M

Norbert: Good of you to share. One thing though - I thought the photons on the outside of the curve stayed at the speed of light while those on the inside slowed to a brisk jog for the duration of the curve, only speeding back up on the straightaway, where they merged with the new pack of full-speed protons going by. That's why they're called 'pokons', a contraction of 'pokey photons'.


Entered at Sun Apr 16 00:18:12 CEST 2017 from (173.3.50.206)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Buying clothes for Chuck

Pete, & anyone else, I linked the Marshall Chess Chuck Berry article again.

My issues start when Marshall states that for three blocks Delmar Blvd is like being in New Orleans. If i had the slightest inkling that was true I'd never bother going to New Orleans...The Loop really is nothing special, but it's better than nothing.....Stating Chuck was very influential in reviving that area refers to a widely suspected likely fact. The man that did revive the area, & owns, possibly as a major stockholder in a front containing Chuck & his estate, is Joe Edwards. Joe owns or controls Bluebrry Hill, & The Pageant, & probably 80 to 100% of the property ( or key property) in the Loop. I've never asked anyone who might know, but it's assumed & referred to by people who have reason to think it, that Chuck is a partner of Joe's. Berry & Edwards have been close since before the development began & Chuck & his music & memorabilia were a founding & permanent cornerstone of Blueberry Hill.

I don't know Chuck really took care of all his kids as Marshall wrote. First hand knowledge, one central offspring has had some real hard times financially. As in not being able to pay the electric bill. Just a couple years ago.

I found this section very disturbing, exceptionally rude & disrespectful." Then in 1963, when Chuck got out of prison he drove right to Chicago. I was 21 ........Chuck wasn’t dressed very well when he came in – his clothes looked a little raggedy – and my dad handed me a $100 bill and said, “Take him down to Max’s on 8th Street and buy him some new clothes. He’s going on the road soon.” In those days, that was like $500, and I got him a few outfits.."
How did he expect him to be dressed , if as he wrote he had just gotten out of prison & drove straight there. Of course he was tapped out after years in jail. Leonard handing Marshall a hundred bucks & telling him to buy him clothes, is possible, but I find it hard to imagine Chess disrespecting Chuck by having Marshall hold the dough & physically pay for the items. Sending Marshall as a guide to the store, friend of Chuck's, and a liaison to represent Chuck to the storeowner, would be respectful.If they were wiorried about Max overcharging Chuck, but knew they;d get a deal themselves, The right thing to do would be take Max on the side say, my pop is paying for this, Chcuk has the cash, but its my father's or my pop is paying, we'll come back and pay you later, or call my father, he'll tell you.. Neither my father or stepfather would have had me pay for the clothes and hold the money & I can;t imagine Leonard chess doing that. But even if Marshall held the money. the right way to tell the story would have been telling it from the perspective as a guide & friend. Not: "I got him a few outfits.." by writing it this way Marshall makes both he & his father look like real bastards.

Scolding The Stones & Clapton for not coming to the funeral was ridiculous. First of all, as possiby mentioned by Peter,, Clapton is ill, and the Stones might be busy. but, when it comes down to it, the only real tie the Stones have to him is a musical influence. No one could claim that The Hail Hail Rock & Roll film forged any great relationship between Clapton or Keith & Chuck, or thst either of them even appeared to enjoy the experience...If Keith and Clapton belonged at any Berry music related funeral is was Johnnie Johnson's. Hail Hail Rock & Roll was the beginning of permanent friendship for both of them with Johnnie..Clapton & Johnnie had a close , easy friendship. .Keith truly loved him, & produced his most successful solo album. Both employed him in live performances, Clapton extensively in those Royal Albert Hall Blues shows, Keith on record & live with the Xpensive Winos. Both Clapton & Keith sent floral arrangements & notes to Johnnie's wife & the ongoings. Apparently no one heavy came to Chuck's funeral. Gene Simmons (ha) was there cause he was in St Louis for a comic(s) convention. Apparently the big guns could really care less at this stage... In Johnnie's case, Bob Weir canceled 3 Ratdog gigs, chaertered a plane, & he, Jeff Chimenti, & Jay Lane came to St Louis for the wake & funeral. Bob performed at the wake.

Marshall is full of himself. I know he worked for The Stones for a while ages ago. He hasn't done shit n musically since. He did open a label, maybe Czyz, or something like that, & release one or a handful of very inferior recordings.

Again, other than the truth and his actual genius i could really care less about how people treat Chuck Berry. the man was a imperfect genius and one of the the most important people in the history f rock and roll and our culture.Socially and musically. But fuck Marshall Chess. If he was capable of caring about anyone he;d have gone to the trouble of thinking before he pumped out a piece that disrespected Chuck, his father, The Stones, & Eric Clapton. Fuck Marsghall chess


Entered at Sat Apr 15 22:00:29 CEST 2017 from (99.229.224.79)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Peter V Tony Blackburn

No Peter, unfortunately I have not had the pleasure.


Entered at Sat Apr 15 21:32:33 CEST 2017 from (86.170.251.56)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland
Web: My link

Subject: Music

But what do I know. BB Radio 6 had their annual music festival in Glasgow recently and they listed 11 important Glasgow albums. I have the Blue Nile album and Orange Juice's greatest hits, but that's all. I am an Eastcoaster, but obviously not keeping up.


Entered at Sat Apr 15 21:22:15 CEST 2017 from (86.170.251.56)

Posted by:

Dunc

Location: Scotland

Thanks, Norbert. Coincidentally, I played Rollie's album last week.

I'll listen to the Tony Blackburn Show, Peter. He goes back to a time when disc jockeys had to have an interest in music and be knowledgeable about it. Their role was to educate and inform you about music. That was their job.

Now it is to entertain you between songs, host quizzes, get people to wind up their dad on air etc. Some of it is slick enough, but different.

Still some good radio programmes. I like anything John Cavanagh does.

I'm playing the remastered Dylan and the Dead. I really like the album, but may be the only one? And I didn't know a lot about the Grateful Dead.


Entered at Sat Apr 15 17:13:40 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

See what you've done, Norbert … you've created a loop in time … loop in time … loop in time …


Entered at Sat Apr 15 17:11:48 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

John D, did you ever meet Tony Blackburn? I had an airport run this morning and discovered that he had taken over the late great Brian Matthews "Sounds of the 60s" radio show on BBC Radio Two … a fixture on Saturday mornings here. Brian Matthews was pre-recorded, but it's changed to live … and was much livelier. I took a stack of CDs for the 2 hour drive and ended up listening to the radio all the way instead … though they moved it from 8 am to 10 am, to 6 am to 8 am … perfect for me today. Tony Blackburn used to be the sound of my morning commute in the 70s too … always very good on soul / Tamla stuff.


Entered at Sat Apr 15 17:07:53 CEST 2017 from (172.12.248.174)

Posted by:

Paul

Location: Chicago

The Marshall Chess piece was worth a read, he's got stories to tell. but we all tend to think we're at the center of every story, and that everyone should fly in if we did. My main memory of Marshall is that Godfathers and Sons segment of the Scorsese "The Blues" PBS series. Chess and the session musicians took all kinds of bows about the great Electric Mud sessions, while carefully avoiding mentioning what Muddy and Wolf thought of that stuff.


Entered at Sat Apr 15 17:01:56 CEST 2017 from (99.229.224.79)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Bruce Langhorne

The title character of Bob Dylan's song "Mr. Tambourine Man" was inspired by Langhorne, who used to play a large Turkish frame drum in performances and recordings. The drum, which Langhorne purchased in a music store in Greenwich Village, had small bells attached around its interior, giving it a jingling sound much like a tambourine. Langhorne used the instrument most prominently on recordings by Richard and Mimi Fariña. The drum is now in the collection of the Experience Music Project, in Seattle, Washington.

In addition to inspiring the title character of "Mr. Tambourine Man", Langhorne played the electric guitar countermelody on the song. His guitar is also prominent on several other songs on Dylan's Bringing It All Back Home album, particularly "Love Minus Zero/No Limit" and "She Belongs to Me"; he also played the lead guitar parts on "Subterranean Homesick Blues", "Outlaw Blues", "Bob Dylan's 115th Dream" and "Maggie's Farm". He also played the guitar for Dylan's television performances of "It's Alright Ma (I'm Only Bleeding)" and "It's All Over Now, Baby Blue on The Les Crane Show in February 1965, a month after the Bringing It All Back Home sessions. Two years earlier, Langhorne performed on "Corrina, Corrina", on the album The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan, and on the outtake "Mixed-Up Confusion", which was eventually released on Biograph. Years later, Langhorne played on tracks for Dylan's album Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid.


Entered at Sat Apr 15 15:37:12 CEST 2017 from (70.26.123.234)

Posted by:

Mike Nomad

Norbert, I've had those same trips through space and time that you described but, alas, no military spy plane in my ignominious past. I passed up my great Winterland opportunity in '76 because of a marriage in near-collapse. But in my mind, and on many occasions, I've been there, oh, yeah, along with Rollie and Jack Wingate and a few others here who are no longer here, in a state of somnambulatory exhilaration. But, dammit, no turkey and dressing; for some reason I keep arriving to the tables too late. Just there in time for the music, man.


Entered at Sat Apr 15 14:19:18 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: F*ckin' around with the space/time thingy

You'd better be careful that you view the DVD of TLW at the proper angle & speed or else that full head of hair could be a Trump-like 'do or something similiar to the one that graces the head of that nutbar who presides of the northern part of the Korean peninsula. ; )


Entered at Sat Apr 15 13:36:19 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Norbert, I’m worried about what you’ve done to time. I’m now terrified to put TLW DVD on. If we spot you in the crowd, we have to assume that we will then look out of the window, or watch the TV news and find everything else is different. I have a full head of hair. Trump isn’t president. Britain’s happily in the EU, Manchester United and Chelsea are in the fourth division. Bournemouth are due to play Liverpool in an All-British European Cup Final. Each have four players from the World Cup winning England team. I’m plucking up the courage to slip the DVD on and hoping to see you.


Entered at Sat Apr 15 13:30:49 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Marshall Chess & Chuck

The Marshall Chess interview had some snippets of interest. I can see that The Rolling Stones owed Chuck Berry a massive debt, but Chess mentions Eric Clapton too, which seems ignorant of the R&B and blues scene … and lead guitar playing. While The Yardbirds recorded Let it Rock in 1963, and Too Much Monkey Business in 1964, I thought the distinctive thing about Eric Clapton was that he reached further back in the blues, and was unusual among British guitarists of the 60s in breaking away from the Chuck Berry style. I know he jammed with Chuck and Keef, and my memory is patchy, but I can’t recall Clapton covering a Chuck Berry song since The Yardbirds. I’m sure he jammed on a few because that’s what everyone does, but in a long list of blues / R&B covers, Chuck Berry songs are conspicuous by their absence. So what is Marshall Chess's point?


Entered at Sat Apr 15 12:08:29 CEST 2017 from (62.251.71.189)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: strictly confidential

Let me begin this post with a warning dear Band fan; …There is a lot of fake news around on the WWW at the moment, please be aware, thank you.

I always double check my stories, but this time I don’t have to check a single thing cause I experienced this story I want to tell you myself, although I could never talk about. But just hours ago my confidentiality statement, I once signed, expired. So here it is …

As most of you know after my PhD in physics they asked me to serve our Majesty. For my duty I had to join the united forces in Berlin. I came in contact with the Berlin Brigade (USA) and I agreed to participate in a, back then, secret military intelligence project.

A Convair 6 RB-36D Peacemaker Mohawk, flying at a high altitude, brought me to Mount Weather, Berryville, Virginia.

It was like walking in a science fiction movie there in those huge bunkers deep underneath Berryville. For me, as a scientist, to experience the unbelievable future there was like a kid walking in a candy store.

I found out they were experimenting to bend light around objects, and so making matter invisible. I joint my team gladly and for month we, a top team of scientists, worked day and night exploring the future.

I don’t want to be too technical here, after all this is still a Band site …. but in short … to bend light you have to play with, gravity, space and time.
If light, forced by a gigantic artificial dark mass, bends, the particles on the outside of the curve, have to travel faster than the ones in the, shorter, inside corner. This means that light on the outside travels faster than the speed of light. Now every first year physics student can tell you what happens then: You travel back through space and time…..

It sounds absurd and you won’t believe it but it is actually possible and it already has been done, although you need equipment of a billion dollars or more.

Anyway I volunteered to make a short test trip back in time. Secretly I chose Thanksgiving 1976 as my destination time and my target location was Winterland San Francisco. And so it happened, I was for 14.3 seconds at the Last Waltz. Rick was singing It Makes No Difference, Garth played his little Sax, the crowed was roaring and Rollie sitting next to me and I shook his hand.

Rollie later never mentioned this but that wasn’t his fault, but he couldn’t do so cause I came in from the future. …

Would he have noticed me, later after the concert, that would have altered the future in the past. Now that is not only forbitten by law but it is also not possible. If you can change the future by traveling back in time there wouldn’t be a singular future anymore. Although scientist can do much, this is still only up to God.

Now every time Rollie mentioned his presence at TLW here, I had to bite my tongue, which was not always easy…..but I can assure you …. Rollie was at The Last Waltz, just like me.

Now eat, drink and love … celebrate life … Happy Easter all.


Entered at Sat Apr 15 06:18:06 CEST 2017 from (67.84.78.233)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: Divining Rods - You Don't Miss Your water. I'm Gonna Go Down by The Water

Read what Jack De Johnette said about Garth & the Band. Its brief, but i bet he could talk about them for days..... DeJohnette has lived in Woodstock a long time. My cousin's twin girls were in his local band, on bass & drums.


Entered at Sat Apr 15 05:20:21 CEST 2017 from (67.84.78.233)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

That last subject line shoulda been Mr. Tambourine Man. And here i was, proud of myself for noticing i had left out the period after Mr & went back to install it.


Entered at Sat Apr 15 05:18:23 CEST 2017 from (67.84.78.233)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Mr. Tambourineman

Bruce Langhorne has died. ZimmerMen & Women know who he is.


Entered at Sat Apr 15 03:42:19 CEST 2017 from (67.84.78.233)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Linked is a very bullshit, self serving, & disrespectful piece about Chuck Berry & his funeral written by Marshall Chess. I could go through it to make my points, but pay attention to the choices of words & phrases & you'll see what I mean. It doesn't bother me one bit but it speaks volumes about the author.


Entered at Sat Apr 15 02:15:03 CEST 2017 from (67.84.78.233)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Jerry, Bob, Peter.. Should that have been "Pseudosubseriously speaking" or "Subpseudoseriously speaking"?
I know, I know.........Probably something else entirely.


Entered at Sat Apr 15 01:43:49 CEST 2017 from (67.84.78.233)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: Pesudosubseriously speaking.

Bob,although this is a public forum, the establishment & popularity of FB has pretty much relegated this GB to almost private status. Only the spammers bother us.. So i think there's pretty much a limit to what a generally private forum about The Band and some related points of interest to us that been here a while can pull off these days. If that don't make you feel like a relic I can do better... LOL


Entered at Fri Apr 14 23:51:13 CEST 2017 from (24.69.133.64)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: aspiring

Thank you, Bob F. I think maybe I'll go back to school and see if I can maybe shed the 'pseudo' and become the real thing. On second thought, maybe no.


Entered at Fri Apr 14 23:40:28 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

JT, as far as I'm concerned you don't post enough. I always enjoy your posts.

John D, just a little sarcasm I guess. If people are getting their point across that's good enough for me. Probably because I'm the one around here with the worst grammar. lol


Entered at Fri Apr 14 21:42:15 CEST 2017 from (62.251.71.189)

Posted by:

Norbert

Subject: Friday

Also The Band had a cross to carry …. but maybe that dark side just saved us all .... and made The Band superior under God.


Entered at Fri Apr 14 20:21:15 CEST 2017 from (24.69.133.64)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: 2X

And while I'm at it, I'll like 'double down' .


Entered at Fri Apr 14 19:48:01 CEST 2017 from (99.229.224.79)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Bob F

I must have missed a thread. What is this intellectual thing about driving people away. I think I might know what you mean; but I don't fully understand. Care to elaborate? Thanks Bob. Hope family is well.


Entered at Fri Apr 14 18:05:37 CEST 2017 from (24.114.65.188)

Posted by:

Bill M

Thanks Peter V. Interesting. Odd that the designated begging day comes but once a year - a lot less frequently than hunger and poverty.


Entered at Fri Apr 14 17:32:19 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Maundy Money

Good point, Bill. Wiki has a good bit, and in Britain the monarch gives out "Maundy money" to pensioners at a selected cathedral every year, thus "maundy" comes from Latin for begging. Maundy money is new mint coins from the year and collectible. "Maundy money … so good to me."


Entered at Fri Apr 14 16:36:18 CEST 2017 from (24.69.133.64)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: pseudo intellectual

Bob F: Interesting thought. It occurs to me that I'm not sure whether that means I'm not contributing enough.


Entered at Fri Apr 14 15:30:05 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Food for Thought

I wonder if knowing the intellectual members of the Guestbook are critiquing everything that's written leads to so few contributors.

Kev, thanks for the tip. We will definitely check out The Bureau. Recently loved Spiral and Braque, two great French shows.


Entered at Fri Apr 14 15:29:34 CEST 2017 from (24.114.74.21)

Posted by:

Bill M

Subject: blowing', like, in the wind ...

Peter V: A church I often drive by always has, at this time of year, a list of special services, Palm Sunday, Maundy Thursday, Good Friday, Easter Sunday. Is the 'maundy' related 'maudit' (damned)? It occurred to me a few days ago that if it did, it makes John Phillips's great song "Monday Monday" even better.


Entered at Fri Apr 14 15:10:11 CEST 2017 from (24.69.133.64)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: "There There"

And then since we are talking about innovation in speech that grates, there is the recent 'there there' referring to an actuality or event(s). This is not grandma giving you consolation ('There there, Beatrice. It's not so bad now, is it?) but rather its a new person or commentator saying "There's no there there."

So, reaching out like going forward from strength to strength in this, let us fill the airwaves with word brutality so indeed, no one will perceive what the f**k we are talking about.


Entered at Fri Apr 14 14:04:35 CEST 2017 from (89.242.85.9)

Posted by:

Solomon

Subject: Sodajerker Podcast

Robbie was a guest recently.


Entered at Fri Apr 14 11:43:09 CEST 2017 from (174.1.36.190)

Posted by:

Lisa

And moving forward is so prevalent that hardly a sentence is spoken without its being tacked on the end. Which when you stop to think about it is ridiculous - unless you have a time machine, there's only one way you are going, and that's forward. But maybe I'm being too literal here.


Entered at Fri Apr 14 11:26:22 CEST 2017 from (174.1.36.190)

Posted by:

Lisa

Another word that politicians around here tend to misuse is fulsome. But reaching out and moving on seem to pepper every pronouncement you hear, especially these days with a provincial election just around the corner. The "reaching out" is especially irritating, as it is usually used in the context of trying to help, when you know damn well that said reaching out is only done when repeated attempts at contact have been completely ignored until the issue goes public.


Entered at Fri Apr 14 10:16:41 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

Subject: What's not to like?

So, I'm, like, ya know...then she's, like...and then I go, like,...and she's all like...

Whoa, dude, like...

; )


Entered at Fri Apr 14 09:46:19 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Move forward …

Good one … politicians love this one. In Britain it became Tony Blair's catch phrase, "Let's move on …"

It was his response to all difficult questions. "So why did you lie about weapons of mass destruction? "

"Let's move on …"

It spread like wildfire through the Labour party, then the other parties caught the virus too.

The other politician virus was started by the nasty Conservative, Michael Gove. This is "End of." It means "End of story." and means I'm not saying any more on the subject. It makes the speaker sound like an arrogant arsehole.


Entered at Fri Apr 14 09:40:34 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Upon General Ignorance …

A fuss has broken out over here over Tesco supermarkets advertising campaign "We make Good Friday Better."

Today is a bank (public) holiday here, and the religious communities have responded … er … robustly. There was never anything "good" about the crucifixion, and the name Good Friday is held to relate back to the reluctance to name the deity, so is a re-casting of "God's Friday."


Entered at Fri Apr 14 09:33:59 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: The language nerve

Has this bureaucrat-speak reached (or come from) North America?

We are reaching out robustly to embrace the challenges in the (xxx) community.

ROBUST appears in whatever a politician or bureaucrat says on Radio 4 in the mornings. Why do you "embrace" a "challenge" which anyone else would call a problem? And we all recall that Elvis Presley hit song "In the Community."

IN THE COMMUNITY

And his single-parent carer is upset

Because if there's a challenge she cannot embrace

It is another under-privileged child to feed

In the community (… community)



Entered at Fri Apr 14 08:03:36 CEST 2017 from (67.84.78.233)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: A bunch of hacks.

Ahah! I remembered. The new usage of "hack" annoys me. To hack is a verb, to hack away at something, and a hack is an incompetent person. Now people use "hack" as a easy way to accomplish something, or a shortcut, secret method... It makes no sense whatsoever.


Entered at Fri Apr 14 07:11:53 CEST 2017 from (24.114.68.38)

Posted by:

Kevin J

I see that Bob Dylan has settled into a nice encore of Ballad of a Thin Man and Blowin In the Wind..........at least the casuals will go away somewhat happy........ But looking at the regular set-list night after night these days one does think back to guitarists like RR and Larry Campbell who Bob would make work pretty hard and just smile for Charlie and think - well as uninteresting as your night may be at least it is pretty much stress free !

For Bob F and any other DVD movie/tv fans, the French spy drama "The Bureau" seasons 1&2 might just be the best show ever made in depicting what the spy life is really all about. Highly recommended.


Entered at Fri Apr 14 04:24:20 CEST 2017 from (24.69.133.64)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: From strength to strength

So, like reach out and go forward from strength to strength. Whatever.


Entered at Fri Apr 14 02:02:41 CEST 2017 from (67.84.78.233)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Yes Lisa. "Reach out" has driven me insane from the first time i heard it used by a non wise guy who wasn't relating a wise guy experience use it.

"Crazy" has that newish usage that is inexplicable, as is "sick" and there's one most recent one that is just plain seriously disturbing. I can't think of it.

the kind of slurred, strange, manufactured, incomprehensible accent that people use today in the United states drives me insane, It's not even civil. Why people want to sound like morons is beyond me.

"Shred" for guitar playing is ridiculous. It was started as way to refer to a style, now it's becomes a term used for playing well. It's a horrible term.

Don't get me started on tattoos. guys that wanted to have one, two, three semi normal tattoos, sure, why not? Gals that might want a small one in a non obvious place, hey, it's their body. But these people that cover themselves, and women who ruin their natural beauty, it just drives me nuts. And it's the rage for some time now, and ever growing. I don't get how people don't realize they look like morons. but the question that i always have to ask is why? If you're a Marine, sure. Navy, Army, okay, but otherwise, i just don;t understand it and never will.


Entered at Fri Apr 14 00:11:00 CEST 2017 from (174.1.36.190)

Posted by:

Lisa

"So" let's all "reach out" and "dialogue" as we "move forward".

(Sound of teeth grinding.)


Entered at Thu Apr 13 23:32:13 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter v

JT, like as a hesitation device has now passed to like (verb) and like (comparing things) in frequency. So - you can't stop it unfortunately. It is here to stay. Whatever. Nor 'so' as the initial word or even the lone word in a sentence. So? We all have our own language nerve. One of mine is leaped instead of leapt.


Entered at Thu Apr 13 12:53:00 CEST 2017 from (24.69.133.64)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: Using words painful to the ear to communicate

Kevin: You struck a raw nerve:

1. Like (every 4th word in a sentence)
2. So (starts a sentence)
3. Whatever (disdain)
4. F**k (ever 3rd word in a sentence)

This is English destruction at its most prolific. These grate when I hear them. I use the subway (underground) in Toronto often now and there are often kids communicating loudly and this is what I hear. 'So' has invaded the media in places like CNN. What next?


Entered at Thu Apr 13 07:18:36 CEST 2017 from (67.84.78.233)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Kev, I, & I'd expect most people that would post here would also be, am totally against cosmetic surgery. If cosmetically improving surgery is performed as part of a necessary surgery that's another story. But I'm against nose jobs for the cosmetic sake of em, even ears jobs for the cosmetic sake. And I'm certainly against breast implants. They're really no fun for a guy at all, & i can't see why a woman would want em. Or even feel good about em. And I don't know why any guy would want his lady to get em... I know some wealthy older women who keep getting face lifts, & it gets scary. If you're old, look old. What's the big deal?

I also think it's ridiculous for guys to color their hair. You're aging. Look like it. Old guys with brown, blonde, or black hair, well, it's just plain old ridiculous...I don't give a fuck who they are.


Entered at Thu Apr 13 07:11:31 CEST 2017 from (24.114.68.38)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Millennials...........

......has anyone else noticed that 99% of all millennials start every sentence with "So...."


Entered at Thu Apr 13 07:03:02 CEST 2017 from (24.114.68.38)

Posted by:

Kevin J

"On a morning from a Bogart movie in a country where they turn back time/You go strolling through the crowd like Peter Lorre contemplating a crime"...........Just heard "Year of the Cat" and realized that I hadn't seen Casablanca when I first heard this song....... I guess massive hits still exist but.....oh what a big one that one was.

on the J.Geils front, if anyone has a wife or girlfriend/mistress looking at plastic surgery - do point out Faye Dunnaway and that should be sufficient to discourage such procedures - yikes.


Entered at Thu Apr 13 00:01:24 CEST 2017 from (75.98.19.132)

Posted by:

Bill M

b.lee: Thanks for the story. Don't be shy - tell us what happened with Charlie Daniels's crew ...


Entered at Wed Apr 12 23:33:54 CEST 2017 from (72.78.140.180)

Posted by:

b.lee

Location: DE, USA

Subject: J. Geils

Stop me if I've told this one before...

Came very close to meeting the J. Geils Band when they played at my college back in the '70s. The Full House album was in heavy rotation in my Freshman dorm, but this was a few years later. I was on the concert committee and would hang out during stage setup, lending a hand as needed and making beer and liquor runs since the college could not provide alcohol.

I came across a crewman futilely trying to de-burr the top of a high hat stand with a round file. I pointed out that he should have a flat file, and if he needed one, I had on in my car. So I fetched it, showed him the correct way to use it (heck, I was studying to be a shop teacher) and ended up selling it to him, since when I pointed out he could get one at any Sears store, he said, "When the hell do you think I get to go to Sears?"

He then asked if I would like to go "backstage" (the gym's locker room) and meet the band after the show. Unfortunately, I told him, my own band had a gig that night and I was not going to be able to see the show. But I did meet all of the crew, who took a short break to make sure I was properly toasted for the rest of the afternoon. Absolutely one of the most friendly road crews I ever encountered. (Don't get me started on Charlie Daniel's)

My favorite was that they put down a sheet of Lexan and sprayed it with WD-40 for Magic Dick to do his slides on. Showmanship, baby, showmanship. I heard it was a great show.


Entered at Wed Apr 12 20:35:24 CEST 2017 from (67.84.78.233)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Yes Bob, early on they were a damn good r & b band, some blues etc. the early records showed that..Their own songwriting in that vein was never great... When they found their "niche" obviously they knew how to connect big time commercially while playing the schlock they wrote superbly. That was a band full of musical greats. Danny Klein the bass player has been doing a J Geils music show for years, maybe he calls it Full House? Magic Dick works too, blues dhows with Ray Norcia, Anson Funderburgh, and Mark Hummell, and duo shows. He recently played The Falcon with an accompaniest on guitar.


Entered at Wed Apr 12 15:05:28 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: J Geils Band

Jeff, interesting points. I've always felt they were over achievers. They were a hard working band for many years. Live Full House is a monster record. Truly one of the great American bands.


Entered at Wed Apr 12 14:47:26 CEST 2017 from (203.160.29.153)

Posted by:

Fred

The only J Geils Band song I really liked was Love Stinks. It sums up rather succinctly every Italian opera ever written. : )


Entered at Wed Apr 12 13:47:44 CEST 2017 from (24.114.84.232)

Posted by:

Bill M

Location: Tronto

The J Geils Band was phenomenal live. I saw them at Maple Leaf Gardens in '75, sandwiched between Gentle Giant and Jefferson Starship. But I never liked their records - not before seeing them, and not after seeing them. (Gentle Giant was a different story - very impressive live, very impressive on record too, as I came to learn.)


Entered at Wed Apr 12 09:35:59 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Another one gone. I always liked Centrefold.


Entered at Wed Apr 12 09:10:20 CEST 2017 from (67.84.77.44)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Kev, there is no denying the musicianship of all the members of J Geils. And there is no denying the writers in the band knew how to write hits. But personally, i think all of them have / had far greater musical talent and ability than the music that band made popular. But, again, there's nothing wrong and alot to be said for musicians looking at it as a job... Though it does sometimes prevent a lot of great music from getting made.


Entered at Wed Apr 12 07:58:00 CEST 2017 from (24.114.57.7)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: J. Geils

Jeff A: Thank you. Sadly, I seem to get all my news these days from the Band GB - and most of it grim.............that said, I have a very special place in my heart and musical memory bank for J. Geils Band and the song "Musta Got Lost".... I remember my older brother having it playing on his stereo with what seemed a 20 minute introduction and thinking at the time that it was the best thing I had ever heard ! Later came Faye Dunnaway and everything else but at the time I couldn't think of rock n roll getting any better...I was just a kid and high cheekbones and low cut dresses and all that......

Songwriting: Weirdest thing about the J.Geils Band is that it really should have been called the Seth Justman Band as he wrote almost 100 % of the songs along with singer Peter Wolf with J. Geils contributing very little in terms of composition.


Entered at Wed Apr 12 02:13:57 CEST 2017 from (67.84.77.44)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

J. Geils has died.


Entered at Tue Apr 11 10:41:19 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Ian, email me … the editor of a major UK magazine told me no British music mag had ever paid to reproduce a record sleeve, or a record company advert.


Entered at Tue Apr 11 09:17:44 CEST 2017 from (86.25.242.77)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Questions about images and copyright

What is the situation when one wishes to reproduce, say, a record company advertisement that includes a photograph of an artist or several artists?


Entered at Mon Apr 10 17:37:05 CEST 2017 from (75.98.19.132)

Posted by:

Bill M

NwC: I'm sure he's saving his Nobel thoughts for the next album. This Sinatra business can't be intended to go on forever.

Bob, as we know, generally writes alone, but perhaps we could take in upon ourselves to come up with some song titles. Nothing tawdry like "Kid Dynamite" or "No Bells For This Boy"...


Entered at Mon Apr 10 17:27:39 CEST 2017 from (83.249.177.82)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Bob Dylan didn't give his Nobel Prize lecture in Scania Northwest either.

No Nobel Prize lecture was embedded in the last (so far) visit in Sweden.

WHAT A GREAT GB POST IT WOULD HAVE BEEN!


Entered at Mon Apr 10 11:18:17 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Unless it's on children's illustrated books, illustration / photo is a fee basis for most books. You will pay more for higher-resolution, and agencies will ask for more if you want to use it for a cover / jacket picture. No doubt even more for advertising. Usually you pay for the size you're going to print it. As with text, and recordings, illustrations go out of copyright with time.

However, galleries and museums will charge for a picture from their collections. In fact they hold no intellectual rights, but you need the copy. A few years ago we wanted a famous painting for a book, and paid an art museum for what turned out to be a dusty 35 mm slide. It obviously dated from the time, decades ago, when museums sold slide sets to visitors. It was faded colour, marked. Awful. And they charged as if they'd been down and taken a clean new photo. The publisher paid, but then we scanned the same picture from a high quality art book I already had.

Wiki reckons that art museums hold no rights to 2D reproductions of famous works. They would hold rights if you took a photo showing it in situ in its frame. I am sure Wiki is right, but on the whole commercial publishers would prefer to simply pay a fee (they're usually not that high) and avoid future discussion.


Entered at Mon Apr 10 10:45:50 CEST 2017 from (114.75.202.247)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

A couple of clips of Rick I hand't seen before.


Entered at Mon Apr 10 08:28:11 CEST 2017 from (210.86.73.92)

Posted by:

Rod

There are a couple of bars/cafes around town that have large images of Dylan on the wall - taken from photos but not photos (eg the one holding the Jazz bass - amongst others). I wonder if they have to pay a royalty for those?


Entered at Sun Apr 9 08:28:32 CEST 2017 from (114.75.203.96)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

Just came across this footage of Fotheringay from 1970 including a version of Too Much of Nothing.


Entered at Sat Apr 8 23:20:10 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

I assume that their indemnity means they will pick up the costs of any legal judgement. That means publishers can relax (and maybe get rid of their own copyright departments). In the millions of transactions, they will be caught out on one or two, but that's insignificant in the amount of money flowing in.


Entered at Sat Apr 8 22:18:42 CEST 2017 from (114.75.203.96)

Posted by:

Wallsend

I have seen statements in books etc saying things like 'Every effort has been made to find the copyright holder ...... If anyone has a copyright claim over this photo we will compensate them' etc This may be how they provide an indemnity against claims. Unless something is really worth a lot on money I doubt people would sue.


Entered at Sat Apr 8 21:46:22 CEST 2017 from (67.84.77.112)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Pete, what I don't follow is how H-G can provide indemnification from the actual owner of a copyright, if the actual copyright owner is some one else & decides to sue some one who infringed, but paid H-G. I'm thinking H -G collects enough they can afford to settle some rare cases where they get caught, or even lose some. It'd be nice to see them get reamed.


Entered at Sat Apr 8 14:02:13 CEST 2017 from (213.47.227.228)

Posted by:

Christoph

Subject: Thanks für the library

Great library of lyrics - grateful to have this huge resource. Greetings from Vienna!


Entered at Sat Apr 8 10:13:21 CEST 2017 from (114.75.198.39)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Large companies screwing little people. Same old story. This is why I don't have too many scruples about downloading stuff although I do like to support new bands etc by buying their product.


Entered at Sat Apr 8 10:00:53 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

The Authors magazine has had something on picture copyrights. Someone whose own photos illustrated their book, and put them on their blog free, found they were "on sale" by the conglomerate H-G that bought up every other agency. On tracing, it seems they will supply them (priced by size) and indemnify users against legal action. They did not claim to own the copyright and admit they could be found free elsewhere, but they provide that indemnity.

Similarly, I wanted to use some 19th century book illustrations, long out of copyright for a new ELT version of the story. I had the physical book in superb condition. It wasn't even expensive, so I could have cut out the pages to get a totally flat scan. The publisher preferred to pay H-G for exactly the same long out of copyright illustrations, because it was no hassle for them and they wanted the legal indemnity. To me, it was mad. The book cost £20 and had all 12 pictures. I have a good scanner. They paid vastly more for electronic files of them. Dumb.


Entered at Sat Apr 8 09:30:29 CEST 2017 from (210.86.73.92)

Posted by:

Rod

Yes Jeff, I know. Great lyrics though.


Entered at Sat Apr 8 09:20:03 CEST 2017 from (210.86.73.92)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: picture

Crazy stuff. Never thought it was that great a picture anyway.


Entered at Sat Apr 8 01:59:53 CEST 2017 from (173.3.49.178)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

odds are the law firm is representing the copyright holder. Wally, there are all kinds of companies with all kinds of programs that search for both copyright & trademark infringement. I think some are called things like copyright alert system, etc etc


Entered at Sat Apr 8 00:05:23 CEST 2017 from (174.1.36.190)

Posted by:

Lisa

I feel like I'm missing something here - if they don't own the copyrights how can they claim that they do, to the point of threatening lawsuits? I know a lot of crazy, unfair stuff goes down these days but this seems a bit much ... nobody's challenged or exposed them?


Entered at Fri Apr 7 23:25:00 CEST 2017 from (114.75.198.39)

Posted by:

Wallsend

This copyright issue is interesting. I recently put up some copyrighted material on youtube for teaching purposes with the setting on 'private' (which I had been told was OK to do). A few weeks later I noticed there was a message underneath saying 'contains copyright material'. When I clicked on it there was another message saying 'the copyright holder allows you to use this material but ads may appear in it'. I was wondering how this kind of thing is detected, presumably by some kind of bot.


Entered at Fri Apr 7 21:51:11 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Jan: Alternatively, send Warner an invoice for $1000 for promotional activity. They might just pay it. One hand certainly won't have a clue what the other hand is doing. Perhaps $1000 is so small they'll overlook it. Make to $10,000 and they might just pay.


Entered at Fri Apr 7 21:46:52 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Jan, this is happening all the time. Hulton-Getty (spit on the ground every time their name gets mentioned!) continually put pictures up claiming copyright. In fact they don't have it at all, but a publisher I work for prefers to pay Hulton-Getty as a source (because it indemnifies them against any copyright action).

It's all down to ambulance chasing lawyers. The answer is in two words. The second one is "off" and then ask please demonstrate and quantify what revenue is lost by this picture being posted on this site at lo-res.

The other is , bollocks, just take it off and avoid the hassle, A songwriter friend says he gets several lawyers (spit on the ground) a month approaching him asking if they can follow up internet copyright infringements and get him money.

These people are filth, because at least we can see the motivation of these Nigerian princesses with $10,000,000 in the bank who want to give you half. These filfth are American and don't need the money.

But fuck it, take the picture off. It's their loss of free promotion.


Entered at Fri Apr 7 19:28:09 CEST 2017 from (100.34.127.122)

Posted by:

PSB

Subject: Bert Berns film

John, thanks for your comments on the Berns movie. A friend of mine named Bob Sarles co-directed the film with Berns' son. Bob does a lot of film work for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, for instance the bios that appear on the TV show and also at the museum. He also made the film on Mike Bloomfield that comes with the box Columbia put out a couple of years ago.


Entered at Fri Apr 7 18:24:50 CEST 2017 from (84.212.112.85)

Posted by:

jh

Subject: Weird

We just received a bordering-on-paranoid aggressive e-mail from some copyright protector agency or something working for Warner, insisting that we must remove a small b/w photo of Robbie with Scorsese, lifted from the sleeve of the 1982 soundtrack album "The King of Comedy". If this level of weird behaviour from major media actors is going to continue, a lot of fan sites like this one will have to fold. Jeez.


Entered at Fri Apr 7 16:48:36 CEST 2017 from (173.3.49.178)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Someone, maybe 00Kevin asked about streaming pay rates, maybe Spotify... I think it was Kevin in relation to Drake. Well, hit that link & choo gots some perspective.


Entered at Fri Apr 7 16:26:46 CEST 2017 from (99.229.224.79)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Doc on Bert Berns

As you all know Bert Berns aka Russell wrote Cry To Me; which was recorded by Solomon Burke. There's a great story in the doc; about Freddie Scott recording this song as well. Sadly Freddie's twin sister had just been killed. He was obviously heavily distraught and was in tears. They asked him to come into the studio and record Cry To Me. He said he was much too upset to record. They said, "No Better Time To Record This Song." He went into the studio and recorded the song and you can tell these words are at time hard to get out. It's available on The Best of Freddie Scott. Great story and great recording.


Entered at Fri Apr 7 15:59:40 CEST 2017 from (74.14.7.247)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto

Subject: Dylan in Europe/Scandinavia

A couple of Dylan Scandinavia shows have been put up on Expecting Rain and I have listened. Good to very good. Competent. Stand up well with the last 20 years of shows. The standards are being presented with aplomb while the original Dylan songs are sung well and with conviction. When I listen I am reminded of the commitment of a 75 year old man to the popular song. I know there are differing opinions. Given what has occurred so far in only the first 3 shows, there may be other Dylan originals inserted over the next couple of months. Stay tuned.


Entered at Fri Apr 7 14:29:08 CEST 2017 from (99.229.224.79)

Posted by:

John D

Subject: Correction

Line should read...."I think the Bert Berns doc is one of the best music docs I have ever, ever seen." Jan, we have to put in an edit button one day. We use it here; in Toronto; on a radio forum


Entered at Fri Apr 7 14:26:11 CEST 2017 from (99.229.224.79)

Posted by:

John D

Location: Toronto

Subject: PSB Bert Berns

PSB. I think the Bert Berns doc maybe one of the best music docs I have ever, ever seen. What a genius he was. I learnt things; about the man I did not know. As a producer and songwriter he was in a class of his own. I was told it was shown here in a docs festival in March; but was not aware of it. The Bang story to its fullest was information I was not completely aware of. His son is to be commended for such a great story. A wonderful tribute to his Father.


Entered at Fri Apr 7 11:37:52 CEST 2017 from (173.3.49.178)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Rod, that lyric has nothing to do with Jim Marshall or his amps.


Entered at Fri Apr 7 10:12:53 CEST 2017 from (114.75.198.53)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

Interesting interview with Jim Marshall.


Entered at Fri Apr 7 09:47:04 CEST 2017 from (210.86.73.92)

Posted by:

Rod

Subject: Jim Marshall

I don't mean to be disrespectful in any way of Jim Marshall but these lyrics from Uncle Tupelo immediately sprang to mind:

There's a guitar leaning on a Marshall stack

Used to sound like the sun on the horizon

Now I think we've been had


Entered at Fri Apr 7 04:11:05 CEST 2017 from (173.3.49.178)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

JIm Marshall, the Marshall Amp man, died. Linked.


Entered at Fri Apr 7 01:52:37 CEST 2017 from (96.227.58.249)

Posted by:

PSB

Location: City of Brotherly Love
Web: My link

Subject: Philly Band Tribute

For folks in and around Philly, there is going to be a Levon/The Band tribute show Wednesday, April 19th at 8 at the Mermaid Inn (see link above) in the Chestnut Hill section of Philly. The Edge Hill Rounders are hosting the event and myself and other local musicians will be taking part.


Entered at Fri Apr 7 01:18:49 CEST 2017 from (173.3.49.178)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Web: My link

Subject: "Welcome To 1979"!!! Get al load of this!!

The home page explains some of this and provide links to details of this amazing complex analogue recording studio/ analogue mastering/ analogue machine and also direct to vinyl recprding complex.

A great operation.

What surprised me is their choice of & deep involvement with MCI machines. Apparently the owner is very familiar with and fond of them, plus found a niche. Yet, Walter Sear, one of the all time great recording engineers,studio owners, recording equipment designers, and possessed of one of the most respected pair of ears and technical minds in the audio industry ever told me to stay away from MCI tape machines, that they sounded dead.


Entered at Thu Apr 6 22:37:03 CEST 2017 from (173.3.49.178)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Don Rickles has died.There is a Band connection. Barbara O' has written that Levon hoped to get Rickles to open a Ramble.


Entered at Thu Apr 6 20:39:45 CEST 2017 from (96.227.58.249)

Posted by:

PSB

Web: My link

Subject: Bert Berns film

Since it's been discussed here, I thought I'd let people know that "Bang! The Bert Berns Story" has been accepted for theatrical release, and will be in various cities across the US, starting with NYC at IFC from April 25th through May 4th. The link above is the official site for the film, though all the screenings are not listed yet.


Entered at Thu Apr 6 16:51:15 CEST 2017 from (74.203.77.122)

Posted by:

Jon Lyness

Location: NYC
Web: My link

Subject: Camp Cripple Creek

OK, this looks like fun. Who's in?


Entered at Wed Apr 5 12:59:50 CEST 2017 from (70.49.171.236)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto

Subject: The Skinny

Oslo encore: Dylan finishes with 'Ballad Of A Thin Man'.


Entered at Wed Apr 5 06:08:27 CEST 2017 from (114.75.193.38)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

Just came across this site that looks like it might be worth exploring.


Entered at Wed Apr 5 05:04:47 CEST 2017 from (63.142.158.9)

Posted by:

JQ

Subject: Valerie June - The Order of Time

Unique and interesting; I think you folks here will enjoy it -


Entered at Wed Apr 5 04:05:04 CEST 2017 from (96.54.61.38)

Posted by:

Bonk

Subject: The Hawk

Bill and Kevin. I don't remember that documentary that you speak of but I do remember a magazine interview/story with Ronnie around 1983, 1984. He was pretty subdued and a little down on his luck at the time and felt that the biz was passing him bye. There was a picture of him sitting on a bed wearing suspenders and he was really fat and not too healthy. He was talking about the old days and how he used to be able to light a cigar with a bill and not worry. He also repeated that story of him walking into a Rolls Royce dealership in Toronto and wanting to buy a Rolls and the salesman, thinking he was a nut, asked him how he would like to pay. Ronnie pulled $50,000 out of a brown bag and said 'like this' I remember Robbie and Beverly and a few others from the early Toronto days adding to this interview but I can't remember the publication. What I do remember is that Carol Pope from Rough Trade gave me the magazine. I had a printing shop across the street from where she lived at Charles Street and Bay Street and she was always coming in to get stuff copied.


Entered at Wed Apr 5 03:18:11 CEST 2017 from (64.229.14.176)

Posted by:

Bill M

Web: My link

Kevin J: Not counting Richard, Levon and Rick - who were always there mainly to sit down and play - Ronnie Hawkins always had a second lead vocalist through the '60s, from Robbie Lane to Jay Smith, to Jay Smith + Jackie Gabriel (an African-Canadian from Springhill NS) to Smith + Gabriel + Tobi Lark (an African-American from Detroit) to Richard 'King Biscuit Boy' Newell + Tobi Lark, to Newell + Kelly Jay + John 'Johnny Rhythm' Rutter.

Jackie Gabriel was good, with a voice a lot like Anne Murray's (probably not coincidentally, also from Springhill), but Tobi Lark was spectacular - so it's likely her you're thinking of. She recorded many 45s in Detroit, mostly for small labels, and many of which are on YouTube because she's big in England's Northern Soul circles. Unfortunately, she didn't record with Hawkins at all that I know of (though Gabriel did - but just back-up); she did, however, allow herself to be whisked off to NY by King Curtis for some sessions that came out on a couple of Cotillion 45s - '67 / '68 I believe.

But in 1970, back in Toronto, she did an absolutely riveting performance of a local pop-rock song, "We're All In This Together". Brilliantly recorded in a church by Jack Richardson and his engineers, with the entire large congregation of friends and friends-of-friends singing along. But it's not on YouTube, and I've been checking for twenty years. However, you can get a bite-size bit of it at the link - though first you have to listen to 45 seconds of its vastly inferior B-side. About five seconds after the clip ends, she turns the intensity up to 11. (And at about the same time a juvenile Kim Mitchell enters the scene on lead guitar.)

Tobi did well in clubs immediately afterwards, including in some stage productions like 'HairAfter' (and come to think of it, she may have been in the Toronto cast of 'Hair' too. No records immediately, however, and only one or two more that were pretty country. She moved back to Detroit somewhere along the line, though I did hear some years ago that she'd move back across the border to Windsor. Some of the videos on YouTube show a fairly recent Tobi lip-synching to her old Northern Soul hits.


Entered at Tue Apr 4 23:22:11 CEST 2017 from (114.75.193.38)

Posted by:

Wallsend

I saw a short interview with Robbie from the Hawk documentary a while ago so I did a search for it but was not able to turn anything up.


Entered at Tue Apr 4 22:20:15 CEST 2017 from (69.159.60.251)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Bill M: Perhaps it was a stand-alone CBC production but I had thought NFB....Bev D'Angelo also is in it as was Carl Perkins and I recall a scene with an outstanding black female vocalist......a much subdued Hawkins in most parts which was a change from most features on him.....what was striking at the time to me was that it was the first time I had scene Robbie Robertson speak since 1978 and TLW.....I can even remember him talking about quart beer bottles in Quebec !


Entered at Tue Apr 4 21:23:17 CEST 2017 from (64.229.14.176)

Posted by:

Bill M

Kevin J: A quick look at the NFB website doesn't turn up a Hawkins doc, though it does exist. I certainly remember hearing about it, but I don't know that I ever saw it - maybe because I was abroad most of mid '81 to mid '85.


Entered at Tue Apr 4 21:08:27 CEST 2017 from (86.25.242.77)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: "The Hawk" documentary

Peter V, has the "The Hawk" ever been shown in the UK?


Entered at Tue Apr 4 19:49:27 CEST 2017 from (96.245.114.250)

Posted by:

b.lee

Location: DE, USA
Web: My link

Subject: Blues Beatles

These guys are pretty damn good, covering a collection of Beatles tunes with a twist. I've Got a Feeling stands out for me. Yesterday, not so much. Interesting concept, though. I'd sit and nurse some beers to hear them live.


Entered at Tue Apr 4 19:47:33 CEST 2017 from (69.159.60.251)

Posted by:

Kevin J

....and meant to add that I don't recall Dylan having any interview segments in "The Hawk"...but as I said, I've only seen it once and that was a long time ago.


Entered at Tue Apr 4 19:45:04 CEST 2017 from (69.159.60.251)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Ian

A National Film Board documentary called "The Hawk". I watched it when it aired on CBC in 1981 or so and have never seen it again - though I have mentioned several times over the years at this GB of how much I would like to get a copy....It was an excellent doc - and featured Robbie during the lost years and some great stories from Johnny Paycheck.


Entered at Tue Apr 4 19:13:47 CEST 2017 from (86.25.242.77)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Robbie and Tim Hardin

I looked up Robbie and Tim Hardin in ROLLING STONE for 1980 and 1981 and nothing came up.\ What I did find was a reference to a Canadian documentary on Ronnie Hawkins "now being filmed that will include interviews with old buddies Robbie Robertson and Bob Dylan". This was in issue 329 that had the masthead date of 30 October 1980. This was on the newsstands between 14 October and 30 October 1980 and the date of publication (hidden in small print at the start of the issue) was 1 October 1980. The news therefore seems to relate to September 1980.

Did I miss this?


Entered at Tue Apr 4 18:53:11 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: Relentless …

Yes, I think that's the issue. I find myself longing for a change after 5 or 6 because they are so similar. The familiar ones are better because you know the tune. Stormy Weather is the most interesting so far, but to be honest, apart from the best known stuff, I find the songs incredibly dull in a row. And face it, they were purely commercial weepies, no one was trying to be real or sincere with this stuff however apparently emotional the words.

I had Triplicate playing doing routine editing job today, and then had to go out in the car to collect kids and had an Oxford American Southern Music CD on, and listened through. After a day of Dylan on Sinatra, the quality of Randy Newman on Louisiana 1927 was stratospherically better, then you get Mose Allison on Seventh Son. I realised how bored I'd been during the day.


Entered at Tue Apr 4 18:33:42 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Count Your Blessings

We really owe a lifetime of thanks to Robert Johnson, Muddy Waters, Hank Williams, Billie Holiday, Woody Guthrie, Elvis, Little Richard, Sam Cooke, James Brown, Etta James, Chuck Berry, Pete Seeger, Nina Simone, Buddy Holly, Patsy Cline, Ronnie Hawkins and all the other architects of this great music we love a world of thanks. I couldn't imagine a lifetime of fascination with music if these saloon songs were all we had.


Entered at Tue Apr 4 18:10:22 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Subject: Talking About Kings

If you load all three cd's it can get monotonous. I made a playlist of the songs I really like and find that to be a more enjoyable listen. It's great background music. Until the Sinatra experience, I've never felt that way about any Dylan music. At the end of HBO's brilliant Big Little Eyes they had a scene where the actors were performing Elvis songs. I couldn't help thinking how much more I would have enjoyed Dyaln doing that material.


Entered at Tue Apr 4 16:27:40 CEST 2017 from (74.14.7.247)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto

Subject: I like it

I like what I have heard so far from 'Triplicate'. It has the Dylan stamp on it with the emotions of loss and forlornness as its major attributes. I do like the songs that convey sadness more than the 'lighter' songs. Again, its interpretation here that is the strong suit

.re the vocals; It took me a while to enjoy "Nashville Skyline" when it first came out. (I grew into it).


Entered at Tue Apr 4 16:03:09 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

How are people getting on with Triplicate? I've played it through twice, and am still finding it turgid and much too samey. I found a reissue of Marvin Gaye's "Tribute to the Late Nat King Cole" from 1965 the same day, and that was a serious error.

Listening to Marvin Gaye singing Rambling Rose and Unforgettable shows how to approach and cover someone else's standard. Having a voice of equal range helps a lot!


Entered at Tue Apr 4 15:21:37 CEST 2017 from (74.14.7.247)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto

Subject: Ian W: too many Robs

The album (Unforgiven) was released (recorded 1980); produced by Rob Fraboni (not Robbie Robertson; his name is nowhere to be seen in my research) and with Nicky Hopkins and other musicians/n Sounds like someone made an error in that article possibly?


Entered at Tue Apr 4 14:29:13 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

New to me. Ronnie Hawkins covered Tim Hardin in 1968 and 1971, but nothing connected to Robbie.


Entered at Tue Apr 4 14:21:15 CEST 2017 from (86.25.242.77)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Robbie Robertson and Tim Hardin

I don't know if this well-known or not but, hunting out something from early 1981 for a friend, I came across a small newspaper cutting from MELODY MAKER for 14 February 1981.

The headline is: HARDIN'S LAST SESSION. The text reads:

"The late TIM HARDIN was involved in recording sessions last June with Robbie Robertson of The Band and Nicky Hopkins"

Does this ring any bells?


Entered at Mon Apr 3 22:32:40 CEST 2017 from (114.75.198.238)

Posted by:

Wallsend

Web: My link

An interview with Clinton Heylin about the 1966 tour - not very interesting.


Entered at Mon Apr 3 22:17:53 CEST 2017 from (69.159.60.251)

Posted by:

Kevin J

JT: Yes, those were my thoughts exactly at first glance. I had forgotten how the recent Sinatra themed tours had become so rigid in terms of songs played.....anyhow, as you say, a tough thing in this day and age to keep everyone happy...Nice to see some variation might be creeping back in though.....Just wish the venue choices were a better fit for the style of music being played.

Funny with Bob, there are always a few songs that linger in lists for years that I wonder about. "Early Roman Kings" is the latest one. While it does work better live than on record, it is the get up and stretch/go get a beer song for me....."Floater" was that one in earlier years..


Entered at Mon Apr 3 21:39:34 CEST 2017 from (70.49.171.236)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: Dylan shows

Kevin J: I thought you posted to demonstrate the mix of Dylan originals and some non-Dylan standards. One might conclude that this shows some understanding of what the paying customer hopes for.

Of course, the song line up does not vary much during a Dylan tour. With some exceptions, this is true for most performers on tour. For those who go to consecutive shows (and there are a significant number of those), they likely already know what they are going to get. Its been a very long time when Dylan varied his usual 17-20 song list by more than a few songs./n Of course the paying customer and even those who don't go but would like to see variation have the absolute right to complain. And from what I read, complain they do. Tough!

I think its a good line up of songs. Ramona and 'Spirit' showed up yesterday. I think we will get a few others over time.


Entered at Mon Apr 3 20:44:31 CEST 2017 from (69.159.60.251)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Dylan's Set-list

Sorry, I guess not that interesting after all in that Bob has started this new tour after a 4 month break with the identical set-list he played most of 2016.


Entered at Mon Apr 3 18:51:11 CEST 2017 from (86.25.242.77)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Aviation again

To those indifferent to aviation matters, I apologise for continuing this theme.

For Peter V:

Heathrow opened in 1946, before which BOAC used Hurn. It would be May 1946 before a BOAC Lancastrian left Heathrow for Australia on the “kangaroo service”, a service operated jointly with QANTAS. Its first service from Heathrow to New York (La Guardia)was in July 1946. At this time, Heathrow consisted of large tents, with duckboards between them so passengers wouldn’t have to traipse through mud.

By the end of 1946, BOAC transferred its remaining services from Hurn to Heathrow, where the tents had been replaced by temporary buildings that were large versions of prefabs (the single-storey “prefabricated” houses built after WWII). Intercontinental services continued to use these ‘temporary’ prefab buildings into the early 1960s. Even after the opening of the Oceanic Building in the Central Area in 1961, they were still being used for freight services. I had a summer job in one of them in 1966.

For Landmark:

"On flat country some ten miles from the city, adjoining the groups of French-Canadian villages which fringe Lake St. Louis, a great airport was planned. It has since become famous as the Montreal Airport, Dorval": from "Atlantic Bridge", an official British government booklet published in 1945. Dorval was built in 1941 to provide a base for ferrying aircraft from the USA and Canada to Britain in WWII and for the return of the delivery pilots under the Return Ferry Service, which was set up to replace the sea journey which took 10 to 14 days.



Entered at Mon Apr 3 18:28:44 CEST 2017 from (24.114.55.200)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Bob Dylan set list opening night in Sweden....an interesting mix all things considered:

1. Things Have Changed

2. Don’t Think Twice, It’s All Right

3. Highway 61 Revisited

4. Beyond Here Lies Nothin'

5. Full Moon And Empty Arms

6. High Water (For Charley Patton)

7. Melancholy Mood

8. Duquesne Whistle

9. Love Sick

10. Tangled Up In Blue

11. Pay In Blood

12. Standing In The Doorway

13. Scarlet Town

14. I Could Have Told You

15. Desolation Row

16. Soon After Midnight

17. All Or Nothing At All

18. Long And Wasted Years

19. Autumn Leaves

(encore)

20. Blowin' In The Wind

21. Why Try To Change Me Now


Entered at Mon Apr 3 11:12:22 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

A connection … Sydney is the world's largest natural harbour, and Poole is apparently the second largest. Both great for flying boats.


Entered at Mon Apr 3 11:09:36 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Well, obviously Sydney-Bournemouth was a sensible arrangement for the first land plane flight. You go where people want to go. I have seen ads of "Poole-Sydney. Longest flight in the world" and that was by flying boat (seaplane). I have an ad for Poole-Singapore too. Because they had established the seaplane route from Poole to Singapore and on to Sydney, I'd assume they had the ground facilities and admin established (probably hotel contracts too), so it was logical to bring the first land plane flight into Hurn, just a few miles away.

I'm fascinated by those old seaplane routes, several days with overnights in hotels along the way. The old flying boats were still around in Poole and in Southampton Estuary, rotting away quietly, when I was a kid. Like Ian, I spent much time at Heathrow … I stayed with my aunt every summer nearby.


Entered at Mon Apr 3 05:36:30 CEST 2017 from (24.114.65.23)

Posted by:

Bill M

I pulled a couple albums from a neglected closet for a listen this evening. One was "It All Comes Back" by Paul Butterfield's Better Days. Amazing musicianship, good songs, an appearance by Bobby Charles. Nothing at all to dislike, but I get why it was in the closet. The other was "Paintings" by th Mike Quatro Jam Band, which was played on radio a lot, and which I like a lot, back in the early '70s. I even saw the core group - Quatro and drummer - back then, and thought it was wonderful. But now not so much. Band link: Lead vocals (except the cover of "Court OF The Crimson King") are by John Finley, who sang briefly with Levon and the Hawks post-Hawkins, but who ultimately turned down the gig and stayed with his own group, the Checkmates.


Entered at Mon Apr 3 02:27:03 CEST 2017 from (86.25.242.77)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Montreal and aircraft (more non-music matters)

Once again, many thanks for all your help regarding Montreal, everyone. It is much appreciated.

To answer Landmark's question, I don't collect aircraft photos as such but I do have a small collection from an interest in aviation in my deep past. I really couldn't help it, having been born just a few miles from Heathrow on the day it opened and in a direct line from its first runway. To add to this, I lived for many years barely half-a-mile from London's very first international airport (long gone but on Hounslow Heath) and I used to pass what had been Hanworth Air Park (there are photographs on-line of the Graf Zeppelin there - all 775 feet of it!)on my way to school each day. All of this was only a mile or so from Heathrow itself, where my mother worked for one of the airlines and where I had several holiday jobs while at school. From my bedroom window and with the prevailing westerly wind, I could see aircraft coming into land from at least 5 miles out (maybe as many as 10) and, at their closest, they were side on and barely half-a-mile away. There was no way for me not to be interested in aircraft. And, being young and interested, older people passed things on to me - photographs, magazines, books and the like - many of which I still have. I have added a bit to these over time, even though my aviation interest lay somewhat dormant for many years.

Peter V may be interested in one of the photographs. It is of a Lancastrian aircraft. On the back is written in pencil, "Lancastrian flight to Britain - Arrival U.K.". It is a press photograph and a little research revealed that it showed the very aircraft that flew the inaugural (post-WWII) service from Sydney, Australia to Britain in June 1945. And the airport it flew into was Hurn, near Bournemouth.

Another may interest Landmark. It is an official 'Trans-Canada Air Lines' photo of one of its Lancasters just after WWII. The photo is taken from the dark inside of the terminal building, with waiting passengers in the foreground but all in silhouette. The Lancaster, in contrast, gleams in bright sunlight, facing them head -on, seen through the terminal's windows. On the back of the photo, in pencil, is written, "Dorval Airport".

I could go on but many of you will already be bored.


Entered at Sun Apr 2 20:41:24 CEST 2017 from (70.49.171.236)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Victoria often

Subject: Canadian Telephone exchanges: Montreal in particular

Thanks Bill M:

Ian W: MA = Marquette (I found this by searching through a telephone exchange research site from the past.)

With a number of clicks looking under the topic 'telephone exchanges in Canada', this is discoverable.


Entered at Sun Apr 2 20:30:00 CEST 2017 from (24.114.65.23)

Posted by:

Bill M

Ian W: JT's right - if you scroll down far enough when googling (or try "jack markow" +montreal) you'll find the guy. One link ties at least one of his photos to an archival fond for John Gilmore's collection of photos of jazz musicians in Montreal from the '20s to the '70s. Including a couple of US jazz great Wayne Shorter's Montreal uncles.


Entered at Sun Apr 2 18:49:28 CEST 2017 from (82.69.47.175)

Posted by:

Peter V

Subject: St Maarten

I have a great picture of an American Airlines plane at St Maarten in one of my EFL books. For those who don't know it's a Waynes World moment where the planes touch down just past the beach and are incredibly low over the beach. Not that I've been there. We wanted a picture for an EFL book, and the ones online were silly prices. My son-in-law's sister was going there on holiday and I mentioned we;d been looking for a photo and she said "No problem. I'll take some. Everyone does on that beach." She gave us a selection.


Entered at Sun Apr 2 17:54:16 CEST 2017 from (96.22.59.90)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal
Web: My link

Seems like with the help of others, you may solve the riddle after all. I kick myself for not suggesting that, that may have been a phone number.

Do you collect photos of aircraft? I too am an airplane geek. I work not far from the runway at Dorval airport and have seen quite a few cool things, including an Air France 767 do a "touch and go". As well, my only caveat for going on our winter/spring cruise is that we stop at St-Maarten,whereby we run to Maho Beach, where we camp out at the edge of the runway and film planes coming and going. On my and my wife's Facebook site, we have posted several photos and videos, including the iconic KLM 747 doing its thing. On the beach, we order chairs and umbrella as well as food and a bucket of Heinekins. I even got a massage there.They even have have free wifi on the beach!


Entered at Sun Apr 2 14:30:50 CEST 2017 from (83.249.177.82)

Posted by:

NorthWestCoaster

Location: Scania Northwest

Subject: Dylan and BB / European scandal beauties

Dylan fanatics remember these lines: " "My friend, Bob, what do we need to make the country grow" ? / I said, "My friend, John, with BRIGITTE BARDOT, Anita Ekberg Sophia Loren / Country'll grow." - Should I add : Melanie Trump?


Entered at Sun Apr 2 14:25:52 CEST 2017 from (70.49.171.236)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto

Subject: under the radar again

In my continued quest to suggest that there are continued admirable creative efforts in music (and other arts) that deserve our attention, I suggest the site

undertheradarmag.com


Entered at Sun Apr 2 13:18:30 CEST 2017 from (70.49.171.236)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto

Subject: Less obvious

Ian W: If one looks further down the lists of entries in a search for 'Jack Markow', one does find Jack Markow photographer in Montreal.

If one looks at these entries, this may be the same Jack Markow who is Cpl Jack Markow and photographed for newspapers (ie. The Queen Elizabeth ship) and airplanes.

As I noted in an earlier post, the name 'Jack Markow' still is associated with a photographic company on St. Catherine St. (a main thoroughfare in Montreal).


Entered at Sun Apr 2 11:51:27 CEST 2017 from (86.25.242.77)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Montreal (non-music) again

A telephone number! Of course! That makes sense. Thanks, guys.

When I tried a search on 'Jack Markow', I got an American cartoonist. And when I searched for "MA 0688", it kept trying to direct me to Massachusetts.

Telephone number! MA = a telephone exchange. Why didn't I think of that? On my first visit to the States, the phone numbers were all like that, one digit longer but similar format. From something else, I know that YU (= YUkon) was the start of Dylan's telephone number when he lived in Greenwich Village in the early days, for example.

Thanks, everyone, for your help. Much appreciated.



Entered at Sun Apr 2 04:24:56 CEST 2017 from (70.49.171.236)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto

Subject: DAMMIT JANET

it corrected dealing. it did it again.. dialing


Entered at Sun Apr 2 03:54:47 CEST 2017 from (70.49.171.236)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto

Subject: Six to seven digit dealing

In the early 1950s, North America went from 6 to 7 digit dealing.


Entered at Sun Apr 2 03:50:32 CEST 2017 from (70.49.171.236)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto

Subject: Phone number

YES Bill M. I agree.


Entered at Sun Apr 2 03:39:20 CEST 2017 from (24.114.54.197)

Posted by:

Bill M

JT: maybe MA-0688 was Markow's phone number? I have no idea when we moved to seven-character phone numbers, but when we did, the first two were letters and the rest numbers. (In Pickering, our prefix was TE, pronounced 'temple' for mnemonic purposes. So the local cab company was Temple Taxi, a pattern that was replicated all over, and I suspect lives on, even though the letters were replaced by numbers decades ago.)


Entered at Sun Apr 2 03:38:43 CEST 2017 from (70.49.171.236)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto

Subject: error Ian W

That's MA 0688 (sorry)


Entered at Sun Apr 2 03:37:52 CEST 2017 from (70.49.171.236)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto

Subject: Telephone exchange

Ian W: After doing more research, it is pretty clear to me that MA 0866 is a phone number and MA is a telephone exchange (likely Market).

Read 'Telephone exchange names' in Wikipedia.


Entered at Sun Apr 2 03:06:00 CEST 2017 from (70.49.171.236)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto

Subject: further on Markow

Montreal Jack Markow may have passed away in 2001. There is Jack Markow who was a US cartoonist (as you probably know). This makes the search a little confusing.


Entered at Sun Apr 2 02:55:39 CEST 2017 from (70.49.171.236)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto

Subject: photographer

Jack Markow is noted to be a Montreal photographer who passed away in 1983. It looks as if he photographed many Montreal and Canadian-related people and places (school classrooms, etc.) Again, what MA is is unclear.

There is still a Jack Markow photography company on St. Catherine St. in Montreal. There is a phone number associated with that company (a 514 number...).


Entered at Sun Apr 2 02:43:57 CEST 2017 from (24.114.54.197)

Posted by:

Bill M

Ian W: Google maps sugests there's a 688 rue St Jacques in downtown Montreal. Don't know what 'MA.' would though.


Entered at Sun Apr 2 02:23:01 CEST 2017 from (86.25.242.77)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Montreal 1946 ? (Non-music matter)

Thank you,Landmark, for that information.

I'm afraid that I can nothing to my previous description. There is a three-line hand-stamp on the reverse side of each photograph.

The first line reads: "JACK MARKOW" who took the photos.

The second reads, "Photographer".

The third line reads, "ST JAMES ST. W. MA. 0688".

The above has been applied using a handstamp. Underneath these three lines is "MAY 10 1946" but this has been added using one of those date-stamps with moveable rubber type.

Someone has written "Constellation" on the reverse of each photograph in pencil. There are no other markings.

The two photographs show the tailplane of the same Lockheed Constellation aircraft belonging to BOAC but taken from different sides. The date falls between the following two dates: 6 April 1946 (when the aircraft in question was allocated its British registration) and 21 May 1946 (when it received its Certificate of Airworthiness from the British authorities). This could well indicate that the photographs were taken at Dorval Airport, because this aircraft was one of five Constellations that Lockheed delivered to Dorval, where BOAC had a maintenance base.

Since the aforementioned handstamp does not give a building or house number, is it possible that "MA. 0688" is a Post Office box number where Mr Markow, the photographer, would go to pick up his mail?


Entered at Sun Apr 2 01:00:23 CEST 2017 from (96.22.59.90)

Posted by:

Landmark

Location: Montreal

Ian, back in 1946, the postal code(zip code) would've been a two digit number only. Such as 26, whcih was mine growing up. As you remarked, St. James is now referred to as St-Jacques.

Is there a stamp from teh photographer or archive?


Entered at Sat Apr 1 21:43:49 CEST 2017 from (70.49.171.236)

Posted by:

JT

Location: Toronto

Subject: Peter Stone Brown on Chronic Dylan

Peter Stone Brown strikes a positive note yet again.... great commentary and review. Thank you.


Entered at Sat Apr 1 19:05:19 CEST 2017 from (24.114.55.200)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: PSB' Review

Peter's friend Mike Hansen might have the most original take on what Bob is up to that I have heard.....great review - I especially loved the detail and thoughts on the Hawks-Dylan 66 tour.


Entered at Sat Apr 1 17:34:38 CEST 2017 from (86.25.242.77)

Posted by:

Ian W

Subject: Nothing to do with music; Montreal perhaps

I'm seeking help from our Canadian friends. on a non-musical subject

I have a couple of old 10" x 8" (professional) photographs taken at an airport that I've always assumed to be Dorval Airport, Montreal. The address of the photographer is given as "ST.JAMES ST. W" (no building or house number is stated), which could well be Montreal (rue St. Jacques?).

My doubt arises because the street name is immediately followed by "MA. 0688". The date of the photographs appears to be "10 May 1946" (that's what's stamped on the rear, anyway), so this "MA. 0688" well predates zip codes or postal codes, to the best of my knowledge.

Assuming these photographs were taken at Dorval Airport, can any of our Canadian brethren please advise me as to the meaning or significance of "MA. 0688" in the immediate post-WWII period?


Entered at Sat Apr 1 15:03:02 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Subject: PSB Review of Triplicate

PSB's review is right there of course. I dig how he singles out Once Upon A Time.


Entered at Sat Apr 1 09:34:43 CEST 2017 from (5.148.89.130)

Posted by:

Peter V

Tickets secured for Rodney Crowell in Milton Keynes. Thanks Jeff, both for the heads up and fine review. Margo Price covers one of his live, and it's on the Third Man Records live set.

I haven't got Triplicate yet, but yesterday's reviews point out that it is designed for vinyl, with 3 x 32 minute LPs, so that would easily fit on two CDs. It also quoted Bob as saying 32 minutes was the ideal LP length (which for full quality is pretty near).


Entered at Sat Apr 1 07:37:19 CEST 2017 from (67.84.78.189)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Subject: The Signs of Old Age. Not even impending death.

Susan's parents, Bob. In that earlier post I meant your wife's parents but typed Ro's name by virtue of synapse collapse.
I can't even get names right, let alone remember all the song details.


Entered at Sat Apr 1 02:57:28 CEST 2017 from (24.114.55.200)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Subject: Roseanne Cash

I like everything about Roseanne Cash but especially her voice. Heyday of music video tv, I saw a video of hers and went straight out and purchased "Interiors". Loved the album....a cassette I think it might have been. All those dusty and lost cassettes.....where did they all go...


Entered at Sat Apr 1 02:01:17 CEST 2017 from (67.84.78.189)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

You sent me to All Music, Bob. The song Rosanne sang was a Rodney composition, "No Memories Hanging Round."


Entered at Sat Apr 1 01:39:43 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

Roseanne Cash and Rodney Crowell made so many great records together. Link to Seven Year Ache one of the all time great jukebox songs.


Entered at Sat Apr 1 01:34:43 CEST 2017 from (67.84.78.189)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

I had to think Bob....You get you glasses, I'll get memory herbs... They did a song from her first solo album that Rodney produced in 1979. She introduced it, stated that right after it came out Emmylou Harris told her it was one of the most perfect country songs she ever heard. I couldn't tell you the name of the song. She sang on some other songs too.


Entered at Sat Apr 1 01:28:40 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Jeff, my bad. I thought maybe she got a solo or maybe they would do Seven Year Ache for old time sake. So it was just the new song then.


Entered at Sat Apr 1 01:27:35 CEST 2017 from (67.84.78.189)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Bob, maybe you mean that i mentioned Roseann but forgot to write that she was great? I 'm remiss. Her singing was great. & added alot. The chemistry was superb. All that writing, & I missed. So sue me :-) . Call me pisher... I'll kill myself.... LOL I'm laughing here, cause these are all expressions your mother & uncle & Roseann's parents must have used when their forgetfulness was pointed out. NYC stuff.


Entered at Sat Apr 1 01:23:58 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Web: My link

John D, you're spot on. The band is great, the sound is so warm and the vocals are beautiful. Once Upon A Time is just amazing. Link is to Mikal Gilmore's review in Rolling Stone.


Entered at Sat Apr 1 01:21:02 CEST 2017 from (67.84.78.189)

Posted by:

Jeff A.

Bob, thank you. put on your glasses, or go get some glasses :-) stop being so vain :-). And read more slowly LOL :-)
00Kevin, thank you too.

Shame is, as much as I'm predisposed to not liking the venue, I wouldn't have gone if i wasn't comped to the show. Now I'm more predisposed to going there, but, if the place is packed, & you're stuck in some uncomfortable situation , it's gonna suck. I did have a great , perfectly prepared strip of tofu. Maybe 7 inches long, about and inch and ahalf across & up. One piece of bok choy on top, and several sauces on various sides of the tofu. $19.00. for that, That;s it. Beer was priced about normal for NYC, 8 -9 bucks a glass. IF the shows great, and you are comfortable, that's fine. But this was my first comfortable experience in the place.


Entered at Sat Apr 1 00:50:33 CEST 2017 from (24.44.153.18)

Posted by:

Bob F

Jeff, fine write up. Thanks for that. You didn't mention the great Roseanne Cash's contribution? Just got cd today. Really enjoyed listening to the songs on NPR this past week.


Entered at Sat Apr 1 00:25:53 CEST 2017 from (24.114.55.200)

Posted by:

Kevin J

Wow ! Just a great scene setter and description of the show, Jeff. Thank you.


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